100 point FIBS rating point drop.

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Edward D. Collins

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Nov 2, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/2/99
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> I had been steadily improving my rating on FIBS
> until it reached a tad above 1700. It then
> oscillated for a couple of weeks just a few
> points below 1700.

> Then, kaput, I dropped to barely above 1600
> in another couple of weeks. Can't explain what's
> going on...

> ... I was getting the feeling that I was starting
> to understand the game; now I am not too sure I do.
> Advise please.

I had to look at who wrote the above post to make sure that "I" didn't,
since it could easily have come from me!

For the longest time my rating hovered around 1550. Then, over the past
couple of months I was seeing slow, but steady improvement. Then BANG I
finally hit 1600 and then 1630! I finally thought that all of the
reading and playing that I had been doing was beginning to pay off!

However, I've currently lost 12 of my last 14 matches. (I keep track.)
My rating is back down to 1569 and the thought of the work that it is
going to be just to get back to 1630 is discouraging. Oh yea, the two
matches that I won were one-point matches against Abbott and Harmony!

I DO have a couple of saved matches were my opponent dropped on me...
with me either winning the match or in a commanding lead so (hopefully)
I'll be getting those points soon but still, my current losing streak is
almost unbelievable.

My only advice is to hang in there. You're not alone.


Best regards,

|'-''-'| ___ __ _
|______| (_ _/ _ _ _/ / ) / ) //' _
|====| /__(/((/(// (/ /(_/. (__()((//)_)
| |
| | ecol...@inficad.com
|____|
|====| Edward D. Collins proudly presents...
/======\ his very own homepage!
(________) http://www.inficad.com/~ecollins


Leo Bueno

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Nov 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/3/99
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I had been steadily improving my rating on FIBS until it reached a tad
above 1700. It then oscillated for a couple of weeks just a few
points below 1700.

Then, kaput, I dropped to barely above 1600 in another couple of

weeks. Can't explain what's going on. Has my brain suffered some
organic damage or something? I was getting the feeling that I was


starting to understand the game; now I am not too sure I do. Advise
please.

==================================================================
Snail-mail: P.O. Box 440545, Miami, FL 33144-0545 (USA)
Test De Cubanidad: http://www.accesspro.net/leobueno/cubanidad.htm
Castro Fall Poll: http://www.accesspro.net/leobueno/adiosfidel.htm
Miami Backgammon: http://www.accesspro.net/leobueno/gammon.htm
==================================================================

CCSlsbry

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Nov 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/3/99
to
Backgammon, as we all know, is an often-maddening pursuit. Losing streaks and
100-point rating plunges can make one doubt one's competence, sanity, or worse.
However it has been noted that even the 'bots Snowie and Jellyfish have
occasional precipitous rating drops, and presumably their quality of play never
varies. So basically, as hard to take as they are, losing streaks are a part
of this wonderful game. "Lady Luck" rules very often.
It also may be possible (or probable) that you made a few more mistakes than
usual during this period, and even minute errors can cause the most devastating
and disproportionate results, as we all are unfortunately too familiar with.

Walter Trice

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Nov 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/3/99
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It happens frequently to players at all levels. A couple of years ago Kit
Woolsey went from over 2000 to around 1820 in a short period of time. (And
then back again.) I have had a few 80-point downturns on FIBS and Gamesgrid.

Normally the explanation is simply a streak of bad luck.

Sometimes it works in the other direction, which is more fun, of course.

It's my opinion that the formula lets ratings fluctuate excessively.

-- Walter Trice


Leo Bueno wrote in message <381f8120...@news.accesspro.net>...

Richard P. Reasin

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Nov 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/3/99
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Leo,

There is an old adage that goes: Skill and knowledge will always win over
luck and superstition. Remember this. It's all too easy for a player to
blame his fall in ratings to "bad luck". World renowned backgammon
player and author, Bruce Becker, once stated, "Luck is for losers!" The
top players know this and try to comfort you by saying, "It's just a bad
luck streak.", as they trot to the bank with your money. Don't buy into
this foolishness. You make your own luck. When you are on a losing
streak, you are making sub par plays, consistently. Your mental attitude
is such that you just fall into the "oh well" acceptance rut. You must
learn how to fight back and beat this thing. One way is to identify the
items that cause your game to go off. Then when "Lady Luck" turns against
you, you can retrace your steps and discover the root cause of your poor
play. I was very fortunate. Early on in my backgammon career, I was able
to isolate the root causes of my poor play. Periods of high sunspot
activity throw my game into the sewer. I just avoid playing during peak
periods. However, these solar eruptions are difficult to predict and can
occur when I am in the middle of a match. You know the scenario, ahead
9-0 in a 11 point match, and lose. In an attempt to prevent as many of
these "events" as possible, I have begun to carry a portable C-B radio.
When sunspot activity is high, the radio is engulfed with static. The
results of the C-B test are still out, but look promising. I have had far
fewer big losing streaks than usual.

