Google Groups no longer supports new Usenet posts or subscriptions. Historical content remains viewable.
Dismiss

Morning

5 views
Skip to first unread message

Ulf Fischer

unread,
May 26, 1994, 11:50:57 AM5/26/94
to

A morning without coffee is a wrong one.
I like microwave-hot-water with instant-coffee and artifical sugger.
And YOU?

Golden Richard

unread,
May 26, 1994, 11:58:06 AM5/26/94
to


You're sick sick SICK!!!!! :)


Cheers,

--Golden
--
Golden G. Richard III Ohio State Computer & Info Sciences 614-292-0056
gric...@cis.ohio-state.edu Compuserve:72634,1272 "I'm your huckleberry..."

Matt Conlon

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:05:04 PM5/26/94
to
In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de>, caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf
Fischer) wrote:

Wow, that's kind of hard-core minimal, eh?

I've settled on Medaglia d'Oro (sp?) (Gold Medal?) espresso roast coffee
(product of Italy). I make it like regular drip coffee, except that I
probably use about half as much because it tastes nice and strong. I drink
it black with no sugar. I have a coffee maker with a timer, so I wake up to
the smell of my coffee brewing.

Matt

Fred Condo

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:03:07 PM5/26/94
to
In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de>, caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf
Fischer) wrote:

>
> A morning without coffee is a wrong one.

A morning without coffee is like a coma. :-)

> I like microwave-hot-water with instant-coffee and artifical sugger.
> And YOU?

Goodness, no! Coffee made from freshly-ground beans stored in the
refrigerator is vastly better than instant coffee. It is well worth the
little bit of extra effort.

I add sugar only to espresso -- and only real sugar. My regular morning
coffee, I have black.
--
Fred Condo + fr...@lightside.com

Tim Mullen

unread,
May 26, 1994, 12:26:03 PM5/26/94
to

>In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de> caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf Fischer) writes:
>>A morning without coffee is a wrong one.
>>I like microwave-hot-water with instant-coffee and artifical sugger.
>>And YOU?

My motto is "No natural anything". When shopping for food-things at
the supermarket, always check for an expiration date -- if it doesn't
have one, you know it's *good stuff*. If it does have one, make sure
it's at least in the next century.

>You're sick sick SICK!!!!! :)

But remember, "Practice makes perfect"! :)

>Cheers,

>--Golden
>--
>Golden G. Richard III Ohio State Computer & Info Sciences 614-292-0056
>gric...@cis.ohio-state.edu Compuserve:72634,1272 "I'm your huckleberry..."

--
Tim Mullen
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Am I in your basement? ALWAYS looking for antique televisions, fans, etc.
--------------------------------call anytime: (212)-463-0552 -------------

Mathew Revington

unread,
May 26, 1994, 12:35:04 PM5/26/94
to


How about some of that non-dairy edible oil product fake milk powder. Now theres
a flavour to savour in the morning.

Matt Revington

Keith Dreibelbis

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:42:03 PM5/26/94
to

For me, tap-hot-water and instant-coffee is good enough. So
what if it tastes bad. Just give me some coffee!!! :) No sugger
(sic) on it... why pretend that we drink coffee because we like how it
tastes?
Uh, this morning was a bad one, but the afternoon is looking
better.

Dribbs (two b's, not 3)

Kurt A. Kistler

unread,
May 26, 1994, 12:49:06 PM5/26/94
to
Matt Conlon (con...@sentry.ndhm.gtegsc.com) wrote:
: In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de>, caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf
: Fischer) wrote:

: Matt

I have heard that espresso beans have less caffeine/bean than say
Columbian beans, but what makes espresso strong is the amount used
per cup. Coffee's which smell and taste strong, like espresso or
French roast, have been roasted longer, but are actually milder
as far as caffeine is concerned. It might be your are making
very mild coffee.

BTW, I like Lavazza in a Bodem coffee maker, very strong, with heavy cream.

Kurt

--
|| |
\\ || // | Kurt A. Kistler
\\||// | University of Pennsylvania
//||\\ The way of water. | Department of Chemistry
// || \\ | kis...@a.chem.upenn.edu
// \|| \\ |

Andrew Klossner

unread,
May 26, 1994, 12:53:21 PM5/26/94
to
Ulf Fischer writes from Germany:

"I like microwave-hot-water with instant-coffee and artifical
sugger."

I've heard apocryphal tales about an engineering establishment near the
French-German border. Inside were two coffee makers, one labeled
"French" and the other "German." The stuff in the French pot had,
shall we say, a relatively low water content.

-=- Andrew Klossner (and...@frip.wv.tek.com)

Chris Myers

unread,
May 26, 1994, 12:53:44 PM5/26/94
to

|> Goodness, no! Coffee made from freshly-ground beans stored in the
|> refrigerator is vastly better than instant coffee. It is well worth the
|> little bit of extra effort.

Amen to that!

We grind our own beans fresh every morning and make it a cup at a time. I used
up the last of the Jamaican Blue Mountain this morning. :-( So I will have to
settle for Kona or Kenya. 8-).

Chris

--
Opinions expressed are my own and not those of my employer.
My employer does not pay me enough to share my opinions.
:-) ch...@albert.den.mmc.com

Dick Jackson

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:07:58 PM5/26/94
to
In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de> caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf Fischer) writes:
>

Pfah!!! And I was just going to post about the superiority of
European coffee (I am English).

