McDonald's fries

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Malcolm Loades

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Aug 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/4/98
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In article <199808031827...@ladder03.news.aol.com>, Kennedy59
<kenn...@aol.com> writes
>Does anyone know the "recipe" for making homemade french fries taste like
>McDonald's fries? What kind of oil do they use? Do they coat the potatoes
>with something?

I don't think you'll be able to make homemade fries like McD's because
they don't use 'fresh' potato. McD's fries are factory made frozen
fries formed from reconstituted potato - not fresh sliced potato.

Malcolm.


John David Auwen

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Aug 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/4/98
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>I don't think you'll be able to make homemade fries like McD's because
>they don't use 'fresh' potato. McD's fries are factory made frozen
>fries formed from reconstituted potato - not fresh sliced potato.

Sadly, you are right. But it wasn't always so. In the early days
of McDonald's, french fries were made from fresh potatoes at each
restaurant. I know this because I took a couple of tours (with
the Cub Scouts back in the '65-'68 time frame) and they had a
potato peeling machine. They also cooked their fries in animal
fat. They were much better than the ones they serve today.

Dave

Dave

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Aug 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/4/98
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>
> And I believe they spray the fries with a light sugar coating to help give
> that nice, browned, looked./
/
This subject comes up from time to time. My understanding is that they
dump the frozen fries in a sugar/water solution before frying. Jives with
what I've seen at their stores.

D

Robin Cowdrey

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Aug 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/4/98
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I'm not sure I believe this. Arby's curly fries are
definitely extruded but I think our McD's are still real.
The fat change was, of course, the result of
cholesterolphobia.

Robin

steve knight

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Aug 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/5/98
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On Tue, 4 Aug 1998 09:33:48 +0100, Malcolm Loades
<Mal...@eraserco.demon.co.uk> wrote:

>
>I don't think you'll be able to make homemade fries like McD's because
>they don't use 'fresh' potato. McD's fries are factory made frozen
>fries formed from reconstituted potato - not fresh sliced potato.


No they are not. They are cut form real potatoes deep fried then flash
frozen. I know I worked at lamb weston for years making them and
wendy's french fries.

"I want to die in my sleep like my grandfather....
Not screaming and yelling like the passengers in his car...."

steve knight

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Aug 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/5/98
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On 3 Aug 1998 18:27:57 GMT, kenn...@aol.com (Kennedy59) wrote:

>Does anyone know the "recipe" for making homemade french fries taste like
>McDonald's fries? What kind of oil do they use? Do they coat the potatoes

>with something? Thanks in advance for any help.
>


Who would want to. they are not very good anymore. WHen they used beef
fat too cook them they were very good. I used to work at the plant
that made them. they were cut then run in hot water then friend then
frozen. We cooked them up each friday. man they were so good. Part of
the problem is Md's leaves them on racks and they thaw out before they
are cooked.

ri...@momii.com

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Aug 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/5/98
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In article <5gCvSFAs...@eraserco.demon.co.uk>,

Malcolm Loades <Mal...@eraserco.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <199808031827...@ladder03.news.aol.com>, Kennedy59
> <kenn...@aol.com> writes
> >Does anyone know the "recipe" for making homemade french fries taste like
> >McDonald's fries? What kind of oil do they use? Do they coat the potatoes
> >with something?
>
> I don't think you'll be able to make homemade fries like McD's because
> they don't use 'fresh' potato. McD's fries are factory made frozen
> fries formed from reconstituted potato - not fresh sliced potato.
>
> Malcolm.
>
>

And I believe they spray the fries with a light sugar coating to help give
that nice, browned, looked.

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http://www.dejanews.com/rg_mkgrp.xp Create Your Own Free Member Forum

dancertm

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Aug 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/5/98
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On Wed, 05 Aug 1998 04:53:17 GMT, dog...@teleport.com (steve knight)
wrote:

>On Tue, 4 Aug 1998 09:33:48 +0100, Malcolm Loades
><Mal...@eraserco.demon.co.uk> wrote:


>No they are not. They are cut form real potatoes deep fried then flash
>frozen. I know I worked at lamb weston for years making them and
>wendy's french fries.

Have you tried checking the Secret Recipes page? They may have it
there. In the bio about Julia, she said the fries are no longer good.
They used to fry them in Fat, and swithced to oil. I had to laugh,
imagin good old Julia scarfing down McDonald's fries and then asking
the kid at the counter why they no longer are good.


