How to disinfect a yellow gold diamond ring I inherited

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Suzie

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Sep 16, 2010, 11:09:10 PM9/16/10
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Hi everyone

I inherited a beautiful diamond ring from my mother last year who
passed away from various things. However the one thing that really
worries me is the MRSA staph infection she had at time of her
passing. She wore the ring right up to the time of her death.

Can anyone tell me how to keep this beautiful ring as gorgeous as it
is but yet give it a good sterilizing so I can feel good about
touching it?

I've wondered about just using boiling water and dish detergent?
Boiling water kills anything, right?

Thanks so much!

Suzie

Martin H. Eastburn

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Sep 19, 2010, 7:12:55 PM9/19/10
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Warm water and dish detergent will do the trick.
Rubbing Alcohol would do it as well. But I would wash it.
And I'm glad a ring like that got into good hands.


Martin

Martin H. Eastburn
@ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net
"Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer
TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal.
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder
IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com/

Chilla

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Sep 19, 2010, 7:12:47 PM9/19/10
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Take it to your local Dentist and ask if they will give it a bath in
cold sterilising solution. That steriliser kills anyting.

Depending on how loose the stones are you could also put it in an
ultrasonic for a little while.


Regards Charles

Abrasha

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Sep 21, 2010, 1:28:57 AM9/21/10
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Just put the ring in a saucepan full of water, and boil it. With or
without detergent.

You may want to put a small rag in the bottom of the pan, so the ring
does not bounce around against the metal of the pan while the water is
boiling.

--
Abrasha
http://www.abrasha.com

Ted Frater

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Sep 21, 2010, 1:40:36 AM9/21/10
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The 2 previous replies ae useful, however thers a lot you can do yourself.
Certainly boiling water is a first step forward, use a spoon to pick
it up to put into the water. Put a little salt in it as well before
bringing to the boil as well as the spoon of course!!. . tho Id suggest
the following.
It depends on the setting of the diamonds, the area difficult to clean
is under the stone, so a tooth brush and tooth paste is a good way to go.
Rinse well of course.
Then theres the baby feeding bottle sterilising tablets. there sodium
hypochlorite and one tablet in a glass of water overnite will sterilise
the ring after you have toothpasted it as above.
Your skin has a natural resistance to bacteria but do wash you hands
well with soap, after handling the ring,.
If i did the 3 steps above, Id be happy to wear the ring.
Ted.
dorset
UK.


--------------010509030501060504080603--

Peter W. Rowe

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Sep 21, 2010, 1:51:26 AM9/21/10
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On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 22:40:36 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry Ted Frater
<ted.f...@virgin.net> wrote:

>> It depends on the setting of the diamonds, the area difficult to clean
>>is under the stone, so a tooth brush and tooth paste is a good way to go.
>> Rinse well of course.

The trouble with that, Ted, is that toothpaste is abrasive. Only slightly, and
not even all brands. But of those that are, they will damage any polish on the
metal, such as in reflective areas behind the diamond. Not an issue of course
on exposed worn metal, but there's no need to scratch up the parts that might
still be bright, with toothpaste. Just use the brush by itself (an old one,
never to be used on teeth again...) to remove anything loosened by not removed
by the boiling. A bit of detergent and/or ammonia added to the boil also helps.

>> Then theres the baby feeding bottle sterilising tablets. there sodium
>>hypochlorite and one tablet in a glass of water overnite will sterilise
>>the ring

yes, but this is a really poor idea. sodium hypochlorite is, essentially,
bleach. And bleach attacks gold alloys (kind of messes up silver too, but only
on the surface). Please don't clean gold, especially white gold, with anything
even remotely resembling (chemically) bleach. It can damage the metal,
sometimes leading to stress cracking that can cause prongs to break, losing the
stones. The boiling water will be quite sufficient to sterilize the ring.
There are only a very few infective agents that aren't killed by boiling (the
agent that causes mad cow disease, for example. It's a prion, not an actual
living organism or virus, and it's rather harder to kill being merely a
particularly unfortunatly shaped protein that isn't actually alive...
Fortunately, it also isn't likely to be on her ring...)

Peter Rowe

FC...