But seriously folks, there is some significant difference between
even restaurant coffee in Europe and in the States. I have tried
all kinds of beans and all kinds of roasts and have not found
the Euro taste. The closest was New Orleans coffee, which has a chicory
tastes that knocks you on the head. Maybe its a trace of chicory
in Europe.

By Europe I mean Britain and France. Further East you get the
Turkish influence, Austrian specialities, etc. All good in their way
though.

Dick Jackson

Ashley Taft

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:15:35 PM5/26/94
to
I like sludge....Industrial strength.

Yes, I'm talking about REAL coffee! Drink half of the cup, and let the
grounds settle to get that last sip!

My brother also makes a killer cuppa cap. He doesn't steam the milk,
though...He has one of those Nifty Devices that can turn skim milk into
whipped cream. He also never sticks to one bean. A typical pot of his
coffee has a fistful of one flavor, and a fistful of another.

Kicks butt, I dare say.

Ashley

P.S.-> Anybody in the CowTown (You know who you are!) know where I can
find good Turkish/Greek coffee?

Jak Kirman

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:21:16 PM5/26/94
to
>>>>> "Fred" == Fred Condo <fr...@lightside.com> writes:
Fred> A morning without coffee is like a coma. :-)
So that's why I never remember those mornings :-)

Fred> Goodness, no! Coffee made from freshly-ground beans stored in the
Fred> refrigerator is vastly better than instant coffee. It is well worth the
Fred> little bit of extra effort.

I certainly agree that coffee made from coffee beans is vastly better
than instant coffee; incidentally, I occasionally find myself in this
unfortunate position: I am at someone else's house; the host offers me
coffee. I accept gratefully. The host gets out a jar of instant coffee
and starts to make it. While valiantly trying to suppress the gag
reflex, I mumble something about having changed my mind, invariably
producing a puzzled look on the host's face. Is this unconscionably
rude?

Anyway, that wasn't the point of this posting -- I was curious about the
notion that one should refrigerate coffee. This is accepted wisdom in
the US, but I don't recall seeing anyone do this in France or Italy,
where coffee is almost a religion. I used to drink French Carte
Noire, then Lavazza (Italian espresso), now Kimbo (also Italian
espresso; I find it much better than Lavazza). I buy it pre-ground,
vacuum-packed. As far as I can tell, there is no degradation of quality
in the can, and although I keep it un-refrigerated (in a sealed
container) I cannot tell the difference between the first cup and the
last. I make it either using a stove-top espresso maker or a small
electric espresso maker. I usually finish a 250g can in 4-5 days.

Why do I not see any difference? Am I just being unobservant? Are
people talking about storing coffee for longer periods? Is it different
for espresso? For drip-made coffee?

Jak Kirman j...@cs.brown.edu
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
De gustibus non est disputandum.

Juergen Stockburger

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:37:00 PM5/26/94
to
In article <2s2ju2$a...@netnews.upenn.edu> kis...@a.chem.upenn.edu (Kurt A. Kistler) writes:

...

I have heard that espresso beans have less caffeine/bean than say
Columbian beans, but what makes espresso strong is the amount used
per cup. Coffee's which smell and taste strong, like espresso or
French roast, have been roasted longer, but are actually milder
as far as caffeine is concerned. It might be your are making
very mild coffee.

BTW, I like Lavazza in a Bodem coffee maker, very strong, with heavy cream.

Kurt

Espresso is typically a mixture of arabica and robusta beans, or is
made from 100% arabica. Arabica has a lot less caffeine, about 20% of
the caffeine content of a typical robusta (says Italian roaster
Kimbo).
My experience is that an espresso is much easier on the
stomach than standard roasts. People tell me that this depends more on
the kind of roast than on the kind of bean.

J:)rgen

Marcus J Ranum

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:39:07 PM5/26/94
to
>Goodness, no! Coffee made from freshly-ground beans stored in the
>refrigerator is vastly better than instant coffee.

You only need to refrigerate coffee if it's freshly roasted.
Otherwise, consider that it wasn't likely to have been refrigerated
while it was being shipped from Africa or Columbia or wherever it
came from. :) Coffee snobs often don't realize that leaving beans
in the fridge is kind of silly, if they've already spent MONTHS
sitting in a burlap sack in a warehouse.

If you roast your own beans, by all means refrigerate the
results -- but if you roast your own, you should just roast a
week's worth (i.e., a pound) at a time and drink it while it's
fresh. If you buy preroasted beans, keep the beans un-ground and
invest in a mill for your home coffee equipment. Milling your
beans instants before cooking will give you a better brew than
buying pre-ground beans and refrigerating them ever will.

mjr.

William Seabrook

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:39:37 PM5/26/94
to
Wow. Just this morning I was grepping my .newsrc for coffee, and
came up with nothing. This afternoon, when I go to rn, there it is....

My reason for this is I purchased an Espresso/Cappucino machine last night.
It was late when I got back so I haven't had time to try it out yet.
I completely agree with whoever said that ground coffee is the way to go....
freshly ground coffee has a wonderful, slightly fruity quality that is lost
even hours after grinding. I suggest (to those interested) getting a
Krups Touch-Top (c) coffee mill. I have found that these are the most
sturdy and reliable--and it pays. I had a cheap one once, and the tips
of the blades eventually broke off in the coffee!
As for keeping the beans in the fridge, I tend to do this, but I'm
not sure exactly how much the beans are affected if kept at room temperature.
There is a school of thought that, after grinding, the grounds should be
microwaved for 30 seconds before brewing; preheating
is supposed to bring out more flavor. Again, I have tried this, but I can't
dicern much difference.

