Nolot test positions: EPD version

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Steven J Edwards

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Jul 28, 1994, 4:36:13 PM7/28/94
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Based on earlier posts in this newsgroup, I've taken the eleven test
positions provided by Pierre Nolot and converted them to EPD format.
This means that those with a current version of HIARCS, Zarkov, or
some other EPD capable program can run them directly without manual
entry. Note: some of the lines are 80 or more characters in length.

I'm not sure if all the best move data is correct. Spector can only
solve a few of these in tournament time.

-- Steven (s...@world.std.com)

r3qb1k/1b4p1/p2pr2p/3n4/Pnp1N1N1/6RP/1B3PP1/1B1QR1K1 w - - bm Nxh6; id "pn.01";
r4rk1/pp1n1p1p/1nqP2p1/2b1P1B1/4NQ2/1B3P2/PP2K2P/2R5 w - - bm Rxc5; id "pn.02";
r2qk2r/ppp1b1pp/2n1p3/3pP1n1/3P2b1/2PB1NN1/PP4PP/R1BQK2R w KQkq - bm Nxg5; id "pn.03";
r1b1kb1r/1p1n1ppp/p2ppn2/6BB/2qNP3/2N5/PPP2PPP/R2Q1RK1 w kq - bm Nxe6; id "pn.04";
r2qrb1k/1p1b2p1/p2ppn1p/8/3NP3/1BN5/PPP3QP/1K3RR1 w - - bm e5; id "pn.05";
rnbqk2r/1p3ppp/p7/1NpPp3/QPP1P1n1/P4N2/4KbPP/R1B2B1R b kq - bm axb5; id "pn.06";
1r1bk2r/2R2ppp/p3p3/1b2P2q/4QP2/4N3/1B4PP/3R2K1 w k - bm Rxd8+; id "pn.07";
r3rbk1/ppq2ppp/2b1pB2/8/6Q1/1P1B3P/P1P2PP1/R2R2K1 w - - bm Bxh7+; id "pn.08";
r4r1k/4bppb/2n1p2p/p1n1P3/1p1p1BNP/3P1NP1/qP2QPB1/2RR2K1 w - - bm Nf6; id "pn.09";
r1b2rk1/1p1nbppp/pq1p4/3B4/P2NP3/2N1p3/1PP3PP/R2Q1R1K w - - bm Rxf7; id "pn.10";
r1b3k1/p2p1nP1/2pqr1Rp/1p2p2P/2B1PnQ1/1P6/P1PP4/1K4R1 w - - bm Bxe6; id "pn.11";

Enjoy.

Feng-Hsiung Hsu

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Jul 28, 1994, 5:33:59 PM7/28/94
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In article <Cto3w...@world.std.com> s...@world.std.com (Steven J Edwards) writes:
>I'm not sure if all the best move data is correct. Spector can only
>solve a few of these in tournament time.

Are you sure that Spector can solve ANY of them in a month?

>r1b3k1/p2p1nP1/2pqr1Rp/1p2p2P/2B1PnQ1/1P6/P1PP4/1K4R1 w - - bm Bxe6; id "pn.11";

Best move for 11 is probably Rh6, not Be6.

Marc-Francois Baudot

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Jul 29, 1994, 7:50:19 AM7/29/94
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s...@world.std.com (Steven J Edwards) writes:

>Based on earlier posts in this newsgroup, I've taken the eleven test
>positions provided by Pierre Nolot and converted them to EPD format.
>This means that those with a current version of HIARCS, Zarkov, or
>some other EPD capable program can run them directly without manual
>entry. Note: some of the lines are 80 or more characters in length.

>I'm not sure if all the best move data is correct. Spector can only
>solve a few of these in tournament time.

Pierre would be very much interested in your results : time, depth,
best line...

Marc-Francois Baudot

Steven J Edwards

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Jul 28, 1994, 11:21:14 PM7/28/94
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f...@watson.ibm.com (Feng-Hsiung Hsu) writes:

>In article <Cto3w...@world.std.com> s...@world.std.com (Steven J Edwards) writes:
>>I'm not sure if all the best move data is correct. Spector can only
>>solve a few of these in tournament time.

>Are you sure that Spector can solve ANY of them in a month?

Yes.

>>r1b3k1/p2p1nP1/2pqr1Rp/1p2p2P/2B1PnQ1/1P6/P1PP4/1K4R1 w - - bm Bxe6; id "pn.11";

>Best move for 11 is probably Rh6, not Be6.

Possibly. As I mentioned, I wasn't sure of the veracity of the best
move data. This is one of the ones Spector got, so maybe it was
miscredited on this one.

I must say that DT has an original way of representing chess position
data. Having semicolons to distinguish black from white pieces is
something I hadn't seen before. The "40" for WTM and "41" for BTM is
new to me also. EBCDIC, perhaps?

-- Steven (s...@world.std.com)

Feng-Hsiung Hsu

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Jul 29, 1994, 8:00:34 AM7/29/94
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In article <CtoMn...@world.std.com> s...@world.std.com (Steven J Edwards) writes:
>f...@watson.ibm.com (Feng-Hsiung Hsu) writes:
>
>>In article <Cto3w...@world.std.com> s...@world.std.com (Steven J Edwards) writes:
>>>I'm not sure if all the best move data is correct. Spector can only
>>>solve a few of these in tournament time.
>
>>Are you sure that Spector can solve ANY of them in a month?
>
>Yes.

"Solve" as in seeing the win? I suspect that the ones that Spector "got"
are either the wrong answers or it happened to play the moves. Most likely
the former, as the moves are all sacs. Otherwise, Spector would not have
finished last in the ACM when even Genius2 cannot solve any of them in weeks.

>>>r1b3k1/p2p1nP1/2pqr1Rp/1p2p2P/2B1PnQ1/1P6/P1PP4/1K4R1 w - - bm Bxe6; id "pn.11";
>
>>Best move for 11 is probably Rh6, not Be6.
>
>Possibly. As I mentioned, I wasn't sure of the veracity of the best
>move data. This is one of the ones Spector got, so maybe it was
>miscredited on this one.

I am almost certain that Be6 is not the answer. It was down by more than
a pawn. And it is any computer's first choice. I didn't check what other
"best move" that Spector comes up with, but I wouldn't be too surprised
that Spector was credited with other wrong answers.

>I must say that DT has an original way of representing chess position
>data. Having semicolons to distinguish black from white pieces is
>something I hadn't seen before. The "40" for WTM and "41" for BTM is
>new to me also. EBCDIC, perhaps?

Nothing special about it. Semicolons are easier to type than Uppercasing
the pieces. It actually would use any unrecognized characters to uppercase
the pieces. "40" is the ply number from start of the game. For these
positions, they are meaningless, but for some positions, they are. Hitech
used the same ply-number convention when I was at CMU, I think. It is
not supposed to be human readable, so whatever is easiest to type...

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