Sushi and parasites

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hmo...@mauigateway.com

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Jul 5, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/5/95
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HA>In <19...@pfood.win.net> apf...@pfood.win.net (Andy Pforzheimer) writes:
HA>> Does his Japanese ancestry make him more capable of learning
HA>>>to prepare good sushi than if his ancestors were from some other part
HA>>>of the world?
HA>>
HA>>Yes, probably.

HA>I don't see how you figure this.

HA>> I prefer to judge where I am going to eat by the quality
HA>>>of the food rather than by the ethnicity of the preparer.
HA>>
HA>>While this is lovely sentiment, it's pretty useless. The original
HA>>poster was talking about finding a good restaurant, the idea being
HA>>that he didn't *already* know what the food tasted like. And, in
HA>>addition, the cleanliness factor -- did the chef take the
HA>>precautions necessary to get bug-free fish and keep it that way --
HA>>is not going to be apparent from eating your meal.
HA>>
HA>>Bigotry is not the same thing as having a rule of thumb as guidance.

HA>The original poster indicated that he would walk out of a restaurant if
HA>the sushi chef were not Japanese. Once there, I would eat first. You
HA>can decide for yourself which position is more reasonable.

HA>Kay

In Maui, Hawaii, the sushi chef can be japanese, tongan, japanese
american, filipino, guamer???guamese???, hey what do you call a person
from Guam? or Chinese or samoan and/or hawaiian. Some people say the
dumbest things. Best sushi ever I ate was in San Juan Capistrano and it
was prepared by some american guys.
Aloha,
Helen

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Joel Ehrlich

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Jul 7, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/7/95
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Hmo...@mauigateway.com wrote about Sushi and parasites to
All on 07-05-95 01:44 saying...
Hm>
Hm> In Maui, Hawaii, the sushi chef can be japanese, tongan, japanese
Hm> american, filipino, guamer???guamese???, hey what do you call a person
Hm> from Guam? or Chinese or samoan and/or hawaiian. Some people say

Guamian.


Joel


... This is NOT a Virtual Tagline. This is -> <-.
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kevin cline

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Jul 9, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/9/95
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Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?

Len Freedman

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Jul 9, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/9/95
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kevin cline (cli...@ix.netcom.com) wrote:
: Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,

: after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
: least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
: later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?

I don't know what wise person said this, but it is true: Judgement comes
from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement! Every once in
a while I have to re-learn the painful lesson about not rubbing your eyes
after cutting up peppers!

The hot stuff in peppers is oil-based and therefore not very
water-soluable. It is more soluable in alcohol, which is why you drink
beer with hot Mexican food. Try some rubbing alcohol or vodka or
something.

--
Len Freedman (le...@netcom.com)

David R. Rhodes

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Jul 9, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/9/95
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kevin cline (cli...@ix.netcom.com) wrote:
: Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
: after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
: least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
: later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?
This is Charlene answering for David . A friend told me that when eating
jalapeno not to drink water because it spreads heat, and to eat bread
instead . So instead of washing your hands rub your hands with bread !

--
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
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^ "When I was young I admired clever people ^
^ Now that I am older I admire kind people" ^
^ Abraham Heschel ^
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
And I am not the Dave Rhodes of 'get rich' quick infamy.

John David Auwen

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Jul 9, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/9/95
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>: Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
>: after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
>: least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
>: later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?
>This is Charlene answering for David . A friend told me that when eating
>jalapeno not to drink water because it spreads heat, and to eat bread
>instead . So instead of washing your hands rub your hands with bread !

Wash them in alcohol. Any kind of alcohol, rubbing or drinking, will
work. It dissolves the stuff in peppers (capsaicinoids) which causes
the burning. Water does not dissolve these substances.

