Camp Recipes

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Stu

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Feb 19, 2001, 11:44:48 AM2/19/01
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Call for Recipes

I have started a site for the purpose of collecting and sharing recipes for
outdoor activities. I do not wish to just copy recipes from a cookbook or
use other peoples recipes without permission. My hope is to provide a
source for good, proven, camping recipes.

Please consider submitting your recipes to http://www.camprecipes.com You
will receive full credit for your recipe(s). The recipes at the site will
be freely available to all. You may also email recipes to
campr...@home.com

Thanks for helping.

Stu


Jack Schidt

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Feb 19, 2001, 11:49:31 AM2/19/01
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"Stu" <campr...@home.com> wrote in message
news:44ck6.124688$g6.60...@news1.elmhst1.il.home.com...

It's been my experience that one eats things while camping
that they'd never eat at home. Like that potato with 2
sticks of butter, or s'mores. I've never seen anyone eat
s'mores at home.

Jack Coleman


K3

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Feb 19, 2001, 12:17:34 PM2/19/01
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Whetever we eat at "Deer Camp", we bring a bottle of Tabasco Sauce, a bottle
or two of Gas-X, and lot's of Toilet Paper! :-)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Kendall F. Stratton III
Fort Fairfield, Maine USA
k...@maine.rr.com
http://home.maine.rr.com/k3

"When you were born, you were crying and everyone
around you was smiling. Live your life so that when you
die, you're smiling and everyone around you is crying."
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----


"Stu" <campr...@home.com> wrote in message
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Debbie

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Feb 19, 2001, 2:55:57 PM2/19/01
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"Stu" <campr...@home.com> wrote in message
news:44ck6.124688$g6.60...@news1.elmhst1.il.home.com...
> Call for Recipes
>
> I have started a site for the purpose of collecting and sharing recipes
for
> outdoor activities. I do not wish to just copy recipes from a cookbook or
> use other peoples recipes without permission. My hope is to provide a
> source for good, proven, camping recipes.
>
Haven't gone camping since I was a kid going with my Dad. First things that
come to mind in relation to food are canned beans, bread and marshmallows!
We had to have eaten more than that but I can't remember it! LOL

D


K3

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Feb 19, 2001, 3:14:58 PM2/19/01
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No, seriously now... How about Maine Bean-Hole Beans

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<snipped from some website> 'cause I was too lazy to type it all
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The art of cooking in a hole in the ground was used for hundreds of years by
Maine's Penobscot Indians. Today, bean-hole beans are still a popular Maine
tradition. The ideal pot for full flavor is a cast iron kettle with a lid
(often referred to as a Dutch oven). If you don't have one and can't borrow
one, any sturdy pot with a lid will do.

1. Dig a hole in the ground large enough to hold the pot with two or three
inches of clearance on all sides, and at least six inches of clearance on
top.

2. Build a fire in the hole with dry firewood and let it burn down to large
embers and ash while preparing the beans.

3. Parboil two quarts of dry beans until the skins wrinkle. Drain off the
fluid.

4. Slice a large onion and place half of the slices in the bean bean pot.

5. Pour in half of the beans.

6. Add another layer of sliced onion and several large slabs of salt pork or
bacon.

7. Add the remaining beans.

8. Measure one cup of dark molasses and pour over the top of the beans.

9. Add enough water to cover the beans.

10. When the fire has burned down in the bean hole, shovel out enough of the
embers and ashes to make room for the pot, and place the pot in the hole.

11. Place a wet dish towel over the top of the uncovered pot and push the
lid securely down over the cloth.

12. Place embers and ashes around the sides and on top of the pot, then
cover these with the dirt you removed when you dug the hole.


Note: Many foods have enhanced flavor when cooked in a hole in the ground in
this manner. If you dig the hole in an appropriate place, you can continue
to use it for outdoor cooking.