My ONLY problem with coffee is the caffeine. It's a love/hate thing.
I won't touch decaff, because it smacks of being "fixed," like a pet or
something--not quite complete. Unfortunately, however, I am very
sensitive to that stimulant, so, unless I want to have the nervous
jitters and namless anxieties all day, I am alas limited to one, _maybe_
two cups in the morning. The coffee/espresso family has between 50 and
200 miligrams of caffeine per serving, espresso being at the upper end
of course. Since, to compare, Jolt Cola has 71 mg per can,
I'm going to have to watch my espresso intake *chuckle*

Anybody have opinions on percolating? This is a trick question.

--Will the proud new owner of a so-far unused Delonghi Cafe Vario Cappuchino
Machine.

email at dsg...@cdslr1.atsc.allied.com
or seab...@ghidrah.umiacs.umd.edu

Samuel H Theiner

unread,
May 26, 1994, 2:06:50 PM5/26/94
to
In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de> caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf Fischer) writes:
>
A morning without coffee means I've had a cup of tea instead! Ah, to be
young and hooked on caffeine....
Instant coffee! Yeah! Who the hell has the brain power to brew coffee
before HAVING coffee? If I cared what my coffee tastes like, I'd by a
coffee machine!
And just what is sugger, anyways? 8-)


Larry DeLuca

unread,
May 26, 1994, 1:09:24 PM5/26/94
to
real brewed stuff for me, please. the darker the better. lots of milk
and enough sugar that there's sludge on the bottom.

larry...


--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1991 Time Magazine/CNN Poll: How many think Elvis is still alive?
16% - Yes, 79% - No, 5% - Not sure
If one in five think Elvis still walks among us, which of them post?
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dan Masi

unread,
May 26, 1994, 2:02:08 PM5/26/94
to

Lukewarm tap water w/ 3 Tbs of Postum imitation instant morning beverage,
with 3 Vivarin tablets dissolved (in place of the sugar; I don't like
the taste of sugar).

Sometimes when I feel the need for a healthy fruit drink, I'll add a
couple teaspoons of TANG to the mix. Breakfast-in-a-Dixie-Cup, I call
it.

Dan Masi
Mentor Graphics Corp.
da...@warren.mentorg.com

Naruhisa Takashima

unread,
May 26, 1994, 2:02:35 PM5/26/94
to

I find that the best way to keep ground coffee is to keep it at
room temperature in a sealed container. It seems that when
you refrigerate it, the ground loose its aroma.
Could it be due to the dry air in the fridge?

I guess the best way to do it is to ground it right before
you drink it....

Naru Takashima
--

.. __o __o __o __o __o __o __o __o ..
.. -\<, -\<, -\<, -\<, -\<, -\<, -\<, -\<, ..
..(_)/(_)(_)/(_)(_)/(_)(_)/(_)(_)/(_)(_)/(_)(_)/(_)(_)/(_)..

Roger Allan Green

unread,
May 26, 1994, 2:29:02 PM5/26/94
to

Dripped from quality grounds. Excess should be kept in the fridge
overnight, have a generous amount of sugar stirred in, then cream and an
icecube added. Make your own ICE COFFEE. It's the best, and you can
drink about 4 cups before even realizing what you've done to your
metabolism for the rest of the day. This only works if you make it strong.


--
-------------------------------------------------------------
Roger_Green University of Manitoba
@cc.umanitoba.ca Winnipeg, Canada

Trouble Man

unread,
May 26, 1994, 3:05:25 PM5/26/94
to
In article <1994May26.1...@news.mentorg.com>,
Dan Masi <da...@warren.mentorg.com> wrote:

>Lukewarm tap water w/ 3 Tbs of Postum imitation instant morning beverage,
>with 3 Vivarin tablets dissolved (in place of the sugar; I don't like

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>the taste of sugar).
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

...does a double take, whistles and bows deeply.

>Dan Masi
>Mentor Graphics Corp.
>da...@warren.mentorg.com

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Life is a tragedy for those that feel,| TROUBLE MAN
and a comedy for those that think. | el...@iastate.edu
-Horace Walpole |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--

Paul J. Giguere

unread,
May 26, 1994, 2:47:58 PM5/26/94
to
In article <2s2mrr$7...@shemesh.tis.com>, m...@tis.com (Marcus J Ranum)
wrote:

> You only need to refrigerate coffee if it's freshly roasted.
> Otherwise, consider that it wasn't likely to have been refrigerated
> while it was being shipped from Africa or Columbia or wherever it
> came from. :) Coffee snobs often don't realize that leaving beans
> in the fridge is kind of silly, if they've already spent MONTHS
> sitting in a burlap sack in a warehouse.

Actually, I thought that the reason you should keep your beans in the
fridge is that they grind better and brew better in the coffemaker if they
are cold. This could be just coffee folklore though.

