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What are breakfasts like in Great Britain?

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Matthew Harrington

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Feb 17, 1993, 10:37:04 PM2/17/93
to
I'm curious about what people in the British Isles eat for breakfast.
We usually learn about other culture's dinner foods from
restaurants, but rarely do restaurants serve ethnic breakfasts.
Anyhow, what goes on over there in the morning? What is eaten with
"English Breakfast" tea?


--Matt

Donald Mackie

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Feb 18, 1993, 12:06:16 PM2/18/93
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Subject: Re: What are breakfasts like in Great Britain?
From: Dave Jones, d...@ekcolor.ssd.kodak.com
Date: Thu, 18 Feb 93 16:02:59 GMT
In article <1993Feb18.1...@pixel.kodak.com> Dave Jones,
d...@ekcolor.ssd.kodak.com writes:

>Matthew Harrington (ph60...@sdcc14.ucsd.edu) wrote:
>> I'm curious about what people in the British Isles eat for breakfast.

Personally: the same as I eat here in the US; half an inch of toothpaste
and a cup of coffee.

(many tasty alternatives deleted)

>Porridge (oatmeal to you)

Joy of my childhood. There was always a day in the year when my mother
started making porridge every morning. This marked the onset of winter.
The choices of what to eat with it... salt, Golden syrup, brown sugar,
traeacle trickled on top which then sinks underneath, Yumm.
>
>And finally: Soft boiled egg placed in an ornamental eggcup, covered
with an
>eggcosy to keep it warm and eaten through a hole cut in one end with a
>silver spoon blackened from years of such use, along with Marmite
soldiers,
>a cup of hot steaming PG Tips and spam.

Sounds good too. As kids we had little horn egg spoons with whistles in
the handle. No nasty taste from interaction with the egg.

Don Mackie - his opinion
UM Anesthesiology will disavow

Dave Jones

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Feb 18, 1993, 1:12:58 PM2/18/93
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Just to derail things a little, I have in my possession a book called
"Diary of a Rowing Tour", purporting to be the notes of a young man who
travelled, in the style of "Three Men in a Boat", with some of his friends
on the Thames in, oh, 1860 or so.

They tended to eat at inns, farmhouses etc., and I have to report that
virtually everything mentioned on this thread was absent from the breakfast
menu. This is not a surprise when it comes to cereal, as no-one had tried
eating corn mash after spilling on a hotplate yet.

The main item was pork chops, leavened occasionally with eggs and (if memory
serves) chicken.

--
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||Marketing is the business of selling
|| Honk if you like Einstein |||||||||||projects to management.
||------------------------------------------------------------------------
||Dave Jones (d...@ekcolor.ssd.kodak.com)|Eastman Kodak Co. Rochester, NY |

Dave Breece

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Feb 18, 1993, 3:18:18 PM2/18/93
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While working at a summer camp one year, there was an exchange with a
camp in England of two staff members. Unfortunatly or fortunatly, I
didn't get to go, but I did learn a lot from the two from England. (I
traded McDonald's employee horror stories with one)

One weekend when there weren't any kids in the camp, they decided to
make us a traditional English breakfast. Everyone was looking forward
it, and anxious to see what was being made, but they wouldn't let us
in the kitchen.

To this day, I don't know if they were being serious, or if they were
putting us on. We had:

stewed tomatoes
deep fried bread
baked beans
bacon
fried eggs
sausage
and oatmeal

I can't say that I've ever heard of anyone deep frying Wonder before.
The grease clogged up my system for the rest of the day, laying in my
stomach not unlike a very large, greasy rock (which is a bad thing if
you're a lifeguard =)

So could someone tell me, were they really serious?


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dave Breece ("Druid") "We are heros, we are dreamers
dbr...@cherry.ucs.indiana.edu of the big dream..."
A/B/W/H

Steve McKinty - Sun ICNC

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Feb 18, 1993, 3:44:46 PM2/18/93
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>
> To this day, I don't know if they were being serious, or if they were
> putting us on. We had:
>

> deep fried bread

>
> I can't say that I've ever heard of anyone deep frying Wonder before.
> The grease clogged up my system for the rest of the day, laying in my
> stomach not unlike a very large, greasy rock (which is a bad thing if
> you're a lifeguard =)
>
> So could someone tell me, were they really serious?

Yes, but they did it badly. The proper way to fry bread is to get the
fat really hot in a shallow frying pan, then dip the bread briefly (1 sec)
each side. Remove the bread, pour off the excess fat, and put the bread
back for a few seconds longer to crisp it.

Of course it's even better if you do it with potato bread and soda farls
instead of boring white foamrubber stuff.

Steve

--
Steve McKinty
SUN Microsystems ICNC
38240 Meylan, France
email: smck...@france.sun.com BIX: smckinty

norman miller

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Feb 18, 1993, 4:58:02 PM2/18/93
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That was a great start, but without kidneys and/or kippers I'd say
you were being short-changed. Maybe they thought you were on a diet?

