New Years Eve -- What to eat ?

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Shawn Ryder

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Dec 23, 2000, 3:02:08 PM12/23/00
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We have decided to host a New Years Eve party and are looking for
suggestions on what to serve the guests ! Want a variety of foods, so
thought that some of you may have great ideas and hits from your own
parties that you host !

Lets plan a great party ! Happy New Year !!
Shawn Ryder
http://www.groceryinsider.com
Grocery Message Board:
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Cuchulain Libby

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Dec 23, 2000, 3:20:22 PM12/23/00
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Serve appetizers and cheese boards. Here is an appetizer that is simple and
very good, even if the name leaves something to be desired.

Cowtown Wolf Turds:

pork tenderloin, cut in strips
wooster or soy sauce
thick bacon
jalepenos, halved de-veined
lemon pepper or your favorite rub

Marinade pork for a bit, place in chile halves, wrap with bacon and secure
with toothpick. Prior to cooking sprinkle with LP or rub
Grill until bacon is cooked to desired doneness.

Habeneros may be substituted in which case the name is 'Dragon Turds'

"Shawn Ryder" <sry...@groceryinsider.com> wrote in message
news:3a450432.65080609@news...

zxcvbob

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Dec 23, 2000, 4:13:02 PM12/23/00
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Shawn Ryder wrote:
>
> We have decided to host a New Years Eve party and are looking for
> suggestions on what to serve the guests ! Want a variety of foods, so
> thought that some of you may have great ideas and hits from your own
> parties that you host !
>

Blackeyed peas. No, wait... That's New Years Day. Nevermind.

Bob
_

"Somebody told me it was frightening how much
topsoil we are losing each year, but I told
that story around the campfire and nobody got scared."
--Jack Handey

Jill McQuown

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Dec 23, 2000, 4:45:39 PM12/23/00
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"Shawn Ryder" <sry...@groceryinsider.com> wrote in message
news:3a450432.65080609@news...

This has been a food in my life since 1970 when we lived in Bangkok. I
don't make these very often. In fact, the last time was New Year's Eve. It
wasn't a party. I had to work the dreaded Y2K on New Year's Eve day last
year, then again until noon on New Year's Day. On New Year's Eve I couldn't
exactly have a party (or really go to one), so I made a treat of these
delicious steamed dumplings. Your guests might enjoy them and you can
easily double the recipe. This is one of my "signature dishes" :-)

Kahnom Jeep (Thai Steamed Dumplings)

3 oz. flaked white crabmeat
6 oz. ground pork
6 large shrimp, minced (for simplicity, I buy tiny frozen salad shrimp and
portion out about 1/4 cup)
1 Tbs. cold water
1/4 tsp. garlic salt (use minced garlic and add some salt to taste)
1-1/2 Tbs. cornstarch
1 large egg
1-1/2 Tbs. light soy sauce
1 Tbs. peanut oil
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1 pkg. wonton wrappers

Combine all ingredients (add cornstarch as needed to make the mixture hold
together, but you don't want a paste) except wonton wrappers. Hold a wonton
wrapper in the palm of your hand. Place 1 Tbs. or so of filling in center.
Fold two corners up to meet in the middle. Pinch to seal. Fold the other
two corners up to the middle. Seal with fingers moistened with water.
Repeat until all filling is used. Some wrappers will (probably) be left
over.

Place dumplings in an oiled steamer basket (you may have to do this in
batches, don't overcrowd them). Bring water to a boil in a deep pot. Place
steamer over water. Turn heat down. Cover and simmer (steam) 20-25 minutes.
Serve with dipping sauce of your choice.

Simple dipping sauces:
(let the flavors blend while making the dumplings)
2 Tbs. dark soy with 2 Tbs. sliced ginger, 4 Tbs. white wine vinegar, 2 Tbs.
hot water and a pinch of sugar. OR Sweet teriyaki with sesame seeds, minced
garlic, sliced ginger, white wine vinegar and water. Chillie-garlic sauce
might be a bit too much for these dumplings.

Happy New Year!

Jill


Stan Horwitz

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Dec 24, 2000, 4:50:51 PM12/24/00
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Shawn Ryder <sry...@groceryinsider.com> wrote:
> We have decided to host a New Years Eve party and are looking for
> suggestions on what to serve the guests ! Want a variety of foods, so
> thought that some of you may have great ideas and hits from your own
> parties that you host !