____________________________

To email me remove the _ from my email address

http://www.primenet.com/~dancertm

Mark Beemsterboer

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Aug 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/5/98
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In article <199808031827...@ladder03.news.aol.com>,
kenn...@aol.com (Kennedy59) wrote:

> Does anyone know the "recipe" for making homemade french fries taste like
> McDonald's fries? What kind of oil do they use? Do they coat the potatoes

> with something? Thanks in advance for any help.
>

> Connie---

Someone already touched on the solution to McDonald's fries, someone
who, apparantly, worked at a plant that processed them. I thought that I
might be able to expand on this. It's true, cooking fries in lard yields
terrific product. (Lard is pork fat, not beef.) Being a vegetarian, I
tend to fry foods (infrequently *pats tummy*) in vegetable oils.

I'd like to point out that, in this case, method far outweighs choice
of cooking oils. Great crispy fries come from cooking them twice. Fast
food restaurants all over the country use pre-cut, pre-cooked potatoes
when making french fries. Most of these employees don't even know this.

You can easily make your own french fries that will rival any others'.
The size of the cut will determine how much crispy surface you have
compared to flaky interior; thin fries are crunchier.

Cook the fries in a "cool" oil- 325F. Cook them until they just start
to to brown. The idea is to dry out the interior of the fries before the
final cooking process. At this point, you can actually remove the fries
from the oil, drain them well, and store in a cooler until needed for the
final cooking step.

Then, cook the fries in oil that is 350-375F until golden brown. Drain
and salt. Eat with ketchup, never with mayonaise or vinegar and salt,
like some strange people do.

I promise that this method yields a great french fry.

Mark :)

--
Mark Beemsterboer The Culinary School
mec...@iconnect.net at Kendall College
http://www.kendall.edu

steve knight

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Aug 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/6/98
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On Tue, 04 Aug 1998 13:03:14 -0700, Dave <dbe...@erinet.com> wrote:

>>
>> And I believe they spray the fries with a light sugar coating to help give

>> that nice, browned, looked./
>/
>This subject comes up from time to time. My understanding is that they
>dump the frozen fries in a sugar/water solution before frying. Jives with
>what I've seen at their stores.


they are blanched before they are fried. that adds the browning
effect.

Leo Scanlon

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Aug 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/6/98
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On Wed, 05 Aug 1998 04:53:17 GMT, dog...@teleport.com (steve knight)
wrote:

>No they are not. They are cut form real potatoes deep fried then flash


>frozen. I know I worked at lamb weston for years making them and
>wendy's french fries.

They came from the same place? AFAIK, McD's fries had the skins still
on and Wendy's didn't. Also Wendy's fries are those fat, mealy
things. So it must have been two separate processes at Lamb Weston,
right?

Leo

Young

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Aug 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/6/98
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Mark Beemsterboer wrote:

> Then, cook the fries in oil that is 350-375F until golden brown. Drain
> and salt. Eat with ketchup, never with mayonaise or vinegar and salt,
> like some strange people do.
>
> I promise that this method yields a great french fry.
>
> Mark :)

(laughing) Then, I guess french fries with tartar sauce is a
definite no no?

nancy

mel sorg

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Aug 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/6/98
to

actually, from what I remember, on the production end they are cut, ran
through a blancher, then on to a tank that adds a finely powdered sugar
to the water they are being transported in, and another chemical, sodium
acid pyrophosphate, which prevents the potatoes from turning brown when
exposed to the air. they are then partially dried, to get the moisture
content that Mc D's or Wendy's or whoever wants, then ran through a
fryer, then flash frozen.
From there the resturant chooses how to fix them.....twice fried, etc.
by controlling the extent of pre-blanching, drying to a certain moisture
content before frying, type of potato, size of cut, etc. you get fries
with different textures, crunchiness, etc.
madpoet

Debra Fritz

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Aug 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/6/98
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On Thu, 06 Aug 1998 07:39:48 -0400, Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com>
wrote:

Oh oh..next, someone will say you can't eat them with bbq sauce
either...well, too bad! I have no intention of giving that up!

