Cooking with Beer

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Peter Karwowski

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Mar 26, 1990, 12:11:05 AM3/26/90
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Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an ingredient?

Apparently there are several dishes that feature it prominently and I would
like to find out for myself if you can actually do more with beer than just
drink it. (remember this is a _cooking_ newsgroup :) )

Thanks,
--Peter
pk...@watcsc.UUCP

nancy.e.ellard-vass

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Mar 26, 1990, 9:08:51 AM3/26/90
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In article <1990Mar26.0...@watcsc.waterloo.edu>, pk...@watcsc.waterloo.edu (Peter Karwowski) writes:
>
> Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an ingredient?

When I first moved into my house I had lots of beer from friends helping
me move, some chicken and some garlic. I threw these together and it
was the best chicken dih ever tasted!


Chicken & Beer

Ingredients: 1 chicken cut up into parts
1 T olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
salt & pepper to taste
1 can beer

Saute the chicken in the olive oil until chicken is brown on all sides.

Add garlic, salt and pepper and beer. Cover and let simmer for 15-20 minutes.

Serve with rice, noodles and of course more beer.

Enjoy!
Nancy Ellard-Vass

m...@cs.rit.edu

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Mar 26, 1990, 11:49:44 AM3/26/90
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Joy of Cooking has a very good Welsh Rarebit that is beer based.

Margaret Reek

What`s in a name?

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Mar 26, 1990, 3:37:27 PM3/26/90
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In article <43...@cbnewsj.ATT.COM> n...@cbnewsj.ATT.COM (nancy.e.ellard-vass) writes:
>In article <1990Mar26.0...@watcsc.waterloo.edu>, pk...@watcsc.waterloo.edu (Peter Karwowski) writes:
>>
>> Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an ingredient?
>
>When I first moved into my house I had lots of beer from friends helping
>me move, some chicken and some garlic. I threw these together and it
>was the best chicken dih ever tasted!
>

There is a wonderful whole chicken braising recipe involving beer and lemon
juice, garlic, celery, carrots, and bacon in the Albert Stockli cookbook.
It also made it into Best Recipes from the Cookbook Guild. My mother has
both these books, but I could get the recipe. If someone else has one of
these books, perhaps they could post it. Otherwise I'll try to get it over
the phone...

--mike


f
o
d
d
e
r
.
--
Mic3hael Sullivan, Society for the Incurably Pompous
-*-*-*-*-
Great ids think alike. --me

John Presley

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Mar 27, 1990, 1:34:30 PM3/27/90
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In article <1990Mar26.0...@watcsc.waterloo.edu>, pk...@watcsc.waterloo.edu (Peter Karwowski) writes:
> Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an ingredient?

When boiling lobster, I like to add a quart of beer to the pot, along with a
handful of pickling spice. The results are well worth not having the beer to
drink!

--
-- John Presley - UNiSYS Canada Inc, Calgary, Alberta - jo...@spycal.UUCP
--

Mark Leone

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Mar 27, 1990, 4:06:55 PM3/27/90
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In article <1990Mar26.0...@watcsc.waterloo.edu> pk...@watcsc.UUCP (Peter Karwowski) writes:
>... and I would

>like to find out for myself if you can actually do more with beer than just
>drink it.

The following cookbook was recommended to me... I haven't checked it
out yet:

Brew Cuisine: Cooking with Beer
by Judith Gould and Ruth Koretsky
Summerhill Press, 1989
192 pages, $9.95

Other information from the inner leaf:
Printed in Canada, Distributed in the United States by:
Sterling Publishing
2 Park Avenue
New York, New York 10016
ISBN 0-920197-73-6

Cheers!

