You guys are crazy(was "charros"recipe)

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playbtrs

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Jan 3, 2001, 5:44:45 PM1/3/01
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Okay, time to clarify for all. Charros is a bean type soupy kind of
thing. Don't know if it's called soup or beans by Mexicans. No, my
spelling isn't off. It can definitely be found in the State of Huasteca
in Mexico. It contains onions and cilantro among other things. I was
just hoping that somebody might have a traditional recipe. I can spell,
this is a bilingual family (spanish/english). Anybody heard of this
dish?
Trish


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Ellen Smith

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Jan 3, 2001, 6:05:38 PM1/3/01
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Geez, Trish. If you already knew what it was and you've eaten it, why
ask us Crazy people. Just trying to be helpful ya know. Not like we knew
your freakin life story or anything.

Ellen

WardNA

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Jan 3, 2001, 8:36:56 PM1/3/01
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>Okay, time to clarify for all. Charros is a bean type soupy kind of
>thing.

Thanks. But sure you don't mean "chorro"?*

*colloquial for "diarhoea"

Agnes7777

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Jan 4, 2001, 11:21:56 AM1/4/01
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I don't know how "traditional" it is, (and I haven't tried it) but I found a
recipe for Charro beans here:

http://soar.berkeley.edu/recipes/beans-grains/charro1.rec

Another recipe for Charro (charra) beans that I have tried quite recently is
this one (You can make it more soupy by pureeing some of the beans):

* Exported from MasterCook *

Beans a la Charra

Recipe By : Chevys & Rio Bravo Fresh Mex Cookbook
Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Mexican/Spanish/Southwestern Side Dishes
Vegetables

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
3 cups dried pinto beans
3 quarts water
6 slices bacon -- uncooked, chopped
1/2 cup diced onion
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1/2 jalapeno -- stemmed, seeded
-- and chopped
1 tablespoon chile powder
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon salt

In a stockpot, soak the beans overnight in the water (to cover). The next day,
cook the bacon in a skillet over medium-high heat until crisp, about 6 to 8
minutes. Add the onion, garlic, and jalapeno and cook for 5 minutes. Stir in
the chile powder and cumin and cook for 1 minute more. Add 1 cup of the
soaking water from the beans while stirring and scraping the bottom of the
skillet to loosen all the brown bits adhered to the pan. Add the beans and
remaining water, and bring to a rapid boil. Decrease the heat to medium-low,
and simmer for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, or until the beans are soft. When the beans
are cooked through, add the salt, and cook 1 to 2 more minutes. Keep warm
until ready to serve, or cool, cover, and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Makes 8 cups.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

NOTES : "These 'cowboy beans' have been on our menu right from the start.
They're tender pintos, simmered with bacon and jalapenos, and they cook up nice
and soupy. In fact, you can even serve them as soup by pureeing some of the
beans and stirring them back in."


The above recipe also makes great frijoles. Saute some onion in a bit of lard
til tender and add some of the leftover beans. Mash about half, and cook til
thick. Totally yummers.

Agnes

DebbieGrrrl

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Jan 6, 2001, 11:56:11 PM1/6/01
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ok...so why didnt you do a web search on Google, or SOAR or any number of
search engines or the restaurant (or person...) that served you this dish,
instead of asking us? since you know what it is and basically what the
ingredients are....


Debbie
"I want to do it because I want to do it."
--Amelia Earhart

Paul Ballas

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Jan 7, 2001, 11:22:16 PM1/7/01
to

> In article <930a0s$u26$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, playbtrs <ver...@yahoo.com>
writes:
>
> >
> > Okay, time to clarify for all. Charros is a bean type soupy kind of
> >thing. Don't know if it's called soup or beans by Mexicans. No, my
> >spelling isn't off. It can definitely be found in the State of Huasteca
> >in Mexico. It contains onions and cilantro among other things. I was
> >just hoping that somebody might have a traditional recipe. I can spell,
> >this is a bilingual family (spanish/english). Anybody heard of this
> >dish?
> >Trish
>
Sorry I'm so far behind on the posts here. I've heard of beans charro style
and it's just a cute way of saying "frijoles de olla." (A charro is a large
ornate hat worn by mariachis.) Boil and simmer pinto beans until soft. Add
a few green chiles, chopped onion, a couple cloves of garlic and spices as
it pleases you. (Don't forget the epazote.) In Oaxca? Good luck with your
Spanish.

pablo


lisa...@gmail.com

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Jan 18, 2014, 5:55:57 PM1/18/14
to
Beans a la Charra
Makes 8 cups
These "cowboy beans" have been on our menu right from the start. They're tender pintos, simmered with bacon and jalapenos, and they cook up nice and soupy. In fact, you can even serve them as a soup by pureeing some of the beans and stirring them back in.

3 cups dried pinto beans
3 quarts water
6 slices (about 8 ounces) uncooked bacon, coarsly chopped
1/2 cup diced onion
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1/2 jalapeno, stemmed, seeded and chopped
1 tablespoon chili powder
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon salt

In a stockpot, soak the beans overnight in the water (to cover). The next day, cook the bacon in a skillet over a medium-high heat until crisp, about 6-8 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, and jalapeno and cook for 5 minuets. Stir the chili powder and cumin and cook for 1 minute more. Add 1 cup of the soaking water from the beans while stirring and scraping the bottom of the skillet to loosen all the brown bits adhered to the pan. Add the beans and remaining water, and bring to a rapid boil. Decrease the heat to medium-low, and simmer for 1 ½ to 2 hours, or until the beans are soft. When the beans are cooked through, add the salt, and cook 1 to 2 minutes. Keep warm until ready to serve, or cool, cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days

Big Trig

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Jan 18, 2014, 6:50:38 PM1/18/14
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Darlin' ya forgot to add some brown sugar, a dash a Wooster sauce, and some
good ol liquid smoke. I like a bit a molasses too and if there's coffee
left in the pot, well, you git the idea, right?