Paul

======================================================================
|Paul J. Giguere (INTJ) | "It is better to stay out than to get out." |
|PGIG...@EDC.ORG | Mark Twain |
======================================================================

Juergen Stockburger

unread,
May 26, 1994, 4:01:57 PM5/26/94
to
In article <JAK.94Ma...@aruba.cs.brown.edu> j...@cs.brown.edu (Jak Kirman) writes:

> Anyway, that wasn't the point of this posting -- I was curious about the
> notion that one should refrigerate coffee. This is accepted wisdom in
> the US, but I don't recall seeing anyone do this in France or Italy,
> where coffee is almost a religion. I used to drink French Carte
> Noire, then Lavazza (Italian espresso), now Kimbo (also Italian
> espresso; I find it much better than Lavazza).

Kimbo is my favourite, too. Could you give me a hint where you can buy it?

> I buy it pre-ground,
> vacuum-packed.

Are you sure? In Europe they sell Kimbo in *pressurized* cans -- keeps
some of the more delicate substances from evaporating.

> As far as I can tell, there is no degradation of quality
> in the can, and although I keep it un-refrigerated (in a sealed
> container) I cannot tell the difference between the first cup and the
> last. I make it either using a stove-top espresso maker or a small
> electric espresso maker. I usually finish a 250g can in 4-5 days.
> Why do I not see any difference? Am I just being unobservant? Are
> people talking about storing coffee for longer periods? Is it different
> for espresso? For drip-made coffee?

You're either an addict, or you have friends who share your taste. I
think people are talking about something like weeks...

Cheers,

J:)rgen

Paul Collins - CVLE/F93

unread,
May 26, 1994, 3:41:57 PM5/26/94
to
Naruhisa Takashima (na...@eng.umd.edu) wrote:

: I find that the best way to keep ground coffee is to keep it at


: room temperature in a sealed container. It seems that when
: you refrigerate it, the ground loose its aroma.
: Could it be due to the dry air in the fridge?

I had been told by a so-called expert that coffee must be frozen when not
in active use. I too keep my coffee sealed in the 'fridge, awaiting the
grinder. I think the reason for your lack of aroma in ground,
refrigerated coffee is that the aroma is carried to our olfactory by
brownian motion: if you let the coffee warm to room temp., you'll find the
aroma is back (more energy in the system!). The critical thing is to keep
your coffee (beans or ground) sealed, as this way the coffee does not lose
too much of its natural moisture.

I have found that inexpensive bean coffees a la Loblaws or A&P are better
(when ground immediately before brewing) than expensive coffees unsealed
for 1 day!

pcol...@malthus.acs.ryerson.ca Paul S. Collins (Wally to you!)

joanslab

unread,
May 26, 1994, 8:49:55 AM5/26/94
to
Fischer) wrote:

Instant coffee...artificial sugar...microwaved...sounds great to me! But
ONLY if you add some sort of artificial "coffee whitener" or fake cream.
Delicious!

--
Brian Anton

joan...@neb.com

Paul Worthington

unread,
May 26, 1994, 3:10:48 PM5/26/94
to
In article <1994May26....@ttinews.tti.com>, jac...@soldev.tti.com (Dick Jackson) writes:
|> In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de> caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf Fischer) writes:

|> ...

|> But seriously folks, there is some significant difference between
|> even restaurant coffee in Europe and in the States. I have tried
|> all kinds of beans and all kinds of roasts and have not found
|> the Euro taste. The closest was New Orleans coffee, which has a chicory
|> tastes that knocks you on the head. Maybe its a trace of chicory
|> in Europe.


Damn straight. Boy, do I miss the coffee in New Orleans. French Market
was the only kind to buy. Even Luzianne was good once in a while, though.

Paul

Paul Worthington

unread,
May 26, 1994, 3:08:28 PM5/26/94
to
In article <fred-260...@user38.lightside.com>, fr...@lightside.com (Fred Condo) writes:
|> In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de>, caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf
|> Fischer) wrote:
|>
|> >
|> > A morning without coffee is a wrong one.
|>
|> A morning without coffee is like a coma. :-)
|>

On the other hand, I *can't stand* coffee in the morning. Yuk. I just
hate the taste and smell of it and don't need it to "wake up".

I prefer to grind and brew my own fresh double cappucinos at 10 or 10:30
at night. Surprisingly, it doesn't keep me awake much, and I fall asleep
by 11:30, no problem.


Paul

Dick Jackson

unread,
May 26, 1994, 4:08:21 PM5/26/94
to
Marcus J Ranum writes:
>
> You only need to refrigerate coffee if it's freshly roasted.
>Otherwise, consider that it wasn't likely to have been refrigerated
>while it was being shipped from Africa or Columbia or wherever it
>came from. :) Coffee snobs often don't realize that leaving beans
>in the fridge is kind of silly, if they've already spent MONTHS
>sitting in a burlap sack in a warehouse.

We keep our coffe beans in the freezer. I agree its probably not
necessary but I rationalise it by remembering that coffee *does* get
stale after some time (how long?) and that the lower temp in the
freezer will slow down whatever oxidation? process is going on.

I can't see that it can do any harm. After grinding and bathing
in hot water the powder must heat up so quickly that it can't
remember ever being cold.

Incidentally, my old pappy used to say to use hot but not boiling
water for coffee. Anyone insist boiling is best?

I use a jug/filter combo with water poured from the kettle, by the
way. I think that the water that comes down from a drip system is
not at boiling point(?).

Dick Jackson

Kip Voytek

unread,
May 26, 1994, 4:28:48 PM5/26/94
to
In <2s2ppe$o...@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca> umgr...@cc.umanitoba.ca (Roger Allan Green) writes:

>In <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de> caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf Fischer) writes:


>>A morning without coffee is a wrong one.
>>I like microwave-hot-water with instant-coffee and artifical sugger.
>>And YOU?

