Translation, please

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Frogleg

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Aug 29, 2003, 9:04:02 AM8/29/03
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OK. I've been looking at French school menus, and staggering through
translation options. So far I have

Monday:

SALADE DE TOMATES, LAPIN FRAIS A LA CATALANE, JEUNES CAROTTES
PERSILLEES, YAOURT VELOUTE FRUIX, ROCHER COCO, Goûter : CONFITURE DE
PRUNES

Tomato salad, rabbit a la Catalan (r?), little carrots blue-molded
(??), fruit yogurt, chocolate candy, and prune jam

Tuesday:

TABOULE, OMELETTE AU FROMAGE, RATATOUILLE, ST PAULIN, FRUIT FRAIS
Goûter : BEIGNET DOONY'S CHOCOLAT

Tabouli, cheese omelet, ratatouille, ??, fresh fruit, chocolate pastry

Wednesday:

SALADE AFRICAINE, POULET YASSA, BOULGHOUR AU BEURRE, MANGUE, Goûter :
LAIT FRAISE, Goûter : PALMIER

African salad (r?), Chicken Yassa (r?), bulgar with butter, mango,
fresh milk (only 1 day a week?), pastry.

Thursday:

COEURS ARTICHAUT VINAIGRETTE, STICK POISSON BASQUAISE, COQUILLETTES AU
BEURRE, SIX DE SAVOIE, COCKTAIL DE FRUITS, Goûter : BRIOCHE

Marinated artichoke hearts, fish sticks with tomato, macaroni &
butter, (??), fruit cocktail, brioche

Friday:

PASTEQUE, SAUCISSE DE VOLAILLE, FRITES, FLAN NAPPE, SABLE CARAMEL,
Goûter : EDAM

(??), poultry sausage (hotdog?), chips or fries, some kind of flan,
some kind of caramel, Edam cheese

Key: ?? indicates total bafflement; r? indicates query about general
recipe or style

So how far off am I? Can anyone help fill in the blanks? Will you get
really crabby if I keep asking as I go through other menus?

levelwave

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Aug 29, 2003, 9:19:51 AM8/29/03
to
Frogleg wrote:

> OK. I've been looking at French school menus, and staggering through
> translation options. So far I have
>
> Monday:
>
> SALADE DE TOMATES, LAPIN FRAIS A LA CATALANE, JEUNES CAROTTES
> PERSILLEES, YAOURT VELOUTE FRUIX, ROCHER COCO, Goûter : CONFITURE DE
> PRUNES


TOMATO SALAD, FRESH RABBIT A The CATALAN WOMAN, YOUNG SPOTTED CARROTS,
YOGHOURT SOFTENS FRUIX, COCO ROCK, Goûter: PLUM JAM

http://translate.google.com/translate_t


~john!


--
"This body holding me reminds me of my own mortality. Embrace this
moment. Remember. We are eternal. All this pain is an illusion...."

Anthony

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Aug 29, 2003, 10:20:36 AM8/29/03
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"Frogleg" <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:dnjukv4ak73ogcl1v...@4ax.com...

My French is kinda rusty, but here goes:


> Monday:
>
> SALADE DE TOMATES, LAPIN FRAIS A LA CATALANE, JEUNES CAROTTES
> PERSILLEES, YAOURT VELOUTE FRUIX, ROCHER COCO, Goûter : CONFITURE DE
> PRUNES
>

Tomato salad, fresh rabbit Catalan style, (whatever that may be), parslied
young carrots, yogurt with fruit (but fruix??), coconut chocolate,
Mid-morning snack, plum jam, (presumably on bread).

>
> Tuesday:
>
> TABOULE, OMELETTE AU FROMAGE, RATATOUILLE, ST PAULIN, FRUIT FRAIS
> Goûter : BEIGNET DOONY'S CHOCOLAT
>

Tabouli, cheese omelet, ratatouille, St. Paulin cheese, (a bit like Port
Salut), fresh fruit, Mid-morning snack chocolate donut.


>
> Wednesday:
>
> SALADE AFRICAINE, POULET YASSA, BOULGHOUR AU BEURRE, MANGUE, Goûter :
> LAIT FRAISE, Goûter : PALMIER
>
> African salad (r?), Chicken Yassa (r?), bulgar with butter, mango,

Mid-morning snack milk and cookies. Not much help on this one; I've no idea
what Africans do with salad, or how Yassa makes his chicken.


>
>
> Thursday:
>
> COEURS ARTICHAUT VINAIGRETTE, STICK POISSON BASQUAISE, COQUILLETTES AU
> BEURRE, SIX DE SAVOIE, COCKTAIL DE FRUITS, Goûter : BRIOCHE

Artichoke hearts vinaigrette, Fish sticks, (eeew!) with a tomato and sweet
pepper sauce, buttered macaroni, fruit cocktail, snack: brioche

>
> Friday:
>
> PASTEQUE, SAUCISSE DE VOLAILLE, FRITES, FLAN NAPPE, SABLE CARAMEL,
> Goûter : EDAM
>

Water melon, poultry sausage with fries, the dessert is a puzzle, but might
be a custard tart with caramel topping, tho how the sand (sable) fits in I
don't know. The snack is Edam cheese

>
> So how far off am I? Can anyone help fill in the blanks? Will you get
> really crabby if I keep asking as I go through other menus?

This is kinda fun, but what you have to remember is that menus in even the
poshest restaurants often have typos, and also cooks sometimes make up names
for dishes.


dsc...@attg.net

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Aug 29, 2003, 10:45:48 AM8/29/03
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OK, here is the translation . We are indeed a long way from the USA school
cafeteria!

"Frogleg" <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:dnjukv4ak73ogcl1v...@4ax.com...

