Using raw beeswax for finishing.

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Converter

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Dec 9, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/9/99
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I have just started wood turning and am sill at the
"converter" stage i.e. I convert a perfectly good piece of
timber into firewood by means of a lathe. I have heard that
one can use beeswax as a finishing medium and I have a lump
of raw wax it in the workshop. How do I go about using it?


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Rick

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Dec 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/10/99
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I used to use beeswax a lot when restoring old wooden fishing reels,
old wooden tools etc. I've used it a fair bit on new wood on the lathe
but find that there are two problems with it. Firstly, straight beeswax
is too hard and you have to rub like crazy to get it in when you want
to repolish or touch up later on when your piece is off the lathe.
Beeswax based finishes, which have other oils added, are much better
for this as they are softer and easier. The main problem with beeswax
is that it just doesn't last. It just keeps soaking in and you have to
keep repolishing. I've had much more success by applying sanding sealer
prior to finishing with beeswax. You still get that lovely soft,
antique glow that only beeswax gives you, and the great smell, and it
lasts. Use the beeswax with softening oils in it and `Bob's your uncle'!


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Rick

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Dec 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/10/99
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Sorry, I didn't actually answer your question! I find the best way to
use any beeswax product is to wipe it on with a rag with the lathe not
running. When you've just about covered your piece with wax, take a
small, folded piece of rag (DON'T use a large rag as beeswax is sticky
and will pick it and your fingers up very easily) and run the lathe as
fast as appropriate for the piece you have turned. Hold the rag firmly
against the turning piece until you see it gloss up. As it does, just
move it slowly sideways. I usually then take another, clean bit of
polishing cloth and give it a final polish with the lathe still
running. If you've used sanding sealer, you'll only need one coat
really but I usually put on two. P.S. Don't use steel wool to apply the
wax with the lathe running as the grain will always pick up little
pieces of it. P.P.S. You need a really smooth, sanded finish prior to
applying wax, whether or not you have used sanding sealer.

Henry C. Sutton III

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Dec 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/10/99
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With a beeswax finish, I follow Richard Raffins example and apply some type
of oil first (I use walnut oil or mineral oil), burnish it in with the lathe
running, then apply the wax to the spinning work. After applying the wax,
burnish it in with a little friction so that the wax melts as you move your
cloth along the work. After the wax is melted in to the finish I go over it
with a clean bit of cloth and "buff" it up a bit.
Hope this helps.
Regards,
Trace Sutton
Converter wrote in message <1ca4f2e8...@usw-ex0103-019.remarq.com>...

JD

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Dec 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/10/99
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I use raw beeswax all the time...
simply take a chunk, and with the lathe still spinning, press it into
the piece. Let it warm up enough to melt, and move it across the work. This
will leave a heavy layer of wax over the entire piece.
take a clean rag, and make a hard knot in the middle. Fold it so that
the know is now the end (you should have a more or less solid chunk of hard
cloth). Press this into the spinning piece, and once again, let the wax heat
up until it starts to melt. Move across the work, and you'll clean up the
excess way, and leave a nice finish. you get pretty good penetration (for a
wax finish) too....
--JD

Converter <humlotN...@eastcape.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:1ca4f2e8...@usw-ex0103-019.remarq.com...

Derek Andrews

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Dec 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/10/99
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Henry C. Sutton III wrote:
>
> With a beeswax finish, I follow Richard Raffins example and apply some type
> of oil first (I use walnut oil or mineral oil), ......

My pharmacy sells two types of mineral oil, Heavy and Topical Light. Any
comments about which is best as a wood finish?

The Light version seems to soak in better, and though it is sold as a
body rub for external use only, the pharmacist assures me it is safe to
use.

Derek

**************************************************
Woodturning & Other Fine Gifts Made of Wood
http://www.sunrisewoodcrafts.ns.ca
Woodturning Instruction for beginners
**************************************************

Paul T. Radovanic

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Dec 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/10/99
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On Fri, 10 Dec 1999 15:55:34 GMT, Derek Andrews <> wrote:

>Henry C. Sutton III wrote:
>>
>> With a beeswax finish, I follow Richard Raffins example and apply some type
>> of oil first (I use walnut oil or mineral oil), ......
>
>My pharmacy sells two types of mineral oil, Heavy and Topical Light. Any
>comments about which is best as a wood finish?
>
>The Light version seems to soak in better, and though it is sold as a
>body rub for external use only, the pharmacist assures me it is safe to
>use.

It is certainly safe. But mineral oil never dries or hardens. It
will either rub off or migrate through the wood, so its benefits are
fleeting at best. Walnut oil is safe (it's a salad dressing after
all), and it does dry -- although it takes long time.

So if you're looking for that oil "look", and you want something that
is completely safe from an environmental standpoint, walnut oil is a
better choice.

So, to answer your question, there is no real difference between the
heavy and light mineral oil, IMHO.

Paul Rad

For walnut oil, either visit a gourmet market (or the gourmet section
of your supermarket), or go here:
http://www.woodlandnut.com/

>
>

Alessandro Neri

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Dec 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/11/99
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I suggest you pineapple oil: less greasy, dry easily and it's perfect with
beeswax
try it

Ashling Ranch

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Dec 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/11/99
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Greetings

I find that the bees get pretty raw at anywhere over 1200 RPM. My
problem is holding them against the wood. And I still don't get too much
wax. Any suggestions?

John Pickett
Ashling Ranch
Llano, Texas
home of killer bees


Alessandro Neri wrote in message <94491876...@tango.comm2000.it>...