>Dripped from quality grounds. Excess should be kept in the fridge
>overnight, have a generous amount of sugar stirred in, then cream and an
>icecube added. Make your own ICE COFFEE. It's the best, and you can
>drink about 4 cups before even realizing what you've done to your
>metabolism for the rest of the day. This only works if you make it strong.

Actually, for iced coffee that can afford to have ice cubes melt in it
for a few minutes the coffee needs to be *really* strong -- too strong
for regular drinking in my book. While I usually don't like any extra
flavoring in my coffee (outside of chicory) vanilla and chocolate
enhanced coffees, brewed biomass style, make great iced coffee.

Dennis Tetreault

unread,
May 26, 1994, 4:38:33 PM5/26/94
to
For the longest time, I preferred black tea in the morning. Then
one day, I had coffee with a friend, and she bought me a cup
of Hazelnut coffee. WOW! Now that I can deal with. Then here
at work we had Swiss CHocolate Almond. Now I find I have about
6 flavors that I love (but straight coffee is still revolting
to me). And just yesterday I tried some butterscotch concoction that
has a real great taste to it.

At a buck a cup, I think I'm going broke!

dennis
But I'll be wired!

George Flanagin

unread,
May 26, 1994, 4:29:54 PM5/26/94
to

: You only need to refrigerate coffee if it's freshly roasted.

: Otherwise, consider that it wasn't likely to have been refrigerated
: while it was being shipped from Africa or Columbia or wherever it
: came from. :) Coffee snobs often don't realize that leaving beans
: in the fridge is kind of silly, if they've already spent MONTHS
: sitting in a burlap sack in a warehouse.

-g-> Coffee is not shipped across the seven seas in a
roased state. As long as coffee is still "green," it can be stored
in those burlap sacks for a year or two, although it becomes less
acidic (when roasted) with the passage of time in its green state.

: If you roast your own beans, by all means refrigerate the


: results -- but if you roast your own, you should just roast a
: week's worth (i.e., a pound) at a time and drink it while it's
: fresh. If you buy preroasted beans, keep the beans un-ground and
: invest in a mill for your home coffee equipment. Milling your
: beans instants before cooking will give you a better brew than
: buying pre-ground beans and refrigerating them ever will.

-g-> Refrigerating the beans is pretty suspect, too. Unless you
leave the beans out on the dining room table on a cookie sheet
as your storage method of choice, taking the beans in and out of
the cold storage probably does more harm than good. Roasted
coffee is hygroscopic (absorbs water from the air), and the
repeated exposure of cold coffee to warm air makes it go south
in a hurry, even when that exposure is for a minute or two. Once
the water has made contact and formed the condensation layer, it
stays with the coffee and begins to disolve its protective layer.

-g-> Roasting one's own coffee is pretty easy to get the hang of.
You must waste a good five to ten pounds to catch on to the
procedure, but it can be done.

george

George Flanagin
Internet: flan...@boi.hp.com (weekdays)
gkfla...@aol.com (weekends)
Sneakernet: Building one, upper floor, NE of column R4.

=====================================================================
"Quality has become quantity. The | The opinions expressed are
only answer to all questions of | hardly ever my own; I learned
`What for?' is `More!'" | everything from someone else.
-- Philip Rieff |
=====================================================================

Jak Kirman

unread,
May 26, 1994, 5:03:08 PM5/26/94
to
>>>>> "Juergen" == Juergen Stockburger <jue...@mizar.usc.edu> writes:

Juergen> (Juergen Stockburger) writes: Kimbo is my favourite,
Juergen> too. Could you give me a hint where you can buy it?

From a small Italian deli in Rhode Island -- probably not very useful to
you :-) I will ask who their distributor is, though, and perhaps you can
find out from them if anywhere in your area stocks it.

Jak>> I buy it pre-ground, vacuum-packed.

Juergen> Are you sure? In Europe they sell Kimbo in *pressurized* cans
Juergen> -- keeps some of the more delicate substances from
Juergen> evaporating.

Well, the can says vacuum-packed, and I have also seen it in soft
packets (some kind of metal-coated plastic, I think) that were clearly
vacuum-packed. This is the standard packaging in France, too. Where do
they pressurize it?

Jak>> As far as I can tell, there is no degradation of quality
Jak>> in the can, and although I keep it un-refrigerated (in a sealed
Jak>> container) I cannot tell the difference between the first cup and the
Jak>> last. I make it either using a stove-top espresso maker or a small
Jak>> electric espresso maker. I usually finish a 250g can in 4-5 days.
Jak>> Why do I not see any difference? Am I just being unobservant? Are
Jak>> people talking about storing coffee for longer periods? Is it different
Jak>> for espresso? For drip-made coffee?

Juergen> You're either an addict, or you have friends who share your taste. I
Juergen> think people are talking about something like weeks...

Just me :-) I drink more (and stronger) coffee than most people I know
in the US, though I never get headaches when I stop for a while,
e.g. when travelling. Some of the people here have been talking of
drinking a pound a week, which seems a lot to me... I could certainly
see the coffee going stale if it was kept for weeks in a container that
was opened every day, but I am still curious as to whether refrigeration
helps.