Norman Miller

David Brooks

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Feb 18, 1993, 6:33:35 PM2/18/93
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smck...@sunicnc.France.Sun.COM (Steve McKinty - Sun ICNC) writes:
>In article <1993Feb18....@news.cs.indiana.edu>, "Dave Breece" <dbr...@strawberry.ucs.indiana.edu> writes:
>
>>
>> To this day, I don't know if they were being serious, or if they were
>> putting us on. We had:
>>
>
>> deep fried bread
>Yes, but they did it badly. The proper way to fry bread is to get the
>fat really hot in a shallow frying pan, then dip the bread briefly (1 sec)
>each side. Remove the bread, pour off the excess fat, and put the bread
>back for a few seconds longer to crisp it.

Oh, I can do better than that. Cut a circular hole in the bread, break an
egg into the hole, and fry the egg along with the bread. High-cholesterol
eggs only, of course.

Kelly's eye, we called it.

When I was growing up in South London, my breakfasts were usually fried:
some combination of eggs, sausage, bacon and fried white bread. Toast and
marmalade if you were still hungry. No wonder I have a weight problem.

These day's, it's one raisin English [sic] muffin [sic] with *real butter*.
--
David Brooks dbr...@osf.org
Open Software Foundation uunet!osf.org!dbrooks
Shine out, fair sun, with all your heat! Black winter freezes to his seat...
The boneless fish close quaking lies...the stars in icicles arise!

Ernest Adams

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Feb 19, 1993, 4:32:23 AM2/19/93
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Fried bread may be going out of style at B & B's. I've only had it
about three times. One of those times it was fried in oil which
had unmistakably been used to fry fish in. While our hostess wasn't
looking, we fed it to her dog.

On the other hand, no one in America seems to be able to duplicate
the banger. They sell things that try, but nothing really captures
the essence of the true banger.

Donald Mackie

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Feb 19, 1993, 9:03:43 AM2/19/93
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Subject: Re: What are breakfasts like in Great Britain?
From: Graham Allan, alla...@student.tc.umn.edu
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 1993 04:45:00 GMT
In article <C2oIJ...@news.cis.umn.edu> Graham Allan,
alla...@student.tc.umn.edu writes:

>
>What I would like to know is how to get UK-style bacon here in the US.

A local deli (Zingermans) has monthly promotions. March is to be English
Month. and they tell me they will be importing some "English bacon". I'm
looking forward to it. I'll see if I can find out where they get it from.

Don Mackie
UM Anesthesiology will disavow...

Michael J. Edelman

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Feb 19, 1993, 9:12:47 AM2/19/93
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It's not that we can't, it's that our Food and Drug Administration has
regulations preventing us from doing so.

--mike ;-)


Chris Ambidge

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Feb 19, 1993, 10:13:05 AM2/19/93
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In article <1993Feb19.0...@netcom.com> ewa...@netcom.com (Ernest Adams) writes:
>Fried bread may be going out of style at B & B's. I've only had it
>On the other hand, no one in America seems to be able to duplicate
>the banger. They sell things that try, but nothing really captures
>the essence of the true banger.
>


My sympathy. Marks and Sparks (oh all right, Marks and Spencer) here
in Canada sell a variety of foods, including their house-brand equivalents
of branston pickle, picallili (?sp?) and salad cream. Their bangers
are really quite good.

too bad they don't carry twiglets, though. They *did* have marmite-
flavoured crisps for about 4 months last year, but I suppose there
weren't enough of the true addicts buying to make it worthwhile.

Not, of course, that I'm suggesting twiglets or crisps at breakfast time.

Chris
--
Chris Ambidge / amb...@ecf.toronto.edu / amb...@ecf.utoronto.ca
chemical engineering / university of toronto
200 college st / toronto ON / M5S 1A4 // 416 978 3106

Anthony A. Datri

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Feb 19, 1993, 10:49:20 AM2/19/93
to

The breakfasts that I got in Wales and Scotland were typically

o optional cold cereal
o bacon -- the UK stuff, which wasn't the same as the US stuff
o sausage -- often very light in color and strange in texture
o egg -- fried (bleah)
o tomato -- slices, or a small one cut in half. Sometimes warmed.


