My Grandma killed my Grandpa

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Susan Hattie Steinsapir

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Nov 23, 1994, 8:10:50 AM11/23/94
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It may have been that your grandpa would have died at age 63
regardless of what he ate. Now, i.e., this week, the doctors are saying
it doesn't matter what you eat. Some families have an inherited
hypercholesterolemia and even if someone with such genes only ate brown
rice, their body would still kick out lots of cholesterol. My mom and
two of my siblings have this. My mother "watches" what she eats (hah!)
and my brother and sister eat carefully and exercise. Even with all
that, my brother's cholesterol level is still high.

At least your grandpa had the pleasure of eating what he wanted.
As for me, I want my tombstone to read "She Ate Well".

Peace and happiness this holiday season. And no, don't tell your grandma.
--
Yours,
Susan
_____________________________________________________________________________
Susan Hattie Steinsapir hat...@netcom.com Sacramento, California

Foodie

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Nov 23, 1994, 12:53:56 AM11/23/94
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Jesus you want to talk about a sensitive subject, even
20 years later.
My Grandmother served my Grandpa brains, scrambled eggs &
cheddar cheese every day for 30 years.
I did the nutritional anyalysis on it yesterday.
He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.
Every day, day in day out for 30 years.
My Grandpa died at 63 of Corinary failure.
Could I tell my 87 year old Grandma that she
did this? Never.
GAT.

LINDA KEYS

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Nov 23, 1994, 11:27:56 AM11/23/94
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In <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com> g...@telerama.lm.com writes:

Another interpretation of the events:

You grandmother ate brains, scrambled eggs and cheddar cheese every day for
over 30 years and lived to be 87. My 87 year old grandmother eats tons of
sausage, butter and cream and is as healthy as a horse.

That's not to say that paying attention to what you eat is a waste of time, but
some people have a genetic predisposition for heart disease and some can
eat whatever they want and their body knows how to eliminate the excess
cholesteral.

Donna Pattee

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Nov 23, 1994, 11:41:44 AM11/23/94
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From: g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie):

>
> Jesus you want to talk about a sensitive subject, even
> 20 years later.
> My Grandmother served my Grandpa brains, scrambled eggs &
> cheddar cheese every day for 30 years.
> I did the nutritional anyalysis on it yesterday.
> He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.
> Every day, day in day out for 30 years.
> My Grandpa died at 63 of Corinary failure.
> Could I tell my 87 year old Grandma that she
> did this? Never.
> GAT.

So! She tied him to a chair, right? Tightly, so he couldn't move. She
forced open his mouth, ignoring his screams of protest, and she poured the
cholesterol-laden food down his throat? Every day he pleaded with her not
to give him brains and eggs and cheese, and she refused to feed him anything
else!! Or maybe Grandpa was incapable of feeding himself?

Why in the world would you ever consider telling your grandma that SHE did
this?!?!?

Foodie

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Nov 23, 1994, 1:28:18 PM11/23/94
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Donna Pattee (pat...@spot.Colorado.EDU) wrote:
> From: g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie):
> >

> So! She tied him to a chair, right? Tightly, so he couldn't move. She
> forced open his mouth, ignoring his screams of protest, and she poured the
> cholesterol-laden food down his throat? Every day he pleaded with her not
> to give him brains and eggs and cheese, and she refused to feed him anything
> else!! Or maybe Grandpa was incapable of feeding himself?

> Why in the world would you ever consider telling your grandma that SHE did
> this?!?!?

Yo Donna chill. Do I need to put a little smiley to indicate that
something is supposed to be humerous :-). Of course he ate what
he wanted. The POINT was I was astonished to see just how much
cholesterol is in Offal.

Evans Curtis

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Nov 23, 1994, 5:39:42 PM11/23/94
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In article <3avqic$a...@news.bu.edu>, LINDA KEYS <LK...@BUPULA.BU.EDU> wrote:
>In <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com> g...@telerama.lm.com writes:
>

>You grandmother ate brains, scrambled eggs and cheddar cheese every day for
>over 30 years and lived to be 87. My 87 year old grandmother eats tons of
>sausage, butter and cream and is as healthy as a horse.
>

Interesting, because with all the news about coconut oil on the popcorns at
movie theaters, it had me thinking. In the caribbean, where I come from,
my mom cooked with coconut at least five days out of every week, yet she's,
as you say, healthy as a horse. And if she DID kill my dad, it took her a
LONG time; he died at 83 :( :)

Evans.-

BTW, a 20-pound turkey is cooked at how many degrees for how many minutes?
I'm thiking 20 minutes/per at 350, but now I'm not sure :(


Marie Campell

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Nov 23, 1994, 6:42:40 PM11/23/94
to
Susan Hattie Steinsapir (hat...@netcom.com) wrote:

: It may have been that your grandpa would have died at age 63

: regardless of what he ate. Now, i.e., this week, the doctors are saying
: it doesn't matter what you eat. Some families have an inherited
: hypercholesterolemia and even if someone with such genes only ate brown
: rice, their body would still kick out lots of cholesterol. My mom and

Wasn't too long ago that I would stare at Dad gape-mouthed. His
favorite meals are fried eggs and bacon (NOT crisp), fried steaks (and
he *always* ate the fat, which I thought was gross!) and french fries.
Loves gravy, loves sausages .... he drinks like a fish (okay, well, he's
slowed that down, Mom threatened to leave!) and he smokes like a
chimney. And he drives EVERYwhere - rarely walks.
Sigh. When he was 35, I overheard Mom say to her best friend
that she didn't expect him to see 40. He's 47 now and actually seems
healthier than I thought he was 12 years ago. Go figure.

--
--
M. Campbell
I respect authority ... authority changes my litterbox.


S. Bhattacharyya

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Nov 23, 1994, 10:04:23 PM11/23/94
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In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:

>My Grandmother served my Grandpa brains, scrambled eggs &
>cheddar cheese every day for 30 years.
>I did the nutritional anyalysis on it yesterday.
>He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.

Might I suggest that you are off by 3 orders of magnitude? That, I presume,
is mg, not g.

