Strange deal at local market.

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Buckler

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Aug 11, 2002, 10:30:10 PM8/11/02
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I'm walking through my local supermarket when I notice these plastic
containers with meat in them on the deli counter. Among them, I see a
whole rotisserie chicken for $2.00, and a 1.5 pound slab of ribs for
the same price. I ask the deli attendant why, and she tells me that
these products are nearing the pull time, and must be sold within
fifteen minutes, or they will be trashed.

"so," I said, "These ribs have been slow-cooked in your ovens and
marinated, then dumped into the steam-tray, where they are allowed to
further cook in their own juices at a low (but bacteria-inhibiting)
temperature for hours, thus allowing them to become tasty and
fall-off-the-bone-tender?"

"Well, yes, if you put it that way".

"And at that point you either throw them away or charge a pittance for
them?"

"Yes".

"I'll take three pounds of ribs."

A strange procedure, but I won't argue. The "about to expire" chicken
has been especially great.

Buckler


To respond via email, apply ROT13 to my email address.
"Time is nature's way of making sure that everything doesn't happen all at once."
- Buckaroo Banzai

st...@temple.edu

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Aug 11, 2002, 10:43:27 PM8/11/02
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Buckler <ohx...@lnubb.pbz> wrote:
>
> A strange procedure, but I won't argue. The "about to expire" chicken
> has been especially great.

The only problem is that the store made ribs and whole chickens where
I shop usually sell out well before their pull time, but every once
in a while, I get a similar deal at the Shop Rite in Cherry Hill, NJ
where I shop. Usually, the whole chickens go for $3 when they're about
ready to be pulled out of the store's display case.

Unknown

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Aug 11, 2002, 11:41:36 PM8/11/02
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I do quite a bit of shopping at Winn Dixie and quite often they have
large cuts of meat reduced by more than half, often times just because
they need to clear shelf space for the next shipment. The trick is you
have to be there at the right time. When they make the announcement,
the coolers are almost cleared out in 15 minutes... Not too long ago I
bought three big ass "family packs" of boneless chuck roast (almost 25
pounds) for 66% off of regular price. The only problem is I didn't
freeze them seperately. Now when I thaw them I end up cooking two
roasts at a time. No big deal, I love the stuff...

candeh

Buckler

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Aug 11, 2002, 11:49:52 PM8/11/02
to

Odd that you mention that...I was talking about Winn-Dixie in the
first place.

Unknown

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Aug 12, 2002, 12:07:17 AM8/12/02
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On Mon, 12 Aug 2002 03:49:52 GMT, Buckler <ohx...@lnubb.pbz> wrote:

>On Mon, 12 Aug 2002 03:41:36 GMT, "can...@thelast.mile" <> wrote:
>
>>On 12 Aug 2002 02:43:27 GMT, st...@temple.edu wrote:
>>
>>>Buckler <ohx...@lnubb.pbz> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> A strange procedure, but I won't argue. The "about to expire" chicken
>>>> has been especially great.
>>>
>>>The only problem is that the store made ribs and whole chickens where
>>>I shop usually sell out well before their pull time, but every once
>>>in a while, I get a similar deal at the Shop Rite in Cherry Hill, NJ
>>>where I shop. Usually, the whole chickens go for $3 when they're about
>>>ready to be pulled out of the store's display case.
>>
>>I do quite a bit of shopping at Winn Dixie and quite often they have
>>large cuts of meat reduced by more than half, often times just because
>>they need to clear shelf space for the next shipment. The trick is you
>>have to be there at the right time. When they make the announcement,
>>the coolers are almost cleared out in 15 minutes... Not too long ago I
>>bought three big ass "family packs" of boneless chuck roast (almost 25
>>pounds) for 66% off of regular price. The only problem is I didn't
>>freeze them seperately. Now when I thaw them I end up cooking two
>>roasts at a time. No big deal, I love the stuff...
>>
>>candeh
>
>Odd that you mention that...I was talking about Winn-Dixie in the
>first place.
>
>Buckler
>