In Wales the warm stuff seemed to be collectively called "a grill".
--

======================================================================8--<

Dave Jones

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Feb 19, 1993, 11:14:19 AM2/19/93
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Chris Ambidge (amb...@ecf.toronto.edu) wrote:
> In article <1993Feb19.0...@netcom.com> ewa...@netcom.com (Ernest Adams) writes:
> >Fried bread may be going out of style at B & B's. I've only had it
> >On the other hand, no one in America seems to be able to duplicate
> >the banger. They sell things that try, but nothing really captures
> >the essence of the true banger.
> >
> My sympathy. Marks and Sparks (oh all right, Marks and Spencer) here
> in Canada sell a variety of foods, including their house-brand equivalents
> of branston pickle, picallili (?sp?) and salad cream. Their bangers
> are really quite good.
>

What's so great about bangers? 50% vegetable meal and 2% rat excrement.
I brought some back from Loblaws in Toronto and decided to stick with US
sausages: 100% meat with the odd spice thrown in. Can't say I like the
maple flavoured ones, though.

Barbara Hlavin

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Feb 19, 1993, 12:26:43 PM2/19/93
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In article <1993Feb18.2...@starbase.trincoll.edu> nmi...@starbase.trincoll.edu (norman miller) writes:
>
>I wish I could find Boswell's Journey to the Hebrides, an account of
>his trip with Johnson. In one house the host's sister offers J a cold
>sheep's head for breakfast. He declines, she insists. Wonderul reading.
>
>Apropos Scotland: Sunday breakfast in a devout b&b could be cold oatmeal
>and yesterday's toast. I've had it.


If I'd been served a breakfast like that, I'd have "had it," too.

So would you say Dr. Johnson's various assessments of Scotland were
accurate? ("Seeing Scotland, Madam, is only seeing a worse England."
Or from his dictionary: "*Oats*. A grain, which in England is
generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people.")

--Barbara, who has absolutely nothing against Scotland or Scots,
but who thinks golf is a most peculiar game

Shannon Smith

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Feb 19, 1993, 8:12:22 PM2/19/93
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"Dave Breece" <dbr...@strawberry.ucs.indiana.edu> writes:

-> stewed tomatoes
-> deep fried bread
-> baked beans
-> bacon
-> fried eggs
-> sausage
-> and oatmeal

This is *typical*?!? You mean, my ex-inlaws *aren't* trying to
poison me?!?!?

BTW, where's the cold hard toast with the porridge?

Did they stack the rest? Fried bread on the bottom, beans next,
followed by stewed tomatoes, bacon/sausage, and topped with the fried
egg, its baleful eye staring up at you, daring you to dig in and keep
it down 'til lunch?

L.A.Z. Smith

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Feb 19, 1993, 11:12:52 PM2/19/93
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In article <1993Feb18....@osf.org> dbr...@osf.org
(David Brooks) writes:

>Oh, I can do better than that. Cut a circular hole in the bread, break an
>egg into the hole, and fry the egg along with the bread. High-cholesterol
>eggs only, of course.
>
>Kelly's eye, we called it.

In the US, these are called Sunrise Sandwiches, or sometimes, Goldmine
Sandwiches. They're especially good if you first fry bacon, then fry
the bread-and-egg in the bacon grease. Yum.

Uh oh! I can feel my arteries hardening!

LAZ Smith le...@smith.chi.il.us

SSB GLOVER

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Feb 21, 1993, 9:53:30 AM2/21/93
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Barbara Hlavin (tw...@milton.u.washington.edu) wrote:

: Or from his dictionary: "*Oats*. A grain, which in England is

: generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people.")

But where else will you find such horses, -- Or such men?
(not me, I'm quoting Ian Hay (John Hay Beith) paraphrasing Boswell's
response)

John Man

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Feb 21, 1993, 8:44:36 PM2/21/93
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No porridge with salt in Scotland ?

John, jh...@phx.cam.ac.uk

hrm...@hkucc.hku.hk

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Feb 22, 1993, 1:37:04 AM2/22/93
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Yes, yes, yes, I remember, I remember, and the buttered toast soldiers, with
the M word stuff on them; and a sprinkle of salt to drop through the hole
made in the top of the egg. And when the youlk was all gone, trying to get
the remaining white out all in one piece...yes. Only my spoon wasnt silver..
I guess I was working class. Sniff.

But now I am educated and eat muesli with chopped fruit and skimmed milk and
look askance at my daughter devouring her daily egg. But do you remember
the little lion that was stamped on the side...? Ooops, that was a bit of
a give away, circa 1962?

Nasty habit.

Richard.>

Anthony A. Datri

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Feb 22, 1993, 2:59:46 PM2/22/93
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>So would you say Dr. Johnson's various assessments of Scotland were
>accurate?

I haven't read them, but isn't this a 19th-century work?

--

======================================================================8--<

Eric B. Stauffer

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Feb 22, 1993, 4:18:41 PM2/22/93
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Am I missing something?? I visited a friend in the West Midland for about a
month. Every morning I had this nastly little circle of salty black stuff. I
ate it until I found out it was nothing but reduced piggy blood. Hasn't
anyone else had this?