Alcoholic beverages also help with burning of the mouth. Mouthwashes
containing alcohol can be use to rinse your mouth if you don't drink.
Or you could just gargle with a little rum or whiskey. Beer is my
personal choice for oral pepper burning syndrome. ;-)

Dave

Paul A. Meadows

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Jul 10, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/10/95
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John David Auwen (au...@convex.com) writes:
>>: Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
>>: after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
>>: least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
>>: later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?
>>This is Charlene answering for David . A friend told me that when eating
>>jalapeno not to drink water because it spreads heat, and to eat bread
>>instead . So instead of washing your hands rub your hands with bread !
>
It is my understanding that the time honored method of dislodging the
'hot' oil from the palette is milk.

While this does nothing particular to the chemistry of the pepper oil, it
does free it from the surface it is clinging to.

This may be a little drastic for a hand wash.....

-=[PAM]=-
--
Paul A. Meadows - Concepts In Drug Education
Nova Scotia Canada FAX 902-864-2968

Marian Russell

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Jul 10, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/10/95
to hmo...@mauigateway.com
hmo...@mauigateway.com wrote:
>In Maui, Hawaii, the sushi chef can be japanese, tongan, japanese
>american, filipino, guamer???guamese???, hey what do you call a person
>from Guam?
>Helen

Gaumanian. I know. I lived in Guam for 3 years.


MRus...@sgit.iaea.or.at


Marian Russell

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Jul 10, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/10/95
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natalia skapski

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Jul 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/11/95
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first, i would suggest that you do not wash your hands with hot water,
this will open the pores in your hands and increase the length of the
burning feeling. before cutting peppers, wash your hands with cold water,
avoid anything oily (like hand cream). then put some lemon juice on your
hands (as an astringent to close the pores). when you gut the peppers
(removing the placenta and seeds) try to avoid using your fingers, do it
with a knife. after you have chopped the peppers wash your hands with
cold water and soap. if the capsicum burninging feeling is persistant,
aloe is effective in relieving the irritation. so i chinese burn oil, as
well as several other methods. i hope that this helps.

nicole bernadette hansen

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Jul 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/11/95
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I found that running my hands under even cold water made it worse. I just

Priscilla Howard

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Jul 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/11/95
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nska...@superior.carleton.ca (natalia skapski) wrote:
> > John David Auwen (au...@convex.com) writes:
> > >>: Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
> > >>: after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
> > >>: least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
> > >>: later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?
>
> first, i would suggest that you do not wash your hands with hot water,
> this will open the pores in your hands and increase the length of the
> burning feeling. before cutting peppers, wash your hands with cold water,
> avoid anything oily (like hand cream). then put some lemon juice on your
> hands (as an astringent to close the pores). when you gut the peppers
> (removing the placenta and seeds) try to avoid using your fingers, do it
> with a knife. after you have chopped the peppers wash your hands with
> cold water and soap. if the capsicum burninging feeling is persistant,
> aloe is effective in relieving the irritation. so i chinese burn oil, as
> well as several other methods. i hope that this helps.

Also, try putting your hands in plastic sandwich bags next time, to avoid
touching the peppers at all.

By the way, some of those muscle rubs (the Flexall type) use capsicum
oil as the heating agent. I tried this once (the brand was Cramer's),
and got badly burned.

P


Information Services

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Jul 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/11/95
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>someone else had suggested to me about rinsing hands in veg oil (corn,
>olive, etc.), but I didn't find it very effective; haven't tried the milk.

I believe the point of this is to coat your hands with oil *before*
preparing hot chiles, to prevent capsaicin from entering the pores to
begin with.

This is a topic often discussed on the Chile-Heads list. If memory
serves, the remedy for "Hunan Hands" widely agreed-upon as being the most
effective is to wash in a weak solution of bleach; however, there were
those who argued against such a practice, primarily for ecological
reasons.

RES
--
KPMG Peat Marwick | Los Angeles
Information Services | California, U.S.A.

BK4Leg

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Jul 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/11/95
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also try hand creams that contain lanolin.

someone else had suggested to me about rinsing hands in veg oil (corn,
olive, etc.), but I didn't find it very effective; haven't tried the milk.

BTW, jalapenos didn't get me, but the habaneros - well, now at least some
of time with them I use gloves when chopping and cutting the habs.