Jak Kirman j...@cs.brown.edu
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
It is not enough that I should win. Everyone else must also lose.
-- Ghenghis Khan

Lindsay Adams

unread,
May 26, 1994, 4:43:31 PM5/26/94
to
About that instant coffee thing. HOW CAN YOU CALL IT COFFEE?
Straight from the bean or nothing, that's coffee. The only pre-processing
I want is grinding.
RE: cigarettes and coffee? Well, 1 part nicotine and 1 part caffeine must
equal a protein as a friend of mine conjectured.
--
Ask not why the streets are paved, shutup and strap on some
Rollerblades! lnza...@netcom.com

Ed Janik

unread,
May 26, 1994, 12:11:22 PM5/26/94
to
In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de>, caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf
Fischer) wrote:

>
> A morning without coffee is a wrong one.
> I like microwave-hot-water with instant-coffee and artifical sugger.
> And YOU?

At my last job (A.C. Nielsen, Northbrook, Il. USA) I had to bring my own
thermos
or shell out a half dollar for really crappy coffee or a dollar for good
coffee
(Starbucks). Now at SPSS Chicago, Il. USA I get FREE Starbucks
coffee...all I
want...hell, I'd work for *free* just to drink all of this wonderful
coffee...
I *LOVE* COFFEE...COFFEE IS MY LORD AND SAVIOR!!!!! I WANT TO TAKE A BATH
IN
COFFEE!!! I WANT TO MAKE LOVE TO COFFEE!!!! JUST GIVE ME COFFEE!!!!
ESPRESSO!!!
CAPPUCHINO!!!! CAFE LATTE!!!! CAFE MOCHA!!!!! COFFEE GROUNDS
SANDWICHES!!!!!!!!

Excuse me, that was very silly. I enjoy Starbucks coffee and cappuchino
the
best. And check out the forthcoming Bad Examples c.d. on the Waterdog
Label
coming out some time in late summer '94 for a song about caffeine addiction
by
that songwriting genius Ralph Covert. The song is titled "Floating In My
Coffee". The Bad Examples play in Chicago a lot, and often tour in
Holland.
They are the greatest rock and roll band in the WORLD!! I LOVE THE BAD
EXAMPLES!
THE BAD EXAMPLES ARE MY LORD AND SAVIOR!!!! I WANT TO MAKE LOVE TO...okay,
maybe
not...my wife would be really concerned.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!

Erik Ramberg

unread,
May 26, 1994, 4:49:10 PM5/26/94
to
In article <2s2msp$o...@ghidrah.umiacs.umd.edu>, seab...@umiacs.umd.edu
(William Seabrook) wrote:

> I suggest (to those interested) getting a
> Krups Touch-Top (c) coffee mill. I have found that these are the most
> sturdy and reliable--and it pays. I had a cheap one once, and the tips
> of the blades eventually broke off in the coffee!

Get a mill grinder. Besides being extreamly convenient (I just dial the
amount I need and it grinds it out for me) the grinds are much more
uniform, are not heated by the process, and you can also finely tune the
grind.

> There is a school of thought that, after grinding, the grounds should be
> microwaved for 30 seconds before brewing; preheating
> is supposed to bring out more flavor. Again, I have tried this, but I can't
> dicern much difference.

Ugh, this is probably not a good idea. The real flavor in coffee is in the
oils...and any heating of the grounds can reduce the ability of the water
to extract the oils. Keep in mind that espresso water should be around 80
degrees centigrade for a perfect draw. (Along with lots of pressure.)
Heating the grounds just seems to wierd to me.

>
> Anybody have opinions on percolating? This is a trick question.
>

Krups Brewmaster with a gold foil insert does the job for me. Just make
sure you clean it often, use cold distilled water, and ignore the cup scale
on the side of the machine--I use 1.5 measures of grounds per measure of
water, but I need 3 measures to make myself one cup of coffee!?!

>
> --Will, the proud new owner of a so-far unused Delonghi Cafe Vario Cappuchino
> Machine.

Good choice for a machine. Myself, I prefer the La Pavoni. I guess I like
the idea of pulling the lever...it makes me feel like I'm making my own cup
rather than the machine.

-Erik

------------------------------------------------------------------
hmmmmm....


Nothing that I say can be construed as the opinion of my employer.

Crystal Bishop

unread,
May 26, 1994, 4:30:29 PM5/26/94
to
In article <1994May26.1...@news.mentorg.com>,

da...@warren.mentorg.com (Dan Masi) wrote:
> Lukewarm tap water w/ 3 Tbs of Postum imitation instant morning beverage,
> with 3 Vivarin tablets dissolved (in place of the sugar; I don't like
> the taste of sugar).
>
> Sometimes when I feel the need for a healthy fruit drink, I'll add a
> couple teaspoons of TANG to the mix. Breakfast-in-a-Dixie-Cup, I call
> it.
>
> Dan Masi
> Mentor Graphics Corp.
> da...@warren.mentorg.com

Yowsa! I'm in love....

--
crystal

no plan, no quotes, just me

Kasper Gustavsson

unread,
May 26, 1994, 5:27:48 PM5/26/94
to
In article <JUERGEN.94...@mizar.usc.edu>,

Juergen Stockburger <jue...@mizar.usc.edu> wrote:
>In article <JAK.94Ma...@aruba.cs.brown.edu> j...@cs.brown.edu (Jak Kirman) writes:
>
<zip>

>> I usually finish a 250g can in 4-5 days.
<zip>

>>Are people talking about storing coffee for longer periods?
>
>You're either an addict, or you have friends who share your taste. I
>think people are talking about something like weeks...

