Texas BBQ

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Bob Gottlieb

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Sep 20, 2003, 12:31:47 PM9/20/03
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I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
(I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds of sides are
typically served with this kind of fare.

Any ideas?

--
Life is like a roll of toilet paper
the closer you get to the end...
the faster it goes..

Bob Gottlieb

Danny Hardesty

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Sep 20, 2003, 12:36:13 PM9/20/03
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Classic Texas side dishes with barbecue are pinto beans, potato salad, cole
slaw, and hot rolls. I also make a carrot salad to go with it which is quite
good.

Danny Hardesty

"Bob Gottlieb" <rob...@pacbell.net> wrote in message
news:robdgot-2009...@adsl-63-206-235-26.dsl.lsan03.pacbell.net...

jmcquown

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Sep 20, 2003, 12:38:40 PM9/20/03
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Bob Gottlieb wrote:
> I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl
> party. (I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks).
> I'm OK with the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds
> of sides are typically served with this kind of fare.
>
> Any ideas?

Potato salad; cole slaw (very vinegary yet creamy dressing); rolls; corn on
the cob. Desserts may include anything from pecan pie to apple pie to peach
cobbler to a fruit jell-0 mold.

Jill


jmcquown

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Sep 20, 2003, 12:49:57 PM9/20/03
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Danny Hardesty wrote:
> Classic Texas side dishes with barbecue are pinto beans
(snip)
> Danny Hardesty
>
I completely forgot about pinto beans! They should be cooked in a fairly
spicy sauce, not your typical Boston Baked beans with brown sugar and
molasses.

Jill

Goomba

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Sep 20, 2003, 1:10:19 PM9/20/03
to Bob Gottlieb
Bob Gottlieb wrote:
>
> I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
> (I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
> the Pork, beef and ribs,

Pork at a Texas BBQ? Oh yeah.. sausages <slaps head> That's the ONLY
pork I've ever had at a Texas BBQ.
Goomba

David Wright

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Sep 20, 2003, 1:11:38 PM9/20/03
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Pork shoulder (Boston butt) and pork ribs.

David

Goomba

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Sep 20, 2003, 1:13:41 PM9/20/03
to
Bob Gottlieb wrote:
>
> I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
> (I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
> the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds of sides are
> typically served with this kind of fare.

White squooshy bread, jalapenos, beans, potato salad, cole slaw... the
typical bbq type stuff.
What about baked jalapeno cheese grits? Something sweet like baked
scalloped apples? Pickles!

jmcquown

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Sep 20, 2003, 1:24:54 PM9/20/03
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Goomba wrote:
> Bob Gottlieb wrote:
>>
>> I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl
>> party. (I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks).
>> I'm OK with the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what
>> kinds of sides are typically served with this kind of fare.
>
> > What about baked jalapeno cheese grits?

OOOH! Jalapeno cheese grits, yes!

Jill


Reg

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Sep 20, 2003, 1:32:29 PM9/20/03
to

Bob Gottlieb wrote:

> I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
> (I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
> the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds of sides are
> typically served with this kind of fare.
>
> Any ideas?


I expect you'll get some pretty spirited discussion of what
"authentic" Texas BBQ is. This isn't considered Texas but it
sure is good. Grilled stuffed jalapenos aka ABTs...

Stuffed Jalapeños
http://www.teddybearbbq.com/appetizers.htm#Jalapeños

The Classic version of this is a Jalapeños stuffed with plain cream
cheese a hunk of smoked meat and wrapped in Bacon. See Atomic Buffalo
Turds for the Original inspiration. We kicked it up and made the
presentation a little more appealing.

Preparation
Soak skewers for 30 minutes in hot water

16 Jalapeños
1 Brick Cream Cheese
6 Large stuffed Olives
Left over Smoked meat
Rub and Mrs. Dash too taste
BBQ Sauce too taste
Hot Stuff too your limit ;)


De-stem the Jalapeños and slice in half then de-seed.
Put the cream cheese, olives, rub and Mrs. Dash in Cuisanart and cream.
Then add heaped handful of chopped up smoked meat and pulse till just combined.
Fill half shell with mixture, top with some smoked meat (optional) wrap
in bacon and skewer.