LizR

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Jul 12, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/12/95
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In article kpm...@netcom.com (Information Services) writes:
>This is a topic often discussed on the Chile-Heads list. If memory
>serves, the remedy for "Hunan Hands" widely agreed-upon as being the most
>effective is to wash in a weak solution of bleach; however, there were
>those who argued against such a practice, primarily for ecological
>reasons.


At many drugstores you can buy individual pairs of surgical gloves (rather
than having to buy a whole box) and I have also found that the grocery stores
are starting to sell packs of 10 gloves that are about the same. Just put on
those and you won't have the problem. I learned the hard way last fall when I
cleaned five pounds of freshly roasted Hatch Hat green chiles. A friend told
me to rub my hands in my hair and oddly enough, that helped to calm the burn
down. But gloves work *much* better.

LizR

Aruna Viswadoss

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Jul 12, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/12/95
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Try rinsing your hands in lemon juice or tamarind paste. That usually works.
Aruna

Sharon Levy

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Jul 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/13/95
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In article <3tp5ns$9...@starman.convex.com>, au...@convex.com (John David Auwen) writes:
|> >: Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
|> >: after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
|> >: least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
|> >: later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?
|> >This is Charlene answering for David . A friend told me that when eating
|> >jalapeno not to drink water because it spreads heat, and to eat bread
|> >instead . So instead of washing your hands rub your hands with bread !
|>
|> Wash them in alcohol. Any kind of alcohol, rubbing or drinking, will
|> work. It dissolves the stuff in peppers (capsaicinoids) which causes
|> the burning. Water does not dissolve these substances.
|>
|> Alcoholic beverages also help with burning of the mouth. Mouthwashes
|> containing alcohol can be use to rinse your mouth if you don't drink.
|> Or you could just gargle with a little rum or whiskey. Beer is my
|> personal choice for oral pepper burning syndrome. ;-)
|>
|> Dave


Will this work for the garlic smell you get on your hands or on
you breath?

sha...@sco.com

Mimi & JB Hiller

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Jul 14, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/14/95
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In article <3u4mvb$p...@giga.bga.com> mand...@bga.com (amanda toering) writes:
>From: mand...@bga.com (amanda toering)
>Subject: Steelasauras VS Garliczilla (was Re: Jalapeno Burns
>Date: 14 Jul 1995 03:06:19 GMT

>In article <1995Jul13.2...@sco.com>, sha...@srv400b.sco.COM says...

>[suggestions snipped]


>>
>>Will this work for the garlic smell you get on your hands or on
>>you breath?
>>
>>sha...@sco.com


>Ten points to anyone who can tell me WHY...

>To get the smell off your hands, grab onto a stainless steel knife and hold
>your hand (with the knife blade in it) under cold running water. All
>admonitions about not slicing wayward digits apply. This is, to me, one of
>life's greatest mysteries, but it really seems to work. Try one hand with
>the knife and one hand without it--you should notice a difference.

>The intent, I assume, is that if you lop your hand off at the wrist, the
>garlic smell won't be a problem. Even still, if the hand remains, success
>is still almost certain.

>As for dragon breath, why would you want to get rid of it? I kinda like it.
>Okay, okay--but if you really have hangups about it, parsley is the common
>cure.


>Really, anyone who can aptly explain why the knife thing works GETS A
>PRIZE!!!


Actually, I once heard that biting down on a whole coffee bean will do away
with dragon breath...but it's kinda gross. On the other hand, Trader Joe's
has chocolate-covered and cocoa-covered coffee beans...now there's a reason to
eat raw garlic!


Mimi Hiller
hil...@smartlink.net
http://www.smartlink.net/~hiller/food/
Hundreds of food-related links and my personal collection of favorite recipes

amanda toering

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Jul 14, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/14/95
to

[suggestions snipped]


>
>Will this work for the garlic smell you get on your hands or on
>you breath?
>
>sha...@sco.com


Ten points to anyone who can tell me WHY...