> OK. I've been looking at French school menus, and staggering through
> translation options. So far I have
>
> Monday:
>
> SALADE DE TOMATES, LAPIN FRAIS A LA CATALANE, JEUNES CAROTTES
> PERSILLEES, YAOURT VELOUTE FRUIX, ROCHER COCO, Goûter : CONFITURE DE
> PRUNES
>
> Tomato salad, rabbit a la Catalan (r?), little carrots blue-molded
> (??), fruit yogurt, chocolate candy, and prune jam

> Tomato salad, Fresh rabbit catalane style (as the north East province of
Spain), parslied young carrots, Smooth style fruit yogurt, Coconut Rocher
(which is a chocolate candy widely sold in the USA, some with cherry some
covered in coconut).
Snack: plum jam.

> Tuesday:
>
> TABOULE, OMELETTE AU FROMAGE, RATATOUILLE, ST PAULIN, FRUIT FRAIS
> Goûter : BEIGNET DOONY'S CHOCOLAT
>
> Tabouli, cheese omelet, ratatouille, ??, fresh fruit, chocolate pastry

> Taboule, cheese omelet, ratatouille (a stew of eggplants, zuchini,
tomatoes, green peppers and garlic), St Paulin (a semi soft cheese), fresh
fruits.
Snack: chocolate beignet (sort of a doughnut)


> Wednesday:
>
> SALADE AFRICAINE, POULET YASSA, BOULGHOUR AU BEURRE, MANGUE, Goûter :
> LAIT FRAISE, Goûter : PALMIER
>
> African salad (r?), Chicken Yassa (r?), bulgar with butter, mango,
> fresh milk (only 1 day a week?), pastry.

> On this one, your guess is a good as mine. My only correction to your
translation is that "Lait fraise" is strawberry flavored milk. If it was
fresh it would be "Frais" without the "e".


> Thursday:
>
> COEURS ARTICHAUT VINAIGRETTE, STICK POISSON BASQUAISE, COQUILLETTES AU
> BEURRE, SIX DE SAVOIE, COCKTAIL DE FRUITS, Goûter : BRIOCHE
>
> Marinated artichoke hearts, fish sticks with tomato, macaroni &
> butter, (??), fruit cocktail, brioche

> Six de Savoie is a cheese.


> Friday:
>
> PASTEQUE, SAUCISSE DE VOLAILLE, FRITES, FLAN NAPPE, SABLE CARAMEL,
> Goûter : EDAM
>
> (??), poultry sausage (hotdog?), chips or fries, some kind of flan,
> some kind of caramel, Edam cheese

> Watemelon, Poultry sausage, french fries (they don't know about Patriot
Fries over there!), Flan napped most likely with caramel, sable is a kind of
sugar cookie.
Snack: Edam cheese.

> Key: ?? indicates total bafflement; r? indicates query about general
> recipe or style
>
> So how far off am I? Can anyone help fill in the blanks? Will you get
> really crabby if I keep asking as I go through other menus?

I hope this helps. May I ask what is the interest in the french school
menus?
Mireille


Bob Pastorio

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Aug 29, 2003, 11:23:22 AM8/29/03
to
Frogleg wrote:

> OK. I've been looking at French school menus, and staggering through
> translation options. So far I have
>
> Monday:
>
> SALADE DE TOMATES, LAPIN FRAIS A LA CATALANE, JEUNES CAROTTES
> PERSILLEES, YAOURT VELOUTE FRUIX, ROCHER COCO, Goûter : CONFITURE DE
> PRUNES
>
> Tomato salad, rabbit a la Catalan (r?), little carrots blue-molded
> (??), fruit yogurt, chocolate candy, and prune jam

Young carrots with parsley.

> Tuesday:
>
> TABOULE, OMELETTE AU FROMAGE, RATATOUILLE, ST PAULIN, FRUIT FRAIS
> Goûter : BEIGNET DOONY'S CHOCOLAT
>
> Tabouli, cheese omelet, ratatouille, ??, fresh fruit, chocolate pastry

St Paulin is a kind of cheese

> Wednesday:
>
> SALADE AFRICAINE, POULET YASSA, BOULGHOUR AU BEURRE, MANGUE, Goûter :
> LAIT FRAISE, Goûter : PALMIER
>
> African salad (r?), Chicken Yassa (r?), bulgar with butter, mango,
> fresh milk (only 1 day a week?), pastry.

Strawberry milk.

> Thursday:
>
> COEURS ARTICHAUT VINAIGRETTE, STICK POISSON BASQUAISE, COQUILLETTES AU
> BEURRE, SIX DE SAVOIE, COCKTAIL DE FRUITS, Goûter : BRIOCHE
>
> Marinated artichoke hearts, fish sticks with tomato, macaroni &
> butter, (??), fruit cocktail, brioche

Scallops (or a local shellfish) with butter
Not sure about Six de Savoie - could be a Savoiarde of Potatoes and
Cheese (usually Gruyere or similar) or it could be the pastry Savoiarde

> Friday:
>
> PASTEQUE, SAUCISSE DE VOLAILLE, FRITES, FLAN NAPPE, SABLE CARAMEL,
> Goûter : EDAM
>
> (??), poultry sausage (hotdog?), chips or fries, some kind of flan,
> some kind of caramel, Edam cheese

Watermelon

> Key: ?? indicates total bafflement; r? indicates query about general
> recipe or style
>
> So how far off am I? Can anyone help fill in the blanks? Will you get
> really crabby if I keep asking as I go through other menus?

Not far off, actually. No reason to get crabby.

Pastorio


Bob Pastorio

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Aug 29, 2003, 12:15:40 PM8/29/03
to
Bob Pastorio wrote:

Um, on second thought, most likely buttered shell macaroni

> Not sure about Six de Savoie - could be a Savoiarde of Potatoes and
> Cheese (usually Gruyere or similar) or it could be the pastry Savoiarde
>
>> Friday:
>>
>> PASTEQUE, SAUCISSE DE VOLAILLE, FRITES, FLAN NAPPE, SABLE CARAMEL,
>> Goûter : EDAM
>>
>> (??), poultry sausage (hotdog?), chips or fries, some kind of flan,
>> some kind of caramel, Edam cheese
>
>
> Watermelon

Sable ("sand") is shortbread.