I'll have to check the deli more closely from now on. BTW, that's an
excellent idea for munging your e-mail addy. Keeps the idiots out,
I'll bet.

candeh

Frogleg

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Aug 12, 2002, 8:42:43 AM8/12/02
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On Mon, 12 Aug 2002 02:30:10 GMT, Buckler <ohx...@lnubb.pbz> wrote:

>I'm walking through my local supermarket when I notice these plastic
>containers with meat in them on the deli counter. Among them, I see a
>whole rotisserie chicken for $2.00, and a 1.5 pound slab of ribs for
>the same price. I ask the deli attendant why, and she tells me that
>these products are nearing the pull time, and must be sold within
>fifteen minutes, or they will be trashed.

Local Food Lion still has some "sell by today" meats re-labeled at
considerable discount for quick sale, but Corporate Management made
them discontinue the "tired veg" rack. Oddly, much of this is now
donated to food bank, etc., where I presume additional time and
handling makes it virtually useless.

Some stores won't even donate for fear of lawsuits. "Where does that
bread you're pulling from the display go?" "The trash." "Could I have
some to feed the ducks?" "No. We have to throw it away." Weird
country.

Jack Schidt

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Aug 12, 2002, 8:49:51 AM8/12/02
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"Frogleg" <nob...@nevermind.com> wrote in message
news:3d57aba8....@news.compuserve.com...

> On Mon, 12 Aug 2002 02:30:10 GMT, Buckler <ohx...@lnubb.pbz> wrote:
>
> >I'm walking through my local supermarket when I notice these plastic
> >containers with meat in them on the deli counter. Among them, I see a
> >whole rotisserie chicken for $2.00, and a 1.5 pound slab of ribs for
> >the same price. I ask the deli attendant why, and she tells me that
> >these products are nearing the pull time, and must be sold within
> >fifteen minutes, or they will be trashed.
>
> Local Food Lion still has some "sell by today" meats re-labeled at
> considerable discount for quick sale, but Corporate Management made
> them discontinue the "tired veg" rack. Oddly, much of this is now
> donated to food bank, etc., where I presume additional time and
> handling makes it virtually useless.

That's too bad. the scratch and dent produce is usually my only hope of
finding ripe bananas.

>
> Some stores won't even donate for fear of lawsuits. "Where does that
> bread you're pulling from the display go?" "The trash." "Could I have
> some to feed the ducks?" "No. We have to throw it away." Weird
> country.

Tell me about it.

Jack Trash


Nancy Young

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Aug 12, 2002, 9:00:14 AM8/12/02
to
Frogleg wrote:

> Local Food Lion still has some "sell by today" meats re-labeled at
> considerable discount for quick sale, but Corporate Management made
> them discontinue the "tired veg" rack. Oddly, much of this is now
> donated to food bank, etc., where I presume additional time and
> handling makes it virtually useless.

It probably winds up in a soup kitchen that day. I see the trucks
pretty often. It usually says something about the truck having been
donated by Jon Bon Jovi. Not that that has anything to do with it,
just saying the food bank sends the food to the soup kitchens all
the time, and there are generous people in the world.

> Some stores won't even donate for fear of lawsuits. "Where does that
> bread you're pulling from the display go?" "The trash." "Could I have
> some to feed the ducks?" "No. We have to throw it away." Weird
> country.