To get the smell off your hands, grab onto a stainless steel knife and hold
your hand (with the knife blade in it) under cold running water. All
admonitions about not slicing wayward digits apply. This is, to me, one of
life's greatest mysteries, but it really seems to work. Try one hand with
the knife and one hand without it--you should notice a difference.

The intent, I assume, is that if you lop your hand off at the wrist, the
garlic smell won't be a problem. Even still, if the hand remains, success
is still almost certain.

As for dragon breath, why would you want to get rid of it? I kinda like it.
Okay, okay--but if you really have hangups about it, parsley is the common
cure.


Really, anyone who can aptly explain why the knife thing works GETS A
PRIZE!!!

amanda


Bill Snell

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Jul 16, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/16/95
to
drrh...@crl.com (David R. Rhodes) wrote:

>kevin cline (cli...@ix.netcom.com) wrote:
>: Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
>: after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
>: least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
>: later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?
>This is Charlene answering for David . A friend told me that when eating
>jalapeno not to drink water because it spreads heat, and to eat bread
>instead . So instead of washing your hands rub your hands with bread !

Nope, not the way to do it. There is one great cure for heat from
peppers, pineapple. Yup! If your mouth is burning eat a piece of
pineapple. Instant kill. Seems like it would work on the skin as
well. Found this trick when traviling in Thailand.


Warren Liebold

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Jul 16, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/16/95
to
Right, also milk.
--

Warren Liebold
"I don't know where we're goin, but we're on our way" - Buckwheat







rsc...@cnsvax.albany.edu

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Jul 16, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/16/95
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In article <DBI54...@freenet.carleton.ca>, af...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Paul A. Meadows) writes:
>John David Auwen (au...@convex.com) writes:
>>>: Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
>>>: after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
>>>: least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
>>>: later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?
>>>This is Charlene answering for David . A friend told me that when eating
>>>jalapeno not to drink water because it spreads heat, and to eat bread
>>>instead . So instead of washing your hands rub your hands with bread !
>>
>It is my understanding that the time honored method of dislodging the
>'hot' oil from the palette is milk.
>
>While this does nothing particular to the chemistry of the pepper oil, it
>does free it from the surface it is clinging to.
>
>This may be a little drastic for a hand wash.....
>
>-=[PAM]=-
>--
> Paul A. Meadows - Concepts In Drug Education
> Nova Scotia Canada FAX 902-864-2968


Hi,

Try washing your hands with vanilla extract! If it works for garlic and onion,
it might work for jalepeno!

Ren

John David Auwen

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Jul 17, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/17/95
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In <3ubkan$l...@rebecca.albany.edu> rsc...@CNSVAX.ALBANY.EDU writes:


>Hi,

>Ren


Boy, is this an attribution mess! I was not the person who originally asked
about this; I was one of the early respondents, however.

As for the vanilla extract, it has a very high alcohol content and this
is what is doing the most good.

Dave
au...@convex.com

coconutg

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Jul 18, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/18/95
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There is no real burn pr damage, right? Just the feeling of burning.
That's the thrill of heat- endorphins for free.


##############################################################
Steve Sando, Coconut Grove, PO Box 78146, San Francisco 94107
voice:415/648.5803 fax:415/282.4394 e-mail:coco...@wco.com
##############################################################
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kcg

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Jul 18, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/18/95
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In article <3uglcp$2...@news.wco.com>, coco...@wco.com (coconutg) wrote:

> There is no real burn pr damage, right? Just the feeling of burning.
> That's the thrill of heat- endorphins for free.

No! In nature plants are producing a substance to protect themselves from
hungry animals (ie stupid humans). The oils actually chemically burn the
mouth and digestive track, warning the animal that this plant isn't a good
choice for a meal. If you don't believe me, try concentrating (in a very
Zen manner) on making the burn go away (it won't). If you really want to
try some fun, try adding a (single) habunero pepper instead of the
handfull of jalepenios (it's the hottest-- a jalapenio rates about 7,000
parts per million while the haburnero runs about 100,000 to 150,000 ppm).
Believe me, you'll still feel this one at a later date.

