Buying a board

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Koyunbaba

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Jun 9, 2007, 8:52:57 AM6/9/07
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Hi I'm getting around to buying a board and have found what i think is a
good range at http://gammoncity.com/backgammon-set/GoldenAnchor/ .

I've got a question though, what surface would people recommend? Gum,
suede, wool?

Also what is gum?

Also if anyone else has a board site they can highly recommend that
sells and ships for around $200, I'd love it if they could point me in
the right direction.

All the best

Koy

Gammon Links

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Jun 9, 2007, 10:54:38 AM6/9/07
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Many online sources to buy boards are listed at

http://www.chicagopoint.com/links.html#boards

On Jun 9, 8:52 am, Koyunbaba <m.a.nolanNOS...@NOSPAMntlworld.com>
wrote:


> Hi I'm getting around to buying a board and have found what i think is a

> good range athttp://gammoncity.com/backgammon-set/GoldenAnchor/ .

mont...@lycos.com

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Jun 9, 2007, 4:43:23 PM6/9/07
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At least in the USA, the cork boards with painted points are standard
for "serious" play. A company called Crisloid makes most of the
"tournament" quality boards/sets of this type now. I collect and
sometimes sell old sets like this. The reason why many people want
the old sets is that they have checkers made out of a plastic called
bakelite (or catalin), which is not being produced any longer. As
to price, I have a Crisloid from the 1950s that is in great shape and
really well-built for $150. Red and yellow bakelite pieces about 1.5
inches across. One inch red bakelite doubling cube, red and white
original dice (2 of each), original dice cups (in like new
condition). Hardware is fine, except for the handle, which was
replaced with a new one. Handles are the "weak point" in Crisloid
sets, and it's common to find only a metal wire remaining where the
handle used to be. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.

N Merrigan

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Jun 10, 2007, 6:22:56 AM6/10/07
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I have a handmade monster size board (25 x 30.5"). Four boards were made
this is the last one.

SPEC:

The exterior is made from Canadian white Oak encased in soft imitation beige
leather padding and real leather handle (black).

The interior playing surface is made from flotex (the Speyside range) which
has been shaved leaving a soft but firm surface.

The base interior colour is light beige with the points being fern green and
dark stone. A colour scheme resembling nature.

The checkers: 15 white marblised, 15 blue marblised measuring approx 2" in
diameter and 10mm thick. Two cubes and four 1/2" precision dice.

I leave the board talk for itself.

Price: £500


"Koyunbaba" <m.a.nol...@NOSPAMntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:Joxai.8042$E9....@newsfe6-gui.ntli.net...

Koyunbaba

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Jun 10, 2007, 6:34:07 AM6/10/07
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I'm not looking to spend that much but thanks for taking the time to post.

Yours Koy

zox625

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Jun 11, 2007, 10:01:28 AM6/11/07
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As to whether Crisloid boards are 'standard' at US touranments, I
would say categorically NOT. Probably 10% or fewer of the boards I
see at an ABT tournament are Crisloid. Monty also has the size wrong:
90% of the advanced and championship players use 1-3/4" checkers, not
1-1/2".

Crisloid boards are certainly durable and have a great value for the
dollar quotient. They are by far the best board you can get for under
$200 ($140 new at http://www.flintbg.com/boutique.html , be sure to
get the 'upgraded' 21" set (which means 1-3/4" checkers and a hard
lacquer applied to the cork).

However, the vast majority of boards at ABT touranments are much
higher quality, with felt, fabric, or leather surfaces, sometimes
you'll see a few hard wooden boards, as well. Many of these boards
sell for $500 - $1000 or more. Again, 1-3/4" checkers are almost
universal; sometimes you'll see a few 2" sets. Smaller sets are
usually considered inferior and relegated to the Novice division.

My board is a Tak Morioka board which has a heavy cotton fabric
surface with painted pips. These boards are quite popular and have
beautiful colors, great lucite checkers and fine woodwork. There are
also some very nice sets from Brazil that use an inlaid felt surface.
And the old Aries boards (fabric with sewn-on leather pips) are also
considered quite nice.

Me thinks Monty hasn't been to a US tournament in a long time (or
ever?), but that's not the main point of my post.

--
Gregg Cattanach

Koyunbaba

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Jun 11, 2007, 10:54:43 AM6/11/07
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Hi Gregg thanks for the reply. So you would recommend I upgraded to
1.75 inch if intended playing in tournaments at some stage in the
future. What is the advantage of 1.75 inch are they just more luxurious
or do they have some practical advantage?

Also have you heard about the Bulgarian board supplier that I was
considering buying from in my original post. I wonder if you could run
a more discerning eye than mine over the link. The big advantage is
that this supplier is in Europe and shipping in included in the cost.
If bought from CJ (who's lovely btw) shipping would be on top and would
be quite expensive from the states.

But the upgraded crisloid board from your link is definitely and option.


Thanks in advance.