Regards,
Eric

Eric B. Stauffer - Clinical Research Information Systems
Eli Lilly & Comapny, Indianapolis, IN 46285
Internet: e...@lilly.com

Simon Patience

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Feb 23, 1993, 4:19:27 AM2/23/93
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In article <ebs.75.7...@lilly.com>, e...@lilly.com (Eric B. Stauffer) writes:
> Am I missing something?? I visited a friend in the West Midland for about a
> month. Every morning I had this nastly little circle of salty black stuff. I
> ate it until I found out it was nothing but reduced piggy blood. Hasn't
> anyone else had this?

This is black pudding and is definitely more than just "reduced piggy
blood", It also contains lumps of fat, herbs and frequently cereals (no I
mean wheat not corn flakes). I personally adore it and I don't care what
it is made of.

Simon.

--
Simon Patience
Open Software Foundation Phone: +33-76-63-48-72
Research Institute FAX: +33-76-51-05-32
2 Avenue De Vignate Email: s...@gr.osf.org
38610 Gieres, France uunet!gr.osf.org!sp

S.R. Atkins

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Feb 23, 1993, 6:51:20 AM2/23/93
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A proper British breakfast would have at least

Porridge (or maybe cereal for the wimps)

Bacon
Sausage (real sausage, not pink supermarket muck)
Scrambled egg (or fried, or for real luxury mumbled)
Black pudding (fried in hardly any fat)
Laverbread (again fried in a little fat)
Grilled Tomato
And possibly baked beans, refried slices of baked potato, mushrooms.

Followed by buttered toast and a decent marmalade (coarse cut, with whisky)

Served with lots of decently brewed tea or coffee.

Unfortunately, you seldom find such a thing outside south Wales.

PS Laverbread is a green glutinous substance made by boiling down a type of
seaweed for a long time.

Matthew Huntbach

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Feb 23, 1993, 9:51:58 AM2/23/93
to
In article <1993Feb23...@eng.cam.ac.uk> 90...@eng.cam.ac.uk (S.R. Atkins) writes:
>A proper British breakfast would have at least
>...

Somewhere in this thread we seem to have lost hold of the fact
that while "an English breakfast" usually refers to something
containing mountains of fried food, toast etc, almost no-one in
Britain eats such a thing, although hotels and guesthouses
still seem to feel obliged to serve it. I seem to recall a
survey on this issue showing that less than 5% of English
people ate "an English breakfast".

I doubt there ever was a time when ordinary working class
people ate like this. I suspect the usage derives from the
middle to upper classes where they had both the money to afford
it and the servants to cook it.

Matthew Huntbach

Nicholas C. Hester

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Feb 23, 1993, 9:06:40 PM2/23/93
to
In article <1993Feb23...@eng.cam.ac.uk>, 90...@eng.cam.ac.uk (S.R.

Atkins) says:
>
>A proper British breakfast would have at least
>
>Porridge (or maybe cereal for the wimps)
>
>Bacon
>Sausage (real sausage, not pink supermarket muck)
>Scrambled egg (or fried, or for real luxury mumbled)
>Black pudding (fried in hardly any fat)
>Laverbread (again fried in a little fat)
>Grilled Tomato
>And possibly baked beans, refried slices of baked potato, mushrooms.
>
>Followed by buttered toast and a decent marmalade (coarse cut, with whisky)

What?! No kippers? I'm apalled!
__

Nicholas C. Hester
ia8...@maine.bitnet
ia8...@maine.maine.edu

Simon Patience

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Feb 24, 1993, 11:18:22 AM2/24/93
to
In article <1993Feb23.1...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk>, m...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk (Matthew Huntbach) writes:
> Somewhere in this thread we seem to have lost hold of the fact
> that while "an English breakfast" usually refers to something
> containing mountains of fried food, toast etc, almost no-one in
> Britain eats such a thing, although hotels and guesthouses
> still seem to feel obliged to serve it. I seem to recall a
> survey on this issue showing that less than 5% of English
> people ate "an English breakfast".

Well I must be one of the 5% then. Not that I had it everyday (which is
why I am still alive) but at least one day every weekend (normally Sunday
as there was sod all else to do). I also seem to know a staggeringly large
number of the rest of the 5%.

little peapod

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Feb 24, 1993, 6:10:55 PM2/24/93
to
i wouldn't really know, but both of my parents are from london, and my mother
is still partial to crumpets, both for breakfast and tea, and my father loves
kippers, which stink up the house for days.

the funny thing is to listen to my mother complain whenever a Thomas' English
Muffin comercial comes on tv. she says it is one of the biggest lies she has
ever seen, and that no muffin she ever ate looked like them.

nicki

Fragano Ledgister

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Feb 25, 1993, 1:33:42 AM2/25/93
to
In article <C2v8v...@siemens.com> a...@siemens.com (Anthony A. Datri) writes:
>>So would you say Dr. Johnson's various assessments of Scotland were
>>accurate?
>
>I haven't read them, but isn't this a 19th-century work?
>
>--
>
No. Dr Johnson lived and died in the 18th century.