Atomic Hot
Unless you are lucky to find Jalapeños grown with very little water
which makes them very hot these can be rather mild. The solution
is to put something hot in the filling. Some kind of powdered pepper
will work I found some nice hot Chipotle powder. Any kind of hot
sauce will work. You can also put in some fresh hot pepper or make
the whole thing out of a hotter pepper.


Smoking


Half a Weber Chimney of Kingsford divided between two sides of a Weber
Kettle using the 3901 charcoal rails. Chunk of Cherry wood on top
of the charcoal on each side. WSM with no water in the water pan,
but the pan still installed will achieve the same result. Smoke
for 30 minutes at around 300. No need to turn or peek. Taste test
for doneness ;)

--
Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com

zxcvbob

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Sep 20, 2003, 1:51:46 PM9/20/03
to
Bob Gottlieb wrote:
> I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
> (I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
> the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds of sides are
> typically served with this kind of fare.
>
> Any ideas?
>
A classic Texas barbecue combination plate consists of:
Slowly smoked beef brisket and pork sausage links.
Sweet and hot tomato based sauce,
Potato salad,
pork 'n' beans,
coleslaw,
white bread.

Serve iced tea to drink (sweet but not too sweet) *AND* beer (preferably
Lone Star and Shiner)

Relish tray consisting of: sliced raw onions, green onions,
pickled whole jalapenos, sliced garden-fresh tomatoes

Cheddar cheese goes nice with barbecue.

You'll need 3 times as much brisket as you think. Everybody will eat a lot
and some folks will eat nothing but beef and bread. No matter how much
they eat, you should not run out of meat. If you're worried about the cost
of the meat, you can also barbecue a bunch of chickens. A half a chicken
serves one person.

I really like pork barbecued Texas style, but it's not traditional.

Hope this helps, :-)
Bob

zxcvbob

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Sep 20, 2003, 1:58:48 PM9/20/03
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zxcvbob wrote:


Replying to my own note. (D'oh!) Pinto beans is a better choice than
pork 'n' beans. And I forgot the dill pickle spears.

Bob

Goomba

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Sep 20, 2003, 3:02:51 PM9/20/03
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David Wright wrote:

> >Pork at a Texas BBQ? Oh yeah.. sausages <slaps head> That's the ONLY
> >pork I've ever had at a Texas BBQ.
> >Goomba
>
> Pork shoulder (Boston butt) and pork ribs.
> David

No, not usually. Pork shoulder/Boston Butt would be something found at a
BBQ up south, say in Georgia to the Carolinas. Although the heavy German
influence in Texas introduced a lot of nice sausages, which of course
are often pork.
Goomba

Danny Hardesty

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Sep 20, 2003, 3:15:51 PM9/20/03
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"Goomba" <goom...@comcastSPAMSUCKS.net> wrote in message
news:3F6CA45B...@comcastSPAMSUCKS.net...

Goomba is correct. I live in Austin, Texas. Go into just about any barbecue
joint here and ask for "pulled pork" and they will think you are crazy.
Which, is too bad, as barbecued pork shoulder is delicious too, and to get
some I barbecue it on my smoker in my backyard.

Danny Hardesty


hahabogus

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Sep 20, 2003, 3:15:56 PM9/20/03
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Goomba <goom...@comcastSPAMSUCKS.net> wrote in
news:3F6CA45B...@comcastSPAMSUCKS.net:

A Corn Salad.

--

The man who put the FU in fun.

Rick & Cyndi

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Sep 20, 2003, 3:42:39 PM9/20/03
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"Danny Hardesty" <dha...@texas.net> wrote in message
news:HH1bb.55955$z32....@twister.austin.rr.com...
:
: "Goomba" <goom...@comcastSPAMSUCKS.net> wrote in message
:
: ==========

Tell me about it! I prefer BBQ Pork to BBQ Beef. More flavor
and less grainy taste (?).