How about some guidelines? Are you on a limited budget, any
guests with special diets, how many people, etc.?

Glenn E. Hammett

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Dec 24, 2000, 9:02:14 PM12/24/00
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The real Southern tradition is to serve black-eyed peas and some sort
of greens (turnip and/or collards come to mind. The black-eyed peas
are for "luck" and the greens are for prosperity. Another tradition is
to cook the black-eyed peas with a penny. Of course you will want to
serve these with cornbread. After being sated with turkey the meat of
choice in the South is ham, pork roast or pork chops. If you need to
go kosher you might try lamb. Although turnip greens are traditional I
much prefer chard and chard mixed with collards is wonderful.
Black-eyed peas can also cooked and then prepared like baked beans.
Oh, for dessert serve sweet potato pie to make the Southern menu
complete.

+Glenn

arthur wouk wrote:
>
> In article <3a450432.65080609@news>,
> Shawn Ryder <sry...@groceryinsider.com> wrote:
> :We have decided to host a New Years Eve party and are looking for


> :suggestions on what to serve the guests ! Want a variety of foods, so
> :thought that some of you may have great ideas and hits from your own
> :parties that you host !

> :
>
> look up red beans and rice in any southern cookbook. traditional for
> new years. very tasty.
>
> the only other really traditional foods are too expensive: caviar and
> champagne.
> --
> Age is a very high price to pay for maturity.
>
> to email me, delete blackhole. from my return address

Dan Berry

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Dec 25, 2000, 1:04:38 AM12/25/00
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In our family, the "penny" was a silver dime. Whoever got the dime
and didn't break a tooth was supposed to have good luck for the next
year.

Merry Christmas!
Dan

"Glenn E. Hammett" <bpg...@planetlink.net> wrote in message
news:3A46AAA6...@planetlink.net...

Betsy

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Dec 27, 2000, 6:18:06 PM12/27/00
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In article <3a450432.65080609@news>,

I'm not going to offer specific recipes, but when I have had people over
for NYE , I decide either to do a sit-down dinner, something fancy and
delicious, but time-consuming etc etc, or, my favorite, everything
must be "finger food". I have made an entire meal out of finger foods.
That means appetizers as poeple arrive, meat and veggies or side dish
type foods, then dessert, of course.

Most/many appetizers are finger food. Just try to have stuff that does
not drip or squirt out, so those in nice clothes stay clean. Things
in one bite, like stuffed mushrooms, or various spreads, or things
wrapped in dough. There's too many to make the choice easy! For meat
you can have various chicken wings, or small kebob type things. I've
made chicken, lamb, pork, and beef on small skewers, all with different
marinades. You can either use toothpicks (too small IMO), or I just cut
down "normal" sized wooden skewers to about 1/2 size. I try to make the
marinade tasty enough that nobody wants dipping sauces, which are messy.
I find most meat marinades will work with small pieces also, you just
don't m,arinate very long, and cook for a _very_ brief time as the
pieces are so small. If you keep them warm, they may cook some more.
For instance, a spicy chicken, and Indian lamb, a fruited pork, and a
teriyaki beef. The choices are many, and you needn't, of course, make
all 4 types of meat. Fish may be too flaky for this use, unless you
have some type of thing like salmon spread on endive leaves or some
such, but that's a good appetizer, also.

For veggies and side dishes, go back to lists of appetizers that are
less fussy. Anyway, after champagne, appetizers and meat, who cares
about very many veggies? Just 2 kinds will do, really. Plus you gotta
leave room for dessert. Dessert are easy also. All kinds of bars,
cookies, mini-muffin cake-type things, candy, whatever. My friends love
this kind of menu, because we can circulate about, get up and eat some,
talk some more, and make a long evening of it. Sit-down dinners are OK
if you have 4-8 people, otherwise your conversation partners are
restricted to your portion of the table, and you get very full or else
dinner takes forever and you can't get up much. With finger foods, the
hot things need to stay hot for a while, so you'll need either a
hot-tray (electrically heated), or some types of chafing dishes. With
the possible exception of the meats, you can make it all ahead of time
and keep stuff warm or cold, then serve at the right time. This allows
you to have fun, too.

And, of course, champagne must flow freely!

Just my $.02
betsy


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