--
Dawn over the dark sea brings on the sun;
She leans across the hilltop: see, the light!
--------------------------------------------------------------------
fled...@weber.ucsd.edu

Matthew Huntbach

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Feb 25, 1993, 4:23:52 AM2/25/93
to
In article <1993Feb24.1...@osf.org> s...@osf.org (Simon Patience) writes:
>In article <1993Feb23.1...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk>, m...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk (Matthew Huntbach) writes:
>> I seem to recall a
>> survey on this issue showing that less than 5% of English
>> people ate "an English breakfast".
>
>Well I must be one of the 5% then. Not that I had it everyday (which is
>why I am still alive) but at least one day every weekend (normally Sunday
>as there was sod all else to do). I also seem to know a staggeringly large
>number of the rest of the 5%.
>
I assume the figure meant that "less than 5% on a given day
ate an 'English breakfast'". If everyone ate a fried breakfast only
on Sundays that would still make less than 20%. What I meamn is
that the impression that this is what English people eat *every
day* for breakfast is wrong.

BTW on the subject of black pudding, of course it is eaten in
the south. The idea that it is a "northern food" is part of
that falsehood which assumes that the south is all fabulously
wealthy. Black pudding is traditionally a poor people's food.
You'll find it in East End markets just as much as anywhere in
the north.

Matthew Huntbach


T Matias

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Feb 25, 1993, 4:42:09 AM2/25/93
to
90...@eng.cam.ac.uk (S.R. Atkins) writes:

>PS Laverbread is a green glutinous substance made by boiling down a type of
> seaweed for a long time.

Sounds good!

And, of course, in my previous post I forgot to mention the porage
(after all I'm in Scotland!) or prridge or oats or whatever you want to
call it :-) and the baked beans.

R.J.W...@lut.ac.uk

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Feb 25, 1993, 6:50:26 AM2/25/93
to
To conclude the thread, "What are breakfasts like in Great Britain?", I
have only one word:

Delicious.

:-)

Rob.

Trevor Kirby

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Feb 25, 1993, 7:20:35 AM2/25/93
to

In article <ebs.75.7...@lilly.com>, e...@lilly.com (Eric B. Stauffer) writes:
>Am I missing something?? I visited a friend in the West Midland for about a
>month. Every morning I had this nastly little circle of salty black stuff. I
>ate it until I found out it was nothing but reduced piggy blood. Hasn't
>anyone else had this?
>
It's been mentioned several times. It's black pudding, it's not just blood, it's
got lumps of fat in it as well and it should be served with lashings of HP on it.

Trev

PS Drool

Matthew Hawley

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Feb 25, 1993, 11:17:33 AM2/25/93
to
I'll add my two cents (tuppence?) to this:

I'm American, but lived in London from ages 9 to 17, and was in boarding school
the last 3 of these years. I thought I'd contribute what I remember of our
boarding school breakfasts (this thread has reminded me of many things; I'd
managed to forget about fried bread!!):

Keywords: Grease, cholesterol, sugar, no fruit or juice.

- Cold cereal: Corn or Frosted Flakes (I don't remember which), Wheetabix,
or Shredded Wheat. Sometimes oatmeal in winter. Most students
added obscene amounts of sugar to these,,

- Eggs: poached, scrambled, fried (W/fried bread), or soft-boiled,

- Meat: bacon, bangers (Greasy sausages), or ham,

- Toasted white bread with tons of butter and marmalade or jam,

- *Very* strong tea (undrinkable without milk & sugar) or coffee.

This was breakfast *every day*. Amazing, when I look back (I now follow a basically
macrobiotic diet (no, I don't want to get sucked into *that* discussion, thanks),
avoiding meat, dairy, eggs, sugar, etc. - those school breakfasts were the very
antithesis of my current (for the past several years) tastes and ideas of what's
healthy).


Interesting side note: I remember well eating the above-mentioned soft-boiled
eggs in their little cups. I tried to recreate this maybe ten years ago in the
States - American eggs have shells that are too thin and fragile to make this
a reasonable way to eat them! (Basically, the shell falls apart as you try to
scoop out the inside.) I assume this is a result of the totally unnatural
conditions and food our laying hens endure.

Matt B^)

Simon Patience

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Feb 25, 1993, 11:57:23 AM2/25/93
to
In article <1993Feb25.0...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk>, m...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk (Matthew Huntbach) writes:
> BTW on the subject of black pudding, of course it is eaten in
> the south. The idea that it is a "northern food" is part of
> that falsehood which assumes that the south is all fabulously
> wealthy. Black pudding is traditionally a poor people's food.
> You'll find it in East End markets just as much as anywhere in
> the north.

