Avocado - when to eat & how?

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Joyce

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May 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/20/99
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Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good for
a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat. So I
thought I might try one, but I'm not sure what to do with it.

I remember once having avocado with prawns as a starter in a restaurant, but
when I bought one and tried it, the thing was hard to eat and tasteless.
I've heard somewhere that they are not ready to eat when you buy one. How
long after buying it is it ready to eat? How can you tell?

What can I eat my avocado with? The only accompaniments I know are prawns
and in an avocado & bacon sandwich

TIA

Joyce

PENMART10

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May 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/20/99
to
In article <7i1sgs$g8g$1...@news4.svr.pol.co.uk>, "Joyce"
<jo...@thumper88.freeserve.co.uk> writes:

>Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good for
>a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat.

Low in fat compared to what... whales?

http://www.sunny-avocado.com/nutritio.htm
AVOCADO Nutrition Facts - Serving Size: 1oz. (28.35 g)

Amount Per Serving
Calories 56 Calories from Fat 36

% Daily Value

Total Fat 4 g. 6%

Saturated Fat 0.4 g. 2%

Cholesterol 0 mg. 0%

Carbohydrates 2 g. 2%

Sodium 180 mg. 8%

Dietary Fiber 6 g. 24%

Sugars 2 g.
Protein 0 g.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
------

