Crow's Foot Knot help

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Steve H

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Dec 10, 2004, 4:20:20 PM12/10/04
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Greetings,

I seek instructions on how to tie a crow's foot knot.

This knot is seen on medieval illuminated manuscripts tying down
pavillions.

The knot is composed of two ropes, with a bight looping around a tent
stake and three lines which are tied to hooks which attach to grommets
on the pavillion's roof. The fourth end is unattached.

I think this knot can be adjusted to increase or decrease the tension.

Pictures of this knot can be seen on this web page:

http://www.greydragon.org/pavilions/basel.html

Any help with this is appreciated.

Thank you for your time.

Steve H
Everett, Washington
USA

gri...@kos.net

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Dec 11, 2004, 7:55:29 PM12/11/04
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Steve H wrote:
> Greetings,
>
> I seek instructions on how to tie a crow's foot knot.
>

Well, I am not sure that I am correct. However, I will give it a try.


> The knot is composed of two ropes, with a bight looping around a tent
> stake and three lines which are tied to hooks which attach to
grommets
> on the pavillion's roof. The fourth end is unattached.

There are three grommets on the edge of the tent's roof. The rope with
hooks on each end is attached to the outside grommets forming a bight
of rope. The second rope has a hook in one end. It is attached to the
middle grommet on the edge of the roof. The second rope is brought down
behind the bight formed by the the first rope. The working end of the
second rope goes around the stake and back up to the bight of the first
rope.

In the closeup picture of the crow's foot knot, on the site you posted,
only one rope shows from the stake to the bight. But the two ropes show
up on other pictures.

Let us call the three lines from the tent roof: "toes". Let's call the
double rope from the stake: the "foot". Then, looking at the close up
picture of the crow's foot, this is what I think.

The working end of the rope, from the stake, goes over the right "toe",
under the middle "toe" and over the left "toe". The working end is
pulled down until the tension in the "toes" and in the "foot" are equal
and "tight enough".

We now have the tension we want in the tent rigging. The next step is
to tie off (belay, fasten) the working end to hold that tension. To do
that, (looking at picture) the working end ties a "half hitch" around
the "foot". The "half hitch" is tied by going infront of the "foot" and
around the back.

Next, (looking at picture) the working end takes a "turn" around the
"foot". The "turn" is made in the same manner as the "half hitch" -
going infront of the "foot" and around the back. The working end is
then tucked between the "turn" and the "half hitch".

Next, the left over length of the working end is taken up with a
"multi-turn overhand knot". The working end with the "multi-turn
overhand knot" is then slung behind the "foot" and though the toes.

I hope this description is understandable. As I said, I am not sure
that I am correct and I look forward to reading other descriptions.
Brian.

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