And the assumption that it is a poor persons food is equally false. I have
found it in every Sainsbury and Waitrose stores that I have frequented,
and believe me, I don't live in poor areas.

Gregory Hill

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Feb 25, 1993, 1:10:10 PM2/25/93
to
In article <1miret...@TIGER.ZOO.CS.YALE.EDU> hawley-...@cs.yale.edu (Matthew Hawley) writes:
> I'll add my two cents (tuppence?) to this:
>
> I'm American, but lived in London from ages 9 to 17, and was in boarding school
> the last 3 of these years. I thought I'd contribute what I remember of our
> boarding school breakfasts (this thread has reminded me of many things; I'd
> managed to forget about fried bread!!):
>
> Keywords: Grease, cholesterol, sugar, no fruit or juice.
>
> - Cold cereal: Corn or Frosted Flakes (I don't remember which), Wheetabix,
> or Shredded Wheat. Sometimes oatmeal in winter. Most students
> added obscene amounts of sugar to these,,
>
> - Eggs: poached, scrambled, fried (W/fried bread), or soft-boiled,
>
> - Meat: bacon, bangers (Greasy sausages), or ham,
>
> - Toasted white bread with tons of butter and marmalade or jam,
>
> - *Very* strong tea (undrinkable without milk & sugar) or coffee.
>
> This was breakfast *every day*.

Yeah, no kidding. I lived in Lancashire (small town called Forton) for a year as a small child
(the only time I've been in the U.K.) and went to
school there. Every day (this was lunch, not breakfast) we had to walk across the street
to a local church where we were served "pig in a blanket" (greasy sausage wrapped in limp
fatty bacon), overcooked brussels sprouts, and burnt custard for dessert. I guess the
philosophy must be, "Why change if what you have already is really atrocious?"

David Brooks

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Feb 25, 1993, 2:44:07 PM2/25/93
to
hawley-...@cs.yale.edu (Matthew Hawley) writes:
| Interesting side note: I remember well eating the above-mentioned soft-boiled
| eggs in their little cups. I tried to recreate this maybe ten years ago in the
| States - American eggs have shells that are too thin and fragile to make this
| a reasonable way to eat them! (Basically, the shell falls apart as you try to
| scoop out the inside.) I assume this is a result of the totally unnatural
| conditions and food our laying hens endure.

Not a problem up here. Shells are strong enough to take this treatment,
but not so strong you get them completely mangled when opening them
initially.

But we do get our eggs from Shaw's, and they *are* owned by Sainsbury's,
after all. "Good Food Costs Less At Shaw's".
--
David Brooks dbr...@osf.org
Open Software Foundation uunet!osf.org!dbrooks
Shine out, fair sun, with all your heat! Black winter freezes to his seat...
The boneless fish close quaking lies...the stars in icicles arise!

Alien

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Feb 25, 1993, 6:56:55 PM2/25/93
to
British food is renowned for being horrible: read 'Asterix in Britain'
for a real piss-take (although the stuff about boiling everything isn't
true).
Personally I have cereal , toast and maybe a boiled egg. Long time
ince i had a real breakfast like the one above!

>BTW, where's the cold hard toast with the porridge?

Cold! Libel! Warm.


Matt.


--
Matthew Woodford Welcome watchers of illusion,
m...@cck.ac.coventry.uk To the castle of confusion,
Alien This is the place to live or die,
This is the place for getting HIGH.

Anthony A. Datri

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Feb 25, 1993, 7:49:25 PM2/25/93
to
>Yes! Only once and never again. I definitely didn't like the flavour and
>only then was I told it was pig blood.

In Wales I was taunted into trying lavabread/laverbread. This is a sort of
seaweed that's sometimes mixed with oatmeal. I had the variety without, and
I honestly found it quite hideous. I unobtrusively alternated bites of it
with bites of ketchup(Heinz!)-drenched chips.
--

======================================================================8--<

Karen Chisholm

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Feb 25, 1993, 10:27:23 PM2/25/93
to
In article <ebs.75.7...@lilly.com> e...@lilly.com (Eric B. Stauffer) writes:
>Am I missing something?? I visited a friend in the West Midland for about a
>month. Every morning I had this nastly little circle of salty black stuff. I
>ate it until I found out it was nothing but reduced piggy blood. Hasn't
>anyone else had this?
>
URGGGGGGHHHHH!

Black pudding - appalling stuff. My father was addicted to it. My mother
cooked it with a peg on her nose and he got his wish - quiet breakfasts.
We'd all leave the house until he had finished it.

You can also get white pudding - although I can't remember what this was
made out of. Anyone know?