Cyndi


MareCat

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Sep 20, 2003, 3:47:48 PM9/20/03
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On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 12:51:46 -0500, zxcvbob <zxc...@charter.net>
wrote:

>>
>A classic Texas barbecue combination plate consists of:
>Slowly smoked beef brisket and pork sausage links.
>Sweet and hot tomato based sauce,
>Potato salad,
>pork 'n' beans,
>coleslaw,
>white bread.

ALL of those are mandatory for a TX BBQ. Ribs, maybe. I would add
jalapeno-cheese bread (as served at Goode Co. BBQ in Houston).

>Serve iced tea to drink (sweet but not too sweet) *AND* beer (preferably
>Lone Star and Shiner)

Shiner Bock!

>Relish tray consisting of: sliced raw onions, green onions,
> pickled whole jalapenos, sliced garden-fresh tomatoes

Definitely.

>Cheddar cheese goes nice with barbecue.
>
>You'll need 3 times as much brisket as you think. Everybody will eat a lot
>and some folks will eat nothing but beef and bread.

I second that. BBQ brisket is GOOD stuff. People scarf it down.

No matter how much
>they eat, you should not run out of meat.

That's a crime punishable by death in TX.

Reg

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Sep 20, 2003, 5:32:44 PM9/20/03
to

Bob Gottlieb wrote:

> I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
> (I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
> the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds of sides are
> typically served with this kind of fare.
>
> Any ideas?
>

Did this for a large crowd last weekend and it disappeared immediately.

------------------------------------------

Grilled Cornbread with Honey Butter

A nice dish that can be (mostly) made ahead. Make the cornbread
anytime then grill it when you're ready to serve.

For the cornbread:

2 cups ground cornmeal, white or yellow, as fresh as possible
1 cup all-purpose flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons butter, at room temperature,
1/4 cup sugar
2 large eggs
2 cups milk

For the honey butter:

1/4 C honey
1/4 lb butter, at room temperature
1/4 t cinnamon (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Butter a 9 inch skillet or
spring form pan.

Whisk together the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, and salt.

In a second bowl, cream the butter and sugar until light and airy.

Add the eggs to the butter mixture one at a time, mixing well
between additions. Add the cornmeal mixture to the butter mixture
in 3 parts, alternating with the milk. Do not over mix.

Load the batter into the prepared pan or skillet. Bake until
lightly browned and a toothpick inserted in the center comes
out clean, about 30 minutes. The cornbread can now be wrapped
tightly and held until serving time. It freezes very well.

To make the honey butter, whip together the honey, butter,
and cinnamon.

A few minutes before service, place the cornbread upside down on
preheated grill. You want it on a fairly hot part of the grill
and you want to rotate 90 degrees once to crisp the top and develop
some nice grill marks.

Flip the cornbread right side up and move it to a cooler part
of the grill, around 325 - 350 degrees F. Spread the honey butter
over the top and let it melt in. It's done when the outside is
slightly crisp and the cornbread is well heated though, around
10 minutes.

Cut and serve immediately.


Notes:

- Cornbread can stick. Make sure the grill is well cleaned
and lubricated.

- This amount of honey butter will fill one to three loaves
of cornbread, depending on your calorie preference. I use
it all on one.

Cindy Fuller

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Sep 20, 2003, 8:45:43 PM9/20/03
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In article <HH1bb.55955$z32....@twister.austin.rr.com>,
"Danny Hardesty" <dha...@texas.net> wrote:

The BBQ joint across the street from the med school in Dallas where I
used to work, Anderson's, had pulled pork occasionally. Of course, they
served it with their Texas-style BBQ sauce and fixings. That was one of
the best places in town, even though the original Sonny Bryan's was
around the corner. At Anderson's you can eat at a table or a booth; at
Sonny's you had to make do with old school desks or the hood of your car.