Jack Schidt®

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Aug 29, 2003, 1:31:35 PM8/29/03
to

"Frogleg" <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:dnjukv4ak73ogcl1v...@4ax.com...
> OK. I've been looking at French school menus, and staggering through
> translation options. So far I have
>


Ping Michel Boucher and be done with it. Jay-sus, you're gonna get a lot of
"I think it means this" otherwise.

Jack Lingo


Lorraine

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Aug 29, 2003, 2:37:35 PM8/29/03
to
Hi Frogleg,

I am sending you (below) what's missing.

Frogleg wrote:

> OK. I've been looking at French school menus, and staggering through
> translation options. So far I have
>
> Monday:
>
> SALADE DE TOMATES, LAPIN FRAIS A LA CATALANE, JEUNES CAROTTES
> PERSILLEES, YAOURT VELOUTE FRUIX, ROCHER COCO, Goûter : CONFITURE DE
> PRUNES
>

> Tomato salad, FRESH rabbit a la Catalan (r?), BABY carrots WITH PARSLEY
>
> (??), fruit yogurt, coconut candy, and PLUM jam


>
> Tuesday:
>
> TABOULE, OMELETTE AU FROMAGE, RATATOUILLE, ST PAULIN, FRUIT FRAIS
> Goûter : BEIGNET DOONY'S CHOCOLAT
>

> Tabouli, cheese omelet, ratatouille, ST-PAULIN - it's a cheese, fresh


> fruit, chocolate pastry
>
> Wednesday:
>
> SALADE AFRICAINE, POULET YASSA, BOULGHOUR AU BEURRE, MANGUE, Goûter :
> LAIT FRAISE, Goûter : PALMIER
>
> African salad (r?), Chicken Yassa (r?), bulgar with butter, mango,

> strawberry milk (only 1 day a week?), pastry.


>
> Thursday:
>
> COEURS ARTICHAUT VINAIGRETTE, STICK POISSON BASQUAISE, COQUILLETTES AU
> BEURRE, SIX DE SAVOIE, COCKTAIL DE FRUITS, Goûter : BRIOCHE
>

> Marinated artichoke hearts, fish sticks with tomato, mini-shells pasta
> &
> butter, POUND CAKE, fruit cocktail, brioche


>
> Friday:
>
> PASTEQUE, SAUCISSE DE VOLAILLE, FRITES, FLAN NAPPE, SABLE CARAMEL,
> Goûter : EDAM
>

> MELON (watermelon), poultry sausage (white sausage), fries, some kind
> of flan (with a sauce on top- upside down) , caramel shotbread, Edam

Frogleg

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Aug 29, 2003, 5:01:55 PM8/29/03
to
On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 09:19:51 -0400, levelwave <level...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

>Frogleg wrote:
>
>> OK. I've been looking at French school menus, and staggering through
>> translation options. So far I have
>>
>> Monday:
>>
>> SALADE DE TOMATES, LAPIN FRAIS A LA CATALANE, JEUNES CAROTTES
>> PERSILLEES, YAOURT VELOUTE FRUIX, ROCHER COCO, Goûter : CONFITURE DE
>> PRUNES
>
>
>TOMATO SALAD, FRESH RABBIT A The CATALAN WOMAN, YOUNG SPOTTED CARROTS,
>YOGHOURT SOFTENS FRUIX, COCO ROCK, Goûter: PLUM JAM
>
>http://translate.google.com/translate_t


And? You didn't quote my translation [Tomato salad, rabbit a la


Catalan (r?), little carrots blue-molded

(??), fruit yogurt, chocolate candy, and prune jam], My query was
obviously directed to those who could help me out of a mechanized
translation.

Frogleg

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Aug 29, 2003, 5:18:14 PM8/29/03
to
On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 10:20:36 -0400, "Anthony" <JAW...@comcast.net>
wrote:

Thanks for the effort. More coming. Yes, I realize typos are going to
be a problem. Same with any quick posting on web sites. I did a lof of
Google 'translate this page' (which is amusement enough for a week),
as well as a couple of online services and my college roommate's
sister's pocket dictionary (don't ask). "Flan Nappe" kept coming out
"flan tablecloth," which doesn't sound too tasty. Watermelon. Ah
hah!. I did find some recipes for "Salade Africaine" which turns out
to be that thing with sliced oranges, red onion, black olives, and (in
one recipe) a mint-yogurt dressing. "Salade Russe" (in the next week's
menu) is a bunch of veg in uniform dice, cooked, chilled, with a
mayonaise dressing. Two new ideas for me. And interesting to think
they're a regular part of a school menu.

So Goûter is a snack?

I'm still puzzled by SIX DE SAVOIE (the all caps portions were copied
and pasted directly from the web page) Something to do with cabbage,
maybe?

Frogleg

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Aug 29, 2003, 5:30:38 PM8/29/03
to

Thanks, Mireille. My interest is that I feel US schools (and
particularly my local system) have *horrible* food. Which I also feel
contributes to both the growing obesity problem, and a lack of even
the slightest acquaintance with decent, non-haut cuisine. In fact,
when I toted up the main dishes on the local school system's menu,
they were pretty much a combo of drive-thru food -- "nuggets",
burgers, hot dogs, and sandwiches. A nod to veg in the form of
"steamed broccoli (I can imagine how much of *that* is consumed) or
"baby (lathed) carrots with dip".

It is a purely intellectual exercise. I have no children in school and
no connection with school lunches. Just figured if anyone had some
interesting basic food, it'd be the French.

Frais -- fraise. Right. This is also a learning experience. If only I
could pronouce it all! :-)


Frogleg

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Aug 29, 2003, 5:35:45 PM8/29/03
to
On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 12:15:40 -0400, Bob Pastorio <past...@rica.net>
wrote:

>Bob Pastorio wrote:
>

>> St Paulin is a kind of cheese
>>

>>COQUILLETTES AU BEURRE


>Um, on second thought, most likely buttered shell macaroni
>
>> Not sure about Six de Savoie - could be a Savoiarde of Potatoes and
>> Cheese (usually Gruyere or similar) or it could be the pastry Savoiarde
>>
>>> Friday:
>>>
>>> PASTEQUE,

>> Watermelon
>
>Sable ("sand") is shortbread.