Mind you - you want truely appalling try tripe and onions for breakfast.
Or crumbed lambs brains or any other of the revolting things that my Mother
told me were traditional breakfast foods.

regards

Karen


--
Karen Chisholm email: k...@saki.com.au
Saki Computer Services Pty Ltd| Purveyors of fine |
93 Kallista-Emerald Road | software | phone: +61 3 752 1512
THE PATCH VIC 3792 AUSTRALIA| (including TruFax) | fax: +61 3 752 1098

Gordon Riddell

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Feb 26, 1993, 6:19:14 AM2/26/93
to
In article <32...@castle.ed.ac.uk> emc...@castle.ed.ac.uk (T Matias) writes:
>e...@lilly.com (Eric B. Stauffer) writes:
>
>>Am I missing something?? I visited a friend in the West Midland for about a
>>month. Every morning I had this nastly little circle of salty black stuff. I
>>ate it until I found out it was nothing but reduced piggy blood. Hasn't
>>anyone else had this?
>
>
>Yes! Only once and never again. I definitely didn't like the flavour and
>only then was I told it was pig blood. I think there is also a white
>version, this one made with milk. Never tried it though.
>
White pudding I remember being a northern Scottish delicacy eaten alongside
meat dishes. It never seemed to be available in west, central Scotland as
my parents would always fill the car with them when we would go and visit
grand-parents in Aberdeenshire. White pudding is also called mealy pudding.

Gordon Riddell

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Feb 26, 1993, 6:23:37 AM2/26/93
to
In article <32...@castle.ed.ac.uk> emc...@castle.ed.ac.uk (T Matias) writes:


There is also tottie (potato) scones to be fried instead of fried bread. I
suppose they are basically whatever one uses to make normal scones but
with potato added to the mixture. They come flat then you fry them.

Of course, in Scotland one would traditionally have used lard rather than
vegetable oil to grease the frying pan.

But is it any wonder the traditional English breakfast is termed by some
`a heart attack on a plate'.

Gordon

Dave

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Feb 26, 1993, 9:47:50 AM2/26/93
to
In article <B8w9yB...@xocolatl.com> ssm...@xocolatl.com writes:
>"Dave Breece" <dbr...@strawberry.ucs.indiana.edu> writes:
>-> stewed tomatoes
>-> deep fried bread
>-> baked beans
>-> bacon
>-> fried eggs
>-> sausage
>-> and oatmeal

Yummy! Please stop this torture, I haven't eaten a breakfast like the
above in ages and my tummy is grumbling that I haven't had anything to
eat for lunch! The only changes I'll make to the above is to fry the tomatoes
(cut them in halve first) and I won't fry the bread (but I'll still butter
it) so I can use it as a 'mop' for the egg yolk, baked bean sauce and fat.

>This is *typical*?!? You mean, my ex-inlaws *aren't* trying to
>poison me?!?!?
>Did they stack the rest? Fried bread on the bottom, beans next,
>followed by stewed tomatoes, bacon/sausage, and topped with the fried
>egg, its baleful eye staring up at you, daring you to dig in and keep
>it down 'til lunch?

If someone made that for me I'll just get my knife and fork and start eating.
A full breakfast is eaten like a 3 course meal:

1) Porridge (Oatmeal) or cereal
2) Fried Breakfast
3) Marmalade or Jam on bread.

Drunk with plenty of tea. I hope I haven't horrified the rec.food.cooking
people to whom it is cross-posted by munching such a fatty breakfast.
Don't worry about torturing me as I really quite enjoying reading about
breakfasts I haven't eaten for a long time.
--
Dave cmh...@cck.cov.ac.uk
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I am a one in ten, Even though I don't exist, Nobody knows me, But I'm always
there, A statistical reminder to a world that doesn't care. (UB40).

Alien

unread,
Feb 26, 1993, 12:44:42 PM2/26/93
to
In article <ebs.75.7...@lilly.com> e...@lilly.com (Eric B. Stauffer) writes:
>Am I missing something?? I visited a friend in the West Midland for about a
>month. Every morning I had this nastly little circle of salty black stuff. I
>ate it until I found out it was nothing but reduced piggy blood. Hasn't
>anyone else had this?

Wow!! Black pudding ! This is best fried with bread ,egg, bacon, sausage
,onion, tomatoes, kidneys, liver, chives, spring onions, and parsley.
Porridge for first course ideally, then buttered toast with marmalade
afterwards + lots of tea all the way through; and a boiled egg with soldiers
somewhere in there.
In the north I hear they have it with tripe and onions: strange tastes...

Matt.

--
Matthew Woodford Welcome watchers of illusion,

m...@uk.ac.coventry.cck To the castle of confusion,

Shannon Smith

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Feb 26, 1993, 9:45:49 PM2/26/93
to
m...@cch.coventry.ac.uk (Alien) writes:

-> I write:
->
-> >BTW, where's the cold hard toast with the porridge?
->
-> Cold! Libel! Warm.

Room temperature. 13 degrees C/55 Farenheit.

I rest my case.