--
Mark R. Leone <mle...@cs.cmu.edu> "Don't just do something,
Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University sit there!"
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Ron Peterson

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Mar 27, 1990, 4:41:29 PM3/27/90
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In article <1990Mar26.0...@watcsc.waterloo.edu> pk...@watcsc.UUCP (Peter Karwowski) writes:
>
>

There are probably a lot of variations on this involving grilling and
other ingredients but the simplest recipe I know is to fill a frying
pan with about a half inch of beer and boil some bratwurst in it (turn a
few times) until the beer completely evaporates at which point you add a
little oil or butter and continue cooking till the bratwurst are browned.
Requires careful attention to catch the moment where the beer is all gone
so that the oil gets added before the bratwurst burns.

Darryl E. Marsee

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Mar 27, 1990, 10:51:09 AM3/27/90
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In article <1990Mar26.0...@watcsc.waterloo.edu>
pk...@watcsc.waterloo.edu (Peter Karwowski) writes:

> Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an
> ingredient?

Here's a recipe I have for Beer & Cheese soup. Serve with bagels.

2 cloves garlic
1/2 medium onion
1/2 cup margarine
1/2 cup flour
6 cups milk
3/4 cup beer
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
8 oz shredded cheddar cheese

Puree garlic and onion. Melt margarine in large (at least 3 quart) pot, add garlic/onion mixture and simmer for a couple of minutes. Mix flour into margarine mixture to make roux. Cook roux for 5 minutes. Heat milk until warm, and add to roux. Stir thoroughly until thickened. Add beer, salt, and
cayenne pepper. Simmer 15 minutes, stiring occasionally. Add cheese.
Simmer 40 minutes, stiring occasionally. Bon appetit.

Darryl E. Marsee
Syracuse University
<dema...@gamera.cns.syr.edu>

Andrew Balinsky

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Mar 27, 1990, 1:30:35 PM3/27/90
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In article <1990Mar26.0...@watcsc.waterloo.edu> pk...@watcsc.UUCP (Peter Karwowski) writes:
>
>Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an ingredient?

There's lots of cooking you can do with beer. Good beers have a rich, yeasty
flavor. Don't try to make a Pabst Blue Rarebit, though: it's a waste of effort
and good cheese, etc.


WELSH RAREBIT

4 slices of thick toast
8 oz. grated cheese
2 oz. butter
1/2 c. dark beer or stout
1/2 t. paprika
1 t. mustard
2 beaten egg yolks
Make toast, keep warm. Melt butter in a double boiler or over very low
heat, add cheese, and stir. Then add beer slowly, stirring all the time until
smooth. Now add paprika and eggs. Keep stirring until warm throughout.
Pour over toast and serve. Never let mixture boil or bubble, or it will
become stringy and lumpy.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

BEER BREAD

3 C. self-rising flour (or 3C. flour & 3 T. baking powder)
12 oz. good (not light) beer
3 T. sugar

Mix. Bake 350 F for 1 hour in greased pan.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FINNISH SOUR RYE makes 2 loaves

starter
1.5 C warm flat beer
1 C pumpernickel rye or medium rye flour

dough
1/4 cup very warm water (105-115 F)
1 pkg active dry yeast
Starter
2 T. salt
1.5 C. warm flat beer
2.5 C. pumpernickel rye or medium rye flour
3.5-4 C. all-purpose flour

1. Four days before making bread, mix starter ingredients in a bowl or
glass jar. Cover loosely and leave in warm place for 4 days, stirring
twice a day. This will bubble and smell fermented. Mmmmm.

2. To make dough, combine 1/4 C. warm water and yeast in a large mixing
bowl and let stand 2 min. Mix in starter, salt, beer. Stir in the 2.5 C.
rye flour and as much of the all-purpose flour as needed to make a soft
dough.

3. Turn out dough onto floured surface and knead for 5 minutes, until
smooth and elastic, adding only as much flour as needed to prevent dough
from sticking. Place dough in a greased bowl, turn once so that greased
side is up, cover, and let rise in a warm place (like inside an unlit gas
oven, or in an electric oven with the light on) until volume doubles
(1-1.5 hours).

4. Sprinkle 1 large or two small baking sheets with corn meal. Punch down
dough, turn out onto a floured surface, and cut in half. Shape each half
into a round loaf and place on prepared baking sheet.