Vitamin A 8% Vitamin C 0%

Calcium 0% Iron 0%

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
------

Sheldon
````````````
On a recent Night Court rerun, Judge Harry Stone had a wonderful line:
"I try to keep an open mind, but not so open that my brains fall out."


Dimitri G Criona

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May 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/20/99
to

Joyce wrote in message <7i1sgs$g8g$1...@news4.svr.pol.co.uk>...

>What can I eat my avocado with? The only accompaniments I know are prawns
>and in an avocado & bacon sandwich
>Joyce


Good Questions.

I would suggest you start with Haas avocados. They are ready to eat when the
avocado yields lightly to the touch. The easiest way to ready the avocado
is to cut it in half lengthwise and then remove the seed (stone). If the
avocado is ripe the flesh closest to the skin is usually quite soft and the
flesh can be easily removed with a large spoon yielding 1/2 an avocado.

After slicing it is a good idea to coat the slices with a little lemon or
lime juice, this keeps the slices from turning black.

As far as eating is concerned Avocado slices are a wonderful addition to a
wide variety of salads. The taste is mild and greatly enhanced by any salad
dressing.

In addition the avocado halves (without the seed) make a wonderful container
for chicken, tuna, ham, crab shrimp or any other diced or minced salad.

Interestingly, I like sliced avocado with almost any citrus salad.
Alternating slices of avocado with orange and/or grapefruit sections on a
bed of greens and then dressed with a vinaigrette is a great start to any
meal or certainly can be a light meal in itself

Regards,

Dimitri

Nancree

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May 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/20/99
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>Subject: Re: Avocado - when to eat & how?
==============
GUACAMOLE!!
Mash avocados with fork.
Mix in fresh lime juice, (or lemon juice, 2nd choice), lots of minced garlic,
a tsp. of chili powder, a few shakes of Tabasco, to taste, salt and pepper.
Use as a dip with chips.
Or, spread on heated tortilla, and wrap in your other fillings of
choice===chopped tomatoes, lettuce, grated cheese---possibly sour cream,
shredded pork, or ground beef which has been sauteed and seasoned with chili
powder.
Yum!
Nancree


moosmeat

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May 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/20/99
to Nancree

Cut ripe (squishy when squeezed) avocado in half. Put a dollop of mayo
(Best Foods is good) in each half and eat with a spoon right out of the
shell. Makes a good salad. Also if you want to enhance things, a
squeeze of lemon or lime juice on the avocado before putting on the mayo
is a good thing to do.


aem

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May 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/20/99
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Dimitri G Criona wrote:

> Joyce wrote in message <7i1sgs$g8g$1...@news4.svr.pol.co.uk>...
> >What can I eat my avocado with? The only accompaniments I know
> are prawns
> >and in an avocado & bacon sandwich
> >Joyce
>
> Good Questions.
>
> I would suggest you start with Haas avocados. They are ready to
> eat when the avocado yields lightly to the touch. The easiest
> way to ready the avocado
> is to cut it in half lengthwise and then remove the seed

> (stone). [snip the rest of good advice.....]

Since you're new to these delectable fruits, let me offer a tip
about removing the seed. Hold the half with the seed in the palm
of your left hand. Tap the seed with your knife blade (right
hand) so that it sticks slightly in the seed. Turn the knife
(counterclockwise?) to loosen the seed for easy removal. (This
may seem so easy as to be sarcastic, but I've seen a number of
people try to pry the seed out with a spoon and generally make a
mess of it.)


mexicanf...@about.com

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to
they aren't exactly low in fat...
I generally stuff mine in a paper sack and hide it somewhere (under a
bed, in a cabinet) for a couple days. To test you will want to press
on the skin. A rip av has a little give on the outside.

Following are two salad recipes
1-1/4 cups small pasta shells
1-1/4 cups cottage cheese
1/4 cup green bell pepper, chopped
1/4 cup chives, chopped
3 tbsp. chopped onion
3 tbsp. sliced radishes
1/4 cup French dressing
1/2 cup sour cream
1-1/4 tbsp. lemon juice
1 dash dry mustard
1 California avocado, pitted, peeled and cubed
Prepare pasta according to package directions; drain and chill. Combine
cottage cheese, chopped bell pepper, chives, onions, and radish slices;
add chilled pasta. In small bowl, mix together dressing, sour cream,
lemon juice, mustard and salt to taste. Add to pasta salad along with
avocado cubes; gently stir to blend. Optionally garnish salad with
green bell pepper rings, red bell pepper strips, and avocado slices.
--------------

TROPICAL SALAD
Servings 8
Ingredients
1/2 cup oil
1/4 cup lime juice
4 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. onion powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper
2 heads romaine lettuce torn into pieces
2 cups mangos, cubed
1 large avocado sliced

Directions Blend together oil, lime juice, sugar, onion powder, salt
and pepper. Toss lettuce, mango and avocado. Pour on dressing.

--
Jessica Cuba
MexicanFood at About.com
http://mexicanfood.about.com
Mexican, TexMex, Native, and AmeriMex


--== Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ ==--
---Share what you know. Learn what you don't.---

Elaine Parrish

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to
On 20 May 1999, PENMART10 wrote:

> In article <7i1sgs$g8g$1...@news4.svr.pol.co.uk>, "Joyce"
> <jo...@thumper88.freeserve.co.uk> writes:
>
> >Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good for
> >a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat.
>