David Burk

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Feb 27, 1993, 10:19:28 PM2/27/93
to
In article <1mhp86...@network.ucsd.edu> fled...@weber.ucsd.edu (Fragano Ledgister) writes:
>In article <C2v8v...@siemens.com> a...@siemens.com (Anthony A. Datri) writes:
>>>So would you say Dr. Johnson's various assessments of Scotland were
>>>accurate?
>>
>>I haven't read them, but isn't this a 19th-century work?
>>
>>--
>>
>No. Dr Johnson lived and died in the 18th century.
>

He died from eating the damn breakfasts.


Broiled tomato anyoone?

Matthew Huntbach

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Feb 28, 1993, 12:11:51 PM2/28/93
to
In article <1993Feb25.1...@osf.org> s...@osf.org (Simon Patience) writes:
>In article <1993Feb25.0...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk>, m...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk (Matthew Huntbach) writes:
>> BTW on the subject of black pudding, of course it is eaten in
>> the south. The idea that it is a "northern food" is part of
>> that falsehood which assumes that the south is all fabulously
>> wealthy. Black pudding is traditionally a poor people's food.
>> You'll find it in East End markets just as much as anywhere in
>> the north.
>
>And the assumption that it is a poor persons food is equally false. I have
>found it in every Sainsbury and Waitrose stores that I have frequented,
>and believe me, I don't live in poor areas.
>
The key word was "traditionally". Yes, of course I am aware
that certain foodstuffs once the preserve of the poor are now
found as delicacies in up-market shops. As it happens, Harrods
does excellent black pudding.

Matthew Huntbach

Ernest Adams

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Mar 2, 1993, 4:40:05 AM3/2/93
to
Alan J Holmes writes:
>In article <1993Feb19.0...@netcom.com> ewa...@netcom.com (Ernest Adams) writes:
>
>>On the other hand, no one in America seems to be able to duplicate
>>the banger. They sell things that try, but nothing really captures
>>the essence of the true banger.
>
>I'm surprised that anyone would want to duplicate the 'banger' when you
>consider that it is 90% cereal you are better off eating fried bread
>which at least is honest.
>

It doesn't matter. Bangers just taste damn good, especially if they
get a bit crisp at the end where some of the stuffing leaks out...
I don't care if they're made of 100% wallpaper paste. I WANT ONE NOW!

(And I wish we could get them in America. Our sausages are tiresomely
meat-filled.)

Colin Crist

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Mar 2, 1993, 6:48:59 AM3/2/93
to


Lavabread is great fried gently so that it becomes every so slightly crispy.

Yum.

Colin
Colin Crist (B83/G38)
c...@muppet.bt.co.uk British Telecom Research Labs
+44 473 648136 Martlesham Heath
BT wouldn't trust me with an opinion ! Suffolk, UK.

Dave

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Mar 1, 1993, 7:16:39 AM3/1/93
to
In article <1993Feb25.0...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk> m...@dcs.qmw.ac.uk (Matthew Huntbach) writes:
>BTW on the subject of black pudding, of course it is eaten in
>the south. The idea that it is a "northern food" is part of
>that falsehood which assumes that the south is all fabulously
>wealthy. Black pudding is traditionally a poor people's food.
>You'll find it in East End markets just as much as anywhere in
>the north.

Black Pudding is a Northern food. Even though I've seen it on sale in the
south. I have never eaten it in the south. I've seen it provided by a pub as
free snack food in the north along with crisps and peanuts etc. Then again
you're not likley to find a pub in the south that will put out free food!

Incidently I like black pudding even though it does have revolting origins.

Babs Woods

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Mar 2, 1993, 2:29:36 PM3/2/93
to
In <1993Mar2.0...@netcom.com> ewa...@netcom.com (Ernest Adams) writes:

>Alan J Holmes writes:
>>In article <1993Feb19.0...@netcom.com> ewa...@netcom.com (Ernest Adams) writes:
>>

>>>.....no one in America seems to be able to duplicate the banger....


>>
>>I'm surprised that anyone would want to duplicate the 'banger' when

>>you consider that it is 90% cereal......

>It doesn't matter. Bangers just taste damn good, especially if they
>get a bit crisp at the end where some of the stuffing leaks out...
>I don't care if they're made of 100% wallpaper paste. I WANT ONE NOW!

>(And I wish we could get them in America. Our sausages are tiresomely
>meat-filled.)


Given that complaint and those comments, and the fact that
I've never even *had* bangers, anyone got a recipe for bangers from
scratch? I want to know just what *does* go into the usual bangers
for myself, so I can judge the differences between the ones across
the pond and our usual links.

-babs
--

"Excuse me, while I dance a little jig of despair."
- had...@ics.uci.edu (Ted Hadley)

Christopher J Carne

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Mar 2, 1993, 7:55:38 AM3/2/93