Well, as a high school student I usually have NO problems in finishing
half a kilo in two weeks when reading for the tests. And now where
speaking cheap, bad coffee. If I would have good coffee at home I would
only be drinking instead of studying.
When I want good coffee I usually go to some cafe or something, good
coffee should be acompanied with a nice environment.

/Kasper

--
Kasper Gustavsson d3ka...@dtek.chalmers.se

Gregory Welch

unread,
May 26, 1994, 5:22:53 PM5/26/94
to
In article <JAK.94Ma...@aruba.cs.brown.edu>, j...@cs.brown.edu (Jak Kirman) writes:
[stuff deleted]

|>
|> Anyway, that wasn't the point of this posting -- I was curious about the
|> notion that one should refrigerate coffee. This is accepted wisdom in
|> the US, but I don't recall seeing anyone do this in France or Italy,
|> where coffee is almost a religion. I used to drink French Carte
|> Noire, then Lavazza (Italian espresso), now Kimbo (also Italian
|> espresso; I find it much better than Lavazza). I buy it pre-ground,
|> vacuum-packed. As far as I can tell, there is no degradation of quality

|> in the can, and although I keep it un-refrigerated (in a sealed
|> container) I cannot tell the difference between the first cup and the
|> last. I make it either using a stove-top espresso maker or a small
|> electric espresso maker. I usually finish a 250g can in 4-5 days.
|>
|> Why do I not see any difference? Am I just being unobservant? Are
|> people talking about storing coffee for longer periods? Is it different

|> for espresso? For drip-made coffee?
|>
|> Jak Kirman j...@cs.brown.edu
|> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
|> De gustibus non est disputandum.

You know, I keep my beans in an air-tight container (clear plastic w/ screw-
on lid), UNrefrigerated, and the flavor is consistently wonderful! In fact,
I found it to be better (maintained better) than when I refrigerated the
same container (I am guessing that the cold temps may have deformed the
container slightly, allowing air to pass the seal.) So now, NO refrigeration,
simply an air-tight container, and I am very happy w/ the flavor retention.

BTW, for the bad coffee syndrome (when you're offered bad coffee at another
person's house, etc.) I simply say "Yes, I'd love some", I taste it, and if
it's not palatable I simply don't drink any more. If they don't know me
well enough to know about my lust for fine coffee, they probably won't
make much ado about the fact that I drink very little of their precious
brew. :-)

--
Greg Welch, wel...@cs.unc.edu
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department of Computer Science

Michael Mallory

unread,
May 26, 1994, 5:52:35 PM5/26/94
to

In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de>, caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf Fischer) writes:
>
>A morning without coffee is a wrong one.
>I like microwave-hot-water with instant-coffee and artifical sugger.
>And YOU?
>
Nothing gets my juices flowing like a hot cup-o-instant Folgers Ground
Crystals with generic brand skim milk. Turn the kettle off shortly
before the wistle if you are in a rush and need to guzzle it down.
--
,, ,,
_ || ||
\\/\\/\\ < \, || || /'\\ ,._-_ '\\/\\
|| || || /-|| || || || || || || ;'
|| || || (( || || || || || || ||/
\\ \\ \\ \/\\ \\ \\ \\,/ \\, |/ @ingres.com
(
-_-

Jeff Bruce

unread,
May 26, 1994, 6:52:41 PM5/26/94
to
C

In article <JAK.94Ma...@aruba.cs.brown.edu>, j...@cs.brown.edu (Jak Kirman)
writes:
>
> Anyway, that wasn't the point of this posting -- I was curious about the
> notion that one should refrigerate coffee.

Actually if you need to store coffee beans you should freeze them. This is for
long term storage only. Coffee beans used for your daily cup(s) should be
kept at room temp. This way the oils can flow freely. Beans kept in the
frig tend to dull and the coffee will not be extruded properly. A good
method is to keep about 1 weeks worth of beans in a jar at room temp.

Jeff

Barista at the Coffe Staion, Moscow, Idaho

john boye

unread,
May 26, 1994, 8:01:42 PM5/26/94
to
George Flanagin (flan...@boi.hp.com) wrote:

: -g-> Roasting one's own coffee is pretty easy to get the hang of.


: You must waste a good five to ten pounds to catch on to the
: procedure, but it can be done.


Exactly how does one go about roasting one's own? Any hints?
I'd like to try it. Thanks.


Nancy Lyons

unread,
May 26, 1994, 9:05:46 PM5/26/94
to
In article <2s2gh1$3...@news.cs.tu-berlin.de> caro...@cs.tu-berlin.de (Ulf Fischer) writes:
>
>A morning without coffee is a wrong one.
>I like microwave-hot-water with instant-coffee and artifical sugger.
>And YOU?

Yes, sounds good.
I have even been known to drink a cup of coffee that has been sitting
on my office desk since the day before. Pretty bad, huh?
Nil

David A. Podgursky

unread,
May 26, 1994, 11:54:21 PM5/26/94
to
Microwave hot water and instant coffee grounds?...
do you eat the grounds and then drink the water?