Cindy

--
C.J. Fuller

Carnivore269

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Sep 20, 2003, 8:52:51 PM9/20/03
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Goomba <goom...@comcastSPAMSUCKS.net> wrote in message news:<3F6C8AC5...@comcastSPAMSUCKS.net>...

Typical sides are potatoe salad, baked beans, mexican rice, sliced
jalapenos, sliced pickles, sliced onions, beer...... ;-)

C,

Joy

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Sep 20, 2003, 11:57:02 PM9/20/03
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"Bob Gottlieb" <rob...@pacbell.net> wrote in message
news:robdgot-2009...@adsl-63-206-235-26.dsl.lsan03.pacbell.net...

Baked beans, potato salad, corn on the cob.....Joy


Bob Gottlieb

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Sep 21, 2003, 2:14:18 AM9/21/03
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In article <830bb.5141$an...@bignews6.bellsouth.net>, "jmcquown"
<jmcq...@bellsouth.net> wrote:

Jill,can you send me or post a recipe for this?

Catbird

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Sep 21, 2003, 5:07:50 PM9/21/03
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"Steve Wertz" <swe...@fastmail.micronesia> wrote in message
news:mgaqmvkl5ufbpnpii...@4ax.com...


> On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 16:31:47 GMT, rob...@pacbell.net (Bob Gottlieb)
> wrote:
>
> >I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
> >(I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
> >the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds of sides are
> >typically served with this kind of fare.
>

> _All_ TX BBQ comes with white bread, pickle chips, and sliced onions
> (as well as what everyone else mentioned + green beans [casserole]).
>
> -sw

Don't forget the banana pudding or peach cobbler.

--
Catbird

"Oh-oh, her schizo is about to phrenia" - Bob Hope


Blair P. Houghton

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Sep 23, 2003, 4:32:41 AM9/23/03
to
Bob Gottlieb <rob...@pacbell.net> wrote:
>I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
>(I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
>the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds of sides are
>typically served with this kind of fare.
>Any ideas?

Cole slaw and fried okra are my favorites when I'm eating
real Texas bobber-q. I add coarse-ground black pepper to
the slaw.

Slab-cut french fries are fine if you can't get fried okra,
and potato salad is okay if you can't get cole slaw.

Others will like baked beans, cornbread, and your other
traditional picnic fixin's with their ribs, etc.

--Blair
"Yeah, now I'm *really* hungry."

Blair P. Houghton

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Sep 23, 2003, 4:36:16 AM9/23/03
to

Then you're a goomba, and not a bobber-q afficionado.

Pork ribs are the real deal. All this nonsense about
brisket is from people who don't understand food, much
less the magnificence of the barbacoa process.

--Blair
"It's full of...lima beans!"
-not what happened in 2001

Goomba

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Sep 23, 2003, 6:50:50 AM9/23/03
to
"Blair P. Houghton" wrote:
>
> Goomba <goom...@comcastSPAMSUCKS.net> wrote:
> >Bob Gottlieb wrote:

> >Pork at a Texas BBQ? Oh yeah.. sausages <slaps head> That's the ONLY
> >pork I've ever had at a Texas BBQ.
>
> Then you're a goomba, and not a bobber-q afficionado.
>
> Pork ribs are the real deal.

Sure they are.. in places *other* than Texas. There, beef reigns
supreme. "bobber-q afficionado(s)" certainly should recognize regional
differences.
Goomba

zxcvbob

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Sep 23, 2003, 1:55:08 PM9/23/03
to
Blair P. Houghton wrote:


You don't know what you're talking about. The OP specifically asked
about *Texas* barbecue, which means beef (or chicken as a tasty but
barely acceptable substitute). If he just asked about generic BBQ, you
*might* have a point.