5. Cover and let rise in a warm place until double, about 30 min.

6. Put in an unheated oven and turn on to 400 F. Bake 45-55 min, or until
loaves sound hollow when underside is tapped. Cool on a wire rack before
cutting.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VORTLIMPA makes 3 loaves

4 pkg active dry yeast
Pinch sugar
1/4 cup very warm water (105-115 F)
3 C. stout or other strong beer
1 t. salt
1/8 lb. (1/2 stick) butter or marge
1 C. dark molasses
6 C. medium rye flour
3.5-4 C. all-purpose flour
Peel of 2 oranges, chopped finely
2 T. fennel, ground or pounded

Glaze: 1 T. molasses
2 T. water

1. Sprinkle yeast and sugar on warm water, stir, and set aside.

2. In a medium saucepan, heat stout, salt, and butter until butter is
melted. Remove from heat. Add molasses and let cool to lukewarm.

3. Put stout mixture into a large bowl. Stir in 3 C. of rye flour and 1 C.
of white flour. Beat (~100 strokes) until batter is creamy and smooth. Add
yeast mixture, orange peel, fennel, and remaining 3C. of rye flour. Stir
until flour is absorbed. Add about 2 C. of white flour and mix until batter
leaves sides of bowl.

4. Turn out onto a floured surface. Knead, adding flour as necessary (you
may need to add a cup or more). When dough no longer sticks to surface,
knead 5 more min.

5. Place dough in a greased bowl, cover, and let rise in a warm place until
volume doubles.

6. Turn out dough onto floured surface and cut into thirds. Form each
third into a long rectangle about 13 inches long. Roll into a loaf, sealing
the seam by pinching it shut with your fingers. Place loaves on greased
baking sheet, far enough apart that they won't stick. Cover with wax paper
and let rise in a warm place until they are double in volume.

7. Preheat oven to 400 F. Prick the top of each loaf with a toothpick an
inch deep in about 12 places to allow steam to escape. Bake for 30 minutes,
reduce oven to 325 F, and bake for 45 more minutes until the loaves sound
hollow when the bottom crust is tapped. Halfway through baking, brush
loaves with glaze mixture. Near the end, brush again with glaze and bake
for another 4 min.

8. Remove and cool on a wire rack. Can be stored in foil or plastic wrap
to keep crusts soft.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
Andrew Balinsky (301)454-8094|For my purpose holds to sail beyond the sunset
UMD, College Park, MD 20742 |And to the baths of all the western stars
bali...@cs.umd.edu | until I die.
..uunet!mimsy!balinsky | -Tennyson, "Ulysses"

Debbie Thomas

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Mar 29, 1990, 7:43:31 AM3/29/90
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In article <1990Mar26.0...@watcsc.waterloo.edu> pk...@watcsc.UUCP (Peter Karwowski) writes:
>
>
>Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an ingredient?

This is one of my favourite casserole recipes. The quantities should
not be taken too literally - it is one of those recipies that you can
adapt depending on what you have available.
A word of warning - if you taste the gravy towards the beginning
of the cooking time it tastes disgusting, it needs a couple of hours
of cooking before the Guinness mixes with the meat juices and mellows
but at the end the flavour is wonderful.

Carbonade of Beef
(serves 4)

1.5 lb of stewing steak, braising steak or shin, cut into 1" cubes
1 large onion, finely chopped
1 bottle of Guinness (or other stout or brown ale)
1 tbsp flour
oil
1 or 2 carrots, sliced
bouquet garni
few button mushrooms

Fry onion in a little oil until soft.
Add meat and fry quickly to seal.
Add flour and fry over a low heat for 1-2 mins stirring constantly.
Add Guinness slowly, stirring to avoid lumps.
Add carrots and bouquet garni.
Turn into a casserole dish and put into a slow oven.
Stew for about 2-3 hours (the longer the better) until really
tender.
Add mushrooms about 15mins before serving.