> Low in fat compared to what... whales?

Yup, whales sound about right!

When we lived in CA, a teenaged boy down the street was a hearty eater
but he was super skinny. His doctor told his mom to feed the boy
a half of avocado with a scoop of ice cream in the center each day and it
would fatten him right up.

Aren't they a nut?


Elaine

Michael Edelman

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to

Joyce wrote:

> Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good for

> a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat. ...

Hardly- they're very high in fat. Guacamole was originally made as a sort of
poor man's butter.

How to eat them? Many ways. Sliced into wedges, they're exceptionally good in
salads with fruit, seafood or fowl.

But health food they ain't.


Wayne Adair

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to
Joyce wrote:

> Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good for

> a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat. So I
> thought I might try one, but I'm not sure what to do with it.
>
> I remember once having avocado with prawns as a starter in a restaurant, but
> when I bought one and tried it, the thing was hard to eat and tasteless.
> I've heard somewhere that they are not ready to eat when you buy one. How
> long after buying it is it ready to eat? How can you tell?
>

> What can I eat my avocado with? The only accompaniments I know are prawns
> and in an avocado & bacon sandwich
>

> TIA
>
> Joyce

The avocado is ripe when it gives a little when gently squeezed. If not ripe
put in paper bag for a day or two.

I cut them in half length wise, remove seed add salt and eat with a spoon. Also
great with chili sauce. Mash it up and spread on bread. Add chunks to a green
salad. Mash up, add onion, garlic lemon juice, this is how I make guacamole.

Going to see my Mom in June, she has a large avocado tree and I will pig out on
them.

Enjoy .

Wayne Adair


--
To reply remove nospam from my address.

The more sand has escaped from the hourglass of our life,
The clearer we should see through it.

Richter (1763-1825)

Jeneen Sommers

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to
I guess there are a lot of different definitions of "healthy" out there. I
use avocados on sandwiches in place of mayo...it's healthier and tastier.

Avocados are high in the good kind of fat, and they have more potasium than
bananas. So, I think of them as healthy. My doctor tells me I have one of
the highest levels of the good cholesterol he's ever seen (and a corresponding
low level of the bad cholesterol).

Jeneen



In article <37454DCD...@mich.com>, Michael Edelman <m...@mich.com> wrote:
>Joyce wrote:
>
>> Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good for

>> a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat. ...
>
>Hardly- they're very high in fat. Guacamole was originally made as a sort of
>poor man's butter.
>
>How to eat them? Many ways. Sliced into wedges, they're exceptionally good in
>salads with fruit, seafood or fowl.
>
>But health food they ain't.
>


--

Young

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to
Michael Edelman wrote:
>
> Joyce wrote:
>
> > Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good for
> > a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat. ...
>
> Hardly- they're very high in fat. Guacamole was originally made as a sort of
> poor man's butter.
>
> How to eat them? Many ways. Sliced into wedges, they're exceptionally good in
> salads with fruit, seafood or fowl.
>
> But health food they ain't.

Are you certain about that? I'm not saying they aren't high in fat,
but I have read that they contain a kind of fat that is actually
good for you. Thank goodness, we're moving away from Fat = Bad.
Also (I'm on very shaky ground here), I'm sure I read somewhere that
the reason you should not have small children on lowfat diets is because
the brain is either (I'm going to get yelled at, I just know it) helped
to develop by fat, or actually IS fat. I don't think that a fat free
diet is good for you. I think there's some truth to what I've said,
because I've had friends who've dieted to where they are very thin
(maintenance thin, not natural thin) and their personality changed to
the point where people would comment upon it. Humorless and nasty.

I bet I get some flack, but I bet some of you are nodding because
you've seen it too.

nancy

PENMART10

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to
In article <374582...@mail.monmouth.com>, Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com>
writes:

Important: check your breasts daily for avocado fat engorgement, and for signs
of greenish tinge, especially about the nipples... massage breasts daily with
cut surface of lemons to prevent oxidation -- Dr. Puckerlipski. :-(())

Barry Grau

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to
Nancree (nan...@aol.com) wrote:
: >Subject: Re: Avocado - when to eat & how?

: ==============
: GUACAMOLE!!
: Mash avocados with fork.
: Mix in fresh lime juice, (or lemon juice, 2nd choice), lots of minced garlic,
: a tsp. of chili powder, a few shakes of Tabasco, to taste, salt and pepper.
: Use as a dip with chips.

Avocado
white onion
tomato
jalapeno
cilantro
lime juice
salt

Pixmedia

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to
>> What can I eat my avocado with?

I mash up ripe avocado with added scallion slice, chopped reconstituted
sundried tomatoes (2 or 3 pieces), a little squeezed lime or lemon.

Next spoon some of this onto the center of romiane lettuce leaf, add a few
raisins (can be soaked prior) and roll up and eat like a burrito.

Two or three of these make a delicious dinner. The lettuce is crispy, cold,
wet and the smoothness inside is .... Yum!

Young

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May 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/21/99
to
Dareus O. Conover wrote:> Young (qwe...@mail.monmouth.com) wrote:
>
> : Are you certain about that? I'm not saying they aren't high in fat,

