Your Favorite Interactive Fiction Game That You Have Played

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brian...@yahoo.com

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Mar 30, 2006, 11:57:52 PM3/30/06
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I'd like to know what everybody's favorite Interactive Fiction game is
out all the Interactive Fiction games that you have played.
-
I'll go first:
-
My favorite Interactive Fiction game out of all that I've played is
Infocom's A Mind Forever Voyaging. The writing is very detailed, and
the ending of A Mind Forever Voyaging is one of the best endings I have
ever seen in a computer game.

Brian

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Victor Gijsbers

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Mar 31, 2006, 3:31:45 AM3/31/06
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brian...@yahoo.com wrote:

> I'd like to know what everybody's favorite Interactive Fiction game is
> out all the Interactive Fiction games that you have played.

I submit that a number of posts on this topic can hardly be as useful to
you as the IF Ratings would be:
http://www.carouselchain.com/if/statistics.php


Regards,
Victor

Paul Drallos

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Mar 31, 2006, 8:12:04 AM3/31/06
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Yes, but the ratings appear to be strongly skewed toward modern IF. If
you are a fan of the old-school games you will find them in the ratings
basement.

there...@yahoo.com

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Mar 31, 2006, 9:45:37 AM3/31/06
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> If you are a fan of the old-school games you will find them in the ratings basement.

I didn't even *find* anything really old-school in the top 50.

I'll mention two: Brian Uri's "Augmented Fourth" and Infocom's
"Leather Goddesses of Phobos". Gotta make me laugh if you want my top
ratings.

One of the coolest experiences with a puzzle-oriented game is to get a
friend or loved one in on it with you, and that's what happened with
LGOP for me and my girlfriend. When I was stuck she'd have an idea, or
vice versa. We had to celebrate with drinks when we got to the end
game. Plus, because there were puzzles, we spent several weekends
messing with it, so it became a small period of a particular summer --
more of a notable memory.

You can't quite share the experience of a "Photopia" or a "Shade" that
way. At best, you recommend it to someone, and they go have their
private, one-night experience with it, and then you talk about it.

Nathan Slife

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Mar 31, 2006, 10:55:03 AM3/31/06
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I can't resist not giving a shout out to one of my favorites from a
couple years ago being - Scavenger. I still remember vividly the
post-apocalyptic type world that was an absolute pleasure to explore.

-Thanks

rgrassi

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Mar 31, 2006, 10:57:31 AM3/31/06
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Hi,

> I still remember vividly the
> post-apocalyptic type world that was an absolute pleasure to explore.

I agree.
Rob

ron...@yahoo.com

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Mar 31, 2006, 11:09:25 AM3/31/06
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My favorite really dates me--Infocom's Sorcerer

Ronale7

Bob

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Mar 31, 2006, 11:18:39 AM3/31/06
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brian...@yahoo.com wrote:

> I'd like to know what everybody's favorite Interactive Fiction game is
> out all the Interactive Fiction games that you have played.

>From the old times I love most Infocom games (excluding the mysteries)
and Gateway.

Of the recent games my favorite is Necrotic Drift. Actually, I guess
that's my all times favorite.

Bob

there...@yahoo.com

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Mar 31, 2006, 2:25:51 PM3/31/06
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> My favorite really dates me--Infocom's Sorcerer

Another Meretzky classic, and nothing to be embarassed about.

I'm a fan of red herrings. Misdirections make the world come alive.
The possibilities you imagine as a player are as important than the
possibilities the designer accounted for.

Jon Ripley

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Mar 31, 2006, 5:05:05 PM3/31/06
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brian...@yahoo.com wrote:
> I'd like to know what everybody's favorite Interactive Fiction game is
> out all the Interactive Fiction games that you have played.

Twin Kingdom Valley released in 1983 by Bug-Byte Software; I had the
Acorn Electron version.

Jon
--
http://jonripley.com/

Corbin

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Mar 31, 2006, 5:50:53 PM3/31/06
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On 2006-03-30 23:57:52 -0500, "brian...@yahoo.com"
<brian...@yahoo.com> said:

> I'd like to know what everybody's favorite Interactive Fiction game is
> out all the Interactive Fiction games that you have played.