PS. I would suggest working up to the haburnero, they're hotter than you
think. I don't really want to hurt any one

PPS. No, that last statement isn't a threat to anyone's manhood, so
really, don't run to the store and pop a fresh one in your mouth.

Brent and Lois Sparks

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Jul 19, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/19/95
to


Hmmmm.....I always heard that one should eat dairy products to neutralize
the "burn" of Jalepenos, et.al. and rinse the hands with lemon juice.
-Lois

Beakman

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Jul 19, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/19/95
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coconutg (coco...@wco.com) wrote:
: There is no real burn pr damage, right? Just the feeling of burning.
: That's the thrill of heat- endorphins for free.


Peppers do not actually damage anything. The reason you feel pain is
because the pepper cleverly (chemically) tricks your body into sending
the appropriate neurotransmitters which tell your brain to say, "ouch".

....the fact that you can't just "will" or "think" the pain away, as
someone else suggested, has absolutely nothing to do with whether or not
damage is actually being done.

However, your body will have the appropriate autonomic reactions toward
the "pain", such as the release of endorphins, additional water being
sent to the stomach, etc. In fact, it is this last reaction that has led
some researchers to believe that hot peppers might actually be GOOD for
ulcers - because they cause no damage, but bring additional water to the
stomach thereby diluting ulcer causing acids.

dave
--
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Frank D. Fellenz

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Jul 19, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/19/95
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In article <3u9mlq$h...@dns.enter.net> bsn...@enter.net (Bill Snell) writes:
>Relay-Version: VMS News - V6.0-3 14/03/90 VAX/VMS V5.5; site news.dp.beckman.com
>Path:
>news.dp.beckman.com!news.cerf.net!usc!howland.reston.ans.net!swrinde!cs.utexas.e
>du!convex!

>drrh...@crl.com (David R. Rhodes) wrote:

>>kevin cline (cli...@ix.netcom.com) wrote:
>>: Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
>>: after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
>>: least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
>>: later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?
>>This is Charlene answering for David . A friend told me that when eating
>>jalapeno not to drink water because it spreads heat, and to eat bread
>>instead . So instead of washing your hands rub your hands with bread !

>Nope, not the way to do it. There is one great cure for heat from


>peppers, pineapple. Yup! If your mouth is burning eat a piece of
>pineapple. Instant kill. Seems like it would work on the skin as
>well. Found this trick when traviling in Thailand.

Anything acidic will help. Lime or Lemon juice. It neutralizes the
capsicain(sp.) which is basic.

DogSupreme

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Jul 20, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/20/95
to
Just a friendly reminder in case this hasn't been covered yet.

Put your contact lens in BEFORE you start making salsa. I cut up half a
dozen Jalapenos, washed my hands well, about 2 hours later I put in my
contacts, about 1/2 a second after that I took my contacts out.

Contact wearers, beware!

DS

Deborah/Joe

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Jul 21, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/21/95
to au...@convex.com
John David Auwen (au...@convex.com) writes:
> Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
> after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
> least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
> later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?

At that point the oil had already done it's damage. You actually were burnt. If I'm not greatly mistaken, treat it like a regular =
burn; aloe, solarcaine, cool water.

Deb
bam...@astral.magic.ca

hu...@asb.com

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Jul 22, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/22/95
to

Just thought I might add my two cents. This goes mostly for men. When working
with jap. or chili peppers make sure to wash your hands real well **before**
going to the bathroom to urinate. As a cook for both TGI Fridays and Bennigans
this was drilled into us often! Yet some people had to learn the hard way, can
you say Emergancy Room!

Information Services

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Jul 24, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/24/95
to
>> Tonight I forgot to wash my hands after mincing jalapeno peppers. Well,
>> after a few minutes my hands started BURNING. I have washed them at
>> least 10 times, rinsed them a lot, and put on aloe gel. Four hours
>> later they still burn. Can anyone help with a remedy?
>
>At that point the oil had already done it's damage. You actually were
>burnt. If I'm not greatly mistaken, treat it like a regular burn; aloe,
>solarcaine, cool water.