At 2786 g of cholesterol, he'd be consuming more cholesterol than the
entire weight of his brain (one of the richest sources of cholesterol, eggs
aside) and, greater, indeed, than twice, maybe three times the wt of his
brain.

Indeed, of pretty much anyone's brain.

(I have a story about brains and cholesterol, which has been known to take
nearby diners right off their feed. Talk about disasters in the kitchen.
Ah, well, next occasion. Gotta go. Plane to catch. Actually, twentyfive
nutritional reports to prepare before plane to catch, but what the hell.)

- Shankar

Foodie

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Nov 24, 1994, 1:38:57 AM11/24/94
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> - Shankar

You better check your nutritioal software. 1 oz. of Beef Brains
contains 565 mg. of cholesterol.
GAT.

S. Bhattacharyya

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Nov 24, 1994, 5:57:27 AM11/24/94
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In article <3b1ce1$4...@tusk.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
>S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:
>> In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:

>> >My Grandmother served my Grandpa brains, scrambled eggs &
>> >cheddar cheese every day for 30 years.
>> >I did the nutritional anyalysis on it yesterday.
>> >He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.

>> Might I suggest that you are off by 3 orders of magnitude? That, I presume,
>> is mg, not g.
>
>> At 2786 g of cholesterol, he'd be consuming more cholesterol than the
>> entire weight of his brain (one of the richest sources of cholesterol, eggs
>> aside) and, greater, indeed, than twice, maybe three times the wt of his
>> brain.
>
>> Indeed, of pretty much anyone's brain.

>You better check your nutritioal software. 1 oz. of Beef Brains

>contains 565 mg. of cholesterol.
>GAT.

What does software have to do with this? There are far too many people
using software they don't understand, to analyze diets on which they don't
have a handle, to calculate levels of nutrients expressed in units for
which they have little feel, based on data whose provenance is unknown, and
whose worth they are unable to examine critically. My point is not about
how much cholesterol there is in brain. My point is that you have units
mixed up. I assumed it was a typo. Your tenacity makes me wonder if that
was a reasonable assumption.

In many people's diets, eggs are the heaviest contributor of cholesterol.
Most people eat them. Eggs aside, in order to get loads of cholesterol, you
have to eat organ meats, and brain is high on the list, and may, in fact,
be the highest cholesterol food available. I'm not sure, offhand, but it's
reasonable that it should be. Cholesterol is a large part of the padding
that keeps your brain from rattling around in the skull. But you still
won't get 2786g from brains in a day.

Do you have any idea how much 2786g is? Or do you mean 2786 grains? Let's
assume that it isn't so far out a choice of units. In that case, your claim
is that your grandfather was eating in the neighbourhood of 6 lb of
cholesterol a day. Now I don't know about you, but I almost never eat
anything like 6 lb of food, of all types, in a day. Let alone cholesterol.

Relax. Eat a third of a large turkey today, bones and all. That will be
about 2786g.

It's too pleasant a holiday to get all kooked up.

- Shankar (who hopes someone else will carry the metric war forward; I'm
headed off on vacation this afternoon. Bad timing, though - too
late for mangoes, too early for guavas)

mi...@radonc.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

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Nov 23, 1994, 10:56:50 AM11/23/94
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g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) writes:
>Jesus you want to talk about a sensitive subject, even
>20 years later.
>My Grandmother served my Grandpa brains, scrambled eggs &
>cheddar cheese every day for 30 years.

Was this for breakfast, or every meal?

>I did the nutritional anyalysis on it yesterday.
>He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

>Every day, day in day out for 30 years.
>My Grandpa died at 63 of Corinary failure.
>Could I tell my 87 year old Grandma that she
>did this? Never.
>GAT.
>

Well, it's probably high, but certainly not that high...

2786 grams (I presume) = 2.786 kg = 6.13 POUNDS!!!!

I doubt he would have lasted 30 years at that rate.

Eggs run about 100-150 mg of cholesterol each; I'd guess
that brains run somewhat the same, and cheese somewhat less.
Could you mean 2786 mg? (= milligrams = 2.786 g = about 0.1 ounce?)
This still sounds rather high, unless that's all he ate.

Go check your math ;-(

And besides, most cholesterol problems are genetically related,
and only somewhat related to food intake -- your body will make
cholesterol if you don't eat enough.

Mike
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Michael Bowers Internet: mi...@radonc.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
University of California, Davis

Leo Girardi

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Nov 24, 1994, 3:15:42 AM11/24/94
to

Sorry to quote the whole article, but....

So I don't think Shankar has to check anything. If you are correct, then
1oz of beef brains at 565mg of cholesterol, with your grandfather
consuming 2786 gm (gr??) of cholesterol, means.... lets see.....

2786gm/565mg/oz = 2786/.565g/oz = 4931oz....

4931oz= 308 pounds!!!!!

Your Grandfather was lucky to live to 63 after eating 308 lbs of brains/day!!!

maybe you were thinking of something else????


Leo

Leo J. Girardi l...@cse.cudenver.edu
UCD - Engineering (303)556-2356
I'm only responsible for what's not working right now. DoD#0874

THOMAS MILLER

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Nov 24, 1994, 9:34:48 AM11/24/94
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Hey, maybe old grandpa insisted on his graveyard breakfast every morning.

Did those fried brains make him any smarter?

Little Dic

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Nov 24, 1994, 12:45:19 PM11/24/94
to
In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie)
writes:

The irony probably is that Grandma probably has ate the same meal and
continues to do so.

Don't overlook genetics. Remember, half of all the heart attacks which
hospitals see everyday are people who do everything right, (eat right,
excercise, etc.) Remember Arthur Ashe? Doctors and nutritionists will
tell you to do everything in moderation, but there is always the one who
dies early and always the story of someone who lives to be 100 who
attributes his longevity to the 3 cigars daily along with the 2 martinis
and leg of lamb he enjoyed so much! Bon Appetite!