I haven't played many newer games, as I'm just getting back into IF
after 20 years or so. Of the new ones I've played, I enjoyed The
Dreamhold the most.

Older stuff? LGOP and Trinity top my list.

--
Corbin

Andy Leighton

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Mar 31, 2006, 6:27:23 PM3/31/06
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On Fri, 31 Mar 2006 22:05:05 GMT, Jon Ripley <ne...@jonripley.com> wrote:
> brian...@yahoo.com wrote:
>> I'd like to know what everybody's favorite Interactive Fiction game is
>> out all the Interactive Fiction games that you have played.
>
> Twin Kingdom Valley released in 1983 by Bug-Byte Software; I had the
> Acorn Electron version.

Wow that is a blast from the past.

For me, The Hobbit always has a place in my heart. It was the first
adventure I actually finished all by myself (with no hints or walkthrough).
Level 9 and Magnetic Scrolls produced good work (probably better than
Melbourne House) but I don't quite have that same level of affection
for their games. For more modern stuff, Jigsaw burns brightest for me.

--
Andy Leighton => an...@azaal.plus.com
"The Lord is my shepherd, but we still lost the sheep dog trials"
- Robert Rankin, _They Came And Ate Us_

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GQrivy

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Mar 31, 2006, 10:22:20 PM3/31/06
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Brian Uri's "Augmented Fourth" is my favorite.

-- Gayla

JSH...@aol.com

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Apr 1, 2006, 12:28:06 AM4/1/06
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Rob,

This is off-topic. Sorry, but I don't know how to get in touch with
you.

I've been trying to e-mail you about the Lo-Tech Comp, but my e-mails
keep bouncing back to me.

Can you email me at JSH...@aol.com... I just have a few brief questions
about the 2006 Comp. Thanks!

Rikard Peterson

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Apr 1, 2006, 1:38:16 AM4/1/06
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"GQrivy" wrote in
news:1143861740.4...@v46g2000cwv.googlegroups.com:

> Brian Uri's "Augmented Fourth" is my favorite.

Mine too.

Rikard

Jake

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Apr 1, 2006, 9:19:41 AM4/1/06
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Can someone tell me where to find Scavenger? Is it Tads or Inform?
Thanks!

Jake

Paul Drallos

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Apr 1, 2006, 9:27:23 AM4/1/06
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there...@yahoo.com wrote:
>
> One of the coolest experiences with a puzzle-oriented game is to get a
> friend or loved one in on it with you, and that's what happened with
> LGOP for me and my girlfriend. When I was stuck she'd have an idea, or
> vice versa. We had to celebrate with drinks when we got to the end
> game. Plus, because there were puzzles, we spent several weekends
> messing with it, so it became a small period of a particular summer --
> more of a notable memory.
>

My favorite gaming experience was very similar. Back in the days before personal computers were common, a friend of mine had Zork on a PDP11 mini computer at work. He used to let my wife and I into the office after hours and we would play Zork 'till well past midnight together a few time a week. We had so much fun solving the puzzles together, and talking about it all week, between sessions.

When you play the game *with* someone like that, it really feels like you are in the game and you are experiencing those things together. By far, my best game experience.

Sophie Fruehling

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Apr 1, 2006, 10:10:09 AM4/1/06
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"Jake" <jetro...@yahoo.com> writes:

>Can someone tell me where to find Scavenger? Is it Tads or Inform?
>Thanks!

Go to http://wurb.com/if/ and put "Scavenger" in the title search
thingy. Then take the one that's not called "Scavenger Hunt" or
"Death's Scavenger Hunt".

--
Sophie Frühling

The cube tastes like sugar. You are suddenly surrounded by a herd
of moose. They start talking to you about a moose-load of things.

Jake

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Apr 1, 2006, 10:50:43 AM4/1/06
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Thank you!

Jake

eluch...@yahoo.com

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Apr 1, 2006, 7:29:21 PM4/1/06
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there...@yahoo.com wrote:
> > If you are a fan of the old-school games you will find them in the ratings basement.
>
> I didn't even *find* anything really old-school in the top 50.