George Nazarko

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Dec 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/11/99
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Have you tried ear wax?

Ashling Ranch wrote in message <82tsp4$8c4$0...@63.84.41.114>...

James Barley

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Dec 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/11/99
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I've been waiting all my life to say something like this, so here goes.
According to what I keep hearing, "Nothing in Texas is tiny"


Ashling Ranch wrote:
>
> George,
>
> I don't know where you come from, but down here in Texas the bees have
> tiny little ears. I don't think they'd have much wax in there.


Ashling Ranch

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Dec 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/12/99
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George,

I don't know where you come from, but down here in Texas the bees have
tiny little ears. I don't think they'd have much wax in there.

JP

George Nazarko <@mail.tds.net> wrote in message ...

Ashling Ranch

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Dec 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/12/99
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James:

I'm speaking, of course, of migrant northern bees (also refered to as
"snow bees", or as we call them: "Winter Texans") The native bees are just
too damn ornery. ;-)

John Pickett
Ashling Ranch
Llano, Texas


James Barley wrote in message <385323E2...@island.net>...


>I've been waiting all my life to say something like this, so here goes.
>According to what I keep hearing, "Nothing in Texas is tiny"
>
>
>Ashling Ranch wrote:
>>

Rick

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Dec 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/12/99
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Yep, this must indeed be the silly season.

Diane and Art

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Dec 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/12/99
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I've heard that beeswax is a little soft as a finish and it can be combined
(melted) with carnuba wax to make a more durable surface that can be applied on
the lathe. Does anyone have experience and comment? Is there a proportion of
each that works better than others? Are there any other ingredients that
optimize the process?
Thanks (in advance) for your help.

ART LEARMONTH

Rick wrote:

> I used to use beeswax a lot when restoring old wooden fishing reels,
> old wooden tools etc. I've used it a fair bit on new wood on the lathe
> but find that there are two problems with it. Firstly, straight beeswax
> is too hard and you have to rub like crazy to get it in when you want
> to repolish or touch up later on when your piece is off the lathe.
> Beeswax based finishes, which have other oils added, are much better
> for this as they are softer and easier. The main problem with beeswax
> is that it just doesn't last. It just keeps soaking in and you have to
> keep repolishing. I've had much more success by applying sanding sealer
> prior to finishing with beeswax. You still get that lovely soft,
> antique glow that only beeswax gives you, and the great smell, and it
> lasts. Use the beeswax with softening oils in it and `Bob's your uncle'!
>

Ashling Ranch

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Dec 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/12/99
to
Rick:

My wife tells me that its lucky I fell in with such a group of mixed
nuts.
Can't figure out what she is talking about. :-)

John Pickett
Ashling Ranch
Llano, Texas


Rick wrote in message <05a4d7f6...@usw-ex0102-012.remarq.com>...

Jon Schilling

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Dec 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/12/99
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Is elephant ear wax available in bulk? Maybe 55 gallon drums?
I'd think it would be rather expensive, and plain old cow ear wax would be
cheaper and easier to get....?
--
Jon Schilling
Ridgefield, Wa USA (10 miles north of Portland, Ore)

George Nazarko <@mail.tds.net> wrote in message
news:y1y44.45$W62....@ratbert.tds.net...

Kevin & Theresa Miller

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Dec 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/12/99
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Ashling Ranch wrote:
>
> Jon,
>
> I have Scottish Highland Cattle, you are welcome to try to coax them out
> of some earwax. I've got to warn you that those gals have 1.5' (more or
> less) horns. You'll have to do the coaxing. I'll watch.
>
> Maybe Kevin Miller could get us some moose earwax if he's not using it
> all on his moose dung art. ;-)

Hey, I don't make no moose dung art! But way back when I built the
pipeline I was walking around in the woods with a couple of those
southerners and one ask "What are those little things?" "Those are
smart pills" I told him, so he popped one in his mouth. "Yuck, those
taste like moose nuggets" says he. "Yup, you're getting smarter
already"
says I.

Some folks say that the finest finish comes from applying moose nose
oil to the wood. But it'snot...

...Kevin
--
Kevin & Theresa Miller
http://www.alaska.net/~atftb

Ashling Ranch

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Dec 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/13/99
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Jon,

I have Scottish Highland Cattle, you are welcome to try to coax them out
of some earwax. I've got to warn you that those gals have 1.5' (more or
less) horns. You'll have to do the coaxing. I'll watch.

Maybe Kevin Miller could get us some moose earwax if he's not using it
all on his moose dung art. ;-)

John Pickett
Ashling Ranch
Llano, Texas

Jon Schilling wrote in message <830q0...@news2.newsguy.com>...

George Nazarko

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Dec 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/13/99
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My wife thought she had discovered a heap of pecans when she stumbled across
her first pile of moose droppings. Still love to needle her on that.

As to dung art, I probably sent out a half dozen or so moose turd tie clips
to my dad's lodge members....

Kevin & Theresa Miller wrote in message <385458B8...@alaska.net>...

Jon Schilling

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Dec 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/13/99
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Mr Pickett,
A person could get kilt doin that!

--
Jon Schilling
Ridgefield, Wa USA (10 miles north of Portland, Ore)

Ashling Ranch <ash...@fbg.net> wrote in message
news:831jhb$ri9$0...@63.84.41.162...

Ashling Ranch

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Dec 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM12/14/99
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Jon:

aw shucks, their real sweet. :-) (and call me John - Mr. Pickett was my
father)

John Pickett
Ashling Ranch
Llano, Texas


Jon Schilling wrote in message <83398...@news1.newsguy.com>...

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