QUYEN NGUYEN

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Nov 24, 1994, 10:23:17 PM11/24/94
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Now that we got over Thanksgiving dinner and I'm looking forward to Xmas
dinner. But I'm a bit sick with turkey, ham, roastbeef, and grilled
chicken. What other dishes to cook for Xmas? Something different, tasty
but not with a large chunk of meat. Small bits of meat is ok for flavor
but I'm a bit put off with lots of meat. Any suggestions?
thanks
qn


doggie

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Nov 24, 1994, 10:41:37 PM11/24/94
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In article <leo-241194...@engr-51.denver.colorado.edu>, l...@cse.cudenver.edu (Leo Girardi) writes:
>In article <3b1ce1$4...@tusk.lm.com>, g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) wrote:
>
>> S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:
>> > In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
>>
>> > >My Grandmother served my Grandpa brains, scrambled eggs &
>> > >cheddar cheese every day for 30 years.
>> > >I did the nutritional anyalysis on it yesterday.
>> > >He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.
>>
>> > Might I suggest that you are off by 3 orders of magnitude? That, I presume,
>> > is mg, not g.
>>
>>>>clip
Hey guys, I think Sankar is right. I used the FoodProcessor V.5.02 from ESHA
Research which has an extremely accurate data base. Here is what I assumed:
2 lg eggs (4 oz) 481 mg
2 oz Cheddar Cheese 59.7 mg
4 oz pan fried beef brains. 2260 mg
(I did not add any butter.. I should have.

total 2800 mg Cholesterol
or for a man in his 60's, not very active and overweight (thats me)
993% of a days ration of Cholesterol, ....about a 10 day supply.

This confirms the conclusion that we were talking about mg milligrams, no big
deal error IMHO, I never thought otherwise.

As to killing the man, HE put the spoon in his own mouth.

Yes it is amazing how much cholesterol there is in brains. I must have a very
well padded brain.
I notice that all the juicy news about cholesterol is based on post mortem
examination of the coronary artery. This has (seemingly) not terrified an
overwheming percentage of the population.
I wonder, has any research been done on the same post mortems correlating
placque in the coronary artery with placque (and consequent blockage) of the
penile artery. That, assuming a positive correlation, would make the front
pages! If death doesn't scare most men, the alternative, living with a
prematurely inefficient penile artery might well?
Anyone know the facts?
steve

Foodie

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Nov 25, 1994, 1:42:21 AM11/25/94
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> 4931oz= 308 pounds!!!!!


> Leo

No Leo, I didn't hit the m key. I guess you have never made
a simple mistake. I forgot to hit the M key. And if anyone
read it to mean g, well I guess they don't know much about
food. And/or they just felt like flaming. How about you?
If you can't discerne a type-O from blatant ignorance
then I guess that makes you, well, just ignorant.
GAT.

Foodie

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Nov 25, 1994, 1:54:59 AM11/25/94
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S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:
> In article <3b1ce1$4...@tusk.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
> >S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:
> >> In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:

> What does software have to do with this? There are far too many people
> using software they don't understand, to analyze diets on which they don't
> have a handle, to calculate levels of nutrients expressed in units for
> which they have little feel, based on data whose provenance is unknown, and
> whose worth they are unable to examine critically. My point is not about
> how much cholesterol there is in brain. My point is that you have units
> mixed up. I assumed it was a typo. Your tenacity makes me wonder if that
> was a reasonable assumption.

My dear, I assume nutritionalist,
You are not schooled in food enough to challenge a professional
chef. It was a typo. I guess you didn't continue reading the
thread?
And if you had read any of the "tenacity" you would have seen
the M.

> In many people's diets, eggs are the heaviest contributor of cholesterol.
> Most people eat them. Eggs aside, in order to get loads of cholesterol, you
> have to eat organ meats, and brain is high on the list, and may, in fact,
> be the highest cholesterol food available. I'm not sure, offhand, but it's
> reasonable that it should be. Cholesterol is a large part of the padding
> that keeps your brain from rattling around in the skull. But you still
> won't get 2786g from brains in a day.

AAGDAREDDDGGGEE........Sorry. 1 oz. of Brains contains 565 MILLI-g of
Cholesterol. 1 oz. of Egg (whole) contains 121 mg. of cholesterol.
No, not 2768g, unless you are a Giant, but 2768 mg. Yeah thats right
MG. :-).

> Relax. Eat a third of a large turkey today, bones and all. That will be
> about 2786g.

Maybe in weight but not in cholesterol.

> It's too pleasant a holiday to get all kooked up.

> - Shankar (who hopes someone else will carry the metric war forward; I'm
> headed off on vacation this afternoon. Bad timing, though - too
> late for mangoes, too early for guavas)

Shakar, read before you write it would become you.
GAT.

Foodie

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Nov 25, 1994, 2:01:17 AM11/25/94
to
Little Dic (litt...@aol.com) wrote:
> In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie)
> writes:

> The irony probably is that Grandma probably has ate the same meal and
> continues to do so.

Nope, hate organ meat.

> Don't overlook genetics. Remember, half of all the heart attacks which
> hospitals see everyday are people who do everything right, (eat right,
> excercise, etc.) Remember Arthur Ashe? Doctors and nutritionists will

Not one pound overweight, boxed regularly, ran alot.

> tell you to do everything in moderation, but there is always the one who
> dies early and always the story of someone who lives to be 100 who
> attributes his longevity to the 3 cigars daily along with the 2 martinis
> and leg of lamb he enjoyed so much! Bon Appetite!

No doubt but this would be the exception, not the rule.
I much prefer Rack of lamb.
And, right, moderation is fine I had sweetbreads (about an oz.) and
brains (about 2 oz.) on a recent trip to Boston. But in the
five days hence I had NO meat or animal fat at all. Great point,
I believe my beloved Grandpa would be alive today if he had
followed the same moderation.
Hate martinis, love wine & beer.
Bon appetite as well, I love Thanksgiving.
GAT.

Ceon Ramon

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Nov 25, 1994, 11:02:33 AM11/25/94
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In article <3b41o3$t...@terrazzo.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
>
>My dear, I assume nutritionalist,

Shankar is a food chemist.

>Shakar, read before you write it would become you.

It's Shankar, and he's one of the nicest, most competent and agreeable
posters on the entire net.

I hope everyone had a pleasant Thanksgiving.