Yours Koy

Svi...@gmail.com

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Jun 11, 2007, 1:58:46 PM6/11/07
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On Jun 11, 5:54 pm, Koyunbaba <m.a.nolanNOS...@NOSPAMntlworld.com>
wrote:
> > $200 ($140 new athttp://www.flintbg.com/boutique.html, be sure to

> > get the 'upgraded' 21" set (which means 1-3/4" checkers and a hard
> > lacquer applied to the cork).
>
> > However, the vast majority of boards at ABT touranments are much
> > higher quality, with felt, fabric, or leather surfaces, sometimes
> > you'll see a few hard wooden boards, as well. Many of these boards
> > sell for $500 - $1000 or more. Again, 1-3/4" checkers are almost
> > universal; sometimes you'll see a few 2" sets. Smaller sets are
> > usually considered inferior and relegated to the Novice division.
>
> > My board is a Tak Morioka board which has a heavy cotton fabric
> > surface with painted pips. These boards are quite popular and have
> > beautiful colors, great lucite checkers and fine woodwork. There are
> > also some very nice sets from Brazil that use an inlaid felt surface.
> > And the old Aries boards (fabric with sewn-on leather pips) are also
> > considered quite nice.
>
> > Me thinks Monty hasn't been to a US tournament in a long time (or
> > ever?), but that's not the main point of my post.
>
> > --
> > Gregg Cattanach- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I am the Bulgarian Supplier
Svilen Todorov (aka Svilo)

One can learn some more about surfaces from www.gammoncity.com/includes/Surface.htm

So can one from www.dice-cups.com

Congrats to Gregg for his Directorship.

Best of luck


mont...@lycos.com

unread,
Jun 11, 2007, 9:10:22 PM6/11/07
to
The new Crisloid sets are a big step down in quality compared to the
old ones, and you get the bakelite checkers (unless the owner sold
those and replaced them with the new, cheaper ones). If you were to
see a new set and the one I have in person, you would see the
craftsmanship as well as the better materials used, though I'm sure it
does weigh a bit more. I agree with Gregg that if you are going to
spend over $100 or so you should get a very high quality set, but if
not, you can pick up a cheap set on ebay for around $25 (with 1.5 inch
checkers). The only advantages to buying the new Crisloid is that you
can get it immediately (don't have to look through ebay auctions), you
won't get laughed out of the tournament room (if you buy one of the
really cheap sets), you get the color scheme you want, and you can get
the 1 3/4 inch ones (if you feel you must have them - I dislike that
size - just too big - I'm used to tournament chess sets, and they are
closer to the 1.5 inch checker size sets).


zox625

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Jun 12, 2007, 3:19:46 PM6/12/07
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On Jun 11, 10:54 am, Koyunbaba <m.a.nolanNOS...@NOSPAMntlworld.com>
wrote:

> Hi Gregg thanks for the reply. So you would recommend I upgraded to
> 1.75 inch if intended playing in tournaments at some stage in the
> future. What is the advantage of 1.75 inch are they just more luxurious
> or do they have some practical advantage?
>
> Also have you heard about the Bulgarian board supplier that I was
> considering buying from in my original post. I wonder if you could run
> a more discerning eye than mine over the link. The big advantage is
> that this supplier is in Europe and shipping in included in the cost.
> If bought from CJ (who's lovely btw) shipping would be on top and would
> be quite expensive from the states.
>
> But the upgraded crisloid board from your link is definitely and option.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Yours Koy
>
>

The 1-3/4" sets ARE the standard size for tournament play. There
isn't anything intrisically better about those that 1-1/2" checkers,
except that they are bigger. Once I starting playing on a real
tournament-size board, I'm always somewhat disappointed when forced to
play on a smaller set.

You certainly could be happy with one of the 'GoldenAnchor' sets, as
they are smaller (40MM, about 1.57") than regular tournament size,
however, the price/quality ratio is probably quite good. My personal
favorites on that page are SB4019 and SB4022. If it were me and I was
committed to spending $200 or less, I'd rather get a Crisloid from
Carol Joy Cole. But I see the trade-off with the free shipping vs.
lots of shipping from US. You might ask her how much it would be, it
might be less than you think.

Her Crisloid boards have a cork surface, but her 'upgraded' version
has a nice clear lacquer laid down over the cork, and the checker
slide nicely and the cork won't chip and wear out. I'm pretty sure you
get cork-lined and lipped dice cups. I'm not sure whether a doubling
cube and/or precision dice are included.

If you want a REALLY nice set, then I can heartily recommend Tak
Morioka's sets, but the price is really high ($850).

--
Gregg Cattanach


zox625

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Jun 12, 2007, 3:21:54 PM6/12/07
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Hey Monty. Why don't you just tell us. When was the last time you
played in a backgammon tournament? (Your complaint about 1-3/4"
checkers is telling...)