Hankering some barbecued beef ribs now,
Bob

travis

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Sep 23, 2003, 2:26:12 PM9/23/03
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On Tue, 23 Sep 2003 12:55:08 -0500, zxcvbob <zxc...@charter.net>
began spewing the following from their cake-hole:


>
>You don't know what you're talking about. The OP specifically asked
>about *Texas* barbecue, which means beef (or chicken as a tasty but
>barely acceptable substitute). If he just asked about generic BBQ, you
>*might* have a point.
>
>Hankering some barbecued beef ribs now,
>Bob
>

North Carolina bbq has y'all beat. :-D
http://bugadventures.dyndns.org/realtires/partytime.jpg
http://bugadventures.dyndns.org/pig8.jpg
I'm such a fan of it that I went and got my own pig roaster. SWEET!!!


--
Travis
'63 VW Camo Baja...
http://bugadventures.dyndns.org
Words that soak into your ears are whispered, not yelled.


:wq!

Dimitri

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Sep 23, 2003, 6:17:59 PM9/23/03
to

"Bob Gottlieb" <rob...@pacbell.net> wrote in message
news:robdgot-2009...@adsl-63-206-235-26.dsl.lsan03.pacbell.net...
> I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
> (I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
> the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds of sides are
> typically served with this kind of fare.
>
> Any ideas?

Ranch beans

Cole slaw

TexasCook Barbecue Sauce on the side

10 Cloves garlic, baked
(at 350° for 30 minutes, then peeled)
2 C Ketchup
2 Celery stalks, chopped
1 C Sweet or yellow onion, chopped
1 C Water
1/2 C Brown sugar, firmly packed
1/2 C Butter 1/2 C Worcestershire sauce
1/2 C Apple cider vinegar
3 T Chili powder
2 t Instant coffee
1/2 t Cayenne pepper
1/2 t Dried crushed red pepper
1/2 t Salt
1/2 t Ground cloves

Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Slowly bring to a boil,
reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Allow to cool.

Pour mixture into blender container. Process until
smooth, scraping down side of container as necessary.
Makes about 5 cups.

Dimitri


Lisa Ellis

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Sep 23, 2003, 7:08:46 PM9/23/03
to
Goomba wrote:

White 'sqooshy bread' for sure. That is what I remember from childhood
(grew up in Texas) BBQ's. I loved white bread - my mom would never buy it.

lisae

Bob Gottlieb

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Sep 23, 2003, 11:31:43 PM9/23/03
to
In article <rt31nvgfovd5kr23o...@4ax.com>, travis
<travist34...@hotmail.com> wrote:

> North Carolina bbq has y'all beat. :-D
> http://bugadventures.dyndns.org/realtires/partytime.jpg
> http://bugadventures.dyndns.org/pig8.jpg
> I'm such a fan of it that I went and got my own pig roaster. SWEET!!!

Great..but the Super Bowl isn't in North Carolina this year

Blair P. Houghton

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Sep 24, 2003, 2:40:30 AM9/24/03
to
zenit <ze...@thepressroom.com> wrote:
>On Tue, 23 Sep 2003 08:36:16 GMT, Blair P. Houghton <b@p.h>
>had to open a new box of zerones to say

>>Pork ribs are the real deal. All this nonsense about
>>brisket is from people who don't understand food, much
>>less the magnificence of the barbacoa process.
>
>You ain't from Texas, are 'ya, son...? And if you are, you were
>probably deported for crimes against nature... Pork ribs--boiled,
>sauced, and scorched over one of them plug-in grills on the balcony...
>Loved by Yankees and Sutherners who ain't been taught right... Bah...!

Uh-huh.

No.

Pork ribs, slow-cooked in a giant smoker for half a day and
then served with cole slaw, okra, and a Shiner Bock.

Brisket is nasty. I never had trouble finding ribs in
Texas, but I don't doubt you were humored when you made
those drunken noises about Brisket. Texan publicans know
what Texan consumers can be like, and make good coin from
husbanding them.

Texas' great contribution to bobber-q isn't brisket. It's
sauce made from smoker drippings.

--Blair
"The vet will be by later to give
you your hoof'n'mouth shot."