--Barbara

phy...@csc.canterbury.ac.nz

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Nov 25, 1994, 9:00:39 PM11/25/94
to
ce...@u.washington.edu (Ceon Ramon) writes:
> In article <3b41o3$t...@terrazzo.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
>>
>>My dear, I assume nutritionalist,
>
> Shankar is a food chemist.
>
>>Shakar, read before you write it would become you.
>
> It's Shankar, and he's one of the nicest, most competent and agreeable
> posters on the entire net.

Seconded. Foodie's original article was witless and vaguely unpleasant,
as have been every one of his/her/its subsequent posts in the thread,
and Shankar's have been nothing but pleasant and correct. Another
illustration of the old adage that newbies with big egoes should sit on
their hands for a few months before posting...

> I hope everyone had a pleasant Thanksgiving.

Why should I? What was it?

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lyndon Watson L.Wa...@csc.canterbury.ac.nz
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Foodie

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Nov 25, 1994, 8:37:51 PM11/25/94
to

Then sit on YOUR hands & don't respond, please.
Why not. A family gathering. Don't like your family either
Dear Watson?
GAT.

Ben Hochstrasser

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Nov 26, 1994, 12:32:02 PM11/26/94
to
I would suggest some smoked salmon with toast, butter, capers, onion rings
(not fried!) and a blend of shredded horseradish and whipped cream.
Serve separately. Fits with a dry white wine.

We once had spaghetty with some different sauces: Bolognese, Gorgonzola-and-
cream, Pesto, Salmon-and-cream, pil-pil (spicy lil' peppers), Eggplant etc. etc.
If you like to have it more Christmas-like, take (real) home-made fettucini in-
stead of spaghetty.

Or, cook something off your Great-Grandmother's book - chances are little you
get it in a restaurant nowadays...and everybody likes it. Simply forget about
calories and fat - diet doesn't make us happier anyway...

May the bytes be with you, Ben.
------------------------------------------------------
Preferred Internet Address: BHochs...@vnet.ibm.com
Alternate Internet Address: Hoc...@ibm.net

Ceon Ramon

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Nov 26, 1994, 5:59:51 PM11/26/94
to
In article <1994Nov26...@csc.canterbury.ac.nz>,
<phy...@csc.canterbury.ac.nz> wrote:

>> I hope everyone had a pleasant Thanksgiving.
>
>Why should I? What was it?


It's the day of the year we give thanks for Internet access.

Everyone prepares some traditional software and feeds it to his
favorite computer.

--Barbara

Dan Masi

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Nov 26, 1994, 7:36:36 PM11/26/94
to
In article 4...@tusk.lm.com, g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) writes:
>S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:
>> In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
> [...]

>> >He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.
>
>> Might I suggest that you are off by 3 orders of magnitude? That, I presume,
>> is mg, not g.
>
>> At 2786 g of cholesterol, he'd be consuming more cholesterol than the
>> entire weight of his brain [...]

>> - Shankar
>
>You better check your nutritioal software. 1 oz. of Beef Brains
>contains 565 mg. of cholesterol.

I think you might want to reread Shankar's post before suggesting that there's
a problem with his "software". You originally said 2786 *grams* of chosterol
daily, and Shankar was pointing out that you probably meant *milligrams*.
Assuming your figure of 565 mg per oz figure to be correct, your grandfather
would have to eat over 308 pounds of beef brains to get the daily cholesterol
intake of 2786 grams that you mentioned. OK, maybe he could cut his organ
meat intake down to a hundred pounds per day if you include a couple of
full wheels of cheese and a 10-foot omlette...

---
Dan Masi
Mentor Graphics Corp.
da...@warren.mentorg.com

Ray Taylor

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Nov 26, 1994, 8:08:00 PM11/26/94
to

Why not Baked Manicotti or Lasagna??? Prime Rib??? Quiche and
Salad??? Keilbasa and Sauerkraut??? Veal Parmesan??? How about
BBQ Spareribs??? Corned Beef and Cabbage??? Roast Duck??? Maybe
Cornish Hen??? How about just a bunch of appetizers??? It does not
matter WHAT you have to eat as long as you are with family and
friends. The true meaning of the holidays are on the inside, not
the outside! Hot Dogs and Beans are great when shared with those
you love and who love you!!!

Happy Holidays to all!!!
/rt
--
To Do is to Be Plato
To Be is to Do Socrates
Do Be Do Be Do Frank Sinatra

Alvin Croll

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Nov 26, 1994, 11:07:31 PM11/26/94
to
Sorry to have to play Columbo here, but you're assuming that your
grandmother didn't know what she was doing to your grandfather by feeding
him that meal every day...... *<8?) (class clown)

phy...@csc.canterbury.ac.nz

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Nov 27, 1994, 1:21:18 AM11/27/94
to
ce...@u.washington.edu (Ceon Ramon) writes [anent Thanksgiving]:

> It's the day of the year we give thanks for Internet access.
>
> Everyone prepares some traditional software and feeds it to his
> favorite computer.

Ah, thanks! Mine prefers solid food and just ingested a disc, alas.

Dennis Benjamin

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Nov 27, 1994, 1:58:32 AM11/27/94
to
g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) writes:

>S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:

... classic GAT vitriol deleted

>Shakar, read before you write it would become you.

Yowsa! Talk about the pot calling the kettle black! If you had taken the
5 seconds necessary to spot the egregious error in your initial post all
this flaming would not have occurred. And his name is Shankar.
>GAT.

--
--- DB benj...@picasso.ucsf.edu
"A biped capable of slaying another with iron is evidently to modern eyes a
man and a brother. It cannot be doubted that for smashing skulls, iron is best"
-Winston Churchill, 'A History of the English Speaking Peoples'

Foodie

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Nov 27, 1994, 7:37:41 PM11/27/94
to

No, I don't think she did sir. Nice raincoat.
GAT.

Foodie

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Nov 27, 1994, 7:42:01 PM11/27/94
to
Dennis Benjamin (benj...@picasso.ucsf.edu) wrote:
> g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) writes:

> >S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:

> ... classic GAT vitriol deleted

> >Shakar, read before you write it would become you.

> Yowsa! Talk about the pot calling the kettle black! If you had taken the
> 5 seconds necessary to spot the egregious error in your initial post all
> this flaming would not have occurred. And his name is Shankar.
> >GAT.