> : but I have read that they contain a kind of fat that is actually
> : good for you. Thank goodness, we're moving away from Fat = Bad.
>
> i'm glad you said it. i'd go one further and say Fat = Good.
>
> : Also (I'm on very shaky ground here), I'm sure I read somewhere that

> : the reason you should not have small children on lowfat diets is because
> : the brain is either (I'm going to get yelled at, I just know it) helped
> : to develop by fat, or actually IS fat. I don't think that a fat free
> : diet is good for you.
>
> the central nervous system is composed in large part of myelinated
> neurons (tissue which transmits signals to and from the brain and includes
> pathways communicating within the brain itself), and myelination is
> essentially a thick multilayer lipid coat. as such, the brain is more fat
> than other major organ of the body. it's not surprising that it's
> growth and development are 'fat sensitive'.

Thank you! (laugh) Sorry if I've snipped badly (on a diet, dontcha
know), but I'm happy that you backed up not only my readings, but my
gut feelings about the subject.

nancy (have a couple of slices of avocado, or just some olive oil, just
don't overdo it ... but remember, I'm no doctor)

Dareus O. Conover

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to
Young (qwe...@mail.monmouth.com) wrote:

: Are you certain about that? I'm not saying they aren't high in fat,
: but I have read that they contain a kind of fat that is actually
: good for you. Thank goodness, we're moving away from Fat = Bad.

i'm glad you said it. i'd go one further and say Fat = Good.

: Also (I'm on very shaky ground here), I'm sure I read somewhere that
: the reason you should not have small children on lowfat diets is because
: the brain is either (I'm going to get yelled at, I just know it) helped
: to develop by fat, or actually IS fat. I don't think that a fat free
: diet is good for you.

the central nervous system is composed in large part of myelinated
neurons (tissue which transmits signals to and from the brain and includes
pathways communicating within the brain itself), and myelination is
essentially a thick multilayer lipid coat. as such, the brain is more fat
than other major organ of the body. it's not surprising that it's

growth and development are 'fat sensitive'. in particular, nutritional
studies have shown that certain fats (like omega threes found in fish) are
especially important. some researchers have even suggested that fish heavy
diets played a direct role in the the evolution of higher brain functions
of our primate ancestors.
outside the brain, fats also play an important role in other aspects of
growth. consider, for example, that fat soluble vitamins such as vitamin d
are essential for calcium uptake and metabolism. vitamin e is important in
immune response, and has been shown to be protectitive in patients at risk
for heart disease. furthermore, fats are necessary for the natural
maintenance of hormone levels. the body needs fats.
finally, the 'bad' effects of 'fat' consumption are hardly self-evident,
and have not been proven scientifically. long-term studies have shown that
fat consumption as high as 40% of dietary intake has little, if any,
effect on actual body fat. we assume fat = bad mostly because fats are a
high density food source, but also because we want to eat 'heart'
healthy--something about the creaminess of a glass of whole milk is
somehow un-wholesome and definitely very decadent. in fact, fats are vital
for 'healthiness' and artificial substitutes like margarine (high in
'trans' fats) actually do nasty things like raise LDL levels (higher than
butter actually would).
i'm not endorsing the unfettered consumption of large tubs of ice-cream,
but don't fear fat out of hand. if you want to eat sensibly reduce your
total caloric intake and eat variety, don't cut out essential parts of a
well balanced meal. and if anyone insists on pursuing fat-free high carb
food fads, be responsible, don't inflict the same damage on your children.

BTW: constituents of avocados and soybeans have been shown helpful in
managment and treatment of osteo-arthritis (Maheu E. etal. Arthritis and
Rheumatism. 41(1):81-91, 1998 Jan.). and diets rich in mono-unsaturated
fats (from avocados) have also been similarly helpful in people with mild
hyper-cholesterolemia (Ledesma R. etal. Archives of Medical Research.
27(4):510-23, 1996 Winter).

:)

Dareus O. Conover
dcon...@pobox.com
http://www.pobox.com/~dconover


Alan Boles

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to
So by this if I called <notice the if> you a fathead . You should be
pleased and say thank-you? :)

Dareus O. Conover <dcon...@mail2.sas.upenn.edu> wrote in message
news:7i50ts$6r8$1...@netnews.upenn.edu...

Hazel

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to
This is one of my favourite salad dressings / dips (from any Leslie
Kenton book) :

1-2 avocados
1 cup fresh orange juice (add more/less for desired thickness)
1 tsp curry powder
2 tsp vegetable bouillon pwder
fresh herbs (lovage & parsley are good)
1 clove garlic

Peel & stone avocado, blend everything together until smooth.

Here's another of her recipes - I just found it so I haven't tried it
though.

Fresh Green Soup

2 avocados
2 cups apple juice
1-2 cups water (add more/less for desired thickness)
2 lemons
1 tsp vegetable bouillon powder
parsley & lovage
dash of white wine
centre stalks of a head of celery

Peel & stone avocados, process with apple juice, water, 1 heaped tsp
of chopped lemon rind, the lemon juice, bouillon, herbs and wine. Chop
celery stalks, including leaves, add to soup. Blend well & serve
garnished with a thin slice lemon.

Hazel


Dareus O. Conover

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to
Alan Boles (agb...@hotmail.com) wrote:
: So by this if I called <notice the if> you a fathead . You should be

: pleased and say thank-you? :)

uh, i . . . am pleased, and . . . thank you :)

Gary O.

