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Why Club Sandwich?

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AST

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Dec 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/7/98
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I live in England and have no Idea why 'Club' sandwiches are thusly
called...and want to know why....also, what does 'Open-faced' ....
mean?


Taa.

--
Alessio Tiramani
Replace "d66ABd-65465215" With "Alessio" (If you don't, I won't get it!)

"I think That I Shall Never See, My Cataracts Are Blinding Me." --Hans Moleman

watts taylor

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Dec 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/7/98
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I am not a gourmet by a long shot, but I have weakness for Club
Sandwiches. I was always told that the name for this triple-decker
delight originated in American golf clubs, but that may be apocryphal.

As to open-faced sandwiches, they generally are hot "meals" served on
bread with some glutinous sauce. My favorite is the hot brown.

Since you appear to be British, my question to you is why spotted-dick?

Lutyens of Godalming


Dave

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Dec 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/7/98
to
AST wrote:
>
> I live in England and have no Idea why 'Club' sandwiches are thusly
> called...and want to know why....also, what does 'Open-faced' ....
> mean?
>
> Taa./
/
Open-faced means there is only one slice of bread. They're usually run
under a broiler to melt the cheese and heat the other ingredients. I
usually use a knife and fork to eat this type because they're messy.

Don't know about club sandwiches.

D

Mary Gorman

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Dec 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/7/98
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Can't help you with the club sandwiches, but an open-faced sandwich is
simply a single slice of bread with sandwich filling on top, without a
second slice of bread covering it. A popular hot open-faced sandwich is
turkey meat (with or without mashed potatoes) on a slice of bread, covered
with gravy.

AST wrote in message ...

Bob Y.

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Dec 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/8/98
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On Mon, 7 Dec 1998 19:06:18 +0000, AST <d66ABd-...@valdena.demon.co.uk>
wrote:

>
>I live in England and have no Idea why 'Club' sandwiches are thusly
>called...and want to know why....also, what does 'Open-faced' ....
>mean?
>

Could be they were first served in men's clubs or in the club cars on trains.
Then again, maybe not. An open-face sandwich is a slice of bread with goodies on
it but lacks the top slice of bread. For instance, a slice of bread or toast
with sliced roast beef and gravy on it, is an a open-face sandwich.

Bob Y.

A telephone has no constitutional right to be answered.
Justice Snow, "First Monday on October"

Michel Boucher

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Dec 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/8/98
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"Mary Gorman" <mgo...@hia.net> wrote:

>Can't help you with the club sandwiches, but an open-faced sandwich is
>simply a single slice of bread with sandwich filling on top, without a
>second slice of bread covering it.

So strictly speaking, it's not filling...it's topping ;-)

Open-faced is also called Danish style.


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PENMART10

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Dec 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/8/98
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So how come when a Jewish Deli serves a Corned Beef on *Club*, it arrives on a
section of bagette-like bread rather than sliced bread, and it's not
multi-decker?