Pots & kettles are all the same color. If *shankar* had taken
the time to realize that no human could consume 308 lbs. of
brains per day, then all this flaming would not have occurred.
Isn't that an open wound?
GAT.

Gary Heston

unread,
Nov 25, 1994, 9:58:44 PM11/25/94
to
In article <leo-241194...@engr-51.denver.colorado.edu> l...@cse.cudenver.edu (Leo Girardi) writes:
>In article <3b1ce1$4...@tusk.lm.com>, g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) wrote:
>
>> S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:
>> > In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:

>> > >He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.

>> > Might I suggest that you are off by 3 orders of magnitude? That, I presume,
>> > is mg, not g.

>> You better check your nutritioal software. 1 oz. of Beef Brains

>> contains 565 mg. of cholesterol.

>Sorry to quote the whole article, but....

Oh, I think it was reasonable. I excised a bit of it, though.

>So I don't think Shankar has to check anything. If you are correct, then
>1oz of beef brains at 565mg of cholesterol, with your grandfather
>consuming 2786 gm (gr??) of cholesterol, means.... lets see.....

>2786gm/565mg/oz = 2786/.565g/oz = 4931oz....

>4931oz= 308 pounds!!!!!

>Your Grandfather was lucky to live to 63 after eating 308 lbs of brains/day!!!

No, it was brains, eggs, and cheese--probably split about evenly between
the three. So, since eggs and cheese will contain a lower percentage of
chloresterol than brains (I think), Gramps was probably eating closer to
340-350 pounds of food per day.

Talk about a monotonous diet.....he probably died of boredom.

>maybe you were thinking of something else????

I believe he was thinking up the best way to get into as many killfiles
as quickly as possible.


--
Gary Heston, at home..... ...which is now running Unix... :-)
ga...@cdthq.uucp uunet!sci34hub!cdthq!gary ga...@cdthq.uucp@uunet.uu.net
"Knowledge accumulates in universities, because the freshmen bring a
little in, and the seniors take none away." Academic saying

Christine Neidecker

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 8:27:15 AM11/28/94
to
In article <benjamin....@picasso.ucsf.edu> benj...@picasso.ucsf.edu (Dennis Benjamin) writes:
>
>Yowsa! Talk about the pot calling the kettle black! If you had taken the
>5 seconds necessary to spot the egregious error in your initial post all
>this flaming would not have occurred. And his name is Shankar.

Yeah, let's give Shankar a break. To my knowledge, he's never used the
words "risotto" and "Uncle Ben's" in the same sentence.

Chris

Walter Gray

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 11:35:38 AM11/28/94
to
In article <3b0vrn$m...@ios.com>, sbha...@ios.com (S. Bhattacharyya) writes:
>In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
>
>>My Grandmother served my Grandpa brains, scrambled eggs &
>>cheddar cheese every day for 30 years.
>>I did the nutritional anyalysis on it yesterday.
>>He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.
>
>Might I suggest that you are off by 3 orders of magnitude? That, I presume,
>is mg, not g.
>
>At 2786 g of cholesterol, he'd be consuming more cholesterol than the
>entire weight of his brain (one of the richest sources of cholesterol, eggs
>aside) and, greater, indeed, than twice, maybe three times the wt of his
>brain.
>
>Indeed, of pretty much anyone's brain.
>

Nice one, Shankar!

I tried the sums, if we can believe 1 oz brains = 565 mg chol. then a 3 lb
helping of this gukk will give 27 grams of cholesterol, not a big deal,
especially if you are working hard. (Better than a quarter pounder & fries.)

On the other hand, we don't know what else might have happened during
those meals... (I read Steven King, occasionally.)

------------------------ usual disclaimers etc. ------------------------

Doris F Kuehl

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 11:47:53 AM11/28/94
to

Maybe try poached salmon?

--
Doris F Kuehl
dfk...@iastate.edu

Michael Kankiewicz

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 12:48:28 PM11/28/94
to
In article <3bclrj$s...@linus.mitre.org>
How ironic. I was watching the frug this past weekend, and he made a
rice-mushroom-cheese dish. He didn't call it risotto, but if it looks like
a duck...well, you know. I almost fell off the couch when he said, "For this
dish I like to use Uncle Bens..."
MK

Emily Breed

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 12:52:32 PM11/28/94
to
In article <3bb90p$h...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
>Pots & kettles are all the same color.

That's the point of the idiom.

>If *shankar* had taken
>the time to realize that no human could consume 308 lbs. of
>brains per day, then all this flaming would not have occurred.

*Shankar* was perfectly aware of that. You, however, appeared not to
realize that amount of cholesterol you claimed you grandfather was
ingesting couldn't be provided in less than 308 pounds of brains.

>Isn't that an open wound?

The only open wound I see here is where your brains were apparently
excised - perhaps to add to the 308 pounds under discussion?

-- Emily Breed

cwe...@iastate.edu

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 1:03:24 PM11/28/94
to
In <3b3lb5$h...@ixnews1.ix.netcom.com> qu...@ix.netcom.com (QUYEN NGUYEN) writes:

>>Now that we got over Thanksgiving dinner and I'm looking forward to Xmas
>>dinner. But I'm a bit sick with turkey, ham, roastbeef, and grilled
>>chicken. What other dishes to cook for Xmas? Something different, tasty
>>but not with a large chunk of meat. Small bits of meat is ok for flavor
>>but I'm a bit put off with lots of meat. Any suggestions?
>>thanks
>>qn

Certainly all American "traditional" meals involve big chunks 'o meat,
don't they. I have two ideas from Italian eating tradition.

1. A very fancy seafood soup (traditionally with 7 kinds of seafood, I
believe) is the traditional x-mas eve meal.

2. I think part of the whole tradition of dining in courses comes from
the fact that meat is expensive and could only be a small part of the
meal for most families. If you really go all out with a multi-course
meal, you could have a simple "second course" with very modest portions
of some elegant meat dish, like rack of lamb, roast quail or squab or
something, grilled salmon, tuna or swordfish, etc. I have found it
especially helps to make the first course unusually stunning, like (if
going italian) a rich risotto or hand-made pasta dish with luxurious
ingrediants like porcini mushrooms, parmigiano reggiano, truffles, or
something of that sort. Also, serving an interesting wine with a modest
meat course seem to make people not notice (or at least not mind) small
portions of meat. Also, serving a salad after the second course helps
people feel full and satisfied with a small amount of meat.

