Heavy Cream - what % milk fat?

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Chris G. and Harumi Y.

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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I have numerous recipes that call for "heavy cream." Problem is,
there's nothing in my supermarket called that. It may just be that
Heavy cream is the US name, and it is called something different in
Canada. The heaviest cream I can find is whipping cream (35% milk fat)

Does anyone know what the percentage milk fat is in heavy cream?


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Alkim

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
to hy...@inforamp.net


The whipping cream you have available is great, I have even used half
and half in recipes if I didn't have any whipping cream (not for
whipping though - if that makes sense:)

Here is a quote from the rec.food.baking FAQ located at the following
address:

ftp://ftp.michvhf.com/pub/rec.food.baking/FAQ

Whipping cream
In the US, cream with at least 30% butterfat (cf light
cream (18%) and heavy cream (36%)).


Enjoy all the wonderful goodies you are baking with that whipping
cream!!
Kim
Cooper City, Florida

Ri...@mnsinc.com

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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On 24 Mar 1997 03:47:22 GMT, "Chris G. and Harumi Y."
<hy...@inforamp.nospam.net> wrote:

>I have numerous recipes that call for "heavy cream." Problem is,
>there's nothing in my supermarket called that. It may just be that
>Heavy cream is the US name, and it is called something different in
>Canada. The heaviest cream I can find is whipping cream (35% milk fat)
>
>Does anyone know what the percentage milk fat is in heavy cream?
>

I'm not sure what the fat content of heavy cream is, but it is likely
around 40% (based on the 35% you quoted for whipping cream). In the
U.S., there are requirements for various products to carry certain
names, and dairy products have to have a certain fat content to be
called ice cream, light cream, heavy cream, etc. Whipping cream is
basically heavy cream with some of the fat replaced with artificial
thickeners (carageenan may be a natural substance, but in my book, if
it isn't naturally in cream, then it is aftificial for that use). Real
heavy cream is getting harder and harder to find in my area. You can
substitute whipping cream for heavy cream in any recipe, but you
should be upset about having to. I am.

Rick Marinelli
ri...@mnsinc.com

Cooking is like love: it should be entered into with abandon or not at all.

Pat Caruthers

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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this is what i finally got the last time i went searching about
cream fat contents:

Half and Half (aka Half Cream in Great Britain) = a mixture of milk and
cream with 10 to 18% milk fat

Light Cream (aka Coffee Cream, Table Cream) = usually 20% milk fat, but
some people also think of it as 10 - 30% mf

Light Whipping Cream (or just Whipping Cream) = is 30 to 36% milk fat and
whips well. It doesn't freeze well. This is the most common form of cream.

Heavy Cream (Heavy Whipping Cream) = has 36 - 40% milk fat

Double Cream = has up to 48% milk fat. When chilled it becomes quite solid.
(not available in the US, last time i checked...:-(

pat

ja...@ziplink.net

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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In article <5h6lho$7...@gazette.engr.sgi.com>, pat...@symph.esd.sgi.com
(Pat Caruthers) wrote:

<snip>

> Double Cream = has up to 48% milk fat. When chilled it becomes quite solid.
> (not available in the US, last time i checked...:-(
>
> pat

I've noticed that - in Australia I used double cream all the time (rich
cream, it was called where I grew up). How come it isn't readily available
here? I know imported English clotted cream (similar consistency) is
available at exorbitant prices, but no "solid" cream in the supermarkets.
Anyone know if there's a reason?

jenni

Sophie Laplante

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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Pat Caruthers <pat...@symph.esd.sgi.com> wrote:

>But yes, we can get clotted cream and creme fraiche
>(oops...pardon the probable misspelling...) but no double cream.
>I've no idea why.

Pat, I'd like to report a double cream sighting in the US.

I bought some "Devon double cream" a week ago at a local
wine&cheese place. 2$ for a teeny little jar, but I had to
try it as I'd never seen any before. Decadent stuff!

-- Sophie Laplante -- G: (shouts) Who do you think you are? --
-- Dept of Computer Science -- R: Rhetoric! Game and match! --
-- University of Chicago -- -- Tom Stoppard --
-- sop...@cs.uchicago.edu -- R. & G. are Dead --

Pat Caruthers

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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In article <jasea-24039...@news.ziplink.net>, ja...@ziplink.net writes:
|> In article <5h6lho$7...@gazette.engr.sgi.com>, pat...@symph.esd.sgi.com
|> (Pat Caruthers) wrote:
|>
|> <snip>
|>
|> > Double Cream = has up to 48% milk fat. When chilled it becomes quite solid.
|> > (not available in the US, last time i checked...:-(
|> >
|> > pat
|>
|> I've noticed that - in Australia I used double cream all the time (rich
|> cream, it was called where I grew up). How come it isn't readily available
|> here?

