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Thermometer check for Steve

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Ed Pawlowski

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Nov 24, 2022, 10:46:45 AM11/24/22
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Steve thinks my meat thermometer is wrong since we disagree on the
temperature meat should come off the grill. I take steaks off at 110.

This morning I was watching a show and they had a segment with the Salem
Cross Inn. I've had their fantastic medium rage prime rib. The spit
cook it and it comes off at 115 degrees.

Checked my three thermometers in warm water. 125. 125. 124.7

https://www.salemcrossinn.com/

We've done this too. Yes, you can go on a sleigh ride.
https://www.salemcrossinn.com/events/dining-events/fireplace-feast/

Sqwertz

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Nov 24, 2022, 11:52:35 AM11/24/22
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On Thu, 24 Nov 2022 10:46:38 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

> Steve thinks my meat thermometer is wrong since we disagree on the
> temperature meat should come off the grill. I take steaks off at 110.

We were speaking of rib roasts, not steaks.

> This morning I was watching a show and they had a segment with the Salem
> Cross Inn. I've had their fantastic medium rage prime rib. The spit
> cook it and it comes off at 115 degrees.

Yeah, because whenever you cook a roast over direct heat and
flames, the temp will rise significantly afterwards. As is true
when cooking a steak quickly on a grill or cast iron- or a roast
in a hot oven. It is not eaten at 115F. A cow's body temperature
is 102F. 115F is beef with a bad flu.

I only disagree with you about when it should come out of a LOW
oven. You never state you final serving temperature. A rib roast
cooked top 110F in a 240F oven will not rise more than 4-6F after
resting for 10-20 minutes.

My last roast was 132.7F when it was served and you said that was
too rare. Which matched the set temp of my SV unit (132.1F) and
adding for the final sear and taken with an electronic probe. And
you said it was still too rare for you (there is no residual rise
in temperature when cooking a roast VIA sous vide).

> Checked my three thermometers in warm water. 125. 125. 124.7

So what *was* the temperature of the water? ;-)

-sw

Graham

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Nov 24, 2022, 12:00:04 PM11/24/22
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At this altitude (~1070m/3500') water boils at about 96C** so it's
impossible to check my thermometers. However, I have a Thermopen
that claims to be accurate.
** Jam setting and candy setting temperatures are also affected.

Ed Pawlowski

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Nov 24, 2022, 12:00:12 PM11/24/22
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On 11/24/2022 11:52 AM, Sqwertz wrote:

>
> My last roast was 132.7F when it was served and you said that was
> too rare. Which matched the set temp of my SV unit (132.1F) and
> adding for the final sear and taken with an electronic probe. And
> you said it was still too rare for you (there is no residual rise
> in temperature when cooking a roast VIA sous vide).

From the photo it looked much less. 130 - -135 is good.
>
>> Checked my three thermometers in warm water. 125. 125. 124.7
>
> So what *was* the temperature of the water? ;-)
>
> -sw

Only one read a decimal place so I'm assuming the others rounded 124.7
to 125 on the readout. Seems right from touch.

Sqwertz

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Nov 24, 2022, 12:24:32 PM11/24/22
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On Thu, 24 Nov 2022 10:46:38 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

> This morning I was watching a show and they had a segment with the Salem
> Cross Inn. I've had their fantastic medium rage prime rib. The spit
> cook it and it comes off at 115 degrees.

From their site:


Highs and Lows

Before I tried to start figuring out how to achieve all these
goals simultaneously it was helpful to note that when cooking beef
to medium-rare, there are really only two temperatures that
matter.

125°F (or 51.7°C) is the temperature at which beef is medium
rare—that is, hot but still pink, cooked but still moist and able
to retain its juices. Any higher than that, and muscle fibers
start to rapidly shrink, forcing flavorful juices out of the meat,
and into the bottom of the roasting pan.

310°F (or 154.4°C) is the temperature at which the Maillard
reaction—that wonderfully complicated process by which amino acids
and reducing sugars recombine to form enticing roasty
aromas—really begins to take off. At this range, meat qill quickly
brown and crisp.

BullSHIT! Med rare is NOT 125F. They need new thermometers.

Turkey Fight at 6:PM sharp! Be there or be chicken!

-sw

Leonard Blaisdell

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Nov 25, 2022, 9:11:57 PM11/25/22
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On 2022-11-24, Ed Pawlowski <e...@snet.xxx> wrote:

> Checked my three thermometers in warm water. 125. 125. 124.7


Sounds like a computer address.

Louis Green

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Dec 12, 2022, 1:32:22 AM12/12/22
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