Good luck! Let us know what you decide on. (I've found that the
hardest part of holiday meals is convincing family members that its ok
to depart at least a little bit from the "traditional" menu!)

--
Craig Weston
cwe...@iastate.edu

AdamJ18351

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 2:30:11 PM11/28/94
to
In article <dfkuehl....@des2.iastate.edu>, dfk...@iastate.edu
(Doris F Kuehl) writes:

Try a Mexican Fiesta. When I lived on the Texas coast a number of years
ago, that was the craze. People would sell fresh-hot tamales
door-to-door. If you are interested, let me know and I'll send you some
easy recipes.

Michael J. Edelman

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 4:08:16 PM11/28/94
to
In article 5...@acsu.buffalo.edu, MICH...@ubvm.cc.buffalo.edu (Michael Kankiewicz) writes:
..

>>Yeah, let's give Shankar a break. To my knowledge, he's never used the
>>words "risotto" and "Uncle Ben's" in the same sentence.

Although legend has it he once shot a man in San Antonio for using a commercial
curry powder...

--mike

Alvin Croll

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 9:08:21 PM11/28/94
to

J-j-just one more thing, sir before I go.....
Are you saying that your grandmother liked your grandfather, then?
The manner of his passing gives new meaning to the term brain dead.
Oh, sorry. I thought this was alt.humor.puns.

(scratches head, puts cigar stump back in mouth, looks puzzled and
shuffles off shaking his head)

david...@24stex.com

unread,
Nov 29, 1994, 2:07:17 AM11/29/94
to

> Try a Mexican Fiesta. When I lived on the Texas coast a number of
> years
> ago, that was the craze. People would sell fresh-hot tamales
> door-to-door. If you are interested, let me know and I'll send you
> some
> easy recipes.

Please do. My internet adress is david...@24stex.com

D.

Chris Bourne

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 3:09:45 PM11/28/94
to
How about a whole baked salmon?


--
Chris Bourne

Michael J. Edelman

unread,
Nov 29, 1994, 11:26:50 AM11/29/94
to
I like to enjoy a traditional Jewish Christmas, which involves going to
a Chinese restaurant. Works great; the restaurants are the only ones open
on Christmas eve, and we're the only ones looking for restaurants... ;-)

--mike


Liz

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 6:46:34 AM11/28/94
to
In article <3b410d$t...@terrazzo.lm.com> g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) writes:

>Leo Girardi (l...@cse.cudenver.edu) wrote:
>> In article <3b1ce1$4...@tusk.lm.com>, g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) wrote:
>> > S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:
>> > > In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
>> > > >He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.
>> >
>> > > Might I suggest that you are off by 3 orders of magnitude? That, I presume,
>> > > is mg, not g.
>> >
>> > You better check your nutritioal software. 1 oz. of Beef Brains
>> > contains 565 mg. of cholesterol.
>> > GAT.

>No Leo, I didn't hit the m key. I guess you have never made
>a simple mistake. I forgot to hit the M key. And if anyone
>read it to mean g, well I guess they don't know much about
>food. And/or they just felt like flaming. How about you?
>If you can't discerne a type-O from blatant ignorance
>then I guess that makes you, well, just ignorant.
>GAT.

GAT, if you read the above you will see that you were rather nasty to Shankar
prior to realizing that *you* had made a typo. We "read it to mean g"
because that is exactly how *you* typed it. I've seen several errors in your
posts while you claim to be accurate (who *is* Mark Kiffen, anyway :). So
take your own advice and read before you flame. Shankar pointed out your
mistake. You should have saids "oops" at that point rather than nastily
telling him to "check his software". From the content of your posts it sounds
that you had better check yours first.

I am sure you have a lot to offer this group, but I must say you are going
about it in a rather antagonistic fashion.

Liz

Liz

unread,
Nov 29, 1994, 6:20:51 AM11/29/94
to
> > Try a Mexican Fiesta. When I lived on the Texas coast a number of
> > years
> > ago, that was the craze. People would sell fresh-hot tamales
> > door-to-door.

Around here (Dallas, TX) it's the custom for Hispanic families to put the
tamales on to steam and then go to Mass. When they get home, the tamales are
done. My mother has a good friend from Mexico who (until she moved out of
town) always made us tamales for Christmas. You can put anything in a tamale.
The dessert ones were incredible - bits of bittersweet chocolate and
cinnamon, butter and raisins. YUM!!!

In my family we always have beef filet for Christmas dinner. Much easier than
turkey and tastes great.

Liz

Diane M. Ferrell

unread,
Nov 29, 1994, 3:06:47 PM11/29/94
to
In my Italian family, Christmas Eve dinner - eaten after midnight Mass--
was always heavy on the protien: Homemade sausages (Italian and
Slovenian), brajioles, meatballs, baked ham, and baccala (fabulous dried
cod-fried in a light batter and served with spaghetti sauce): Homemade
pasta, usually gnocci, roasted potatoes, a wonderful salad with three to
seven different kinds of lettuces, homemade bread or garlic bread,
potitsa, and--of course--good wine. Now, since there were always between
20-30 people for Christmas dinner, my Mom would not jump up and down to
serve the dinner in courses, everything was served at the same time--we
just ate it in courses with the salad always the last. BTW, we also had
roasted pimento peppers in olive oil, pressed eggplant slices in hot
pepper-garlic-mint-olive oil dressing, the veggies, two or three
different kinds of olives, artichoke hearts, fried cardonne, pickled
peppers, pickled veggies and whatever else we happend to can from the summer.

For dessert we had fig bars, pizzelles, kiflin, tarralucci, chocolate
fudge cookies, and ostia.

And guess what? This is still the dinner I will serve at our Christmas
eve celebration--which is now before Midnight Mass. And, I don't have
enough room to have a sit down dinner, so everything is served
buffet--and my family still eats the salad at the last. Oh well--old
habits die hard.