I know that there are places that they do not make
coffee as Americans know and love it...
A
for example in the midle east they drink "turkish' or 'nescafe'...
either brutally strong or instant!
but instant coffee grounds have to be the most offensive invention
since percolator

David's 2 cents
:wq
s

:wq

David A. Podgursky

unread,
May 27, 1994, 12:00:53 AM5/27/94
to
Personally I FREEZE my beans...
the warming proccess/thawing is done in grinding...
they stay great
and aromatic...
the fridge is not a dry place, but the freezer is...
the trick is to just bring it out long enough to get whatever coffee
you need and then to return it


Rob Heerdink

unread,
May 27, 1994, 5:25:10 AM5/27/94
to
In article <1994May26....@ttinews.tti.com> jac...@soldev.tti.com (Dick Jackson) writes:

>But seriously folks, there is some significant difference between
>even restaurant coffee in Europe and in the States. I have tried
>all kinds of beans and all kinds of roasts and have not found
>the Euro taste. The closest was New Orleans coffee, which has a chicory
>tastes that knocks you on the head. Maybe its a trace of chicory
>in Europe.

>By Europe I mean Britain and France. Further East you get the
>Turkish influence, Austrian specialities, etc. All good in their way
>though.

British that know how to make real coffee? This is something new...
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Rob Heerdink Department of Pharmacoepidemiology &
E.R.He...@far.ruu.nl Pharmacotherapy, Utrecht University
-Watch out where the huskies go, and don't you eat that yellow snow!-

Mary Packwood

unread,
May 26, 1994, 11:37:30 PM5/26/94
to
This is my first posting ever to a Newsgroup. This is the first time I've
ever seen this rec.food.etc. group. But I've always wanted to complain to
a coffee-drinker about the plight of tea drinkers. At most functions,
there is always plenty of coffee served, with all the trimmings. But
usually, there is either no tea, or just tea bags with hot water and not
much choice. It's not fair!! I don't like coffee. Sorry. There, I've
said it. Let's see if this message actually gets somewhere.

Fischer) wrote:

>
> A morning without coffee is a wrong one.
> I like microwave-hot-water with instant-coffee and artifical sugger.
> And YOU?

--
Mary Packwood :)
ESL (English as a Second Language) Teacher
Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan School District #196
Minnesota, U. S. A. e-mail: 0196...@informs.k12.mn.us

Steve Linton

unread,
May 27, 1994, 6:38:19 AM5/27/94
to
0196...@InforMNs.k12.MN.US (Mary Packwood) writes:

>This is my first posting ever to a Newsgroup. This is the first time I've
>ever seen this rec.food.etc. group. But I've always wanted to complain to
>a coffee-drinker about the plight of tea drinkers. At most functions,
>there is always plenty of coffee served, with all the trimmings. But
>usually, there is either no tea, or just tea bags with hot water and not
>much choice. It's not fair!! I don't like coffee. Sorry. There, I've
>said it. Let's see if this message actually gets somewhere.


There is one easy fix for your problem (with avrious drawbacks)

Move to England

Specifically the North of England, or West Wales or the North of Scotland.

Of course you will need to drink your tea strong and with milk, still not much
choice, but you can guarantee to be treated better than the coffee drinkers.


Sven Heinicke

unread,
May 27, 1994, 8:49:27 AM5/27/94
to
In article <2s2ju2$a...@netnews.upenn.edu> kis...@a.chem.upenn.edu (Kurt A. Kistler) writes:
I have heard that espresso beans have less caffeine/bean than say
Columbian beans, but what makes espresso strong is the amount used
per cup.

The alt.drugs.caffeine FAQ has something to say about this. Check
out:

http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/caffeine-faq/faq.html

on W3. To quote it.

By means of comparison, a 7 oz cup of coffee has the following caffeine (mg)
amounts, according to Bunker and McWilliams in _J Am Diet_ 74:28-32, 1979:

Drip 115-175
Espresso 100mg of caffeine
1 serving (1.5-2oz)

Brewed 80-135
Instant 65-100
Decaf, brewed 3-4
Decaf, instant 2-3
tea, iced (12 ozs.) 70
tea, brewed, imported 60
tea, brewed, U.S. 40
tea, instant 30

The variability in the amount of caffeine in a cup of coffee or tea is huge
even if prepared by the same person using the same equipment and ingredients
day after day.


--
Sven Heinicke -- (202) 404-8554
E-mail: sv...@wells.nrl.navy.mil || sv...@cs.widener.edu
W3: http://bradbury.nrl.navy.mil/~sven/

ELIOFF,MICHAEL,SCOTT

unread,
May 27, 1994, 11:58:00 AM5/27/94
to
In article <2s2lfn$1...@rigel.infinet.com>, at...@infinet.com (Ashley Taft) writes...
>I like sludge....Industrial strength.
>
>Yes, I'm talking about REAL coffee! Drink half of the cup, and let the
>grounds settle to get that last sip!
>
>My brother also makes a killer cuppa cap. He doesn't steam the milk,
>though...He has one of those Nifty Devices that can turn skim milk into
>whipped cream. He also never sticks to one bean. A typical pot of his
>coffee has a fistful of one flavor, and a fistful of another.
>
>Kicks butt, I dare say.
>
> Ashley
>
>P.S.-> Anybody in the CowTown (You know who you are!) know where I can
>find good Turkish/Greek coffee?
>

Not in Cowtown. But in Lincoln Square there's a place called Coffee Haus
that sells all these weird beans. Maybe there.

If not, there's another just north of Deep Ellum and east of Oaklawn
near the Queen of Sheba ethopian restaurant that has really exotic schtuff.

m.e.