On the other side of the coin, large winning streaks, what can I say.
That's where I lined up all my pigeons and used my superior abilities.

I hope this helped you with your dilemma.

Rich Reasin
aka DiceGod on GG

EdmondT

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Nov 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/3/99
to
>I had been steadily improving my rating on FIBS until it reached a tad above
1700. It then oscillated for a couple of weeks just a few points below 1700.
>
>Then, kaput, I dropped to barely above 1600 in another couple of weeks. Can't
explain what's going on. Has my brain suffered some organic damage or
something? I was getting the feeling that I was starting to understand the
game; now I am not too sure I do. Advise please.

Same thing happened to me. I got to about 1720, then dropped to around 1630,
and could not figure out why. I felt like whenever anyone needed doubles to
win, they got them.

My advice, for what its worth, is to stop playing for a few days and calm down,
wait until you feel your not snake bit before playing again. Its hard to play
when you are convinced bad things are going to happen, and it affects your
play.

When you start playing again, try to play rationally and smart, and stop
playing if you feel your getting emotional again.


Edm...@aol.com

Donald Kahn

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Nov 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/3/99
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On Wed, 3 Nov 1999 06:35:35 GMT, "Walter Trice" <w...@world.std.com>
wrote:

>It happens frequently to players at all levels. A couple of years ago Kit
>Woolsey went from over 2000 to around 1820 in a short period of time. (And
>then back again.) I have had a few 80-point downturns on FIBS and Gamesgrid.
>
>Normally the explanation is simply a streak of bad luck.
>
>Sometimes it works in the other direction, which is more fun, of course.
>
>It's my opinion that the formula lets ratings fluctuate excessively.
>
>-- Walter Trice
>
>
>Leo Bueno wrote in message <381f8120...@news.accesspro.net>...
>>

>>I had been steadily improving my rating on FIBS until it reached a tad
>>above 1700. It then oscillated for a couple of weeks just a few
>>points below 1700.
>>
>>Then, kaput, I dropped to barely above 1600 in another couple of
>>weeks. Can't explain what's going on. Has my brain suffered some
>>organic damage or something? I was getting the feeling that I was
>>starting to understand the game; now I am not too sure I do. Advise
>>please.
>>
>>

I dropped 100 on GG in the past month. Seemed like I found every way
in the world to lose a match. Filthy dice! but it seems to happen to
everyone. (Maybe mine will turn around when I am playing for $100 per
point.)

dk
>>


Donald Kahn

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Nov 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/3/99
to
On 03 Nov 1999 13:26:16 GMT, edm...@aol.com (EdmondT) wrote:

>>I had been steadily improving my rating on FIBS until it reached a tad above
>1700. It then oscillated for a couple of weeks just a few points below 1700.
>>
>>Then, kaput, I dropped to barely above 1600 in another couple of weeks. Can't
>explain what's going on. Has my brain suffered some organic damage or
>something? I was getting the feeling that I was starting to understand the
>game; now I am not too sure I do. Advise please.
>

>Same thing happened to me. I got to about 1720, then dropped to around 1630,
>and could not figure out why. I felt like whenever anyone needed doubles to
>win, they got them.
>
>My advice, for what its worth, is to stop playing for a few days and calm down,
>wait until you feel your not snake bit before playing again. Its hard to play
>when you are convinced bad things are going to happen, and it affects your
>play.
>
>When you start playing again, try to play rationally and smart, and stop
>playing if you feel your getting emotional again.
>
>

This is sensible advice. I have undergone a somewhat different
effect. Last night I played three matches that for adverse dice were
practically comical. My reaction toward it smacked of
"character-building" - like getting whacked around on a football field
or a boxing ring was supposed to make you a better man. I found
myself amused, and very calm. I did not let it affect my play. I
kept reminding myself that, any roll now, the dice might turn my way,
and I needed to be ready for it.