Diane.

Stephanie da Silva

unread,
Nov 28, 1994, 1:22:39 AM11/28/94
to
>ce...@u.washington.edu (Ceon Ramon) writes:

>> I hope everyone had a pleasant Thanksgiving.
>
>Why should I? What was it?

This is sort of like a discussion I had with Peter sometime Thursday after
I decided I wasn't going to get around to cooking the turkey that day. (It
still wasn't quite defrosted, and I know better to buy such a huge turkey on
Tuesday instead of Monday). So I asked him if he would mind if we had it
Friday instead. He replied, "You're asking me? It's your strange American
custom."

I roasted it overnight and we had it for breakfast Friday morning.

Foodie

unread,
Nov 29, 1994, 11:48:42 PM11/29/94
to

> Chris

Just in case you were not paying attention, Chris, and you obviously
were not, I was the one who posted the facts on risotto. This
sentence to which you are referring was the following:
"You still can't make risotto from Uncle Ben's."
Wake up.
GAT.

Foodie

unread,
Nov 29, 1994, 11:58:08 PM11/29/94
to
Liz (RL...@msg.ti.com) wrote:
> In article <3b410d$t...@terrazzo.lm.com> g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) writes:
> >Leo Girardi (l...@cse.cudenver.edu) wrote:
> >> In article <3b1ce1$4...@tusk.lm.com>, g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) wrote:
> >> > S. Bhattacharyya (sbha...@ios.com) wrote:
> >> > > In article <3auldk$1...@epicycle.lm.com>, Foodie <g...@telerama.lm.com> wrote:
> >> > > >He was eating 2786 gr. of Cholesterol daily.

> >No Leo, I didn't hit the m key. I guess you have never made

> >a simple mistake. I forgot to hit the M key. And if anyone
> >read it to mean g, well I guess they don't know much about
> >food. And/or they just felt like flaming. How about you?
> >If you can't discerne a type-O from blatant ignorance
> >then I guess that makes you, well, just ignorant.
> >GAT.

> GAT, if you read the above you will see that you were rather nasty to Shankar
> prior to realizing that *you* had made a typo. We "read it to mean g"
> because that is exactly how *you* typed it. I've seen several errors in your
> posts while you claim to be accurate (who *is* Mark Kiffen, anyway :). So
> take your own advice and read before you flame. Shankar pointed out your
> mistake. You should have saids "oops" at that point rather than nastily
> telling him to "check his software". From the content of your posts it sounds
> that you had better check yours first.

> I am sure you have a lot to offer this group, but I must say you are going
> about it in a rather antagonistic fashion.

Well, Liz, unfortunately I have that habit. I can be antagonistic,
and well........ sometimes it is unjustified. I did, however,
after I would say the third post, realize that I had hit the wrong key.
I am quite sure Shankar is a very knowledgeable person in his
field, and I honestly respect that.
However, realize, he flamed as well.
And my software is state of the art and I know how to use it.
The *POINT* is, if there is one left, is that the article was
meant to be cynical. It was a joke, it was funny. I KNOW
my grandmother did not kill my grandfather. If it was the
Brains & eggs, the roast beef, or his DNA that killed him
*is* debatable.
GAT.

Foodie

unread,
Nov 30, 1994, 12:07:17 AM11/30/94
to

Nice response, you finally *get it.*
I am not sure she did, like him that is.
Good pun as well.
However, Mr. Columbo, you tone indicates you accuse me?
He turns back.
I did not tell her to feed him the brains, and when I
ate them with him I didn't even know what they were
(or I would not have eaten them).
And in that day how could one know the relation to
heart disease. And he smoked, get out, your cigar
smoke is infringing on my rights.
GAT.

Diane M. Ferrell

unread,
Nov 30, 1994, 2:45:27 PM11/30/94
to
I catered a special meal for my parents that served 10 people at a sit
down dinner: This was the menu

an antipasto (can't spell hors de ouvres) of veggies with eggplant dip,
roasted pimento peppers in olive oil, blue cheese/walnut butter with rye
bread

Sunday soup - a rich broth served over french toast croutons, very small
meatballs, and provolone cheese cubes

7 leaf salad - a mixture of iceburg, green leaf, red leaf, romaine,
buttercrunch, oak leaf, and radiccio. Avacados, tomatoes and radishes were
included. The dressing was cider vinegar and extra virgin olive oil with
garlic salt
and black pepper. Each individual dish was presented with a green pepper
ring, a twist of orange, and a pitted Scicilian olive. Fresh baked
garlic bread and butter were served with the salad.

a sorbet - I used pineapple sherbert

Bonless pork loin - roasted with soy, garlic and honey and stuffed with
basil/spinach pesto

Steamed asparagus spears in cashew butter sauce

Herbed roasted potato balls

Fresh baked Vienna bread and butter

For dessert I served a scoop of French vanilla ice cream with fresh mint,
a chocolate mint wafer and semi-sweet chocolate syrup

We served three different wines--a light wine before dinner and with the
soup and salad, a robust red with the main entree, and Asti (I think)
after the dessert.

I hope I gave you some ideas you can use. BTW, what made this meal so
much fun was that my son-in-law dressed up in a tux and served my parents
and their guests--making the dinner very formal and quite elegant.

Diane

Christine Neidecker

unread,
Nov 30, 1994, 3:23:21 PM11/30/94
to
In article <3bh07a$d...@epicycle.lm.com> g...@telerama.lm.com (Foodie) writes:
>
>Just in case you were not paying attention, Chris, and you obviously
>were not, I was the one who posted the facts on risotto. ...

>Wake up.

I'm awake, and I'm *well* aware that you know all about risotto.

Chris

Jennifer L Michael

unread,
Nov 30, 1994, 4:50:26 PM11/30/94
to

I'd like to change the focus here a bit and just ask what folks
"traditionally" serve for their holiday dinners--Christmas Eve or
Christmas Day.


We always have some sort of shrimp dish for Christmas Eve--it used to be
sauteed shrimp on rice, but now it's more likely to be a rich dish of
shrimp, crab and mushrooms in a cream sauce over fettucine, served with
green peas and/or a green salad. Dessert is usually assorted cookies.

