Old Patterns (was Pattern Storage??)

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Luana Lisandro

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Oct 1, 1995, 3:00:00 AM10/1/95
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Hi,

I have been reading all the wonderful ways of storing patterns... but
what about old patterns (15 years +)? How do ppl treat their old patterns?
And how can you restore or ensure that old patterns don't get damaged?
(Apart from putting them in zip-loc bags and re-tracing severly torn or
damaged pattern pieces) How do museum curators treat old fragile
paper? How do you mend slight rips in these patterns (by not using tape)?

Thanks,
Luana
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Luana Lisandro ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
University of Western Australia | "There is no system that has not
email: lu...@tartarus.uwa.edu.au| another system concealed within it."
| "Art & Lies" by Jeanette Winterson

LWilson777

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Oct 1, 1995, 3:00:00 AM10/1/95
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Luana despite what you elliminated, sounds to me like pattern paper would
be appropriate! I would keep the envelopes and
retrace all of the patterns for possible future use. You could always
keep the patterns too, but I wouldn;t handle them anymore than is
necessary to retrace them. You can buy a 25 yd roll of pattern paper for
under $20. At that price it should be sturdy and have a good degree of
transparency. And come to think of it, why would you not want to
reaccomplish the patterns on new paper? Typically one would appreciate
the picture on the outside of the pattern envelope -not the tissue paper.
Good Luck!
Linda


In article <44ltoa$g...@styx.uwa.edu.au>, lu...@tartarus.uwa.edu.au (Luana

Nancy Polk

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Oct 3, 1995, 3:00:00 AM10/3/95
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On 1 Oct 1995, Luana Lisandro wrote:

> I have been reading all the wonderful ways of storing patterns... but
> what about old patterns (15 years +)? How do ppl treat their old patterns?
> And how can you restore or ensure that old patterns don't get damaged?
> (Apart from putting them in zip-loc bags and re-tracing severly torn or
> damaged pattern pieces) How do museum curators treat old fragile
> paper? How do you mend slight rips in these patterns (by not using tape)?
>
> Thanks,
> Luana

I keep my oldies-but-goodies in a separate box. I buy oldies (20s-50s)
at antique fabric shows and antique stores. By and large I don't use
them except as inspiration. The style/design lines are so fabulous.
However, some of the pattern envelopes are really frayed, so I put them
in special envelopes. Nancy's Notions, a U.S. based company, has special
ziploc baggies. In addition to the basic baggie, there is an external
pocket for the jacket (the pattern goes inside the baggie).

I would suggest that if you're going to sew from an oldie trace
off the pattern onto tracing or pattern paper. The older pattern sizing
isn't te current standard (at least in the US). It also would be easier
to handle. I'd be less stressed out using a trace-off than the
original. Besides a lot of my really old pattern have absolutely no
markings on them except a hole here or there. You have to rely on the
pieces pictured on envelope compared to the shape of the pattern to
figure out what piece it is. Few patterns until about the 40s had
instruction sheets either. Like a jigsaw.

As far as tape goes, if you do tape it, I'd use the very non-stick, peel
off tape. (But I making a trace-off pattern is a better way to go).

And there's an antique show this weekend. Cool.

Nancy in Seattle


pique

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Oct 4, 1995, 3:00:00 AM10/4/95
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>
>>I have been reading all the wonderful ways of storing patterns... but
>>what about old patterns (15 years +)? How do ppl treat their old
>patterns?
>>And how can you restore or ensure that old patterns don't get damaged?
>>(Apart from putting them in zip-loc bags and re-tracing severly torn or
>>damaged pattern pieces) How do museum curators treat old fragile
>>paper? How do you mend slight rips in these patterns (by not using
>tape)?
>>
I have a large collection of old patterns, and I don't treat them all
that differently from a new pattern. I use the original tissue, and have
found it to be quite sturdy. I will however trace a pattern that I plan
to use a lot.

Libraries with valuable old paper will have it chemically treated to
neutralize the acids that cause the paper to disintigrate. I don't think
it would be worth your time to try to do this. Tracing is more
reasonable. Small rips usually aren't mended, unless they are going to
tear further. Then something called "Japanese Tissue" is used. It's
tissue paper, with stamp-like glue.


Alicia Cosgrove

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Oct 9, 1995, 3:00:00 AM10/9/95
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For those of you who want to repair/reinforce your older patterns,
I'd recommend Document Repair Tape over kizukishi or sekishu
(Japanese papers) and glue. I'm in charge of mending and con-
servation in an academic library, and I promise you Document Repair
Tape is *far* simpler to use than the Japanese papers and
glue. Methyl-cellulose is recommended for use with the Japanese
papers, and it can be messy, frustrating and expensive for the
hobbyist. The Document Repair Tape comes on a roll in a little box
and because it is not as bulky or thick as, say, Scotch tape, it
is better for the tissue paper. You shouldn't have to worry about
doing more damage to the pattern with this stuff. I use a tape made
by University Products called 'Archival Aids Document Repair Tape' to
mend brittle papers here at work, and can't imagine why it wouldn't
work on pattern tissue paper. It doesn't have enough body to make
your pattern stand up to repeated use, but it should stabelize
tears enough so that you don't have to worry about the pattern being
distorted. I myself would use the tape to fix a tear, then either
trace the pattern onto another paper or perhaps iron it onto a
'supportive' material like those pattern perserving papers I keep
hearing about. This treatment would *not* be considered 'archival
approved', of course, but it would allow you to use an old favorite
without too much concern about destroying it in the process.


Alicia
The Book Doctor ;-)

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