Blair P. Houghton

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Sep 24, 2003, 2:43:37 AM9/24/03
to
zxcvbob <zxc...@charter.net> wrote:
>You don't know what you're talking about. The OP specifically asked
>about *Texas* barbecue, which means beef (or chicken as a tasty but
>barely acceptable substitute). If he just asked about generic BBQ, you
>*might* have a point.

You don't know what you're talking about. Brisket blows.
Texas-bbq'ed pork ribs rule.

But next time I'm in Dallas, I'll tell Sammy's and Railhead
and Sonny Bryan's to stop doing pork ribs, just for you.

--Blair
"But only just for you."

MareCat

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Sep 24, 2003, 1:17:38 PM9/24/03
to
On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 03:31:43 GMT, rob...@pacbell.net (Bob Gottlieb)
wrote:

>In article <rt31nvgfovd5kr23o...@4ax.com>, travis


><travist34...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> North Carolina bbq has y'all beat. :-D
>> http://bugadventures.dyndns.org/realtires/partytime.jpg
>> http://bugadventures.dyndns.org/pig8.jpg
>> I'm such a fan of it that I went and got my own pig roaster. SWEET!!!
>
>Great..but the Super Bowl isn't in North Carolina this year

And brisket beats out pulled pork anyway.

Mary in Houston

Jack Schidt®

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Sep 24, 2003, 1:37:52 PM9/24/03
to

"MareCat" <Nittany_Lio...@NoSpam.com> wrote in message
news:59k3nvo3g4jdgtbk0...@4ax.com...

Apples and oranges. A true q afficianado will adore both. Better yet, both
served at the same table!

Jack Smoke


BOB

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Sep 24, 2003, 2:04:31 PM9/24/03
to
Jack Schidt® typed:

Even cooked together in the same pit!

BOB


Cuchulain Libby

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Sep 24, 2003, 4:22:16 PM9/24/03
to

"Steve Wertz" <swe...@cluemail.compost.invalid> wrote >
> Come to think of it, I've never seen pulled pork in TX. At least not
> at a BBQ place (I'm sure Luby's does theirs in a crockpot).

It's getting around. Rudy's sells it, although I've not et there in years.
Bullpepper's sells it. I will someday <sigh>

-Hound


travis

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Sep 24, 2003, 4:56:25 PM9/24/03
to
On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 14:54:50 -0500, Steve Wertz
<swe...@cluemail.compost.invalid> began spewing the following from
their cake-hole:

>On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 06:40:30 GMT, Blair P. Houghton <b@p.h> wrote:
>
>>No.
>>
>>Pork ribs, slow-cooked in a giant smoker for half a day and
>>then served with cole slaw, okra, and a Shiner Bock.
>>
>>Brisket is nasty. I never had trouble finding ribs in
>>Texas, but I don't doubt you were humored when you made
>>those drunken noises about Brisket. Texan publicans know
>>what Texan consumers can be like, and make good coin from
>>husbanding them.
>>
>>Texas' great contribution to bobber-q isn't brisket. It's
>>sauce made from smoker drippings.
>

>You should really leave the discussions about TX BQQ to those of us
>who know something about it rather than making a fool of yourself.
>While you can find pork ribs at most BQQ places, brisket and beef is
>king. And I can't name a single place that uses drippings in their
>sauces.
>
>You should really stick to being arrogant and pigheaded about things
>you have a little knowledge of.
>
>-sw (who eats TX BBQ at least weekly)

It must be that TX BBQ that makes you such an asshole then. I'll be
sure to not eat any of it. Thanks for the help, fat boy. You know
how stupid you sound when you brag about "knowing about TX BBQ?" You
idiot. *plonk*

zxcvbob

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Sep 24, 2003, 5:42:32 PM9/24/03
to


I actually like barbecued pork better than beef (not "pulled pork" or
pork ribs, but pork shoulders or butts barbecued the way Texans usually
do beef). But that's not the point. What Steve said was correct, and
you really should go plonk yourself.