"readily" - i think its not At All available!
and i have no idea why; its common in some other places; standard grocery
store stuff.

|> I know imported English clotted cream (similar consistency)

But quite different taste - i Think clotted cream is a culture of some
sort... isn't it? But yes, we can get clotted cream and creme fraiche

(oops...pardon the probable misspelling...) but no double cream.

I've no idea why.

pat


Pat Caruthers

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
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In article <E7KI4...@midway.uchicago.edu>, sop...@cs.uchicago.edu (Sophie Laplante) writes:

|> Pat Caruthers <pat...@symph.esd.sgi.com> wrote:
|>
|> >But yes, we can get clotted cream and creme fraiche
|> >(oops...pardon the probable misspelling...) but no double cream.
|> >I've no idea why.
|>
|> Pat, I'd like to report a double cream sighting in the US.
|>
|> I bought some "Devon double cream" a week ago at a local
|> wine&cheese place. 2$ for a teeny little jar, but I had to
|> try it as I'd never seen any before. Decadent stuff!


cool.
now, does anyone know if "Devon double cream" is the same
as just plain "double cream"? :-)

it might be time to go nag the local "gourmet" store.
although at $2 bucks a crack i'm not going to be using Alot!

pat

kate

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Mar 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/24/97
to

Hi Sophie! I have seen that "Devon double cream" at Treasure Island. It
comes in a small glass container with a Union Jack (I think) somewhere on
the label. It's delicious and extremely (translate heavenly) high fat. I
don't remember if it was a clotted cream (sometimes called Devonshire cream
if memory serves correct) or a double cream. Either way it's a treat!
I'll look next time I am in Treasure Island, probably tomorrow. Clotted
cream usually has a creamy yellow appearance and it's butterfat content is
somewhere around 55 % compared to double cream at @ 48%.

Kate

Sophie Laplante <sop...@cs.uchicago.edu> wrote in article
<E7KI4...@midway.uchicago.edu>...


> Pat Caruthers <pat...@symph.esd.sgi.com> wrote:
>
> >But yes, we can get clotted cream and creme fraiche
> >(oops...pardon the probable misspelling...) but no double cream.
> >I've no idea why.
>
> Pat, I'd like to report a double cream sighting in the US.
>
> I bought some "Devon double cream" a week ago at a local
> wine&cheese place. 2$ for a teeny little jar, but I had to
> try it as I'd never seen any before. Decadent stuff!
>

nicole bernadette hansen

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Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
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Sophie-I assume you bought it at Chalet, no? How did you use it?

Nicole


Sophie Laplante

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Mar 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/25/97
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nicole bernadette hansen <nbha...@midway.uchicago.edu> wrote:
>Sophie-I assume you bought it at Chalet, no? How did you use it?

Yep. I ran home and made some scones! I still have some left
though, any other suggestions?

Killer scones
=============

2 1/4 c flour
2 T sugar
2 1/2 t baking powder
1/2 t baking soda
1/2 t salt
1/2 c cold butter, cubed
1/2 c currants
1 c buttermilk
1 egg, slightly beaten

Preheat oven to 425 (F).

Mix flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in
the bowl of a food processor; add butter and process until
the mixture ressembles coarsely ground meal.

Add currants, then buttermilk, stirring quickly with a fork
until the dough is soft and slightly sticky. With floured
hands, press the dough into a ball. Knead delicately a dozen
times. (Don't over-manipulate the dough, just mix in a
kneading motion until all the dry ingredients are incorporated
and the dough is just barely manageable.)

Flatten the dough into a 1" thick circle. Cut into 3" disks.
Repeat this with remaining dough.

Paint the scones with egg. Bake 12-15 minutes.

Rain

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Mar 27, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/27/97
to

HY->I have numerous recipes that call for "heavy cream." Problem is,
HY->there's nothing in my supermarket called that. It may just be that
HY->Heavy cream is the US name, and it is called something different in
HY->Canada. The heaviest cream I can find is whipping cream (35% milk fat)

That's heavy cream, and it should do fine in your recipes.

---
þ OLX 2.1 TD þ Flu; the natural psychotropic.

Scott W. Binder

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Apr 12, 1997, 3:00:00 AM4/12/97
to

Rain (ra...@hothouse.iglou.com) wrote:

: HY->I have numerous recipes that call for "heavy cream." Problem is,


: HY->there's nothing in my supermarket called that. It may just be that
: HY->Heavy cream is the US name, and it is called something different in
: HY->Canada. The heaviest cream I can find is whipping cream (35% milk fat)

: That's heavy cream, and it should do fine in your recipes.

At the dairy that I distribute products for, light (regular)
whipping cream is 32%, and heavy (manufacturing) cream is 40%.

Hope This Helps!
Scott - Humboldt County, CA


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