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to
"Joyce" <jo...@thumper88.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:

>Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good for

>a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat. So I
>thought I might try one, but I'm not sure what to do with it.
>
>I remember once having avocado with prawns as a starter in a restaurant, but
>when I bought one and tried it, the thing was hard to eat and tasteless.
>I've heard somewhere that they are not ready to eat when you buy one. How
>long after buying it is it ready to eat? How can you tell?
>
>What can I eat my avocado with? The only accompaniments I know are prawns
>and in an avocado & bacon sandwich
>
>TIA
>
>Joyce
>
>

Geesh. Doesn't anyone else hate avocados? Thanks to Sheldon, I can't
even say that they have cholesterol anymore. (I always thought that
they did).

Guacamole:

One ripe avocado.
2 tbsp fresh lime juice.
optional salt or even optional pepper.

mash with a fork. add lime juice and stir.

Heavenly. And almost as close to pure avocado as you can get without
discoloration!


Avocado can be added to most any salsa and to a variety of salads to
add that wonderful cool, creamy texture. You can layer pizza with
avocado. I like having small chunks of avocado in a bow with another
bowl with chile flavored nuts and a fine brew (suds, guys and gals).

Gary O.
trac...@pacbell.net

Young

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to
> Geesh. Doesn't anyone else hate avocados? Thanks to Sheldon, I can't
> even say that they have cholesterol anymore. (I always thought that
> they did).

I went home to my parent's for dinner one day and the subject came up
and I said, vegetables don't contain cholesterol. My father was annoyed
and snapped, well then, why do they tell you to stay away from palm oil,
then! I said, well, because people are animals, too, and certain stuff
makes us produce cholesterol.

My dad was a grump, but he loved me.

nancy

Jim Weir

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to

->>
->> >Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good for
->> >a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat.

Run a knife through one the long way around (through the stem) and let it break
evenly into two halves. Dig the pit out of the half it stayed in. Fill the pit
cavity with salad shrimp and a Tbsp of whatever salad dressing you are fond of
over the shrimp. I prefer blue cheese, others may want nothing more than a bit
of lemon. Your choice.

Best damned salad this side of the pond.

Jim

maryf

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to
PENMART10 wrote:
>
> Important: check your breasts daily for avocado fat engorgement, and for signs
> of greenish tinge, especially about the nipples... massage breasts daily with
> cut surface of lemons to prevent oxidation -- Dr. Puckerlipski. :-(())


Don't massage yourself, have your SO do it ;-). Much more fun that way

--
Mary f. <Taking herself off to the corner for that comment, I'll
behave now I
promise! :-)>
_ _
( \ / )
|\ ) ) _,,,/ (,,_
/, . '`~ ~-. ;-;;,_
|,4) -,_. , ( `'-'
'-~~' (_/~~' `-'\_)
It's a widdle,widdle, widdle pud (She's not big on sharing, is she?)
http://home.earthlink.net/~maryf


paschal

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to

On Sat, 22 May 1999, maryf wrote:

> PENMART10 wrote:
> >
> > Important: check your breasts daily for avocado fat engorgement, and for signs
> > of greenish tinge, especially about the nipples... massage breasts daily with
> > cut surface of lemons to prevent oxidation -- Dr. Puckerlipski. :-(())
>
>
> Don't massage yourself, have your SO do it ;-). Much more fun that way

One of my best friends has survived breast cancer; she caught it
early because her husband found it.

Anyway: I love guacamole. I think that, made correctly, it must be one of
the foods of the gods. I'd love it if people would post their favorite
guac recipes - I'd post mine, but I haven't been able to perfect it yet;
because of my terrible blender, it always turns out too acidic, because I
put extra lemon juice in to make the damn blender work right.

I'd also love to see a recipe for some low-fat chip-type thing for dipping
into guac. The tortilla chips you can buy in bags, are always too salty;
and the bagged baked ones taste weird.

-P.


paschal

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to

On Sun, 23 May 1999, Alan Boles wrote:

> Just sprinkle tortilla with favorite seasonings cut into shapes you
> like and bake untill dried...

WHAT tortilla? How can I make my own tortilla chips, like the ones that
we get from the really-authentic-mexican-restaurant, that are never too
salty or oily, and always crispy?

Jeez,

-P., ignorant...


Nancita

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to
Last December I went to Honduras to visit and meet my husbands family. I
was taught how to make tortillas by hand and cooked over a wood fire. My
husband's mother and sisters laughed at mine as they were usually misshapen
and too thick in places. I must admit that they looked pretty goofy but
they did taste much better than any tortilla I've ever eaten here in the
U.S.
Nancita

J Durbin <slot...@poisson.com> wrote in message
news:37485717...@nntp1.ba.best.com...

>You can't. You don't have the patience.
>
>Those that do use stale store-bought tortillas fried in vegetable oil
>using standard frying techniques. A little practice produces a product
>better than that found in most restaurants.
>
>

paschal

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May 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/22/99
to


On Sun, 23 May 1999, J Durbin wrote:

> paschal <pas...@wam.umd.edu> wrote:
>
> >On Sun, 23 May 1999, Alan Boles wrote:
> >
> >> Just sprinkle tortilla with favorite seasonings cut into shapes you
> >> like and bake untill dried...
> >
> >WHAT tortilla? How can I make my own tortilla chips, like the ones that
> >we get from the really-authentic-mexican-restaurant, that are never too