This is very important in a long tournament matches. You lose the
first 10 points of a 15 point match. The table says that you now have
10% match winning chances. If you don't get your full 10% out of it,
you have wasted your entry money, the hotel room, maybe plane fare.
And a valuable weekend of your life.

I wonder if I can follow through the next time it happens.

dk

Michael Strato

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Nov 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/3/99
to

Leo Bueno <leob...@usa.net-REMOVE-TEXT-WHICH-FOLLOWS-net> wrote in message
news:381f8120...@news.accesspro.net...

>
> I had been steadily improving my rating on FIBS until it reached a tad
> above 1700. It then oscillated for a couple of weeks just a few
> points below 1700.
>
> Then, kaput, I dropped to barely above 1600 in another couple of
> weeks. Can't explain what's going on. Has my brain suffered some
> organic damage or something? I was getting the feeling that I was
> starting to understand the game; now I am not too sure I do. Advise
> please.


Hi Leo,

I know exactly how you feel, don't give up hope. First, ask yourself "how
did I get to 1700 in the first place?" I am sure you have. The answer should
be "because I played well or was lucky". Since skill usually is the
determining factor, you do play well Leo and this is just a phase.

Where I play I have established a rating of over 2000. I have been sitting
there for a few months now in a game of snakes and ladders rising up to 2088
and sliding down to 2020. I have lost 8 out of my last 12 matches. This can
be frustrating because you give everything you have to make the right moves
and your opponents (it seems) get all the right numbers with ease and fly by
you like a breeze.
Game after game, match after match, it can wear you down.

It's like every stone you are offered to hit you miss, and miss again, and
in the next opportunity, again. You start to think "does my opponent know I
am so unlucky I can't hit the side of a barn".
Then when you need a 5-5 or a 6-6 just to even out the race or at least have
a chance you get 2-1 or 3-1 and your opponent get the biggie? After a while
this can make you very negative and your mind will play games on you. Soon
you will start to expect these things to happen, sometimes they will.

Instead Leo, try this, when you sit down to play clear your mind. Forget
about those little everyday worries like a bill you have to pay, a problem
with your car or so many others. This is the time you are dedicating to the
game you love. Concentrate!

Don't think negative. Don't expect the worse. Wish it on your opponent. Ask
for your best possible roll before you click to get your dice. When you get
hit and you're against an opponent's strong homeboard to get in, take your
time, stay calm, count to 7 before you click to get your dice.

When your position looks good and you're wondering "should I double?" then
just do it, don't think "no, maybe I will wait one more roll". If your
position is that good, then your opponent should see it too and drop. When
you get doubled consider the following. Is it a bluff? Don't think only of
the worst possible rolls your opponent can get and drop in fear of getting
gammoned. Check your position well, how good of a home you have, what the
timing looks like and what good rolls can come to put you in the position to
re-double.

Being brave sometimes doesn't mean we played wrong, some gambles pay off.
Keep in mind that the higher you get in your rating the tougher the
competition will be, that's the fun. In the end, we are only playing for
points not money or blood. Points and elo are only pride and ego. We can
play backgammon all our lives and still learn something new everyday. That
is the challenge of the game.

Best regards,

Michael
^____^


stev...@my-deja.com

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Nov 3, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/3/99
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In article <3820AF0C...@computer-connection.net>,

"Richard P. Reasin" <rpre...@computer-connection.net> wrote:
> Leo,
>
> There is an old adage that goes: Skill and knowledge will always win
over
> luck and superstition. Remember this. It's all too easy for a player
to
> blame his fall in ratings to "bad luck". World renowned backgammon
> player and author, Bruce Becker, once stated, "Luck is for losers!"
The
> top players know this and try to comfort you by saying, "It's just a
bad
> luck streak.", as they trot to the bank with your money. Don't buy
into
> this foolishness. You make your own luck. When you are on a losing
> streak, you are making sub par plays, consistently. Your mental
attitude
> is such that you just fall into the "oh well" acceptance rut. You


Ya right.

So I have timed my backgame perfectly, have two of my opponents checkers
on the bar with points 2 thru 6 closed, and am bringing the rest of my
checkers around. The dice have not allowed me to close off the bar point
or the 1 point yet, so the only way my opponent can win is to roll
double 1's then double 6's in succession.

By your reasoning, in the unlikely event he/she rolls these doubles in
succession, at just the right time, I have played an inferior game. If
the succession of doubles *are not* rolled and I win, then I have played
superior.

Bull.