Please don't feed the ducks bread. You could kill them all from the
bacteria from bread. They should be fed things like cracked corn.

nancy

Melba's Jammin'

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Aug 12, 2002, 11:21:41 AM8/12/02
to
In article <3d57aba8....@news.compuserve.com>,
nob...@nevermind.com (Frogleg) wrote:
>
> Local Food Lion still has some "sell by today" meats re-labeled at
> considerable discount for quick sale,

My store stopped -- too much sticker-switching by crooked customers --
even when they thought they had a method for preventing it. Pity.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of
St. Pectina of Jella (HOSSSPoJ)
<www.jamlady.eboard.com>

Nancy Young

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Aug 12, 2002, 11:33:07 AM8/12/02
to
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>
> In article <3d57aba8....@news.compuserve.com>,
> nob...@nevermind.com (Frogleg) wrote:
> >
> > Local Food Lion still has some "sell by today" meats re-labeled at
> > considerable discount for quick sale,
>
> My store stopped -- too much sticker-switching by crooked customers --
> even when they thought they had a method for preventing it. Pity.

That is sick! And I thought midwesterners were supposed to be
paragons of honesty.

nancy

Melba's Jammin'

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Aug 12, 2002, 3:23:05 PM8/12/02
to
In article <3D57D533...@mail.monmouth.com>, Nancy Young
<qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:

Lotta myths in the world. Ask a non-native resident of MN about our
reputation for "Minnesota Nice." Odds are it'll be said to be a myth.
Oh, we're friendly enough, and pleasant, but we don't invite you home
and we're not really interested in being your bosom buddy.

spam]@world.std.com Blair P. Houghton

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Aug 12, 2002, 10:57:45 PM8/12/02
to
There was a fried chicken place in Cambridge that I'd go
to just at closing time. I could get a dozen pieces of
perfectly good chicken for $3, if I got there before the
cops did (they knew the setup, too).

--Blair
"The Miracle of Capitalism."

spam]@world.std.com Blair P. Houghton

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Aug 12, 2002, 11:25:02 PM8/12/02
to
Nancy Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:
>Please don't feed the ducks bread. You could kill them all from the
>bacteria from bread. They should be fed things like cracked corn.

It's not bacteria in the bread killing the duck you feed
it to. It's bacteria from bread and cracked corn and
other garbage getting rotten in the pond you throw it in
until another duck comes along a month later and finds it.

Feed the ducks unless they're starting to die.

--Blair
"Urban legends kill more
ducks than anything."

Nancy Young

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Aug 13, 2002, 8:17:04 AM8/13/02
to

Actually it's not that simple. The uneaten bread (not corn)
leads to botulism in the water itself, killing off all of
the ducks, not just one who ate old bread. There have been
a number of cases where there were whole ponds full of ducks
dead.

nancy

Nancy Young

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Aug 13, 2002, 8:22:31 AM8/13/02
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Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>
> In article <3D57D533...@mail.monmouth.com>, Nancy Young
> <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:
>
> > Melba's Jammin' wrote:

> > > My store stopped -- too much sticker-switching by crooked customers --
> > > even when they thought they had a method for preventing it. Pity.
> >
> > That is sick! And I thought midwesterners were supposed to be
> > paragons of honesty.
> >
> > nancy
>
> Lotta myths in the world. Ask a non-native resident of MN about our
> reputation for "Minnesota Nice." Odds are it'll be said to be a myth.
> Oh, we're friendly enough, and pleasant, but we don't invite you home
> and we're not really interested in being your bosom buddy.

I'm cut to the quick! And I was planning on visiting you next week
for a heart to heart. (smile) Actually, I'm suspicious of people
who are too nice and people who pronounce it FAAHRgoh.

nancy

Melba's Jammin'

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Aug 13, 2002, 8:44:37 AM8/13/02
to
In article <3D58FA07...@mail.monmouth.com>, Nancy Young
<qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:

It wasn't personal. And if you're visiting, let me know! We'll do
breakfast at Al's!