> >salty or oily, and always crispy?
>
> You can't. You don't have the patience.
>
> Those that do use stale store-bought tortillas fried in vegetable oil
> using standard frying techniques. A little practice produces a product
> better than that found in most restaurants.

You have NO IDEA how much patience I have, especially when it comes
to learning new things.

Anyway:

Thanks for everyone's advice and support.

I'll inform you as to the results, when they happen.

Best Wishes,
-P.


Alan Boles

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
to
Just sprinkle tortilla with favorite seasonings cut into shapes you
like and bake untill dried...

paschal <pas...@wam.umd.edu> wrote in message
news:Pine.GSO.3.95q.99052...@rac8.wam.umd.edu...

RMi1013934

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
to
In article <Pine.GSO.3.95q.99052...@rac8.wam.umd.edu>, paschal
<pas...@wam.umd.edu> writes:

>
>Anyway: I love guacamole. I think that, made correctly, it must be one of
>the foods of the gods. I'd love it if people would post their favorite
>guac recipes - I'd post mine, but I haven't been able to perfect it yet;
>because of my terrible blender, it always turns out too acidic, because I
>put extra lemon juice in to make the damn blender work right.
>

All you need to do is ask- here is my favorite Guacamole
2 avocados ( haas preferred) press and if soft, then they are ready
lime
cloveof chopped garlic
1 fresh tomato diced
1red onion diced
1 fresh jalapeno , minced
1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
3 to 4 Tablespoons chopped cilantro ( chopped coarsely )
Chop the avocado, using two knives, or use your fingers to squeeze and you will
have a nice mix of chunks and smoothness. Squeeze the lime over, and carefully
fold it in. Add rest of ingredients and carefully mix together, serve with
chips etc.

Rosie

PENMART10

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
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In article <374741...@earthlink.net>, maryf <ma...@earthlink.net> writes:

>PENMART10 wrote:
>>
>> Important: check your breasts daily for avocado fat engorgement, and for
>signs
>> of greenish tinge, especially about the nipples... massage breasts daily
>with
>> cut surface of lemons to prevent oxidation -- Dr. Puckerlipski. :-(())
>
>
>Don't massage yourself, have your SO do it ;-). Much more fun that way
>

>--
>Mary f.

Hehe, and just who'd ya think is Dr. Pukerlipski? ;)

J Durbin

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
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paschal <pas...@wam.umd.edu> wrote:

>On Sun, 23 May 1999, Alan Boles wrote:
>

>> Just sprinkle tortilla with favorite seasonings cut into shapes you
>> like and bake untill dried...
>

PENMART10

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
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>On Sun, 23 May 1999, Alan Boles wrote:
>
>> Just sprinkle tortilla with favorite seasonings cut into shapes you
>> like and bake untill dried...
>
>WHAT tortilla? How can I make my own tortilla chips, like the ones that
>we get from the really-authentic-mexican-restaurant, that are never too
>salty or oily, and always crispy?
>

>Jeez,
>
>-P., ignorant...
>

There's nothing "really-authentic-Mexican" about tortilla chips per se,
actually those Dorito style thingies are Gringo chips... only the tortillas are
Mexican. Anyhoo, slice up a big stack of store-bought fresh corn tortillas
into wedges and deep fry in corn oil until just crispy - not browned - then
immedately upon removal from hot oil drain and place on absorbant toweling,
then while still hot season per your taste. I prefer to pan-fry whole
tortillas and then break them into manageable pieces by hand - now that's
authentic - that's how you'll find them throughout all of Central America where
the gringo touristas don't go. Whole fried tortillas eaten spread with mashed
refried beans, diced tomatillo, fiery hot diced peppers, diced onion, and a bit
of grated mild white cheese, they're called 'garnachas', no guacamole.

J Durbin

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
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paschal <pas...@wam.umd.edu> wrote:

>On Sun, 23 May 1999, J Durbin wrote:
>
>> paschal <pas...@wam.umd.edu> wrote:
>>

>> >On Sun, 23 May 1999, Alan Boles wrote:
>> >
>> >> Just sprinkle tortilla with favorite seasonings cut into shapes you
>> >> like and bake untill dried...
>> >
>> >WHAT tortilla? How can I make my own tortilla chips, like the ones that
>> >we get from the really-authentic-mexican-restaurant, that are never too
>> >salty or oily, and always crispy?
>>

>> You can't. You don't have the patience.
>>
>> Those that do use stale store-bought tortillas fried in vegetable oil
>> using standard frying techniques. A little practice produces a product
>> better than that found in most restaurants.
>

>You have NO IDEA how much patience I have, especially when it comes
>to learning new things.
>
>Anyway:
>
>Thanks for everyone's advice and support.
>
>I'll inform you as to the results, when they happen.

Good. I hoped a little impatient goading would cause you to experiment
and find out how easy making better-than-restaurant tortilla chips
really is. Enjoy.

paschal

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
to

Well, it confused me because the couple of times I've purchased tortillas,
they've seemed too thick to make restaurant-style chips out of.

Next, I'll get you to direct me to a make-your-own tortilla recipe :-)

-P.


Ken

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
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Dareus O. Conover wrote in message <7i50ts$6r8$1...@netnews.upenn.edu>...

> finally, the 'bad' effects of 'fat' consumption are hardly self-evident,
>and have not been proven scientifically. long-term studies have shown that
>fat consumption as high as 40% of dietary intake has little, if any,