--
Gregg C.


mont...@lycos.com

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Jun 12, 2007, 4:38:40 PM6/12/07
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Go to youtube.com, do a search for backgammon, take a look at the sets
being used at the major international tournaments, and decide for
yourself which sets are closest to what you see, the 1.5 or the 1.75
inch diameter checkers.


Raccoon

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Jun 13, 2007, 1:32:13 AM6/13/07
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It's no surprise, but Gregg, who has attended many international
backgammon tournaments, is right; Professor Montygram, who hasn't
attended any, is wrong.

"In the US, tournament players prefer 1 3/4 in = 1.75 in (= 4.4 cm)
checkers. Only occasionally are larger or smaller sets seen at
tournaments." -- Chuck Bower, http://www.bkgm.com/rgb/rgb.cgi?view+409

At the moment I have two sets. The one I never took to tournaments has
nice Bakelite checkers, but they're only 1.5 inches in diameter. The
one I used, a standard tournament size made by Dal Negro, has 1.75
inch checkers.

It's not that you can't play with 1.5 inch checkers. It's not that you
can't find nice sets with 1.5 inch checkers. It's just that most open
level players prefer a larger size.

Nale

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Jun 13, 2007, 3:15:11 AM6/13/07
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I recommend that you take a peek at http://www.bgshop.com. This site
has been around for many years and is located in Denmark. Otherwise I
think that the Golden Anchor sets in size S44 looks like fine boards
at reasonable prices.

Guerre

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Jun 13, 2007, 3:42:29 AM6/13/07
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On 13 Jun., 09:15, Nale <nal...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I recommend that you take a peek athttp://www.bgshop.com. This site

> has been around for many years and is located in Denmark. Otherwise I
> think that the Golden Anchor sets in size S44 looks like fine boards
> at reasonable prices.

Actually Chris (and bgshop) moved to UK a year or two ago :-)

Otherwise I can certainly vouch for Svilo's boards. I have one of his
King Size boards (S44 - 1-3/4" checkers) myself, and for a backgammon
board at that price, I don't think you can get much better. I agree
that the 'Golden Anchor' sets are a bit too small for tournament play
(although in Denmark we actually do see some boards of this size at
the open flights in the big tournaments), but the King Size Svilo
boards are very nice.

/Guerre

Nale

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Jun 13, 2007, 4:47:13 AM6/13/07
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Thanks for the update Guerre :o). That might also explain why Chris
haven't attended at Swedish Open the last years.

meyegon

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Jun 13, 2007, 6:06:59 AM6/13/07
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I also have a Svilo board. The board is nice and pieces move so
smoothly. One problem is the playing surface is difficult to clean so
you must be cautious not to spill something on it.

Meyegon


Koyunbaba

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Jun 13, 2007, 10:02:21 AM6/13/07
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Hi Meyogon, thanks for the post, what surface did you buy gum, felt or
suede fabric?

I'm thinking of getting this model from svilo.

http://gammoncity.com/backgammon-set/KingSize/S44368.htm

I've got to admit I hadn't considered the difficulty of cleaning a
surface before is this a problem on all boards or particularly svilo boards?

Thanks for your time

Koy

Guerre

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Jun 13, 2007, 12:33:45 PM6/13/07
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On 13 Jun., 16:02, Koyunbaba <m.a.nolanNOS...@NOSPAMntlworld.com>
wrote:
> Koy- Skjul tekst i anførselstegn -
>
> - Vis tekst i anførselstegn -

That is actually exactly the board and the colors I have. It's very
nice, and the suede fabric is a very pleasant surface to play on.

mont...@lycos.com

unread,
Jun 17, 2007, 11:54:16 PM6/17/07
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I think the problem is the width to length size of the board, rather
than checker diameter. The 1 3/4s are mostly 1 11/16 actually, and
the 1.5 are usually 1 7/16. I'd like to see 1 9/16 diameter checkers
that are as thick as most 1 11/16 ones. However, I would make the
length (the height of the points and space in between) longer than
usual, while making the width as tight as possible. This would
compact the 1 3/4 sets a bit (not much in length) while retaining a
lot of space for dice and also having checkers that are a nice size
(and also provide more space on the points if more than 5 are on
them).

meyegon

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Jun 19, 2007, 8:27:55 AM6/19/07
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On Jun 13, 5:02 pm, Koyunbaba <m.a.nolanNOS...@NOSPAMntlworld.com>
wrote:
> Koy- Hide quoted text -

>
> - Show quoted text -

Sorry for the late reply. You should, in general, have suede garments
professionally cleaned. Cleaning the playing surface of a backgammon
board is an issue in varying degrees for all boards. Surely metal and
wooden boards are easiest. Suede must be among the hardest to clean.

Meyegon


Warwick

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Jun 23, 2007, 4:31:11 AM6/23/07
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I Dunno about suede but my oldest, and largest, set is felt
with rubber cushions. Like a pool table. It helps to contain
the dice, wood and steel the dice wind up cocked more often
imho.

Also inlaid points beat the crap out of stitched ones when
it comes to sliding checkers around.
--

cheers

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