Well IFratings uses the archive as its database so nothing comercial is
included at all. Games that I might call 'old school' like
Risorgimento Ripresso and Isle of the Cult are ranked fairly well. Of
course, the only computer game I played in the '80's was Adventure so I
have a skewed perspective. My personal favorite, which has already
been mentioned, is Scavenger by Quintin Stone.

David Goldfarb

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Apr 1, 2006, 8:37:22 PM4/1/06
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In article <2006033117505316807%cnladd@maccom>, Corbin <cnl...@mac.com> wrote:
>I haven't played many newer games, as I'm just getting back into IF
>after 20 years or so. Of the new ones I've played, I enjoyed The
>Dreamhold the most.

If you liked _The Dreamhold_, I strongly recommend you play _Spider
and Web_, _So Far_, _Hunter, in Darkness_, and _Shade_.

My personal pick would be _So Far_, I think -- it's a large game with
an intriguing theme, evocative writing, and tough but (mostly) fair
puzzles. (The existence of online clues helped a lot.)

_Spider and Web_ is a close second; it's more brilliant but smaller
and more focused. A matter of taste.

--
David Goldfarb |"Ah, Amerikanski humor. Is most funny.
gold...@ocf.berkeley.edu |
gold...@csua.berkeley.edu | We bomb now."
| -- J. Michael Straczynski

Mike Snyder

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Apr 3, 2006, 10:48:09 AM4/3/06
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<brian...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1143781072.3...@u72g2000cwu.googlegroups.com...

> I'd like to know what everybody's favorite Interactive Fiction game is
> out all the Interactive Fiction games that you have played.

The first text adventure I played was "The Arconiax Assignment" for the
TRS-80 Color Computer. It was published in Rainbow Magazine, and it was a
"scratch and sniff" adventure, oddly enough. There was a scented insert with
squares referring to objects in the game. I forget now exactly how it
worked. I think the game would say "you found something green and soft --
sniff box 7" and box 7 was mint-scented (you found a mint leaf). Anyway, it
was my first experience with IF, and since it's what got me hooked on it to
begin with, I'd have to say that's my favorite.

---- Mike.


Benjamin Caplan

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Apr 3, 2006, 12:21:40 PM4/3/06
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Galatea. She comes closer to being a real person than any other NPC or
PC I have ever seen in any game, including tabletop RPGs.

Quintin Stone

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Apr 3, 2006, 4:30:57 PM4/3/06
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On Sat, 1 Apr 2006, Sophie Fruehling wrote:

> "Jake" <jetro...@yahoo.com> writes:
>
>> Can someone tell me where to find Scavenger? Is it Tads or Inform?
>> Thanks!
>
> Go to http://wurb.com/if/ and put "Scavenger" in the title search
> thingy. Then take the one that's not called "Scavenger Hunt" or "Death's
> Scavenger Hunt".

Alternatively, the Scavenger homepage and downloads can be found at
http://www.rps.net/NE/Scavenger

==--- --=--=-- ---==
Quintin Stone "You speak of necessary evil? One of those necessities
st...@rps.net is that if innocents must suffer, the guilty must suffer
www.rps.net more." - Mackenzie Calhoun, "Once Burned" by Peter David

John DeBerry

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Apr 4, 2006, 2:04:36 AM4/4/06
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My favorite "old school" games:

Trinity
Moonmist
Infidel
Zork and Enchanter trilogies
Dragonworld (from Tellarium)

My favorite "new school" games:

Exhibition (Ian Finley)
Anchorhead (Michael S. Gentry)

On 2006-03-30 22:57:52 -0600, "brian...@yahoo.com"

Victor Gijsbers

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Apr 4, 2006, 3:52:50 AM4/4/06
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Benjamin Caplan wrote:

> Galatea. She comes closer to being a real person than any other NPC or
> PC I have ever seen in any game, including tabletop RPGs.

I have a lot of respect for the programming feat that is Galatea, but I
simply don't believe her coming closer to being a real person than any
PC or NPC played by a real human being, no matter how bad an actor that
person is.

Roleplayed characters have an infinitude of possible behaviours, just
like real humans; Galatea has a finite and indeed very limited number of
possible behaviours. Try saying "Do you prefer red or white wine?" to
Galatea, then to a character you meet in a tabletop RPG - the latter
will have an appropriate response, the former will not. And this is the
case with almost beverything you can do: Galatea constantly shows you
her limits (and, until computers become like real human beings, this is
a necessity of the medium), while a roleplayed character does not.