I'm afraid that you *are* greatly mistaken. The "burns" produced by
chile peppers are not the same as those caused by heat or acids and
other strong chemicals; in the case of the former, no actual cellular
damage occurs. The sensation of "burning" is the result of chemicals
produced by the placenta of chile peppers (the membrane to which the
seeds are attached...the seeds themselves are *not* the hottest part of
chile peppers, and are only hot because of their close proximity to the
placenta), called capsaicinoids, that fool your body's pain receptors
into sending a message to the brain, making it believe you have been
burned; which is one of the most alarming warning signals your brain can
receive. The simple truth, however, is that you are in no real
physical danger (and, since no real physical damage has occured, remedies
for actual burns are completely unecessary, and ineffectual.)

Regardless, because the brain believes it has been burned it releases
endorphins; the body's natural pain-killer. This reaction is often
referred to as a "chile high", since the endorphins leave one with a
slightly euphoric feeling, and is believed by some to be the source of
true chile-heads' "addiction" to hotter and hotter spicy foods. As one
becomes accustomed to the burning sensation, fewer endorphins are
released, and ultimately it takes a higher dose to achieve the same
effect (in theory, anyway...studies I've seen are still not what I'd
consider definitive.)

Warren Liebold

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Jul 26, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/26/95
to
Bill is right. Milk is another good antidote.
--

Warren Liebold
Lisa Simpson - Live Like Her








Ray Bruman

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Jul 27, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/27/95
to
hu...@asb.com wrote:

: Just thought I might add my two cents. This goes mostly for men. When working


: with jap. or chili peppers make sure to wash your hands real well **before**
: going to the bathroom to urinate.

Isn't this done throughout the Southern Hemisphere? Or is that
just a myth about the water swirling the other way?

As a cook for both TGI Fridays and Bennigans
: this was drilled into us often!

<Delta Delta Delta voice> Oh... mah... Gawd!

Yet some people had to learn the hard way, can
: you say Emergancy Room!

--
Ray Bruman rbr...@netcom.com

Ceon Ramon

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Jul 27, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/27/95
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In article <3v8kmt$2...@usenet.srv.cis.pitt.edu>,
<conn...@vms.cis.pitt.edu> wrote:
>I was in the hospital recently and was given a tube of "Capsaicin"
>cream for a pulled muscle in my shoulder (not the reason I was there).
>The nurse rubbed some on for me. It started to burn. It really,
>really burned. I put up with the heat for a long time and just as
>I was about to believe that I was actually having a bad reaction to
>it, the heat started to subside. A little while later my somewhat
>fever-addled brain made the connection. This cream was just extract
>of chilis. I looked at the label. Yep! That's what it was. It
>just took a while for the name - Capsaicin - to register. Anyway,
>the point is that no matter how much it *felt* like it was burning
>my skin it wasn't really doing any physical damage. So I hardly think
>that someone who touched their private, or any other, parts with
>chili-contaminated hands would really require emergency room treatment.

Yes, but the *pain* is real. If you've experienced real, prolonged pain
(and before Mark makes an announcement that my real name is Barney, let
me add that I've never experienced *this particular* pain) it's entirely
reasonable that you might want medical intervention, in the form of a
strong anodyne.

The heat-based salves that are used in e.g. tooth-ache remedies work on
the principle of displacement, and that sounds like what your Capsaicin
was designed to do.