Hm. I've heard of 'sand tart' as a sort of shortbread (cookie).
>

>>
>> Not far off, actually. No reason to get crabby.

This is really fun. I'm learning a lot. Thanks for your patience.

Frogleg

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Aug 29, 2003, 5:42:10 PM8/29/03
to
On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 17:31:35 GMT, "Jack Schidt®"
<jack....@snet.net> wrote:

>
>"Frogleg" <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote


>> OK. I've been looking at French school menus, and staggering through
>> translation options. So far I have
>>
>
>
>Ping Michel Boucher and be done with it. Jay-sus, you're gonna get a lot of
>"I think it means this" otherwise.

Nope. So far I've gotten some pretty straight dope. And good
corrections of my own "I think this means." I will try to refine my
queries to specific unknowns in future. Listen, if you want to have
a good time, let Google auto-translate a page of French. I haven't
tried it with Spanish yet (of which I know a smattering), but when
recipe directions for a potato include "bear him to the pot" one has
to giggle. I'm sure it's equally amusing from the other side.

Frogleg

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Aug 29, 2003, 5:52:19 PM8/29/03
to
On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 14:37:35 -0400, Lorraine <l_la...@videotron.ca>
wrote:

>Hi Frogleg,
>
>I am sending you (below) what's missing.
>
>Frogleg wrote:
>

>> SALADE DE TOMATES, LAPIN FRAIS A LA CATALANE, JEUNES CAROTTES
>> PERSILLEES, YAOURT VELOUTE FRUIX, ROCHER COCO, Goûter : CONFITURE DE
>> PRUNES
>>
>> Tomato salad, FRESH rabbit a la Catalan (r?), BABY carrots WITH PARSLEY
>>
>> (??), fruit yogurt, coconut candy, and PLUM jam
>>

>> TABOULE, OMELETTE AU FROMAGE, RATATOUILLE, ST PAULIN, FRUIT FRAIS


>> Goûter : BEIGNET DOONY'S CHOCOLAT
>>
>> Tabouli, cheese omelet, ratatouille, ST-PAULIN - it's a cheese, fresh
>> fruit, chocolate pastry
>>

>> SALADE AFRICAINE, POULET YASSA, BOULGHOUR AU BEURRE, MANGUE, Goûter :
>> LAIT FRAISE, Goûter : PALMIER
>>
>> African salad (r?), Chicken Yassa (r?), bulgar with butter, mango,
>> strawberry milk (only 1 day a week?), pastry.
>>

>> COEURS ARTICHAUT VINAIGRETTE, STICK POISSON BASQUAISE, COQUILLETTES AU


>> BEURRE, SIX DE SAVOIE, COCKTAIL DE FRUITS, Goûter : BRIOCHE
>>
>> Marinated artichoke hearts, fish sticks with tomato, mini-shells pasta
>> &
>> butter, POUND CAKE, fruit cocktail, brioche

>> PASTEQUE, SAUCISSE DE VOLAILLE, FRITES, FLAN NAPPE, SABLE CARAMEL,


>> Goûter : EDAM
>>
>> MELON (watermelon), poultry sausage (white sausage), fries, some kind
>> of flan (with a sauce on top- upside down) , caramel shotbread, Edam
>> cheese

Thank you. I'm getting a handle on this now. I *love* all the cheese
choices. How lucky the French are to have them commonly available. And
imagine the horror of little USAsians facing artichoke hearts in
vinaigrette! Or a cheese omelet for lunch.

levelwave

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Aug 29, 2003, 6:03:31 PM8/29/03
to
Frogleg wrote:

> And? You didn't quote my translation [Tomato salad, rabbit a la
> Catalan (r?), little carrots blue-molded
> (??), fruit yogurt, chocolate candy, and prune jam], My query was
> obviously directed to those who could help me out of a mechanized
> translation.


And? I offered you a nifty little tool for language translation...
Whether you are competent enough to use it is none of my concern...

~john!


--
What was it like to see - the face of your own stability - suddenly look
away...

Jack Schidt®

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Aug 29, 2003, 7:29:21 PM8/29/03
to

"Frogleg" <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:vphvkv83ecb20rsre...@4ax.com...


I've found Babelfish to do same, especially in spanish. There's often one
ingredient that will translate to "a mountain of limes" or "a grenade of
carrots". Very funny.

Jack Lengua

Erika

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Aug 29, 2003, 8:42:21 PM8/29/03
to
On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:30:38 GMT, Frogleg <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote:

>Thanks, Mireille. My interest is that I feel US schools (and
>particularly my local system) have *horrible* food. Which I also feel
>contributes to both the growing obesity problem, and a lack of even
>the slightest acquaintance with decent, non-haut cuisine. In fact,
>when I toted up the main dishes on the local school system's menu,
>they were pretty much a combo of drive-thru food -- "nuggets",
>burgers, hot dogs, and sandwiches. A nod to veg in the form of
>"steamed broccoli (I can imagine how much of *that* is consumed) or
>"baby (lathed) carrots with dip".
>
>It is a purely intellectual exercise. I have no children in school and
>no connection with school lunches. Just figured if anyone had some
>interesting basic food, it'd be the French.
>
>Frais -- fraise. Right. This is also a learning experience. If only I
>could pronouce it all! :-)
>

Would you be interested in a swedish scool menu for a week as well, as
a comparison, if so I can translate one for you.

/Erika

sunshine

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Aug 29, 2003, 10:05:21 PM8/29/03
to
On Sat, 30 Aug 2003 00:42:21 GMT, Erika <Fra...@noreply.com> wrote:

>
>Would you be interested in a swedish scool menu for a week as well, as
>a comparison, if so I can translate one for you.
>
>/Erika


I am interested...