>effect on actual body fat. we assume fat = bad mostly because fats are a
>high density food source, but also because we want to eat 'heart'
>healthy--something about the creaminess of a glass of whole milk is
>somehow un-wholesome and definitely very decadent. in fact, fats are vital
>for 'healthiness' and artificial substitutes like margarine (high in
>'trans' fats) actually do nasty things like raise LDL levels (higher than
>butter actually would).


Agree, not to try to cut out fat altogether but I was medically told to
reduce weight. But being rather "ancient" could not pump iron only light
exercise. I enjoy my food, but only cut out the luxury fats, like biscuits,
cakes, ice cream, crisps, butter and most takeaways.

This produced some surprising results. A reduction of 2.5 stone (35lbs) in
about 3 months with very little effort. And feel much better for it. Still
eat red meat & most other foods.

Ken

J Durbin

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
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paschal <pas...@wam.umd.edu> wrote:

>On Sun, 23 May 1999, J Durbin wrote:
>
>> Good. I hoped a little impatient goading would cause you to experiment
>> and find out how easy making better-than-restaurant tortilla chips
>> really is. Enjoy.
>
>Well, it confused me because the couple of times I've purchased tortillas,
>they've seemed too thick to make restaurant-style chips out of.

I may be spoiled by the variety of tortillas we have to choose from
here on the west coast that may not be available where you are. I can
usually find good chip-quality tortillas. White corn tortillas seem
thinner though less flavorful.

>Next, I'll get you to direct me to a make-your-own tortilla recipe :-)

If you can find a package of masa harina, it will have instructions. I
notice that Macy's is also selling tortilla presses now. I suspect
other department store are as well.

However, I think you'll find that the store-bought are more suitable
for frying into chips.


paschal

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
to


Why, Thank You! you droning dizzy-eyed dewberry. I actually saved
this post of yours - there were no profane allusions in it!!! (least,
as far as I could tell...)

-P.

On 23 May 1999, PENMART10 wrote:

> >On Sun, 23 May 1999, Alan Boles wrote:
> >
> >> Just sprinkle tortilla with favorite seasonings cut into shapes you
> >> like and bake untill dried...
> >
> >WHAT tortilla? How can I make my own tortilla chips, like the ones that
> >we get from the really-authentic-mexican-restaurant, that are never too
> >salty or oily, and always crispy?
> >

paschal

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
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On 24 May 1999, PENMART10 wrote:

> In article <Pine.GSO.3.95q.99052...@rac2.wam.umd.edu>, paschal


> <pas...@wam.umd.edu> writes:
>
> >Why, Thank You! you droning dizzy-eyed dewberry. I actually saved
> >this post of yours - there were no profane allusions in it!!! (least,
> >as far as I could tell...)

> >-PRICK


Gosh, you must be projecting; I don't have one of ....those....

-P.



aem

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May 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/23/99
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paschal wrote:

That's not projection, that's wishful thinking.


PENMART10

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May 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/24/99
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>Why, Thank You! you droning dizzy-eyed dewberry. I actually saved
>this post of yours - there were no profane allusions in it!!! (least,
>as far as I could tell...)
>
>-PRICK

YOU! <G>

Michael Edelman

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May 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/24/99
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Young wrote:

> Michael Edelman wrote:
> >
> ...
> > But health food they ain't.


>
> Are you certain about that? I'm not saying they aren't high in fat,
> but I have read that they contain a kind of fat that is actually
> good for you.

And what kind of fat might that be...?

> Also (I'm on very shaky ground here), I'm sure I read somewhere that
> the reason you should not have small children on lowfat diets is because
> the brain is either (I'm going to get yelled at, I just know it) helped
> to develop by fat, or actually IS fat.

Mostly true. Myelin, the substance that insulates and supports nerves- the white
mattter of the brain as opposed to the grey matter- is cholesterol. But once
myelinazation is complete extra fat is not needed, and can be harmful.

> I don't think that a fat free

> diet is good for you. I think there's some truth to what I've said,
> because I've had friends who've dieted to where they are very thin
> (maintenance thin, not natural thin) and their personality changed to
> the point where people would comment upon it. Humorless and nasty.

You've got a lot of semi-correct and confused notions.

You can be thin and unhealthy. You can be underweight and still have too much body
fat. The personality changes you note probably have nothing to do with body fat
percentage, but more to do with the unnatural way these people lost weight. Intense
dieting alone without excercise is unhealthy.

-- mike


Michael Edelman

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May 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/24/99
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Hazel wrote:

> ...Peel & stone avocado...

I tried that, but they wouldn't inhale.


Young

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May 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/24/99
to
Michael Edelman wrote:
>
> Young wrote:
>
> > Michael Edelman wrote:

> > > But health food they ain't.
> >
> > Are you certain about that? I'm not saying they aren't high in fat,
> > but I have read that they contain a kind of fat that is actually
> > good for you.
>