OB Food:

{ Exported from MasterCook Mac }

Pannekoeken

Recipe By: Pillsbury
Serving Size: 2
Preparation Time: 0:00
Categories: Entrees

Amount Measure Ingredient Preparation Method
Pancake:
1/2 cup Pillsbury all purpose or unbleached flour
2 Tbsp. sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 cup milk
2 eggs (*or 1 whole egg + 1 egg white)
2 Tbsp. margarine or butter
Fruit Topping:
1/2 cup sugar
1 Tbsp. cornstarch
1/2 cup orange juice
2 Tbsp. orange-flavored liqueur or orange juice
3 cups sliced fruits and/or berries (strawberries pineapple, kiwi,
melons, banana, peaches - whatever)

Heat oven to 425?. Lightly spoon flour into measuring cup; level off.
In medium bowl, combine all pancake ingredients except margarine. Beat
with wire whisk or rotary beater until smooth. Place margarine in
9-inch (glass) pie pan; melt in 425? oven just until margarine sizzles,
2 to 4 minutes. Remove pan from oven; tilt to coat bottom with melted
margarine. Immediately pour batter into hot pan. Bake at 425? for
14-18 minutes or until puffed and golden brown. (Some margarine may
rise to the surface of pancake during baking.)

Meanwhile, in small saucepan combine 1/2 cup sugar and cornstarch; mix
well. Stir in orange juice and liqueur. Cook and stir over medium heat
5-7 minutes or until sugar dissolves and mixture thickens. Remove
pancake from oven; immediately arrange peaches and strawberries over
pancake and drizzle with orange sauce. Cut into wedges. Serve
immediately. 2-3 servings.

One-third of recipe (using 2 whole eggs) is 460 calories, 145 mg
cholesterol, 12 g fat.

Source: Pillsbury cookbook #159, Springtime Brunches and Parties, May
1994, page 21. *Made 5/8/94 using 1 egg white as substitute for 1 whole
egg and couldn't detect any difference.

----------
Notes: Pillsbury 5/94 booklet.

Per serving (excluding unknown items): 322 Calories; 2g Fat (6% calories
from fat); 2g Protein; 75g Carbohydrate; 8mg Cholesterol; 298mg Sodium
Food Exchanges: 4 1/2 Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 4 Other Carbohydrates
_____

Sue Hutt

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Aug 13, 2002, 10:41:11 AM8/13/02
to
On Tue, 13 Aug 2002 03:25:02 GMT, blair[no spam]@world.std.com (Blair
P. Houghton) wrote:

>Nancy Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:
>>Please don't feed the ducks bread. You could kill them all from the
>>bacteria from bread. They should be fed things like cracked corn.
>
>It's not bacteria in the bread killing the duck you feed
>it to. It's bacteria from bread and cracked corn and
>other garbage getting rotten in the pond you throw it in
>until another duck comes along a month later and finds it.
>
>Feed the ducks unless they're starting to die.
>

I understand the reason you don't feed ducks bread is that they fill
up on bread and don't get the nutrients they need to survive.

The same thing goes for birds.
Now if the pigeons would eat the bread, and leave seeds for the rest
of the birds, I would be very happy.

Sue


Nancy Young

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Aug 13, 2002, 11:01:46 AM8/13/02
to
Sue Hutt wrote:
>
> On Tue, 13 Aug 2002 03:25:02 GMT, blair[no spam]@world.std.com (Blair
> P. Houghton) wrote:
>
> >Nancy Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:
> >>Please don't feed the ducks bread. You could kill them all from the
> >>bacteria from bread. They should be fed things like cracked corn.
> >
> >It's not bacteria in the bread killing the duck you feed
> >it to. It's bacteria from bread and cracked corn and
> >other garbage getting rotten in the pond you throw it in
> >until another duck comes along a month later and finds it.
> >
> >Feed the ducks unless they're starting to die.
> >
> I understand the reason you don't feed ducks bread is that they fill
> up on bread and don't get the nutrients they need to survive.

That might be true as well, but it's still not the reason for ducks
dying by the dozen over a few days.

> The same thing goes for birds.
> Now if the pigeons would eat the bread, and leave seeds for the rest
> of the birds, I would be very happy.