Debra<---who refuses to be politically correct:):)

steve knight

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Aug 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/6/98
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On Thu, 06 Aug 1998 12:59:56 GMT, lsca...@erols.com (Leo Scanlon)
wrote:

>On Wed, 05 Aug 1998 04:53:17 GMT, dog...@teleport.com (steve knight)
>wrote:
>
>>No they are not. They are cut form real potatoes deep fried then flash
>>frozen. I know I worked at lamb weston for years making them and
>>wendy's french fries.
>
>They came from the same place? AFAIK, McD's fries had the skins still
>on and Wendy's didn't. Also Wendy's fries are those fat, mealy
>things. So it must have been two separate processes at Lamb Weston,
>right?


All they did was change the cutters in the "lamb guns" Potatoes were
shot through a long tube with pressure through cutters.

Liv

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Aug 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/6/98
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dfr...@rocketmail.com (Debra Fritz) wrote:

>On Thu, 06 Aug 1998 Young <qwe...@mail.monmouth.com> wrote:

>>Mark Beemsterboer wrote:
>>> and salt. Eat with ketchup, never with mayonaise or vinegar and salt,
>>> like some strange people do.
>>

>>(laughing) Then, I guess french fries with tartar sauce is a
>>definite no no?
>

>Oh oh..next, someone will say you can't eat them with bbq sauce
>either...well, too bad! I have no intention of giving that up!

This is going to sound worse than it tastes, but I sometimes dip my
fries into my Supermac ice cream. Recently I've discovered the ecstasy
of dipping my fries into the sweet curry sauce that comes with the
McNuggets... :)

TGiF!
Liv

--
Pack a cheesy sense of humor when you drop by...
http://www.singnet.com.sg/~liviafyk

To e-mail, remove "zap" from the address.


Doug Weller

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Aug 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/7/98
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In article <35C969...@wcta.net>, on Thu, 06 Aug 1998 08:31:21 +0000,
mel...@wcta.net said...

>
> actually, from what I remember, on the production end they are cut, ran
> through a blancher, then on to a tank that adds a finely powdered sugar
>
>
Here's a recipe for classic french fries I found -- note it uses powdered
sugar!

Russett Potatoes: 1-2 medium-sized spuds per serving
some powdered sugar
Oil (plain old vegetable oil works, but shortening is even better!)
A sharp knife

Let the potatoes sit for about a 4-7 days on a table. Don't worry about
them sprouting eyes. They probably won't. If they do, break them off.
When the potatoes are ready (they should still be firm), peel them and cut
out any green, black or otherwise yukky part.

Prepare a big bowl of water and add enough powdered sugar to make it
pretty
sweet (about 1 Tablespoon per cup of water or 15ml per 250ml)

The tricky cutting part (Cut 'em too thin and you've got blah potato
sticks):
Cut the potato into about 1-1.25cm thick (about 3/8 inch) slices, and then
cut the slices into sticks just as thick.

You should use a temperature-controlled fryer. Turn it on and heat the oil
to 335 degrees F (170 degrees C). Only fill the fryer about halfway with
oil!

You might want to let the cut potatoes soak in plain water for a few hours
to let out excess starch. Then, drain them and put them into the
sugar-water.

After the potatoes have soaked in the sugar-water for at least 15 mins,
take some and drain them and then place them in the fryer. You should only
put about half as many fries in the fryer as there is oil; fries need room
to swim.

After about 30 sec., stir the fries (with a stick or fork or spoon!) so
they don't stick together.

After about 4-6 minutes (depending on water content), they should be a
dark
golden-brown. Your fries are ready to come out of the oil and be drained.

The easiest way to drain them is to put them on a plate that has a lot of
paper towels on it. If you want to salt them, salt them right away, then
mix them around to drain them more and spread the salt.

Start another batch.

Don't let them sit around too long or they'll get soggy and mushy and not
taste very good.
--
Doug Weller Moderator, sci.archaeology.moderated
Submissions to:sci-archaeol...@medieval.org
Requests To: arch-mo...@ucl.ac.uk
Co-owner UK-Schools mailing list: email me for details

LauraM

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Aug 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/9/98
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K.. now I'm curious.. a sweet curry sauce that comes with the nuggets??
this sounds new.. all we have is honey, hot mustard, bbq, or sweet and sour?
Where r u from?! :)

(sorry.. mcd changes intreague me.. ) :)

L.