> And what kind of fat might that be...?

I'm lazy. I read a LOT but I find the concept to be the interesting
part. I skim past the part where they call things l-slkfjasdfkljsdfld
glipids. Those of you with a strong science bent are more than willing
to think that's stupid.

> > Also (I'm on very shaky ground here), I'm sure I read somewhere that
> > the reason you should not have small children on lowfat diets is because
> > the brain is either (I'm going to get yelled at, I just know it) helped
> > to develop by fat, or actually IS fat.
>
> Mostly true. Myelin, the substance that insulates and supports nerves- the white
> mattter of the brain as opposed to the grey matter- is cholesterol. But once
> myelinazation is complete extra fat is not needed, and can be harmful.

I think you missed what I tried to get across. You said, avocados
are high in fat; I was making the point that having a part of your
diet that is high in fat is not a bad thing. Let me put it this way,
olive oil is ALL fat, right? Or damned close. (I have to qualify
everything I say, or you will call me on it) Yet, you will include
it in your cooking. I'm saying, avocados are high in fat, but that
doesn't make it an unhealthy food.

More to the point; you said avocados are not a health food and I say
they most certainly are. It's just not what you want to limit your
diet to. This sort of reminds me of some moron that tore into Consumer
Reports because they rated lowfat salad dressing. He was outraged that
they called them lowfat when they were over 30 percent fat. I thought,
you dipshit, it's an ingredient, part of your diet, of course if all
you eat all day is salad dressing, then yeah, you have more problems
than your fat intake. Sounds to me like that guy could have used an
avocado, if you get my drift.

> > I don't think that a fat free
> > diet is good for you. I think there's some truth to what I've said,
> > because I've had friends who've dieted to where they are very thin
> > (maintenance thin, not natural thin) and their personality changed to
> > the point where people would comment upon it. Humorless and nasty.
>
> You've got a lot of semi-correct and confused notions.

> You can be thin and unhealthy. You can be underweight and still have too much body
> fat.

Where did I say that this wasn't true? I never thought that for a
moment. I also think you can be overweight and healthy.

> The personality changes you note probably have nothing to do with body fat
> percentage, but more to do with the unnatural way these people lost weight. Intense
> dieting alone without excercise is unhealthy.

I was pointing out that INTENSE DIETING (translation: NO FAT) was
affecting their brain. I submit to you that INTENSE DIETING, even
with exercise is unhealthy. How do you like them apples?

nancy

Joyce

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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PENMART10 wrote in message <19990520172453...@ngol02.aol.com>...
>In article <7i1sgs$g8g$1...@news4.svr.pol.co.uk>, "Joyce"

><jo...@thumper88.freeserve.co.uk> writes:
>
>>Saw an article in the paper yesterday which said that avocados are good
for
>>a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce cholesterol and are low in fat.
>
>Low in fat compared to what... whales?
>
Compared to most other foods. It is high in fat compared to other fruit
though. But saturated fats account for only 4g per 100g and anything less
than 10g is low fat.

It's getting some give in it, should be ready to eat tommorow. Thanks for
all the suggestions.

Joyce

Grant Ferguson

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May 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/26/99
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I like to open the ripe avocado lengthwise as well,but like to fill the
cavity with Viva Italian salad dressing and eat it with a spoon.

"Which way should i jump?" GF


Richard Allen

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May 30, 1999, 3:00:00 AM5/30/99
to
I'm just getting over a pathological hatred of
avocados after spending a few months in west
Africa - they were the only decent food (in fact
the ONLY food) in a lot of the markets there -
there's only just so many things you can do with
an avocado, at least things you can discuss here.

I thought avocados had one of the highest fat
contents in the vegetable/fruit category?

Rich
Gary O. <trac...@pacbell.net> wrote in message
news:374707ae...@news.pacbell.net...


> "Joyce" <jo...@thumper88.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:
>
> >Saw an article in the paper yesterday which
said that avocados are good for
> >a healthy diet. Apparently they reduce

cholesterol and are low in fat. So I
> >thought I might try one, but I'm not sure what
to do with it.
> >
> >I remember once having avocado with prawns as a
starter in a restaurant, but
> >when I bought one and tried it, the thing was
hard to eat and tasteless.
> >I've heard somewhere that they are not ready to
eat when you buy one. How
> >long after buying it is it ready to eat? How
can you tell?
> >
> >What can I eat my avocado with? The only
accompaniments I know are prawns
> >and in an avocado & bacon sandwich
> >
> >TIA
> >
> >Joyce


> >
> >
>
> Geesh. Doesn't anyone else hate avocados?
Thanks to Sheldon, I can't
> even say that they have cholesterol anymore. (I
always thought that
> they did).
>

> Guacamole:
>
> One ripe avocado.
> 2 tbsp fresh lime juice.
> optional salt or even optional pepper.
>
> mash with a fork. add lime juice and stir.
>
> Heavenly. And almost as close to pure avocado
as you can get without
> discoloration!
>
>
> Avocado can be added to most any salsa and to a
variety of salads to
> add that wonderful cool, creamy texture. You
can layer pizza with
> avocado. I like having small chunks of avocado
in a bow with another
> bowl with chile flavored nuts and a fine brew
(suds, guys and gals).
>
>
>
> Gary O.
> trac...@pacbell.net

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