RLN

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Feb 19, 2001, 6:32:18 PM2/19/01
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k...@maine.rr.com (K3) wrote:
No, seriously now... How about Maine Bean-Hole Beans
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<snipped from some website> 'cause I was too lazy to type it all
----------------------------------------------


<laughing> Kendall, you made my day! I know you said you are serious,
but I can't even say "bean-hole beans" without starting to laugh!

Ronda (I'm really trying to keep my mind out of the gutter! LOL)

m...@axp14.ams.org

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Feb 19, 2001, 9:39:17 PM2/19/01
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On Mon, 19 Feb 2001, Jack Schidt wrote:
>
> It's been my experience that one eats things while camping
> that they'd never eat at home. Like that potato with 2
> sticks of butter, or s'mores. I've never seen anyone eat
> s'mores at home.
>
> Jack Coleman

You've never been to our house: My daughter loves to make s'mores
in the microwave. We also make campfire stew at home, altho the
woodsmoke flavoring is missing<g>.

maxine in ri

Beth

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Feb 19, 2001, 10:56:59 PM2/19/01
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I recently lead a group of my fellow university students on a camping trip
and was determined not to serve up slop to my fellow campers. I found that
with a little prior prep and a cooler, the food can be wonderful.

We had minestrone soup the first night (I had done all the veggie and bean
prep the night before and tossed all into the cooler in the morning). This
turned out suprisingly well with the exception of burning the garlic due to
little ability to adjust the heat of the camp stove low enough. My fellow
campers were amazed at how good the soup turned out and how healthy it was.
I'll probably post the recipie in a few days but I have an exam tommorow and
since I alter it just about every time I make it, it can take some thought
to get it down.

We also made baked apples on the fire. These were so easy and delicious:

campfire backed apples:

Remove Core from apple (avoid poking through skin on the bottom)
put all or some of the following ingredients in the hole:

brown sugar
cinnamon
raisens
nuts

(you could experiment with other stuff too, like maple sugar, honey, dried
cranberries or cherries or even artificial sweeteners that can be heated to
high temperatures without breaking down (like SPLENDA) if you are trying to
save calories or have a diabetic with you)

Wrap the apple in tin foil and stick it in the fire
After ten minutes or so (I can't remember the exact cooking time) roll it
out of the fire with a stick...take care not to burn yourself and cool a
bit. check to see if it is soft yet. when the apple is soft, it's done.
Eat up.

We also had pasta with vegetables the second night (delicious) dried pasta
and sauce from a jar plus zucchini, garlic, onions, peppers and yellow
squash from the cooler (these I cut up at the campsite) add some basil and
oregano for out of this world flavor.

Breakfast oatmeal doesn't have to be boring either. You can make your own
concoctions or leave it to Quaker

Instant oatmeal

add ins:

Raisens (The cooking kind are especially good because they are juicy and
soft already)
brown sugar
cinnamon
dried cranberries
granola
walnuts :)
honey

Be forewarned chocolate syrup doesn't work too great with oatmeal.

Oh yeah, almost forgot.

Camp Grilled cheese:

take bread and cheese and wrap in tin foil, toss on the fire like the
apples.

Hmm I guess you could even put cheese in the apples....

(LOL - Yuppie camping - campfire baked brie in pears) [Not that it wouldn't
be absolutely delicious - just beyond the means of a college camper]

Last but not least DON'T EVER FORGET the S'Mores. (After having lots of
left over S'Mores ingredients I did perfect a microwave ('cause I don't have
a gas stove) s'mores technique. Whoever said you can't eat s'mores at
home!!! They are a delicious late night snack when organic chemistry is
throwing you for a loop.

Also to any interested parties, There is a very interesting book on Camp
Cooking called "The Hungry Hiker's Book of Good Cooking" by Gretchen
McHugh. (My Dad got it for me for the holidays) there is a lot about
dehydrating food and stuff. It is really geared to the backpacking gourmet.

:) That's all for now.