I would say I played a superior game win or lose by outplaying my
opponent with my backgame. They won with a very lucky succession of
rolls...double 1's and 6's at just the right time.

Like it or not luck plays a significant roll in our favorite game.

Steve

> Leo Bueno wrote:
>
> > I had been steadily improving my rating on FIBS until it reached a
tad
> > above 1700. It then oscillated for a couple of weeks just a few
> > points below 1700.
> >
> > Then, kaput, I dropped to barely above 1600 in another couple of
> > weeks. Can't explain what's going on. Has my brain suffered some
> > organic damage or something? I was getting the feeling that I was
> > starting to understand the game; now I am not too sure I do. Advise
> > please.
> >

> > ==================================================================
> > Snail-mail: P.O. Box 440545, Miami, FL 33144-0545 (USA)
> > Test De Cubanidad: http://www.accesspro.net/leobueno/cubanidad.htm
> > Castro Fall Poll: http://www.accesspro.net/leobueno/adiosfidel.htm
> > Miami Backgammon: http://www.accesspro.net/leobueno/gammon.htm
> > ==================================================================
>
>


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

JOHN RITTINGER

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Dec 1, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/1/99
to
Good god guys Is Backgammon a fun game? I'm a beginner basically (250
game)
and wonder if I should carry on or try a different hobby?

Chuck Bower

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Dec 1, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/1/99
to
In article <38450E45...@sk.sympatico.ca>,
JOHN RITTINGER <jritt...@sk.sympatico.ca> wrote:

>Good god guys Is Backgammon a fun game? I'm a beginner basically (250
>game) and wonder if I should carry on or try a different hobby?

Let me take a wild guess: you're new to this newsgroup. :) Many
people (like me) take backgammon seriously. Some may take it too seriously.
But I don't see that "serious" and "fun" are in opposition. And if you're
looking for a hobby where no one is serious, I think you're going to

a) have to create your own, and
b) not let anyone else in.

In general I've found backgammon players to be friendly, open, and
helpful. (Is this starting to sound like the Boy Scouts?? :) Every once
in a while you'll run into a jerk. This newsgroup SEEMS to have more than
its share until you realize that there are hundreds of posters and thousands
of readers, so the percentages are small. And I'm sure there are newsgroups
that make this one look like the Boy Scouts...

I hope you stick with backgammon. And bring your friends!


Chuck
bo...@bigbang.astro.indiana.edu
c_ray on FIBS

VSG

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Dec 2, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/2/99
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Chuck Bower <bo...@bigbang.astro.indiana.edu> schrieb in im Newsbeitrag:
823n5j$acl$1...@flotsam.uits.indiana.edu...

> In article <38450E45...@sk.sympatico.ca>,
> JOHN RITTINGER <jritt...@sk.sympatico.ca> wrote:
>
> >Good god guys Is Backgammon a fun game? I'm a beginner basically (250
> >game) and wonder if I should carry on or try a different hobby?
>
> Let me take a wild guess: you're new to this newsgroup. :) Many
> people (like me) take backgammon seriously. Some may take it too seriously.

Count me in that group :-)

> But I don't see that "serious" and "fun" are in opposition. And if you're
> looking for a hobby where no one is serious, I think you're going to
>
> a) have to create your own, and
> b) not let anyone else in.

To me it is natural to want to be the best you possibly can be in whatever hobby
you are engaging in (now it sounds like a business pep talk "I CAN, I CAN!!"
lol)This commonly means some form of study or another. I have for the past
couple of years been following this newsgroup and have been known to post the
odd article or 100 :-). I do recall however the first few times I checked out
the posts in this Newsgroup. I honestly thought to myself, "Wow these guys can't
be having fun. It all sounds so serious. What the hell is mcw and 0.345 equity
supposed to mean anyway?" This was before backgammon grabbed me by the short and
curlys and turned me into a bit of a backgammon nerd myself lol. As Chuck says
you can be serious and have fun at the same time. I am always hungry for
backgammon knowledge and would be the first to admit I am somewhat obsessive
about it. I suppose it keeps me off the streets (well gambling in the local
Irish pub anyway :-)

Stick around John you will get used to the terminology and will most definitely
improve your game by digesting some of what's posted. I for example just last
week learned how to play for gammons because I simply asked in this newsgroup.
We are not all sad anoraks who need to get a life but lets just say we are keen
on the game :-)

regards

Alan Webb

Webby's Backgammon Site

www.isg-vsg.de/backgammon/BGHome.htm


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