Regards,
Bob

--
"Intolerance is one of my few remaining virtues." --Dick Adams

travis

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Sep 24, 2003, 6:27:31 PM9/24/03
to
On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 16:42:32 -0500, zxcvbob <zxc...@charter.net>

I didn't say it was incorrect. He just said it like he was a
dickhead. I'd lie and say I was sorry if you don't like it when I
killfile someone but I don't give a shit if you like me or who I
killfile or not Mr I'm In Everyone's Business. Fuck off. *plonk*
ps- I don't give a fuck what you like, shitbreath.

MareCat

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Sep 24, 2003, 6:54:16 PM9/24/03
to

Steve was responding to someone who said that "Texas' great
contribution to bobber-q isn't brisket." HUH?? Brisket IS king here in
TX. Ribs (or sausage, depending on the BBQ joint) come in second to
brisket. That's a *fact*.

Unless we're talking about Texas in an alternate universe or
something...

travis

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Sep 24, 2003, 7:02:14 PM9/24/03
to
On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 17:54:16 -0500, MareCat
<Nittany_Lio...@NoSpam.com> began spewing the following from
their cake-hole:

Oh, it must have been that "reason" that gave him the right to be a
complete dickhead about it. My fault. phhht.

BOB

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Sep 24, 2003, 8:16:45 PM9/24/03
to
Steve Wertz <swe...@cluemail.comost.invalid> typed:

> On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 18:27:31 -0400, travis
> <travist34...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> I didn't say it was incorrect. He just said it like he was a
>> dickhead. I'd lie and say I was sorry if you don't like it when I
>> killfile someone but I don't give a shit if you like me or who I
>> killfile or not Mr I'm In Everyone's Business. Fuck off. *plonk*
>> ps- I don't give a fuck what you like, shitbreath.
>
> Lookslike we have a new kook on the block. I give him a 4, maybe 5
> days. Place your bets everyone.
>
> -sw

Won't really matter. He'll have everyone in his kilfile.

BOB


Goomba

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Sep 24, 2003, 10:28:02 PM9/24/03
to mgo...@intertex.net
MareCat wrote:

> Unless we're talking about Texas in an alternate universe or
> something...

well.. there is always that, too.. :)
Goomba

John Freck

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Sep 24, 2003, 11:03:19 PM9/24/03
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rob...@pacbell.net (Bob Gottlieb) wrote in message news:<robdgot-2009...@adsl-63-206-235-26.dsl.lsan03.pacbell.net>...


> I need some help: I'm planning a Texas BBQ theme for a Super Bowl party.
> (I know it's early, but I have to submit a menu in 3 weeks). I'm OK with
> the Pork, beef and ribs, but I have no idea of what kinds of sides are
> typically served with this kind of fare.

You should consider dropping the pork. Most popular will be large
beef ribs. Also popular in Texas, are chicken, sliced beef, sausage,
and even turkey. The sauce shouldn't be very spicey, not too spicey.
Hickery and mesqueit (misspelled) smoked wood flavors are both
popular. As for the side dishes?

Find the mean for any all-you-can-eat buffet in Texas. USe the phone
book for a big city, call and ask.

As I recall: Cole slaw with carrot, fries, baked potatoes, baked yam,
corn-on-the-cob, corn bread, and various bread and rolls.

John Freck



> Any ideas?

Blair P. Houghton

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Sep 25, 2003, 1:23:00 AM9/25/03
to
MareCat <mgo...@intertex.net> wrote:
>Steve was responding to someone who said that "Texas' great
>contribution to bobber-q isn't brisket." HUH?? Brisket IS king here in
>TX. Ribs (or sausage, depending on the BBQ joint) come in second to
>brisket. That's a *fact*.

Brisket may be "king here in TX", but it's still not the
thing that TX contributed to BBQ that is worth a damn.

>Unless we're talking about Texas in an alternate universe or
>something...

Dallas isn't so much in Texas as surrounded by it.

Just thought I'd remind everyone.