-Beth

"Stu" <campr...@home.com> wrote in message
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Jason

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Feb 20, 2001, 12:44:50 AM2/20/01
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Stu wrote:

> Call for Recipes

Campfire Cake In A Orange Shell

1 Box Jiffy yellow cake mix -- (8 oz.)
6 Large -- ¥
1 Thick skin oranges
water
tinfoil (heavy)

Slice 2 inches in diameter from oranges and save.
Remove orange from shell being careful not to damage shell.
Prepare cake mix per instructions. Fill each orange shell half
full of cake mix. Replace top and wrap in foil. Bake in hot
coals or on grill about 20 minutes, turning often. I use this
as a breakfast treat when camping. We eat the oranges out of
the shell with a spoon, then when the cakes are done you may
eat them with a spoon or peel your orange and have a hot orange
cake.


Baked Apples Stuffed with Raisins


4 green Granny Smith apples
1/2 c sultanas (not golden raisins)
1/3 c sugar
1 tsp ground cinnamon

Remove the cores of apples such that the apples are intact with a tube
like hole right through the centre. Keep the skins of the apples.

Mix the sugar, raisins & cinnamon together. Stuff this raisin mixture
into the cored apples in the tube-like hole. Compact well and wrap each
whole apple in aluminium foil paper.

Throw in embers at campfire... wait 8-10 minutes...remove from embers and
remove foil and
serve

Campfire Hash

2 tbsp cooking oil
1 lg onion -- chopped
2 garlic cloves -- minced
4 lg potatoes -- peeled and cubed
1 lb smoked sausage -- cubed
1 can chopped green chiles -- (4 oz)
1 can whole kernel corn -- drained

In a Dutch oven, heat oil. Saute onion and garlic until tender. Add
potatoes. Cook, uncovered, over medium heat for 20 mins., stirring
occasionally. Add sausage; cook and stir until potatoes are tender and
well browned, about 10 mins. more. Stir in chilies and corn; cook until
heated through.

Creole Skillet

2 tb Margarine
1 md Onion - chopped
1/2 md Green Pepper - chopped
1/2 c Celery - chopped
2 tb Flour
2 ts Seasoning Salt (See Recipe)
2 cn Chunky Tuna
1 1/2 c Kernel Corn

Melt margarine in skillet and lightly fry onion, pepper and celery
until tender crisp. Add flour and blend in. Add other ingredients and
heat through. Serve with rice and grated Parmesan/Romano cheese

Foiled Fish on the Grill

1 pound fish fillets
2 tablespoons margarine -- not diet
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 tablespoon fresh parsley -- chopped
1 teaspoon fresh dill weed
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1 onion -- thinly sliced

Use heavy aluminum foil cut into large squares. Place equal
portions of the fish fillets on each piece of foil.
In a saucepan, melt margarine. Add lemon juice, parsley, dill,
salt and pepper. Stir to blend well. Pour this mixture over the fish,
sprinkle with paprika, and top with the onion slices which have been
separated into rings. Fold the foil around the mixture and seal
tightly. Leave a little space for the food to expand while cooking.
Place on hot grill and grill for 5-7 minutes per side. Fish
should flake easily when done.

Polish Sausage & Cabbage

2 lg Onions
8 Potatoes
1 md Head of cabbage
3 lb Polish sausage
salt and pepper to taste

Slice onions and arrange to cover bottom of dutch
oven. Slice potatoes, layer them on top of onins and
cover with water and salt and pepper to taste. Cover
and place on coals until water starts to simmer. Cut
cabbage into wedges. When water is simmering, add
cabbage wedges and sausage and return to heat. simmer
until potatoes and cabbage is tender.


Jack Schidt

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Feb 20, 2001, 9:38:12 AM2/20/01
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<m...@AXP14.AMS.ORG> wrote in message
news:Pine.PMDF.3.95.101021...@AXP14.AMS.OR
G...

Duh <slapping self on forehead>! I forgot that kids like
them anywhere.