~sunshine

Bob Pastorio

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Aug 29, 2003, 11:24:15 PM8/29/03
to
Frogleg wrote:

Been more years than I want to consider since I lived in Brussels and
had to function in French. Between this exercise and a conference in
Montreal last Spring, I've learned how much I've forgotten. And while
the forgetting is sad, the reminders let me flash on some of the
moments I recall, with the people I associated with while there.

This is fun for me, too.

I have a 12-year-old daughter in public school and she talks about the
school food with scorn and amusement. Start with the fact that we're
in a rural area and food opportunities are scarce. The people working
in the cafeteria are sincere and mean well, but they get mediocre raw
materials and have to produce the meals according to very strict
recipes and menu directions. But even if they had more choices about
what to do with the foods, they'd still produce big portions, with
lots of fat and sugar and overcooked everything.

My daughter deals with the cafeteria as though it were a real
cafeteria where people actually get choices. Rather than the place
where you get what you get. Pick meal "A" or meal "B" and that's what
hits your tray. She asks for extras of the good things and refuses
other offerings. Most of the staff has heard her on the radio with me
talking about food, so they deal with her almost as an equal. By and
large, the food is right up at fast food, but not as good as what's
produced by the commercial operators.

Pastorio


S.Dunlap

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Aug 30, 2003, 12:10:58 AM8/30/03
to
Frogleg <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote in message news:<krgvkvs6runak8uo5...@4ax.com>...

>
> It is a purely intellectual exercise. I have no children in school and
> no connection with school lunches. Just figured if anyone had some
> interesting basic food, it'd be the French.
>

I'm in Honduras, teach school as a matter of fact. We just started
back this week. I normally don't eat lunch at school but I did twice
last week.
Day one: Cooked yucca on a corn tortilla, topped with shredded
cabbage, and picadillo (seasoned ground beef); fresh watermelon juice
or horchata (a rice/cinnamon drink) for snack. Lunch was carne asada,
green salad, rice, beets, corn tortillas.

Yesterday I didn't have snack but it was picadillo and shredded
cabbage on a tortilla with an enchilda sauce drizzled over it, the
same two drinks. I had a pork chop, rice, green salad and watermellon
juice for lunch. Horchata was the other drink option.

I had snack today, two pastelitos (little "fried pies") filled with
cheese. Sometimes they have chicken or ham and cheese in them. I was
able to leave before luch today so I ate at home.

More to come as school lunches progress!

Sandi

levelwave

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Aug 30, 2003, 12:45:22 AM8/30/03
to
Bob Pastorio wrote:

> the staff has heard her on the radio with me talking about food, so
> they deal with her almost as an equal.
>

> Pastorio


So I take it you're in the Radio biz?...

Frogleg

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Aug 30, 2003, 5:31:45 AM8/30/03
to
On Sat, 30 Aug 2003 00:42:21 GMT, Erika <Fra...@noreply.com> wrote:

>On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 21:30:38 GMT, Frogleg <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote:
>
>>Thanks, Mireille. My interest is that I feel US schools (and
>>particularly my local system) have *horrible* food. Which I also feel
>>contributes to both the growing obesity problem, and a lack of even
>>the slightest acquaintance with decent, non-haut cuisine.

>


>Would you be interested in a swedish scool menu for a week as well, as
>a comparison, if so I can translate one for you.
>

You betcha. Thank you. Looks as if I may have to turn this into a
'project' of some sort.

A year or 2 ago Emeril had a special during which he was to "improve"
a US school's lunch menu. And I was thinking, "Terrific. Now we can
see an example of thoughtful food prep applied to a mass-feeding
situation." As I recall, in between all the hype and
self-congratulatory hoopla, his "improvement" was to dump tater tots
into a hot dog & maccaroni casserole. Sigh.

Frogleg

unread,
Aug 30, 2003, 5:40:56 AM8/30/03
to

Wow! Maybe I shouldn't have picked out France, but just any place
outside the US ('though doubtless there *are* some excellent programs
here, too. I hope.)

Thanks for the input. I'm going to have to get organized now.

Gabby

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Aug 30, 2003, 6:52:10 AM8/30/03
to

"Frogleg" <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:gsfvkv0anhfits4k0...@4ax.com...

> Thanks for the effort. More coming. Yes, I realize typos are going to
> be a problem. Same with any quick posting on web sites. I did a lof of
> Google 'translate this page' (which is amusement enough for a week),
> as well as a couple of online services and my college roommate's
> sister's pocket dictionary (don't ask). "Flan Nappe" kept coming out
> "flan tablecloth," which doesn't sound too tasty.

I think the problem there is Nappe should have been Nappé which means
'coated' or 'covered' so a custard tart with a sauce or glaze.

> I'm still puzzled by SIX DE SAVOIE

Six de Savoie is a kind of cheese.

Gabby

Sheryl Rosen

unread,
Aug 30, 2003, 9:48:29 AM8/30/03
to
in article dnjukv4ak73ogcl1v...@4ax.com, Frogleg at
fro...@nowhere.com wrote on 8/29/03 9:04 AM:

> OK. I've been looking at French school menus, and staggering through
> translation options. So far I have
>
> Monday:
>
> SALADE DE TOMATES, LAPIN FRAIS A LA CATALANE, JEUNES CAROTTES
> PERSILLEES, YAOURT VELOUTE FRUIX, ROCHER COCO, Goûter : CONFITURE DE
> PRUNES
>
> Tomato salad, rabbit a la Catalan (r?), little carrots blue-molded
> (??), fruit yogurt, chocolate candy, and prune jam

Those would be baby carrots with parsley and I'm guessing, as a snack, plum
jam. Perhaps a plum pudding? Or stewed plums? Either way, prune is the word
for plum.

>
> Tuesday:
>
> TABOULE, OMELETTE AU FROMAGE, RATATOUILLE, ST PAULIN, FRUIT FRAIS
> Goûter : BEIGNET DOONY'S CHOCOLAT
>
> Tabouli, cheese omelet, ratatouille, ??, fresh fruit, chocolate pastry

Catalan and St. Paulin would be "Styles".....in other words, the ratatouille
is made like they make it in St. Paulin. Not the classic ratatouille. Not
sure what that would be, would have to consult a french culinary dictionary.