Could it be 'cause they didn't let Jews in them other Clubs? <G>


Sheldon
````````````
On a recent Night Court rerun, Judge Harry Stone had a wonderful line:
"I try to keep an open mind, but not so open that my brains fall out."


Rick Mendenhall

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Dec 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/8/98
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On Mon, 07 Dec 1998 01:56:42 -0800, Dave <dbe...@erinet.com> wrote:

>AST wrote:
>>
>> I live in England and have no Idea why 'Club' sandwiches are thusly
>> called...and want to know why....

I agree with Bob Y. here. When I was very young, and the U.S. still
had functional passenger railways, I would eat these sandwiches. The
"dining car" was also known as the "Club Car."

Young

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Dec 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/8/98
to
PENMART10 wrote:
>
> So how come when a Jewish Deli serves a Corned Beef on *Club*, it arrives on a
> section of bagette-like bread rather than sliced bread, and it's not
> multi-decker?
>
> Could it be 'cause they didn't let Jews in them other Clubs? <G>
>
> Sheldon

I buy club rolls all the time ... but you don't make club sandwiches
with them ... (smile) Jews have club sandwiches, they're called
Jewish Sloppy Joes, where I live.

nancy

AST

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Dec 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/8/98
to
watts taylor <mailto:Lut...@webtv.net> posted an article to
rec.food.cooking on On Mon, 7 Dec 1998 at 19:37:01 and wrote:

Well...Thanks every1 for the explanations....now as for you...Watts.

>Since you appear to be British, my question to you is why spotted-dick?

I shall endeavour to make a discovery of your request.

Two shuttles in one sentence! Woohoo! :@)

Nyman

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Dec 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/8/98
to

AST wrote in message ...
>
>I live in England and have no Idea why 'Club' sandwiches are thusly
>called...and want to know why....also, what does 'Open-faced' ....
>mean?


I don't know why they are called it....I do know that they don't taste too
good. I prefer hot meat on toasted bread.

Open faced means two slices of bread with stuff piled up on each side. You
have the option of jamming it all together and eating one sandwich, or
eating side at a time.

Liz

sarahmelissa douglas

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Dec 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/8/98
to
Chicken and Lettuce Under Bacon.

That is how it was explained to me.

Michael Sierchio

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Dec 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/8/98
to
sarahmelissa douglas wrote:
>
> Chicken and Lettuce Under Bacon.
>
> That is how it was explained to me.

I love spurious acronyms, but you don't really believe that one, do you?

Harry A. Demidavicius

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Dec 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/9/98
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I allways thought that the "club car" was the "bar car". And if not,
what is *it* called?
Harry Demidavicius


On Tue, 08 Dec 1998 15:42:13 GMT, ri...@bright.net (Rick Mendenhall)
wrote:

>On Mon, 07 Dec 1998 01:56:42 -0800, Dave <dbe...@erinet.com> wrote:
>
>>AST wrote:
>>>

>>> I live in England and have no Idea why 'Club' sandwiches are thusly

Harry A. Demidavicius

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Dec 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/9/98
to
back in my youth days, a sandwich was stuff on a piece of bread. I
never saw a "covered" sandwich until I hit North America. Then the
term "open-face" made sense.
harry Demidavicius

On Tue, 08 Dec 1998 16:10:29 GMT, alsa...@netcom.ca (Michel Boucher)
wrote:

Harry A. Demidavicius

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Dec 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/9/98
to
Sheldon, if it ain't on rye, don't touch it ....
harry Demidavicius

On 08 Dec 1998 15:42:15 GMT, penm...@aol.com (PENMART10) wrote:

>
>So how come when a Jewish Deli serves a Corned Beef on *Club*, it arrives on a
>section of bagette-like bread rather than sliced bread, and it's not
>multi-decker?
>
>Could it be 'cause they didn't let Jews in them other Clubs? <G>
>
>
>Sheldon

Nancree

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Dec 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/9/98
to
>
>> Chicken and Lettuce Under Bacon.
=======
I didn't see anyone really explain a Club Sandwich. It is made with three
slices of toast. On the bottom slice, for instance, there is mayonnaise,
lettuce , tomato and bacon. Then add the middle slice of toast. On that, put
sliced chicken (or turkey) lettuce and mayonnaise, then the top slice.
A "Junior Club" is the same thing but with the middle piece of toast
removed.
Occasionally, one will see sliced egg on one of the layers.
It is sliced crosswise twice, making four triangles.
Very good, indeed. And a good, filling, casual meal.
Enjoy, Nancree

Peter Morwood & Diane Duane

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Dec 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM12/9/98
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On Tue, 8 Dec 1998 16:36:46 +0000, AST <d66ABd-...@valdena.demon.co.uk>
wrote:

>>Since you appear to be British, my question to you is why spotted-dick?

It's a good question!

The Oxford English Dictionary lists it. Under "spotted" the OED shows it as a
"colloquial usage" with the first written occurrence of the name no earlier
than 1849 (in Alexis Soyer's _Modern Housewife_): "Plum Bolster, or Spotted
Dick. Roll out two pounds of paste...have some Smyrna raisins well washed..."

Under "dick", though, the OED gives a dialect usage of 1847 for a kind of hard
cheese, and then right after that, a definition from the _Almondbury and
Huddersfield Glossary_ of 1883, "'Dick', plain pudding: if with treacle
sauce, 'treacle dick': mod. 'spotted dick', currant or raisin pudding." Then
other definitions come up (older meanings of the word, such as a riding whip, a
dike, and slang for a dictionary or for a declaration.

Anyone have an earlier citation or derivation?

Also, just a conjecture: could the second part of the name be a corruption
from Dutch _dek_ or German _dick_, "thick?" Because the stuff sure is.

Best! -- Diane


Peter Morwood & Diane Duane / The Owl Springs Partnership
Co. Wicklow, Ireland / http://www.ibmpcug.co.uk/~owls/index2.html
ICQ # 21654840

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