Janet Wilder

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Jan 18, 2014, 8:57:51 PM1/18/14
to
If you made Charro beans like that down here, they'd laugh you out of town.

If you want smokey flavor, throw in some leftover brisket.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com

Julie Bove

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Jan 19, 2014, 2:28:22 AM1/19/14
to

"Janet Wilder" <not...@notreal.com> wrote in message
news:52db306c$0$7132$c3e8da3$76a7...@news.astraweb.com...
I could swear that somebody here posted that recipe some long time ago. I
remember making it. It was good but I prefer plain pinto beans.

Message has been deleted

Big Trig

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Jan 19, 2014, 1:09:02 PM1/19/14
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On Sat, 18 Jan 2014 19:57:51 -0600, Janet Wilder wrote:

> On 1/18/2014 5:50 PM, Big Trig wrote:
>> On Sat, 18 Jan 2014 14:55:57 -0800 (PST), lisa...@gmail.com wrote:
>>
>>> Beans a la Charra
>>> Makes 8 cups
>>> These "cowboy beans" have been on our menu right from the start. They're tender pintos, simmered with bacon and jalapenos, and they cook up nice and soupy. In fact, you can even serve them as a soup by pureeing some of the beans and stirring them back in.
>>>
>>> 3 cups dried pinto beans
>>> 3 quarts water
>>> 6 slices (about 8 ounces) uncooked bacon, coarsly chopped
>>> 1/2 cup diced onion
>>> 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
>>> 1/2 jalapeno, stemmed, seeded and chopped
>>> 1 tablespoon chili powder
>>> 2 teaspoons ground cumin
>>> 1 tablespoon salt
>>>
>>> In a stockpot, soak the beans overnight in the water (to cover). The next day, cook the bacon in a skillet over a medium-high heat until crisp, about 6-8 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, and jalapeno and cook for 5 minuets. Stir the chili powder and cumin and cook for 1 minute more. Add 1 cup of the soaking water from the beans while stirring and scraping the bottom of the skillet to loosen all the brown bits adhered to the pan. Add the beans and remaining water, and bring to a rapid boil. Decrease the heat to medium-low, and simmer for 1 � to 2 hours, or until the beans are soft. When the beans are cooked through, add the salt, and cook 1 to 2 minutes. Keep warm until ready to serve, or cool, cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days
>>
>> Darlin' ya forgot to add some brown sugar, a dash a Wooster sauce, and some
>> good ol liquid smoke. I like a bit a molasses too and if there's coffee
>> left in the pot, well, you git the idea, right?
>>
>
> If you made Charro beans like that down here, they'd laugh you out of town.

Where's "down here"?

I've et em like that in El Paso, no laugh at all.

> If you want smokey flavor, throw in some leftover brisket.

That for damned sure is no sin, yeah!

Big Trig

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Jan 19, 2014, 1:14:57 PM1/19/14
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On Sun, 19 Jan 2014 08:49:47 -0600, Sqwertz wrote:

> If you haven't had them yet, try the HEB brand Spicy Charro beans in
> the can (they

Ya know what, fuck off, ok?

Janet Wilder

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Jan 19, 2014, 2:22:51 PM1/19/14
to
On 1/19/2014 8:49 AM, Sqwertz wrote:
> On Sat, 18 Jan 2014 19:57:51 -0600, Janet Wilder wrote:
>
>> If you made Charro beans like that down here, they'd laugh you out of town.
>
> If you haven't had them yet, try the HEB brand Spicy Charro beans in
> the can (they also have a borracho made with Shiner bock). But the
> charro beans, especially, they rock. They're kinda soupy - perfect
> for a cold day (or night). $.97/can, here's a picture of them (at an
> outrageous price):
>
> http://www.amazon.com/HEB-Borracho-Beans-Made-Shiner/dp/B00BUBVL7E/ref=sr_1_5/183-6638689-4540023?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1390142878&sr=1-5
>
> -sw
>

We like the Borracho beans and the Charro beans are just spicy enough to
be edible by me.

Janet Wilder

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Jan 19, 2014, 2:25:17 PM1/19/14
to
On the southeastern tip of Texas right on the Mexican border. The vast
majority of the population has roots in Mexico.

> I've et em like that in El Paso, no laugh at all.

I don't think the Worcestershire sauce and liquid smoke would be
authentic even in El Paso.

>> If you want smokey flavor, throw in some leftover brisket.
>
> That for damned sure is no sin, yeah!
>


Message has been deleted

Nunya Bidnits

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Jan 20, 2014, 12:25:09 PM1/20/14
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It's just the casa boner troll again, trying on a Duck Dynasty persona.

MPD... it's the new bipolar.

Big Trig

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Jan 20, 2014, 2:22:23 PM1/20/14
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Roger that!
>
>> I've et em like that in El Paso, no laugh at all.
>
> I don't think the Worcestershire sauce and liquid smoke would be
> authentic even in El Paso.

I used to live over by Transmountain, and I never got no complaints.

Lotsa times you make charro beans and dont use the smoker, thse work great
in the crock.

I also use pork hocks.

Big Trig

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Jan 20, 2014, 2:27:32 PM1/20/14
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On Sun, 19 Jan 2014 22:58:56 -0600, Sqwertz wrote:

> You actually read and entertain his posts by telling him where you
> live? <boggle>
>
> -sw

Are you stalking her like you did Omelet?

Big Trig

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Jan 20, 2014, 2:34:01 PM1/20/14
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Now this is from the guy who has HOW many socks?
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