Looking for Pelforth

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Ron Nadel

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Jan 14, 1994, 11:22:32 AM1/14/94
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This is my second attempt to find Pelforth brune, a most delicious dark French
beer. No on responded to me a couple months ago, but I just cannot believe
that no one else knows of this beer.

If you have any information on this beer, if you've seen it, how to get it,
who has it, etc., I'd like to hear from you.

Thanks all,

Ron

Martin Lodahl

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Jan 16, 1994, 8:25:17 PM1/16/94
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In article <NADEL.82...@litc.lockheed.com> NA...@litc.lockheed.com (Ron Nadel) writes:
>This is my second attempt to find Pelforth brune, a most delicious dark French
>beer. No on responded to me a couple months ago, but I just cannot believe
>that no one else knows of this beer.

Oh, it's certainly not unknown ...

>If you have any information on this beer, if you've seen it, how to get it,
>who has it, etc., I'd like to hear from you.

Ron, I've never heard of its being imported to the U. S., and one reason
for that may well be that your opinion of the beer is far better
than most people's. I thought it was a fine beer to knock
back after working on the plumbing of my in-laws' house in Paris,
but not the sort of beer I'd actively go looking for; at least not
when it shared market shelf space with Chimay, Orval, Mort Subite,
Jenlain, etc.

Good luck!


--
= Martin Lodahl Systems Analyst, Capacity Planning, Pacific*Bell =
= mal...@pacbell.com Sacramento, CA USA 916.972.4821 =
= If it's good for ancient Druids runnin' nekkid through the wuids, =
= Drinkin' strange fermented fluids, it's good enough for me! (Unk.) =

Olivier Lai

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Jan 18, 1994, 8:21:37 AM1/18/94
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but not the sort of beer I'd actively go looking for; at least not
when it shared market shelf space with Chimay, Orval, Mort Subite,
Jenlain, etc.

You're quite right.... Here in France, pelforth brune is quite
common, and not at all sought after. But then I suppose it's part of
human nature as you always want what you can't get (e.g. the last
trend beerwise in Paris is Samuel Adams....); the other beers you
mention are definitely more ineteresting (apart for Jenlain, may be),
but if anyone really appreciates pelfort the I guess I'll go and have
one for them tonight....
Olive

Linda Cunningham

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Jan 18, 1994, 10:46:42 AM1/18/94
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l...@hplyot.obspm.circe.fr (Olivier Lai) a dit:

OL> You're quite right.... Here in France, pelforth brune is quite
OL> common, and not at all sought after. But then I suppose it's part
OL> of human nature as you always want what you can't get (e.g. the last
OL> trend beerwise in Paris is Samuel Adams....)

What's the verdict on 3 Monts? We see it regularly at only one outlet here in
the Washington, DC area and pick some up almost every time. One of our
regular dinner guests knows about our preference and always brings some over
for dinner, also. Apart from the Saint Sylvester Winter Ale we had last
weekend, and the Biere de Garde de Saint Leonard I used to get infrequently in
Canada, the 3 Monts is our favourite French/Flemish brew.

Linda


Ron Nadel

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Jan 18, 1994, 2:46:52 PM1/18/94
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someone replied to my search for Pelforth:

> but not the sort of beer I'd actively go looking for; at least not
> when it shared market shelf space with Chimay, Orval, Mort Subite,
> Jenlain, etc.

Are these dark beers? I spent several weeks in France a few years back trying
as many different French beers as I could get. I love dark, bock, porters and
stouts, and this was most tasty and refreshing. Although I like Pilsners and
lighter ales as well, my tastes definitely run to the dark.

Ron

Martin Lodahl

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Jan 18, 1994, 8:45:58 PM1/18/94
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The remark was mine.

Chimay is a Trappist, brewed in a monastery in Belgium, commonly available
in France. They make four variations, and sell three of them to the
public. The "red" is a sort of dark amber with a very distinctive
flavor rich in esters and phenolics, and rich in malt. The "white"
is paler, stronger, hoppier, with less in the way of malt flavors.
The "blue" (gold, in the USA) is dark, "raisiny," complex; perfect
with moules marinieres.

Orval is also a Trappist, but couldn't be more different. A very
hoppy beer, with a fabulous nose!

Mort Subite is a lambic: a spontaneously-fermented Belgian beer.
The Gueuze is sour, clean, crisp, complex. The peche is sweet and
fruity, a good accompaniment to a fruit dessert, but to my tastes,
horrid on its own. The cassis is sweet and syrupy, but a reasonable
aperitif. The rest of the variations are reasonable examples of
their styles.

Jenlain is the only French beer in the group, but only by political
accident, as the brewery is about 15 minutes from the Belgian border,
by conservatively-driven car. It's an example of the Biere de Garde
style, which has always seemed very Belgian in its approach to me.
Amber, sweet, malty, well-balanced.

All these beers are commonly available in France.

geovan...@gmail.com

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Mar 27, 2018, 7:29:34 PM3/27/18
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Hey bro, I really share the passion for this amazing dark beer. Pelforth brune is common in Paris and underrated. If you ever come across any please let know.

John Geoffrey

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Apr 15, 2018, 4:08:04 PM4/15/18
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uhm... he posted that in 1994, I hope he found what he was looking for
in the last 24 years
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