Liv

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Aug 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/10/98
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"LauraM" <lau...@net1fx.com> wrote:

>K.. now I'm curious.. a sweet curry sauce that comes with the nuggets??
>this sounds new.. all we have is honey, hot mustard, bbq, or sweet and sour?
>Where r u from?! :)

Singapore, on the other side of the planet. I don't know why the curry
sauce is sweet, we really prefer our curries spicy, but I'm not
complaining because it still tastes pretty good.

Once a year, we get the Samurai burger for a short period. It has this
sweet teriyaki sauce that is to die for. :)

Yummy-yum!

A.Ferszt

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Aug 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/10/98
to
LauraM wrote:
>
> K.. now I'm curious.. a sweet curry sauce that comes with the nuggets??
> this sounds new.. all we have is honey, hot mustard, bbq, or sweet and sour?
> Where r u from?! :)
>
> (sorry.. mcd changes intreague me.. ) :)
>
> L.


Then you might be interested in the fact that McDonald's in New Mexico
serves green chile with the burgers periodically. I wish they'd do it
all the time!

Jean Lissenden

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Aug 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/10/98
to A.Ferszt
Here in Maine, McD's has a "McLobster" sandwich in the summer for the
tourists!

Tis terrible.

Jean

Tony Pelliccio

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Aug 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/10/98
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In article <35CEF2...@javanet.com>, je...@javanet.com says...

> Here in Maine, McD's has a "McLobster" sandwich in the summer for the
> tourists!
>
> Tis terrible.

Totally agree. For $4.00 I tried one and the lobster is like rubber.
Yeeecchhh!

Tony


DieStanDie

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Aug 11, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/11/98
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Jean sed:

>Here in Maine, McD's has a "McLobster" sandwich in the summer for the
>tourists!

Wow! When I lived in Mississippi, they served McCatfish, too! And in Hawaii,
I hear they have poi!!!! Too bad the French ones don't have anything to make
fun of.

Others, please share your frightening
"regional" McDonald's dishes with us!!!

G

Leslie Paul Davies

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Aug 11, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/11/98
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[McKermies?]

GL
--
Paul W2SYF/4 Ft Lauderdale
"Heisenberg may have slept here... "
Leslie Paul Davies
lpda...@bc.seflin.org


steve knight

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Aug 11, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/11/98
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On Mon, 10 Aug 1998 17:59:35 -0400, nospam...@nospam.ultranet.com
(Tony Pelliccio) wrote:

>> Here in Maine, McD's has a "McLobster" sandwich in the summer for the
>> tourists!
>>

>> Tis terrible.
>
>Totally agree. For $4.00 I tried one and the lobster is like rubber.
>Yeeecchhh!


you expected it to be good?

Mrs. M

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Aug 12, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/12/98
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I had a few McLobster sandwiches several years ago. I liked them!
--can't get enough of that stuff! (Although, they were just "fill-ins"
until I got to my next lobster dinner (with or without steamers).

On Tue, 11 Aug 1998 16:23:12 GMT, dog...@teleport.com (steve knight)
wrote:

>On Mon, 10 Aug 1998 17:59:35 -0400, nospam...@nospam.ultranet.com


Mrs. M
To reply via e-mail, remove "nospam" from the address.

Doug Weller

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Aug 12, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/12/98
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In article <199808110528...@ladder01.news.aol.com>, on 11 Aug
1998 05:28:33 GMT, diest...@aol.com said...

>
>
> Wow! When I lived in Mississippi, they served McCatfish, too! And in Hawaii,
> I hear they have poi!!!! Too bad the French ones don't have anything to make
> fun of.
>
>
French ones do some sort of cheese nugget.

Italian ones do a very nice fresh fruit salad -- and are a cheap place to
get cold drinks. That's all, though!

connie gallagher

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Aug 12, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/12/98
to
In Florida McDonalds had single or family sized pizzas with choice of
toppings.In the Hudson Valley,NY we can get hot dogs

"A happy person is not a person in a certain set of circumstances,but
rather a person
with a certain set of attitudes."
~Hugh Downs~


Betsy Hirschburg

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Aug 12, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/12/98
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McDonald's in Seattle has little packs of Tartar Sauce,I've never seen
that at McD's anywhere else. Betsy


Elizabeth & Keith Falkner

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Aug 13, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/13/98
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Betsy Hirschburg wrote:
>
> McDonald's in Seattle has little packs of Tartar Sauce,I've never seen
> that at McD's anywhere else. Betsy

Here in Sarasota, you routinely can get those little packages of Tartar
Sauce on the condiment table. It's for the McFishy sandwiches.