Note: It's best not to put too much flour in at the beginning
or the casserole will stick. If the gravy is too thin, thicken it
at the end with cornflour mixed with a little water.
--
Debbie Thomas,
Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UUCP: {...!}mcsun!ukc!rlinf!dt
Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX JANET: D.Th...@uk.ac.rl.inf
Tel: +44 235 446712 (direct dial)

Roberta Wyatt

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Mar 29, 1990, 10:59:21 PM3/29/90
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In article <1990Mar26.0...@watcsc.waterloo.edu> pk...@watcsc.UUCP (Peter Karwowski) writes:
>Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an ingredient?

Yes, I have a wonderful recipie for Beer Bread, which comes from _The
Texas Inns Historic Cookbook_ by Ann Ruff and Gail Drago. Reprinted
without permission. It calls for self-rising flour, but if you don't
have any in your kitchen, just add 1 teaspoon of baking powder and .5
teaspoon salt for each cup of flour

Beer Bread

3 cups self-rising flour
3 Tablespoons sugar
1-12 oz. can beer, at room temp.

Mix all ingredients. Spray 9X5 loaf pan with non-stick cooking
spray. Pour mixture into pan. Bake at 375F for 40 minutes, or
until brown. This has a wonderful yeasty smell without adding
any yeast. Yum!

Duke Of Earl

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Apr 2, 1990, 12:13:33 PM4/2/90
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pk...@watcsc.waterloo.edu (Peter Karwowski) writes:

Corn-on-the-Cob soaked in beer. Soak fresh corn in the husk in a bucket
of beer for at least a couple hours with the husk slightly torn. Wrap in
aluminum foil and grill. Very tasty.
--
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
||| duke!lopez!sharkey!mailrus |||
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||

Bruce Binder

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Apr 4, 1990, 9:19:23 PM4/4/90
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pk...@watcsc.waterloo.edu (Peter Karwowski) writes:
>Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an ingredient?
>Apparently there are several dishes that feature it prominently and I would
>like to find out for myself if you can actually do more with beer than just
>drink it. (remember this is a _cooking_ newsgroup :) )
>
>Thanks,
> --Peter
> pk...@watcsc.UUCP

Buy a prepacked corned beef brisket. Instead of boiling it for 2-4 hours,
put it in a big pot, on a steamer rack, over an inch of beer. Steam for
2-4 hours (until tender). Add more beer as needed.

For variety, add a few dried red chiles to the beer. Try also a bay
leaf, cinnamon stick, coriander seeds (tsp), mustard seeds (tsp), whole
allspice (tsp) or a combination.

bmb

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Bruce M. Binder (bruceb) uucp: ucsd!lccsd!bruceb |
| Locus Computing Corporation, San Diego (619) 587-0511 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

What`s in a name?

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Apr 5, 1990, 8:04:57 PM4/5/90
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In article <67...@oolong.la.locus.com> bru...@locus.com (Bruce Binder) writes:
>pk...@watcsc.waterloo.edu (Peter Karwowski) writes:
>>Could someone send me (or post) some recipies involving beer as an ingredient?

>Buy a prepacked corned beef brisket. Instead of boiling it for 2-4 hours,


>put it in a big pot, on a steamer rack, over an inch of beer. Steam for
>2-4 hours (until tender). Add more beer as needed.

> [and spice suggestions]

Hmm... so the title is? Beef Brisket Braised in Beer? or BBBB for short?

This sounds like the sort of recipe that could be really wonderful but that
I wouldn't dare try until someone I trusted recommended it... I'll have to
give it a shot...

Have you tried it with different types of beer? Is it worth spending a
stout or something on? Or should I just go with regular American
mass-distribution crap?

--mike

--
Mic3hael Sullivan, | "Who's paying 20 grand a year to go here,
Society for the Incurably Pompous | and who's calling whom *stupid*??"
University of Rot and Fester | --to someone calling UR admins stupid.
-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

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