Starbucks

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Eat Tasty Death!!!

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Feb 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/18/96
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Why do they call their employees 'baristas'? I have no idea what
the heck it means (especially since barista looks an awful lot like
barrister, which is another way of saying 'lawyer'! yecch!).

Shawn
http://www.ptbo.igs.net/~shawn

Richard B. Moreland

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Feb 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/20/96
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>==========Eat Tasty Death!!!, 18/02/96==========
Think "bartender" as in " espresso bar".

alan

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Feb 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/25/96
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And, is it gender-specific? A "barista" is a female coffee
maker/attendant, and a "baristo" is a male?????


Alan

Most people stumble over the truth, now and then, but they
usually manage to pick themselves up and go on, anyway.
---- Winston Churchill


Scott Tennant

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Feb 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/25/96
to sbe...@ivory.trentu.ca
Barrista is Italian for bartender. In Italy, if you run a bar or work
behind one, you end up pumping out more coffees than liquor! And man,
are they ever good at what they do.
It's like when they insist at Starbucks on saying "doppio" instead of
"double". Drives me crazy, but...

Scott

Robert L. Stokes

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Feb 25, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/25/96
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In article <Dn2sq...@corsair.daytonoh.attgis.com>,
rmor...@postsmg.daytonoh.attgis.com (RMORELAN) wrote:

> >Why do they call their employees 'baristas'?
> >

> Think "bartender" as in " espresso bar".

They *want* you to think you're getting something remotely resembling what
you'd get if you walked into a bar in Italy, where coffee is an art
(practiced by people called "baristas", who prepare drinks in "bars").
You're not. Whatever your feelings about Starbuck's coffee may be, it is
NOT Italian.

Slywy

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Feb 26, 1996, 3:00:00 AM2/26/96
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>They *want* you to think you're getting something remotely
>resembling what you'd get if you walked into a bar in Italy,
>where coffee is an art (practiced by people called "baristas",
>who prepare drinks in "bars"). You're not. Whatever your
>feelings about Starbuck's coffee may be, it is NOT Italian.

My feeling about Starbucks is that it's definitely not coffee, either.

__________________________________________________________
Just another humble opinion heard from . . . the masses. Okay, just me.

"It's not the fall, but landin'
That'll alter social standin' . . ."
Andy M. Stewart, "Take Her in Your Arms"
Dublin Lady

Andris J. Auzins

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Mar 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM3/3/96
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In article <4gq8vf$h...@usc.edu>,
Speaking of being driven crazy, ordering in North America ain't that
easy for someone who uses the traditional nomenclature.
Traditioally, espresso can be ordered using the following "basic"
variations:

"espresso" standard 1.5 oz drink
"ristretto" about 1 oz.
"longo" greater volume than "espresso" about 2+ oz.
"doppio" double espresso.

To date, I have yet to encounter a knowledgeable coffee bar person that
could equate the North American terms "short" and "long" to the
traditional names: espresso, ristretto or longo. My confusion is
compounded by the fact that in most places that I have encountered
"short" and "long", there has been no "straight" espresso choice, as
in: "How do you want your espresso -short or long?"

Any help out there?

Regards, Andris J. Auzins.

--
MonteKristo (R) is Latvia's foremost provider of specialty coffee and
related accessories. Our address is Gertrudes 27, Riga, Latvia LV-1050.
Our tel/fax/ans is + 371 731-0010. Enjoy the best coffee in the world!

Mark Anthony Balzer

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Mar 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM3/3/96
to
auz...@bis.on.ca (Andris J. Auzins) writes what must be a troll:

>
>Scott Tennant <ten...@bcf.usc.edu> wrote:
>
>>Barrista is Italian for bartender. In Italy, if you run a bar or work
>>behind one, you end up pumping out more coffees than liquor! And man,
>>are they ever good at what they do.

I am dying to know if you call the college kid who pumpa la benzina
into your Alfa Romeo a "gasista" ...

>Speaking of being driven crazy, ordering in North America ain't that
>easy for someone who uses the traditional nomenclature.
>Traditioally, espresso can be ordered using the following "basic"
>variations:
>
> "espresso" standard 1.5 oz drink
> "ristretto" about 1 oz.
> "longo" greater volume than "espresso" about 2+ oz.
> "doppio" double espresso.
>
>To date, I have yet to encounter a knowledgeable coffee bar person that
>could equate the North American terms "short" and "long" to the
>traditional names: espresso, ristretto or longo.

Do you know what? I have the same problem whenever I order in Swahili !
Hmmmm, could it be because Swahili and Italian were never mainstream
traditional languages in North America?
Naahh, of course not.
Maybe we just need to order s l o w l y and LOUDLY !!

>Any help out there?

Yea, move to Italy.... (or at least to "Little Italy") :-)

Until then, when you're in Rome...


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