>
> Wednesday:
>
> SALADE AFRICAINE, POULET YASSA, BOULGHOUR AU BEURRE, MANGUE, Goûter :
> LAIT FRAISE, Goûter : PALMIER
>
> African salad (r?), Chicken Yassa (r?),

(See above for explanation...)


> bulgar with butter, mango,
> fresh milk (only 1 day a week?), pastry.
>
> Thursday:
>
> COEURS ARTICHAUT VINAIGRETTE, STICK POISSON BASQUAISE, COQUILLETTES AU
> BEURRE, SIX DE SAVOIE, COCKTAIL DE FRUITS, Goûter : BRIOCHE
>
> Marinated artichoke hearts, fish sticks with tomato, macaroni &
> butter, (??), fruit cocktail, brioche

Savoie is a place. Again, I think you are getting caught up with the place
names describing the preparation styles.

>
> Friday:
>
> PASTEQUE, SAUCISSE DE VOLAILLE, FRITES, FLAN NAPPE, SABLE CARAMEL,
> Goûter : EDAM

.

>
> (??), poultry sausage (hotdog?), chips or fries, some kind of flan,
> some kind of caramel, Edam cheese

a sablé is a shortbread cookie. sable is sand. So it's either a cookie with
caramelized sugar on it, or it's a sugared caramel.

Erika

unread,
Aug 30, 2003, 12:02:06 PM8/30/03
to

First I have to explain that school lunches here are paid through the
taxes and therefor "free" for all pupils.
Everyday they can also choose to eat yoghurt and cornflakes or choose
from the salad bar that normally contains cabbage, lettuce, tomatoes,
cucumber, sweet corn or garden peas, some sort of cheese (feta cheese
or other cubed cheese) and grated carrots. Sometimes it also contains
chicken or smoked ham

Ok here is a a week of scool lunches from two different towns in my
region.

My town:

Monday: Chicken schnitzel with boiled potatoes ans sauce. Vegetarian
alternative: Carrotpatties with seasoned cottage cheese och boild
potatoes
Tuesday: Spaghetti Bolognese /Spaghetti with a vegetarian mince sause
Wednesday: Fish gratin with basil and garlic, boiled potatoes/
Fishballs in dillsauce/Vegetablegratin with boiled potatoes
Thursday: Italian pastasoup, cheese sandwiched/ Pasta and letil soup
cheese sandwiches
Friday: Chhesegratinated sausages with boiled potatoes /Vegetarian
lasagna


Neighbouring town:

Monday: Boiled hen, currysauce/ macaranipudding/ Garnders casserole
Tuesday: Cottage pie/Black pudding /falafel with apple tzaziki
Wednesday: Boiled fish, boiled eggs and boiled
potatoes/potatoepatties/ Vegetable hash (potatoes and vegetebales
diced and fried together)
Thursday: Sausage brugers, dressing, bread, mashed potatoes/ Risotto
with smoked ham/ Veggieburgers and bread
Friday: Schnitzel, bearnias sauce potato wedges/ Tomato and tuna
casserole with pasta/ Quorn scnitzel


S.Dunlap

unread,
Aug 30, 2003, 12:52:13 PM8/30/03
to
levelwave <level...@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<bioigj$bcra1$1...@ID-199095.news.uni-berlin.de>...

> Frogleg wrote:
>
> > And? You didn't quote my translation [Tomato salad, rabbit a la
> > Catalan (r?), little carrots blue-molded
> > (??), fruit yogurt, chocolate candy, and prune jam], My query was
> > obviously directed to those who could help me out of a mechanized
> > translation.
>
>
> And? I offered you a nifty little tool for language translation...
> Whether you are competent enough to use it is none of my concern...
>
> ~john!

A mechanized, translation tool was used - it didn't work real well.
That's why your input really didn't fit the need. That's why other
help, i.e. French language speakers, was sought. Online and computer
translation programs suck at recipe translations much of the time.

Sandi

Frogleg

unread,
Aug 30, 2003, 2:59:15 PM8/30/03
to
On Sat, 30 Aug 2003 16:02:06 GMT, Erika <Fra...@noreply.com> wrote:

>
>
>First I have to explain that school lunches here are paid through the
>taxes and therefor "free" for all pupils.
>Everyday they can also choose to eat yoghurt and cornflakes or choose
>from the salad bar that normally contains cabbage, lettuce, tomatoes,
>cucumber, sweet corn or garden peas, some sort of cheese (feta cheese
>or other cubed cheese) and grated carrots. Sometimes it also contains
>chicken or smoked ham
>
>Ok here is a a week of scool lunches from two different towns in my
>region.

Thanks, Erika. 'Schnitzel' is a sort of 'scallop' or thin slice of a
meat thing, right?

I don't know if you're an ex-pat or Swedish, but school lunches in the
US are generally subsidized to varying degrees, 'though rarely free
for all kids. There are free school lunch (and breakfast) programs for
poorer children. Most pay something. Another line of research to
compare costs and payments. I'm gonna stick with menus for the
present. :-)

PENMART01

unread,
Aug 30, 2003, 3:06:58 PM8/30/03
to
Erika <Fra...@noreply.com> writes:

>First I have to explain that school lunches here are paid through the

>taxes and therefor(e) "free" for all pupils.

But not free for the pupil's parents (or whomever pays the taxes).

Nothing is "free"... especially not Freedom.


---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

Erika

unread,
Aug 30, 2003, 4:00:55 PM8/30/03
to
>Thanks, Erika. 'Schnitzel' is a sort of 'scallop' or thin slice of a
>meat thing, right?

In a restaurant it would be a thin peace of meat tossed in flour, egg
and breadcrums. When it comes to cheaper cooking (as in school
lunches) it normally pressed meat.