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Sep 21, 2010, 4:10:22 PM9/21/10
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On Sep 20, 11:51 pm, Peter W. Rowe <rec.crafts.jewe...@earthlink.net>
wrote:


The general consesus regaring MRSA 'surface longevity' is pretty
clear. 3 months as the MAXIMUM for MRSA and although that is a LONG
time for a bacteria, the conditions would need to be 'condusive to
growth' (perfect). Also, the possibility of infection to a healthy
person is LOW and this is why so many people in Hospitals contract and
actually 'die' from MRSA.

Although Peter suggests that BLEACH is not good for your ring, one of
the ONLY chemicals that WILL kill MRSA 'AND' 'denature' a PRION is in
fact concentrated BLEACH. What Bleach has a hard time with, is
'Spores'. Having stated that, Vinegar and Hydrogen Peroxide WILL Kill
MRSA within 60 minutes at a 'SAFE' dilution of 3% (OTC peroxide) with
regular Table Vinegar. 50/50 mix, used in WELL-VENTILATED AREA and/or
in a 'Film Canister' to preserve the strength of the HP. In turn,
this will not harm your ring like BLEACH will with 'White Gold' (much
less a 'Hardy Substance' than 'Yellow Gold' as far as 'bleach' is
concerned.)

Here are some interesting Factoids on Vinegar and Hydrogen Peroxide

http://www.apple-cider-vinegar-benefits.com/vinegar-as-a-disinfectant.html

Cheers,

Suzie

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Sep 23, 2010, 4:52:21 AM9/23/10
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> http://www.apple-cider-vinegar-benefits.com/vinegar-as-a-disinfectant...
>
> Cheers,- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Hi everyone and thankyou to all who replied on this subject. The
diamond ring is a single diamond in yellow gold. I am torn on what
to do. You see, I am not a germaphobe but there are scarey things on
the internet about MRSA. However, again, this infection was in her
bladder/urine and the ring never came in contact with that! Some
people have MRSA in a wound form, that could be really contagious if
not covered and taken care of. I've even wondered if I am
overreacting to this totally. I say this because heck, I have some of
her furniture and I didnt go disinfecting any of that. I just brought
it over to my house and here I am a year later, healthy and fine.
When I was with her, I didnt go home and scrub my hair. I would go
home and shower but not always wash my hair. So any MRSA germs I was
exposed to, would have gotten in my hair and clothes, which I didnt go
home washing either. She had a catheter and a urine bag (sorry if too
much info.) so I just really wonder if I am blowing this out of
proportion even? You wont hurt my feelings if you tell me I am
blowing this out of proportion. In fact, it would be great to think
nothing really had to be done at all.
Did one of you say that MRSA germs live on a surface for 3 months
max? If that is the case, its been 12 months now. The ring has been
in a brown velvet bag up until last night when I did put on rubber
gloves and looked at it and then wrapped it up in kleenex and put it
on my dresser. I remember one of the hospital nurses saying they are
so use to seeing MRSA, that while they have to take precaution, due to
hospital protocal, it really doesnt phase them anymore and a couple of
nurses would come in and not even glove up while touching her. Again,
you would think that as long as you didnt go playing with the urine
bag, you would be fine. I was in the mall earlier today and talked to
a very reputable jeweler and she told me to not use toothpaste for
sure. She told me that for a small fee, they would take care of it
for me while I waited. I tend to be one who second guesses whether I
do something good enough or thorough enough and maybe it would be good
to just let the jeweler do it. Paying the small fee is no big deal to
me. Or maybe the MRSA doesnt even exist on the ring? Maybe it never
really did? I have her nightstand next to my bed and all I did with
that was dust it off. I didnt disinfect it. Here I am, 12 months
later, fine. So I am torn as to how to proceed. It's been a very
lonely year for me without my mother and I have had no one to talk
this over with so it helps to run this past people. (sigh!)
Anyone here think maybe nothing needs to be done at all? Thanks to
all for input!

Suzie

Peter W. Rowe

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Sep 23, 2010, 5:00:04 AM9/23/10
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 01:52:21 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry Suzie
<Suzi...@aol.com> wrote:

>>
>>Hi everyone and thankyou to all who replied on this subject. The
>>diamond ring is a single diamond in yellow gold. I am torn on what
>>to do. You see, I am not a germaphobe but there are scarey things on
>>the internet about MRSA. However, again, this infection was in her
>>bladder/urine and the ring never came in contact with that! Some
>>people have MRSA in a wound form, that could be really contagious if
>>not covered and taken care of. I've even wondered if I am
>>overreacting to this totally.