Jack Waterbrain


Ophelia

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Feb 20, 2001, 9:45:53 AM2/20/01
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"Jack Schidt" <jack.schidt@attdotnet> wrote in message
news:ojvk6.14516$X61.1...@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...

>
> <m...@AXP14.AMS.ORG> wrote in message
> news:Pine.PMDF.3.95.101021...@AXP14.AMS.OR
or s'mores. I've never seen anyone
> eat
> > > s'mores at home.
> > >
> > > Jack Coleman


smores?

Ophelia


m...@axp14.ams.org

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Feb 20, 2001, 10:49:45 AM2/20/01
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On Tue, 20 Feb 2001, Ophelia wrote:
>
> smores?
>
> Ophelia
>

Traditional Girl Scout camping treat:

2 graham cracker squares
1 square Hershey's milk chocolate bar (1/2 candy bar)
1 marshmallow

Place marshmallow on tip of green stick. (a fresh stick, not a dried one)
Toast over campfire. Score 1 for charcoal black or solid white. 10 for
evenly brown all around and gooey inside.

Place chocolate on 1 graham square. Place Marshmallow on top of
chocolate. Smush together with second graham square. Enjoy.

maxine in ri

Ophelia

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Feb 20, 2001, 11:48:36 AM2/20/01
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<m...@AXP14.AMS.ORG> wrote in message
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Thank you:))

Ophelia


Sue Jones

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Feb 21, 2001, 5:16:30 PM2/21/01
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And just for the record, it is actually spelt S'mores, the mashed together word
intended to reflect what you want to do after you have eat one...Eat some more
= s'more

Jennie (a girl guide from WAYYYYYY back.

DJKathyA or John

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Feb 21, 2001, 6:30:35 PM2/21/01
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Remember those wonderful tin foil dinners? We'd start with a hamburger patty
(raw) then add a sliced potato, sliced onion, carrot and some basic salt n
pepper then seal up the tin foil by folding it and stick it on the fire
coals...I forget how long we cooked it for, but it was FAB tasting when it
was done. Mmm mmm. Of course, when you are outside camping, EVERYTHING
tastes miles better than in the home.
DJKathyA (Former Junior Girl Scout and proud earner of Outdoor Cooking
Badge)


Martha Hughes

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Feb 21, 2001, 9:26:20 PM2/21/01
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DJKathyA or John <SokS...@cshore.com> wrote in message
news:t98ju93...@corp.supernews.com...
A few years back, I used to do a lot of backpacking. Packing light items
becomes a priority. I would pack things in ziplock bags: uncooked rice and
dried seasonings, I made beef jerky, GORP (gobs of raw protein, made with
nuts, raisins and M&Ms), I packed dried soup mixes, oranges, dried fruit,
cookies, powdered pancake mix, dried eggs and dried milk, expensive coffee
(I don't like completely roughing it!) and on the last night out (we used to
go for a week to two weeks), I would pull out an good bottle of either
brandy or red wine, which I had somehow kept hidden from everyone.
>


Young

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Feb 21, 2001, 9:52:04 PM2/21/01
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Martha Hughes wrote:

> A few years back, I used to do a lot of backpacking. Packing light items
> becomes a priority. I would pack things in ziplock bags: uncooked rice and
> dried seasonings, I made beef jerky, GORP (gobs of raw protein, made with
> nuts, raisins and M&Ms), I packed dried soup mixes, oranges, dried fruit,
> cookies, powdered pancake mix, dried eggs and dried milk,

Imagine what the girl could do with a tilia.

nancy

Martha Hughes

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Feb 21, 2001, 11:46:10 PM2/21/01
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Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote in message
news:3A947E...@mail.monmouth.com...

Yeah

The Trinker

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Feb 22, 2001, 9:18:53 AM2/22/01
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Martha Hughes wrote:
> GORP (gobs of raw protein, made with
> nuts, raisins and M&Ms)

No no no no no!

GORP is Good Old Raisins 'n' Peanuts.

With M&M's is GORMP.

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