For Christmas Day, we have roast prime rib with Yorkshire pudding,
scalloped tomatoes, and some green vegetable, usually brussels sprouts or
broccoli. Dessert: persimmon pudding with a hot butter-rum sauce. The
best meal of the year, IMHO.


Jenny
jmic...@sas.upenn.edu

Joma Roe

unread,
Dec 1, 1994, 9:26:45 AM12/1/94
to
In article <3bis32$e...@netnews.upenn.edu> jmic...@mail2.sas.upenn.edu (Jennifer L Michael) writes:
>From: jmic...@mail2.sas.upenn.edu (Jennifer L Michael)
>Subject: Re: What's to serve for Xmas Dinner
>Date: 30 Nov 1994 21:50:26 GMT


>I'd like to change the focus here a bit and just ask what folks
>"traditionally" serve for their holiday dinners--Christmas Eve or
>Christmas Day.

[delicious sounding stuff deleted]

On Christmas Eve we normally eat out..at the Beef House near Covington, IN.
Christmas Dinner is usually baked ham. If Mom cooks, we have sweet potatoes.
If I cook we have scalloped potatoes. Usually veggie is green bean cassarole,
the one with mushroom soup and onions. Cresent rolls. For dessert, "Next
Best Thing to Robert Redford". Not exactly gourmet fare, but good and
traditional, at least in our family.

joma..


>Jenny
>jmic...@sas.upenn.edu

Johanna Turner

unread,
Dec 1, 1994, 12:46:35 PM12/1/94
to
In article <3bis32$e...@netnews.upenn.edu>,

Jennifer L Michael <jmic...@mail2.sas.upenn.edu> wrote:
>I'd like to change the focus here a bit and just ask what folks
>"traditionally" serve for their holiday dinners--Christmas Eve or
>Christmas Day.

On Christmas eve in my fiance's family (which is where we spend Christmas)
we have home made New England style clam chowder with lots of parsley and
cooked bacon to sprinkle on top. And we have a big crab and shrimp salad
that's arranged on a huge platter and everyone takes what they want.
For dessert there's Buche Noel made by his sister.

Christmas day is turkey or ham I think... Don't remember it quite as much as
the seafood supper on Christmas eve.

Johanna

--
--------------------------------------------------------------
tur...@reed.edu Johanna Turner
Computer User Services Reed College

Anne Threston

unread,
Dec 1, 1994, 6:26:18 PM12/1/94
to

My family always has escargot with garlic butter and then beef fondue
as the main course Christmas eve. It's been a family tradition since
we all first had fondue as *very* young children on vacation in Canada.

Christmas dinner varies. We've had goose, turkey, standing rib roast,
and ham, depending on how many relatives are showing up and what my
mother's butcher has that's good. Side dishes vary with the main
course, and we usually have cheesecake or chocolate mousse for dessert.

Anne

bmai...@eyecon.com

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Dec 1, 1994, 5:25:50 PM12/1/94
to

ID>In <3b3lb5$h...@ixnews1.ix.netcom.com> qu...@ix.netcom.com (QUYEN NGUYEN)
ID>writes:

ID>>Now that we got over Thanksgiving dinner and I'm looking forward to Xmas
ID>>dinner. But I'm a bit sick with turkey, ham, roastbeef, and grilled
ID>>chicken. What other dishes to cook for Xmas? Something different, tasty
ID>>but not with a large chunk of meat. Small bits of meat is ok for flavor
ID>>but I'm a bit put off with lots of meat. Any suggestions?
ID>>thanks
ID>>qn

Then Doris Kuehl (dfk...@iastate.edu) responds:
ID>Maybe try poached salmon?
***************

This just made me think of Wendy Hiller's line in the movie _Murder on
the Orient Express_.... when asked for her luncheon order she replied,
"A nice. Piece. of poached. Salmon. A few boiled whole. New.
Potatoes. And. A. Fresh. Spring. Sal. Ad."

--
****************
Via: Eye Contact BBS telnet: bbs.eyecon.com (204.94.37.2)
Modem:(415) 703-8200 Voice:(800) 949-2668 150 lines
****************

Mark Frieden

unread,
Dec 2, 1994, 1:46:31 AM12/2/94
to
Our family does things a little different for the Christmas season.
While our family has a traditional Thanksgiving, Christmas time has
a traditionally Mexican flair.

My mom makes tamales and menudo for our Christmas "feast". There's
always plenty to go around (usually anywhere from 6 to 10 dozen
tamales!). We also have plenty of menudo.

That's how I know that Christmas is just around the corner!

Maria

Kristin Satterlee

unread,
Dec 2, 1994, 2:31:24 AM12/2/94
to

I'm sorry--what's menudo?

Kristin Satterlee

O'Hara Shun Ping 293-4594

unread,
Dec 2, 1994, 9:10:22 AM12/2/94
to
Kristin Satterlee (asg3...@uxa.cso.uiuc.edu) wrote:

: Kristin Satterlee


TRIPE.

Thomas Fenske

unread,
Dec 2, 1994, 1:22:40 PM12/2/94
to
In article <D06sp...@news.arco.com>,

O'Hara Shun Ping 293-4594 <spo...@Arco.COM> wrote:
>Kristin Satterlee (asg3...@uxa.cso.uiuc.edu) wrote:
>: On 2 Dec 1994, Mark Frieden wrote:
>
>: > Our family does things a little different for the Christmas season.
>: > My mom makes tamales and menudo for our Christmas "feast". There's
>: > always plenty to go around (usually anywhere from 6 to 10 dozen
>: > tamales!). We also have plenty of menudo.
>: >
>: I'm sorry--what's menudo?
>
> TRIPE.


Actually, it is a wonderful spicey tripe SOUP. Mmmmmmmmmm.
It can tend to smell up the house a bit, though. I'd prefer
it if someone would make it someplace else and bring it over.

Oh. And those tamales! Yow!

What time do we need to show up for Xmas dinner?!

Oh, us? We go the traditional route. Boring, but ... we like it.

Thomas Fenske

Joyce Carroll

unread,
Dec 2, 1994, 12:42:07 PM12/2/94