And he's wrong.

The good places use drippings in their BBQ sauce.

--Blair
"I bet he thinks Dickey's is good."

zxcvbob

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Sep 25, 2003, 8:28:21 AM9/25/03
to
Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> Dallas isn't so much in Texas as surrounded by it.
> Just thought I'd remind everyone.
>

Dallas sold its soul (to the Yankees?) during the Johnson administration.

Regards,
Bob

modom

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Sep 25, 2003, 10:25:49 AM9/25/03
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On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 07:28:21 -0500, zxcvbob <zxc...@charter.net>
wrote:

Dallas had a soul?


modom

Since I lost the brindle cat,
The rats come right up and peer into the pot.
-- Han Shan

blake murphy

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Sep 25, 2003, 10:56:36 AM9/25/03
to
On Wed, 24 Sep 2003 17:54:16 -0500, MareCat
<Nittany_Lio...@NoSpam.com> wrote:

>Unless we're talking about Texas in an alternate universe or
>something...

i thought texas, *per se*, was an alternative universe...

your pal,
blake

MareCat

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Sep 25, 2003, 12:53:15 PM9/25/03
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On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 14:56:36 GMT, blake murphy <bla...@ix.netcom.com>
wrote:

Hehe...Got me there. ;)

Sylvia

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Sep 27, 2003, 10:14:56 PM9/27/03
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> I have no idea of what kinds of sides are typically served with this
kind of fare

I lived in TX way too long. Potato salad (not mustard). Baked beans
(barbeque-ey, not sweet). Maybe that Jello salad with lime jello,
cottage cheese, pineapple, and nuts. Corn on the cob. Does that help?

--
Sylvia Steiger RN, homeschooling mom since Nov 1995
http://www.SteigerFamily.com
Cheyenne WY, USDA zone 5a, Sunset zone 1a
Home of the Wyoming Wind Festival, January 1-December 31
Remove "removethis" from address to reply

Sylvia

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Sep 27, 2003, 10:17:36 PM9/27/03
to
> Pork at a Texas BBQ?

You're right about that. I love BBQ pork and in Houston, a city of over
a million people, I only found ONE BBQ place that served good BBQ pork.
And let's not even get into those Texas BBQ sauces ...

OTOH, now I live in Cheyenne, a large town of 50K people, and there are
only 1-2 BBQ places at a time -- they go out of business fairly quickly
(and deservedly). Not one of them (so far) has made good BBQ pork either.

Sylvia

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Sep 27, 2003, 10:19:28 PM9/27/03
to
> Pork shoulder (Boston butt) and pork ribs

Not if you're going to present it as a Texas-style BBQ. No pork
shoulder, and the beef should be brisket. Pork ribs are acceptable, but
if you really want the Texas experience, they should be beef ribs.

Sylvia

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Sep 27, 2003, 10:21:44 PM9/27/03
to
> as served at Goode Co. BBQ in Houston

They didn't have anything I liked to eat, but I could go in and just
live on the aroma. To eat, I went across the street to their Mexican
restaurant. ;)

Sylvia

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Sep 27, 2003, 10:23:21 PM9/27/03
to
> green beans [casserole])

Not part of the classic TX BBQ, and I had to go to tons (work-related,
friends, and my stepmother is part of an enormous TX clan that gets
together twice a year to feast).

MareCat

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Sep 28, 2003, 1:27:17 PM9/28/03
to
On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 02:17:36 GMT, Sylvia
<Sylv...@canadaREMOVE-THIS.com> wrote:

> > Pork at a Texas BBQ?
>
>You're right about that. I love BBQ pork and in Houston, a city of over
>a million people,

Just under 2 million (4.5 million, metro area), but who's counting? ;)

Sylvia

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Sep 30, 2003, 11:55:58 AM9/30/03
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> Just under 2 million (4.5 million, metro area), but who's counting?

Two million is over a million. <g> We left there in 1992 and I must
admit I haven't paid attention to the current population since then.

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