>I don't know if you're an ex-pat or Swedish, but school lunches in the
>US are generally subsidized to varying degrees, 'though rarely free
>for all kids. There are free school lunch (and breakfast) programs for
>poorer children. Most pay something. Another line of research to
>compare costs and payments. I'm gonna stick with menus for the
>present. :-)

I am swedish. I lured my english husband here. That way i get the best
of both world. His charming british sense of humour and the great
nature, ;)

/Erika


Erika

unread,
Aug 30, 2003, 4:01:55 PM8/30/03
to
On 30 Aug 2003 19:06:58 GMT, penm...@aol.como (PENMART01) wrote:

>Erika <Fra...@noreply.com> writes:
>
>>First I have to explain that school lunches here are paid through the
>>taxes and therefor(e) "free" for all pupils.
>
>But not free for the pupil's parents (or whomever pays the taxes).
>
>Nothing is "free"... especially not Freedom.

Which is exactly why I put quotaion marks around free.

PENMART01

unread,
Aug 30, 2003, 5:28:55 PM8/30/03
to
Erika writes:

> (PENMART01) wrote:


>
>>Erika writes:
>>
>>>First I have to explain that school lunches here are paid through the
>>>taxes and therefor(e) "free" for all pupils.
>>
>>But not free for the pupil's parents (or whomever pays the taxes).
>>
>>Nothing is "free"... especially not Freedom.
>

>Which is exactly why I put quota(t)ion marks around free.

That meaning (supposedly implied irony) is not contextually evident...
especially in light of the pedantic nature of your pontificating discourse
("First I have to explain")... next time it's *I 'need' to explain*... in a
free society [net] one does not "have" to explain anything, besides that's
quite officious.

Quotation marks do not imply other than attribution, but in net parlance
sometimes act tantamount to emoticons, to reinforce that something is to be
taken literally (as averse to figuratively)... had one meant otherwise one may
have chosen parenthesis. ie. ""free" for all pupils (not)."

Learn how to write without using "I"... no one here really cares much about you
intimately... especially since your breast size was previously requested,
whereas you remain mute. hehe

Bob Pastorio

unread,
Sep 2, 2003, 2:10:26 PM9/2/03
to
levelwave wrote:

> Bob Pastorio wrote:
>
>> the staff has heard her on the radio with me talking about food, so
>> they deal with her almost as an equal.
>> Pastorio
>
> So I take it you're in the Radio biz?...

Among others. Essentially I've been in the food biz since the 70s.
I've been doing a food-based radio call-in program since the 80s while
running a company that owned restaurants, ran others, consulted on
food product design and manufactured several lines of packaged foods.
Also, weekly newspaper food columns and articles for magazines, web
site copy, and sections for a food and beverage encyclopedia coming
out next year. And always other small things going on (teaching
classes, speaking, demonstrating), almost all related to food,
cooking, etc. somehow.

And cooking with the 12-year-old Amazing Kid like her siblings before her.

Pastorio


blake murphy

unread,
Sep 6, 2003, 4:53:16 AM9/6/03
to

oddly enough, i was talking to a pair of linguists last weekend about
the possibilities of machine translation, after the three of us agreed
pretty much off the bat that it wasn't going to be a happening thing
anytime soon. i said to one of them, 'so you're not worrying about
your job, then.

'nope. it'd be a great tool, though.'

your pal,
blake

blake murphy

unread,
Sep 6, 2003, 5:04:09 AM9/6/03
to
On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 23:29:21 GMT, "Jack Schidt®"
<jack....@snet.net> wrote:

>
>"Frogleg" <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote in message
>news:vphvkv83ecb20rsre...@4ax.com...

>> Nope. So far I've gotten some pretty straight dope. And good
>> corrections of my own "I think this means." I will try to refine my
>> queries to specific unknowns in future. Listen, if you want to have
>> a good time, let Google auto-translate a page of French. I haven't
>> tried it with Spanish yet (of which I know a smattering), but when
>> recipe directions for a potato include "bear him to the pot" one has
>> to giggle. I'm sure it's equally amusing from the other side.
>
>
>I've found Babelfish to do same, especially in spanish. There's often one
>ingredient that will translate to "a mountain of limes" or "a grenade of
>carrots". Very funny.
>
>Jack Lengua
>

that's what happens when you make the wrong turn at albuequerque.

your pal,
irks

BOB

unread,
Sep 6, 2003, 11:21:04 AM9/6/03
to
blake murphy typed:

> oddly enough, i was talking to a pair of linguists last weekend about
> the possibilities of machine translation, after the three of us agreed
> pretty much off the bat that it wasn't going to be a happening thing
> anytime soon. i said to one of them, 'so you're not worrying about
> your job, then.
>
> 'nope. it'd be a great tool, though.'
>
> your pal,
> blake

Was this pair of linguists cunning?

Your pal,
phil


S.Dunlap

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Sep 6, 2003, 1:04:22 PM9/6/03
to
Frogleg <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote in message news:<3pr0lvc70tmd6njvb...@4ax.com>...

More on Honduran school lunches

Snacks (in addition what already was mentioned) - mini chicken tacos
(look like American style taquitos) with shredded cabbage and salsa;
fried plantain split and stuffed with refried red beans and topped
with crema; baleadas - a flour tortilla filled with refried red beans,
scrambled egg, grated cheese, and crema.

Drinks - fresh watermelon, pineapple, blackberry, or nance (a small
yellow tropical fruit about the size of a large cherry) plus horchata.

Lunches - cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato, onion plus french fries
(on the short school days when only the high school kids are eating,
elementary school half days); Chicken with rice or potatoes, salad
with lettuce, tomato, cucumber; Fried rice with peppers, onions,
carrots, beef chunks, shredded chicken, and egg (another short day
menu when only the elementary kids have a whole day); Pinchos (kebabs)
of beef, chicken and chorizo plus green peppers and onions, rice or
potatoes, salad. Chicken tacos (larger version of the snack) with
shredded cabbage,grated cheese, and salsa, Everyhing comes with
tortillas or bread (except the tacos)

Desserts are not offered. No sweets like cookies or puddings are
available for snacks or with meals.