Elizabeth
(...Sausage McMuffin with Cheese on a Biscuit...oh, the humanity...)

Jennifer Varga

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Aug 13, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/13/98
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Hi, new here.
Just wanted to add.
I live in Canada and some of the McDonalds in the walmarts are just snack
centers and
these have hot dogs available (so far I have found only one of these) and
we have pizza
personal in all restaurants and family in some restaurants. There are
some toppings, but
not a great selection. The pizza's are like the burgers. They have the
specified types of
burgers and pizzas that you order, then you can get toppings omitted (or
added) as you
wish.
Jen

Robert St. Amant

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Aug 13, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/13/98
to
dwe...@ramtops.demon.co.uk (Doug Weller) writes:
> French ones do some sort of cheese nugget.
>
> Italian ones do a very nice fresh fruit salad -- and are a cheap place to
> get cold drinks. That's all, though!

And in Germany and Austria, naturally, McDonald's serves beer. Not
very good beer, from what I remember, though.

--
Rob St. Amant

Holly C.

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Aug 13, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/13/98
to
In some Texas locations, we can get the Texas-style hamburger (mustard
and pickles, no ketchup). We also have Cajun-style McChicken
sandwiches, which are pretty good.

Holly

Frank Martin

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Aug 13, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/13/98
to
Utah you can get "Fry Sauce" which seems to be a Utah favoite. (Mayo and
Ketchup is the basicaly what it is)

Frank Martin

Betsy Hirschburg wrote in message
<3252-35D...@newsd-162.iap.bryant.webtv.net>...

leon family

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Aug 14, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/14/98
to
You can get tartar sauce in Toronto as well...

Elizabeth & Keith Falkner

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Aug 16, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/16/98
to
Lyndon Watson wrote:

> Elizabeth & Keith Falkner <falk...@home.com> writes:


> > Here in Sarasota, you routinely can get those little packages of Tartar Sauce on the condiment table.



> But do MacDonalds use real Tartars to make it, or is it just another one of those artificial foods made from wood pulp?

------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Lyndon Watson


Yer had me stumped, so I hightailed it over to the Golden Arches
(FINALLY delivering that promised chicken soup and matzo balls to the
really nice Keen folks Donald and Verna in Osprey).

From the package: made in 1206, ingredients: Genghis Khan.

This sauce has been specially formulated to promote the collection of
salivary gland minerals that forms a hard layer on the teeth.

Seems like real Tartars to me.

Weird stuff on packages these days...

Elizabeth

Lyndon Watson

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Aug 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/17/98
to
In article <35D2D31C...@home.com>,

Elizabeth & Keith Falkner <falk...@home.com> writes:
> Betsy Hirschburg wrote:
>> McDonald's in Seattle has little packs of Tartar Sauce
> Here in Sarasota, you routinely can get those little packages of Tartar
> Sauce on the condiment table.

But do MacDonalds use real Tartars to make it, or is it just another one
of those artificial foods made from wood pulp?

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lyndon Watson deslash L.Watson/@/csc/./canterbury/./ac/./nz
------------------------------------------------------------------------
postmaster@localhost,abuse@localhost,ro...@mailloop.com
cat/dev/zero/tmp/...`@localhost,halt@localhost

Veronica Sullivan

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Aug 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/18/98
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> Elizabeth & Keith Falkner <falk...@home.com> writes:
(re: real Tartar sauce)
>From the package: made in 1206, ingredients: Genghis Khan.
>
>This sauce has been specially formulated to promote the collection of
>salivary gland minerals that forms a hard layer on the teeth.
>
>Seems like real Tartars to me.
>
>Weird stuff on packages these days..

Way back when I took undergrad Russian History, the guy who taught it
told us by way of background that real Tartar sauce would consist of
equal parts high-proof vodka, kerosene, and Tabasco sauce. These days,
he might mention habaneros.

ron, still missing Lee Williames though not Misericordia

jane hubbard

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Aug 25, 1998, 3:00:00 AM8/25/98