To me it seems that that alone ensures that roleplayed characters are
closer to real human beings than Galatea is. Would you disagree?

Regards,
Victor

Daphne Brinkerhoff

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Apr 4, 2006, 7:23:45 AM4/4/06
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Maybe it's a bad idea for me to reply to this on so little sleep,
but...

When you mentioned bad actors, that made me think about, for example,
live theatre. You can't ask Macbeth which kind of wine he prefers, but
many people would see him as being very close to a real person. Or
many fictional characters in novels. I don't play tabletop RPGs (not
for about fifteen years), so I don't have a lot to compare to there,
but I have seen bad stage actors (say, thirteen-year-olds), and Galatea
seems more real to me than the characters they portrayed, hands down.

Feel free to correct me if I've misunderstood.

--
Daphne

rgrassi

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Apr 4, 2006, 9:12:44 AM4/4/06
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Hi,

> Galatea. She comes closer to being a real person than any other NPC or
> PC I have ever seen in any game, including tabletop RPGs.

It's a very funny statement if you think that it's a statue. 8)
Rob

Victor Gijsbers

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Apr 4, 2006, 9:16:33 AM4/4/06
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Daphne Brinkerhoff wrote:

> Feel free to correct me if I've misunderstood.

Well, I think it is veyr hard to compare characters from IF/tabletop
RPGs and such media with those in (non-improviastional) plays, books and
their ilk. The all-important difference, to my mind, is that in the
former case it is fictional (= 'fictionally true', 'true in the
fictional world') that you interact with the character, whereas in the
latter case, it is not. Since it is not fictional that you can talk to
Hamlet, the fact that you cannot do so and get an appropriate response
does not make the character less real. When you sit in the theater, you
_cannot_ talk to Hamlet; all you can do is ruin the performance.

On the other hand, it is fictional that you can talk to Galatea. But she
will not give you an appropriate response to most of the things you can
decide to say, and that severly impairs - again, to my mind - her
reality as a character.

Is that a difference you can agree with? Or do you think that perhaps I
stress the division between inetarctive and non-interactive media too
strongly?

Regards,
Victor

wes...@laway.net

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Apr 4, 2006, 6:53:09 PM4/4/06
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>
>On 2006-03-30 22:57:52 -0600, "brian...@yahoo.com"
><brian...@yahoo.com> said:
>
>> I'd like to know what everybody's favorite Interactive Fiction game is
>> out all the Interactive Fiction games that you have played.

Curses. Of course.


GQrivy

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Apr 4, 2006, 10:01:44 PM4/4/06
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An excellent choice. Definitely in my top three.

Nathan Slife

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Apr 4, 2006, 11:47:24 PM4/4/06
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> Maybe it's a bad idea for me to reply to this on so little sleep,
> but...

Same here but...

I think the beauty of any IF work in general is to have such a driven
plot that the questions one would ask the NPC's would then center
around that plot; thus the character (NPC) would feel very much "alive"
to the interactor. In this sense there wouldn't be a question you could
ask the NPC that the NPC couldn't answer in a very "real" sense.

This situation goes the same way in any other form of tabletop RPG. If
I asked a question totally off topic to the Dungeon Master, I wouldn't
get a response back that I could understand - just as I wouldn't get a
response back from an NPC in IF if I asked a question totally off the
topic.

How does this sound?

Zer

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Apr 5, 2006, 5:03:04 AM4/5/06
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I'm new to IF, started playng in 1998. My favorite new school game is
"Spider and Web". And "new old-shcool" - Curses and Mulldoon series.

Paolo Lucchesi

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Apr 6, 2006, 9:01:21 AM4/6/06
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brian...@yahoo.com wrote: > I'd like to know what everybody's favorite Interactive Fiction game is > out all the Interactive Fiction games that you have played. City of Secrets, with Anchorhead being a close runner up. Both are incredibly atmospheric, have an excellently detailed world, a fine story and (expecially CoS) nice npcs. Btw: does anyone know why there isn't a capsule review for CoS on the Baf's Guide? Paolo Lucchesi email: plucchesi(at)tin(dot)it
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