You misspelled squirrels.

nancy

spam]@world.std.com Blair P. Houghton

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Aug 13, 2002, 1:01:52 PM8/13/02
to
Nancy Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:
>"Blair P. Houghton" wrote:
>> Nancy Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:
>> >Please don't feed the ducks bread. You could kill them all from the
>> >bacteria from bread. They should be fed things like cracked corn.
>>
>> It's not bacteria in the bread killing the duck you feed
>> it to. It's bacteria from bread and cracked corn and
>> other garbage getting rotten in the pond you throw it in
>> until another duck comes along a month later and finds it.
>
>Actually it's not that simple. The uneaten bread (not corn)
>leads to botulism in the water itself, killing off all of
>the ducks, not just one who ate old bread. There have been
>a number of cases where there were whole ponds full of ducks
>dead.

People have been feeding bread and popcorn to the ducks in
Boston Garden for a couple of hundred years, and I don't
recall any stories of mass kills.

Corn can have as much botulism on it as bread. And the
pond can get it from your feet as easily as the bread.
And from the ducks themselves. Mass kills can be due to
too many ducks in too little water. And people who put
arsenic in the popcorn.

I'm looking around the net, and I can't find anywhere that
there's a story about bacteria coming from bread.

There's this one:
http://home.hetnet.nl/~waterpartijen/please_do_not_feed_the_ducks.htm

It just says the botulism is avian botulism (not the
kind that makes humans sick) and the problem is a chain
reaction where summer heat causes algae blooms that starve
the pond for oxygen which allows botulism in the soil to
breed; then insects that vector botulism thrive on
the bread and other garbage, then fish eat the insects,
then the birds eat the fish.

And it talks about people dumping dozens of pounds of raw
garbage, including meat, not just tossing a few crusts to
a begging duck.

This website is a hoary mess of apocrypha and suppositions:

http://www.lakecrest.ca/grade4/Bread&Ducks.htm

"It swells up in their stomachs" blah blah blah.

Some people should just not try to sound scientific.

--Blair
"When you don't have it,
that's when you need it."
-Yogi Berra

sf

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Aug 13, 2002, 9:41:33 PM8/13/02
to
On Tue, 13 Aug 2002 17:01:52 GMT, blair[no spam]@world.std.com (Blair
P. Houghton) wrote:
>
> There's this one:
> http://home.hetnet.nl/~waterpartijen/please_do_not_feed_the_ducks.htm
>
> It just says the botulism is avian botulism (not the
> kind that makes humans sick) and the problem is a chain
> reaction where summer heat causes algae blooms that starve
> the pond for oxygen which allows botulism in the soil to
> breed; then insects that vector botulism thrive on
> the bread and other garbage, then fish eat the insects,
> then the birds eat the fish.
>
> And it talks about people dumping dozens of pounds of raw
> garbage, including meat, not just tossing a few crusts to
> a begging duck.
>
> This website is a hoary mess of apocrypha and suppositions:
>
> http://www.lakecrest.ca/grade4/Bread&Ducks.htm
>
> "It swells up in their stomachs" blah blah blah.
>
> Some people should just not try to sound scientific.
>
Around here, when the ducks & swans die - it has to do with still
water and poop.

Craig L.

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Aug 13, 2002, 10:19:21 PM8/13/02
to

"sf" <s...@pipeline.com> wrote in message
news:3d59b3f5...@news.mindspring.com...

> Around here, when the ducks & swans die - it has to do with still
> water and poop.

Around here, when ducks and swans die - it has to do with people in
camouflage gear, hiding in the reeds, blowing them to bit with shotguns.

Craig L.
Conquer thyself, till thou has done this, thou art but a slave; for it is
almost as well to be subjected to another's appetite as to thine own.
( Sir Richard Francis Burton )

Buckler

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Aug 13, 2002, 10:42:48 PM8/13/02
to

I want to know more about the discount meats. Albertson's rather
unceremonially dumps all the about-to-trash meat into a bargain bin,
where you can get to it all day. I've heard that WD does a "timing"
deal on shoppers, akin to a Blue Light Special. Any hints?


