VT cook-in - Stuffed Chiles

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Jack Schidt

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Oct 10, 2002, 6:29:23 AM10/10/02
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I won't call these rellenos because they're not fried and I won't call them
wolf turds because I used poblanos instead of jalapenos.

fresh poblano chiles for some
fresh cubanelle chiles for others

stuffed with

diced pork loin (I grilled up some pork tenderloins previously)
ancho chile powder
diced garlic
chopped white onion
diced granny smith apple
allspice
cinnamon
mex oregano
salt
pepper
smoked mozzerella (you knew there hadda be cheese in there someplace, no?)

I started out grilling these at the cook-in, but soon realized there should
be a cover over them as well, so I transferred them to the oven. At home I
would have used my kamado, which is basically an oven when it's closed.

Funny thing, when we tasted these, we found that some poblanos were hot,
much hotter than the 3 on the scoville scale that they're touted as having.
The cubanelles were, of course, as mild as usual.

Jack Insert


Kate Connally

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Oct 14, 2002, 11:38:58 AM10/14/02
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Yes, the chiles were a tad too hot for me but
the filling was scrumptious! Gonna try this myself
one of these days.
Kate
--
Kate Connally
“If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
Until you bite their heads off.”
What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
mailto:conn...@pitt.edu

Sandi D.

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Oct 14, 2002, 11:48:04 AM10/14/02
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"Kate Connally" <conn...@pitt.edu> wrote in message
news:3DAAE512...@pitt.edu...

> Jack Schidt wrote:
> >
>
> > Funny thing, when we tasted these, we found that some poblanos were hot,
> > much hotter than the 3 on the scoville scale that they're touted as
having.
> > The cubanelles were, of course, as mild as usual.
> >
> > Jack Insert
>
> Yes, the chiles were a tad too hot for me but
> the filling was scrumptious! Gonna try this myself
> one of these days.
> Kate
> --
> Kate Connally

I just had a similar instance here in WA state. We bought poblano chiles for
relleno. I removed the skind and seeds and veins, did the rellenos. They
were the hottest rellenos I've ever had -wll over their rating on the
Scoville scale.

Sandi


Pablo

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Oct 14, 2002, 11:39:43 PM10/14/02
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"Sandi D." <westi...@invalid.verizon.net> wrote in message
news:UGBq9.32056$qb....@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...

>
> I just had a similar instance here in WA state. We bought
poblano chiles for
> relleno. I removed the skind and seeds and veins, did the
rellenos. They
> were the hottest rellenos I've ever had -wll over their
rating on the
> Scoville scale.
>
I made stuffed chiles tonight, using poblanos. They were
too hot for us as well (I'm sorry I silently called the VT
attendees wusses...) Could this be because the chiles were
baked without roasting and peeling first? Also, the dish
had very little liquid to perhaps leech out some of that
capsaicin.

Wife: Who gave you this recipe? (Immediately before
tasting the first bit of chile poblano on her
fork.)
Me: Jack Schidt
Her: (almost simultaneously with my above response) Holy
crap!

Therefore, from this day foreword (in our house, at least),
we will refer to Jack as "St. Jack."


Pablo

Jack Schidt

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Oct 15, 2002, 6:42:41 AM10/15/02
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"Pablo" <pabl...@peoplepc.com> wrote in message
news:uqn3l9b...@corp.supernews.com...

ahahahahaha, better than "St. Schidt"

>
>
> Pablo
>

I've encountered hotter than usual poblanos even when roasted. I can't
explain it. Poblanos are 3 on the heat scale and jalapenos are 5, serranos
7 and habaneros 10. How does a poblano become hotter than a jalapeno?
Perhaps it has to do with its ripening off the vine.

Jack St. Jack


Pablo

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Oct 15, 2002, 8:18:39 AM10/15/02
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"Jack Schidt" <jack....@snet.net> wrote in message
news:BiSq9.3696$Bi5.132...@newssvr10.news.prodigy.com...

>
> I've encountered hotter than usual poblanos even when
roasted. I can't
> explain it. Poblanos are 3 on the heat scale and
jalapenos are 5, serranos
> 7 and habaneros 10. How does a poblano become hotter than
a jalapeno?
> Perhaps it has to do with its ripening off the vine.
>
I used to travel to Chihuahua frequently for my job. The
serve fresh jalapeños in the plant cafeteria every day. I'm
not sure where they're grown off-season, but their strength
varies a lot from season to season. Toward winter, they get
too hot for me to eat, unless I mince one up in my soup. In
the springtime, I can eat them like they're bell peppers.
Mis compadres there just accept it as part of life.

Pablo

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