Sandi

Sandi

Jack Schidt®

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Sep 6, 2003, 2:44:25 PM9/6/03
to

" BOB" <N...@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:lWm6b.239$A5....@bignews2.bellsouth.net...


Nice wordplay, BOB. Very nice indeed.

Jack Impressed


WardNA

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Sep 6, 2003, 9:50:48 PM9/6/03
to
>talking to a pair of linguists last weekend about
>the possibilities of machine translation, after the three of us agreed
>pretty much off the bat that it wasn't going to be a happening thing
>anytime soon. i said to one of them, 'so you're not worrying about
>your job

Someone's confusing linguists with translators. Different skills, different
job market.


WardNA

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Sep 6, 2003, 9:53:53 PM9/6/03
to
>> Was this pair of linguists cunning?
>>
>> Your pal,
>> phil
>>
>>
>
>
>Nice wordplay, BOB. Very nice indeed.

A little shopworn, I think. Judy Dench ventured the same pun in Tomorrow Never
Dies.

Frogleg

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Sep 7, 2003, 5:01:01 AM9/7/03
to
On 6 Sep 2003 10:04:22 -0700, west...@yahoo.com (S.Dunlap) wrote:

>More on Honduran school lunches
>
>Snacks (in addition what already was mentioned) - mini chicken tacos
>(look like American style taquitos) with shredded cabbage and salsa;
>fried plantain split and stuffed with refried red beans and topped
>with crema; baleadas - a flour tortilla filled with refried red beans,
>scrambled egg, grated cheese, and crema.

<saved and snipped>

Thanks, Sandi. It sounds pretty good to me, except for cabbage in
tacos. :-) One question that may be relevent is how many children are
being served at one time/place. That is, good 'home' cooking for 50
may be more feasible than for 300. Also, how much time is allotted for
lunch? I seem to (dimly) remember, at least in elementary school,
enough time to eat AND play a bit. I haven't researched this yet, but
I'm betting US lunch times are quite short.

You haven't mentioned milk, either. Do the kids just have fruit juices
and that horchata?

Auto-translation on the web continues to be both amusing and baffling.
I've been checking out Italy, and got "chest of pollo to the furnace,"
which I interpret as 'grilled or baked chicken breast', and not some
incineration process.

S.Dunlap

unread,
Sep 7, 2003, 11:17:25 AM9/7/03
to
Frogleg <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote in message news:<6urllvcmil0tifk9a...@4ax.com>...

> On 6 Sep 2003 10:04:22 -0700, west...@yahoo.com (S.Dunlap) wrote:
>
> >More on Honduran school lunches
> >
> >Snacks (in addition what already was mentioned) - mini chicken tacos
> >(look like American style taquitos) with shredded cabbage and salsa;
> >fried plantain split and stuffed with refried red beans and topped
> >with crema; baleadas - a flour tortilla filled with refried red beans,
> >scrambled egg, grated cheese, and crema.
>
> <saved and snipped>
>
> Thanks, Sandi. It sounds pretty good to me, except for cabbage in
> tacos. :-) One question that may be relevent is how many children are
> being served at one time/place. That is, good 'home' cooking for 50
> may be more feasible than for 300. Also, how much time is allotted for
> lunch? I seem to (dimly) remember, at least in elementary school,
> enough time to eat AND play a bit. I haven't researched this yet, but
> I'm betting US lunch times are quite short.
>
> You haven't mentioned milk, either. Do the kids just have fruit juices
> and that horchata?

Cabbage isn't IN the tacos, it is shredded cabbage on top - with
enchilada or taco sauce and grated cheese over the cabbage. When you
mix up the sauce and cabbage with the cheese, it resembles a cole slaw
sort of mixture.

There are about 240 kids at school plus teachers and staff. They have
recess at 9 or 915 to play. Lunch is 35 minutes, three lunch periods
(lower primary, upper primary, high school). School starts at 7 am,
primary gets out at 1:40 in the after noon. High school gets out at
2:30. Milk isn't served at school, however cheese and crema (a sour
cream like condiment) is at every meal or with snack. Horchata is a
rice and cinnamon drink. Dairy intake here is primarily crema made
from whole milk or whole milk cheese. It's hard to find even
restaurants that serve milk as a beverage. Milk seems to be reserved
for breakfast cereal, cooking (flans, sauces, candies,etc), and
coffee. The big sellers in the markets here are sweetened condensed
milk (at least 4 brands with several sized cans available), evaporated
milk, and the irradiated shelfpack milk. Refrigerated milk often
spoils because of frequent, lengthy power failures - therefore the
school won't risk kids getting sick.

Sandi

Frogleg

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Sep 9, 2003, 5:29:35 AM9/9/03
to
On 7 Sep 2003 08:17:25 -0700, west...@yahoo.com (S.Dunlap) wrote:

>Frogleg <fro...@nowhere.com> wrote
>>

>> Thanks, Sandi. It sounds pretty good to me, except for cabbage in
>> tacos. :-)
>>

>> You haven't mentioned milk, either. Do the kids just have fruit juices
>> and that horchata?
>
>Cabbage isn't IN the tacos, it is shredded cabbage on top - with
>enchilada or taco sauce and grated cheese over the cabbage. When you
>mix up the sauce and cabbage with the cheese, it resembles a cole slaw
>sort of mixture.

>Refrigerated milk often


>spoils because of frequent, lengthy power failures - therefore the
>school won't risk kids getting sick.

Thanks again, Sandi, for the details. Yes, the hoo-haw about the NYC+
power outage makes one realize how fortunate we are with more or less
ever-functioning electricity. And how dependent we are on it.

blake murphy

unread,
Sep 12, 2003, 7:30:19 AM9/12/03
to

well, i didn't see them at work, so it's kind of hard to tell.

your pal,
blake

blake murphy

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Sep 12, 2003, 7:37:08 AM9/12/03
to

but 'cunning translators' lacks a certain amount of punch.

your pal,
blake

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