> BTW, that's an
>excellent idea for munging your e-mail addy. Keeps the idiots out,
>I'll bet.

Indeed. Though I saw a clear-text message today that claimed to have
been encoded using "ROT-26" encoding techniques. I had a good chuckle.

Cheers,
Buckler

sf

unread,
Aug 14, 2002, 1:04:46 AM8/14/02
to
On Wed, 14 Aug 2002 02:42:48 GMT, Buckler <ohx...@lnubb.pbz> wrote:

>
> Indeed. Though I saw a clear-text message today that claimed to have
> been encoded using "ROT-26" encoding techniques. I had a good chuckle.

So 26 is twice as good and ROT-13?

Buckler

unread,
Aug 15, 2002, 8:19:16 PM8/15/02
to

I'm assuming you're providing humor. In the event that you're not,
allow me to explain...

The ROT13 (Rotation-13) cipher method had been around since the time
of Imperial Rome. It is a simple cipher; essentially, one takes any
given letter in a message, then "rotates" it thirteen letters ahead in
the alphabet. For those letters that would otherwise be rotated beyond
"Z", the alphabet begins again. Thus "Y" becomes "L", and so forth.
This causes a plaintext message to be completely unintelligble to the
casual viewer. Some newsreaders have a ROT13 decoder built right in to
decode anything encoded in that form.

The "ROT26" scheme I mentioned before would rotate each letter 26
spaces ahead, thus giving it the same place it had before. Thus the
encoded text is equal to the plain text, hence the joke.

Buckler

sf

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Aug 16, 2002, 1:38:48 AM8/16/02
to
On Fri, 16 Aug 2002 00:19:16 GMT, Buckler <ohx...@lnubb.pbz> wrote:

> On Wed, 14 Aug 2002 05:04:46 GMT, s...@pipeline.com (sf) wrote:
>
> >On Wed, 14 Aug 2002 02:42:48 GMT, Buckler <ohx...@lnubb.pbz> wrote:
> >
> >>
> >> Indeed. Though I saw a clear-text message today that claimed to have
> >> been encoded using "ROT-26" encoding techniques. I had a good chuckle.
> >
> >So 26 is twice as good and ROT-13?
>
> I'm assuming you're providing humor. In the event that you're not,
> allow me to explain...
>

It was a lame attempt at humor. Thanks for the education, I didn't
know what ROT-13 was other that it scrambled messages. You've managed
to demystify it and make me wonder why they bother to include it as an
option.

Buckler

unread,
Aug 16, 2002, 9:19:35 AM8/16/02
to

I wasn't trying to patronize you, sorry if I did. ROT13 is often used
to hide passages that might be offensive to the average reader, or
movie spoilers, etc...

Chef Helen

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Aug 16, 2002, 4:50:57 PM8/16/02
to


Ooooooooooohhhh, thanks! This looks really GOOD.

helen

Miche

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Aug 20, 2002, 5:34:00 AM8/20/02
to
In article <H0rItq...@world.std.com>,

blair[no spam]@world.std.com (Blair P. Houghton) wrote:

> Nancy Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:
> >Please don't feed the ducks bread. You could kill them all from the
> >bacteria from bread. They should be fed things like cracked corn.
>
> It's not bacteria in the bread killing the duck you feed
> it to. It's bacteria from bread and cracked corn and
> other garbage getting rotten in the pond you throw it in
> until another duck comes along a month later and finds it.

That's why, on the rare occasions we go to feed the ducks, we don't
throw the bread in the pond. The ducks are happy to come onto the land
to get it.

Miche

--
And you may say to yourself "Well -- how did I get here?"
-- Talking Heads, _Once in a Lifetime_

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