--Barbara


conn...@vms.cis.pitt.edu

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Jul 27, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/27/95
to
I was in the hospital recently and was given a tube of "Capsaicin"
cream for a pulled muscle in my shoulder (not the reason I was there).
The nurse rubbed some on for me. It started to burn. It really,
really burned. I put up with the heat for a long time and just as
I was about to believe that I was actually having a bad reaction to
it, the heat started to subside. A little while later my somewhat
fever-addled brain made the connection. This cream was just extract
of chilis. I looked at the label. Yep! That's what it was. It
just took a while for the name - Capsaicin - to register. Anyway,
the point is that no matter how much it *felt* like it was burning
my skin it wasn't really doing any physical damage. So I hardly think
that someone who touched their private, or any other, parts with
chili-contaminated hands would really require emergency room treatment.
By the way, that cream worked miracles. Usually when I pull the muscle
in that shoulder it lasts for weeks. This time the pain was gone within
hours.
Kate

kl...@cobra.uni.edu

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Jul 28, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/28/95
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In article <3v8ntn$1...@nntp4.u.washington.edu>, ce...@u.washington.edu (Ceon Ramon) writes:
> In article <3v8kmt$2...@usenet.srv.cis.pitt.edu>,
> <conn...@vms.cis.pitt.edu> wrote:
>>I was in the hospital recently and was given a tube of "Capsaicin"
>>cream for a pulled muscle in my shoulder (not the reason I was there).
>>The nurse rubbed some on for me. It started to burn. It really,
>>really burned. I put up with the heat for a long time and just as
>>I was about to believe that I was actually having a bad reaction to
>>it, the heat started to subside. A little while later my somewhat
>>fever-addled brain made the connection. This cream was just extract
>>of chilis. I looked at the label. Yep! That's what it was. It
>>just took a while for the name - Capsaicin - to register. Anyway,
>>the point is that no matter how much it *felt* like it was burning
>>my skin it wasn't really doing any physical damage. So I hardly think
>>that someone who touched their private, or any other, parts with
>>chili-contaminated hands would really require emergency room treatment.
...

> The heat-based salves that are used in e.g. tooth-ache remedies work on
> the principle of displacement, and that sounds like what your Capsaicin
> was designed to do.

Actually, the capsaicin creams, etc. *require* a bit of pain to work...
they then cause the body to release endorphins, the "natural morphine"
that helps reduce the sensation of pain. Cancer patients and others
with stomatitis (sort of like cold sores all through your mouth) are
using chili-pepper candies (developed at a med school) to help soothe
the pain.

Personally, I prefer other activities that also release endorphins, but
that's most definitely NOT for this group!!!! ;-)

Kay Klier kl...@cobra.uni.edu


conn...@vms.cis.pitt.edu

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Jul 28, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/28/95
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In article <1995Jul28.1...@cobra.uni.edu>, kl...@cobra.uni.edu writes:
> Actually, the capsaicin creams, etc. *require* a bit of pain to work...
> they then cause the body to release endorphins, the "natural morphine"
> that helps reduce the sensation of pain.

That's what I thought too. But when I was discussing it later with my
doctor she told me it has nothing to do with endorphins. It releases
some kind of T- or P- something or other. (I can't remember the exact
word she used. I'm going to ask about it the next time I see her.) But
she definitely said that the pain relieving effect was not due to
endorphin production.

Kate

j. m. recendez

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Jul 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/29/95
to
My family taught me to rub salt over areas that have chili juice or seeds,
then wash. Really works well, the friction of the salt is the mechanism. Now
for the private parts, I don't know.
--jmr.

B. Keith Ryder

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Jul 31, 1995, 3:00:00 AM7/31/95
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j. m. recendez (j...@lamg.com) wrote:
: My family taught me to rub salt over areas that have chili juice or seeds,

: then wash. Really works well, the friction of the salt is the mechanism. Now
: for the private parts, I don't know.
: --jmr.

Should work just fine. Haven't you ever heard of saltpeter?

--
BKeith
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
____
\\// Eschew obfuscation.
B. Keith Ryder \/
bke...@netcom.com

Bill Shoemaker

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Aug 5, 1995, 3:00:00 AM8/5/95
to
I'm not sure how this would work on skin, but when you eat a pepper, sour
cream is a good antidote.

Maybe rubbing on a little sour cream would help skin burns too. The fat
helps dilute the oils, and the fact that it's dairy helps wash them away.

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