You're probably worrying a little too much, since Staph organisms are common in
the environment, and a normal occupant even, of human skin (on the outside).
Only when it gets somewhere inside where it shouldn't be, is there suddenly a
big problem. So a few loose germs are likely not a problem. But MRSA is still
nasty enough that taking some precautions to avoid it is not a silly idea, even
if it might sometimes be overkill. Given the close contact of a ring with skin,
and the hands with the rest of the body, cleaning the ring seems a decent, if
not urgent, idea.

But that's beside the point. Boiling the ring for a little bit with a bit of
detergent not only solves any potential problem, however slight the risk might
be, but more importantly (I'm a jeweler, so of course this is important), your
ring will then be nice and clean, and look it's best. That alone is worth
cleaning the thing for... And you could set it up to do in slightly less time
than it took you to write that reply message to the group...

cheers

Peter Rowe

Abrasha

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Oct 11, 2010, 1:32:15 PM10/11/10
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Ted,

Once again as I have requested before, please stick with the things you
actually know something about. Toothbrush and toothpaste to clean
jewelry is a big no no! Both the brush as well as toothpaste are
abrasive and will remove any polish on jewelry.

Sodium Hypochlorite?!? Are you out of your f***ing mind? That's
bleach! Dude, you are crazy, and ignorant! Please do not post about
things you so obviously know nothing about!

--
Abrasha
http://www.abrasha.com


[[moderator's note: Bleach attacks and damages many gold alloys, especially
white golds, causing stress cracking and potential loss of stones when prongs
thus weakened, crack or break. PWR ]]

Abrasha

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Oct 11, 2010, 1:32:28 PM10/11/10
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Suzie wrote:

> I've even wondered if I am
> overreacting to this totally.

You are!

--
Abrasha
http://www.abrasha.com

Nelly

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Oct 17, 2010, 10:07:40 PM10/17/10
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"Abrasha" <abr...@abrasha.com> wrote in message
news:3hi6b6hskl9mr0mka...@4ax.com...

I don't know if she was, or wasn't - but I for one choose peace of mind.

Last time I bought a pre-owned ring from non-jeweler I ran it through the
dishwasher. For that matter, that's how I regularly clean one ring which has
no good access to the pavilion facets, and doesn't respond well to my
ultrasonic cleaner. Strategically clamped & placed over jet holes (making
sure shank clears the washer arm), voila. Sparkly clean every time. And safe
to eat off too.

I do this probably at least once a week to this ring. The setting is secure,
the stones (diamond in this case) are nothing someone would ever balk at
putting in any other type of cleaner. Opinions?

Peter W. Rowe

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Oct 17, 2010, 10:24:39 PM10/17/10
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On Sun, 17 Oct 2010 19:07:40 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry "Nelly"
<dont...@bother.com> wrote:

>>
>>Last time I bought a pre-owned ring from non-jeweler I ran it through the
>>dishwasher. For that matter, that's how I regularly clean one ring which has
>>no good access to the pavilion facets, and doesn't respond well to my
>>ultrasonic cleaner. Strategically clamped & placed over jet holes (making
>>sure shank clears the washer arm), voila. Sparkly clean every time. And safe
>>to eat off too.
>>
>>I do this probably at least once a week to this ring. The setting is secure,
>>the stones (diamond in this case) are nothing someone would ever balk at
>>putting in any other type of cleaner. Opinions?

First thought.

Geez, I wish my new dishwasher worked that well. Just bought a portable GE
dishwasher from Home Depot. It's a piece of junk. They sent a repair guy to
take a look, which he did, and pronounced it working fine (just listened to it
run, opened the door to see the wash arms moving, and that was enough for
him...) I'm trying to get Home Depot to take it back, but you wouldn't believe
the hassles. So much for their happy customer claims in their so called return
policy.. The darn thing won't even get a load of dishes clean when I pretty
much prewash them... And I'm certain it wouldn't get even a bit of lotion off
a ring's shank. So I'm jealous...

But anyway. That's off topic, but I couldn't resist. And I'm the moderator,
so...

But for your situation, the main things that occur to me are that some
dishwashing detergents contain what amounts to a bit of bleach (sodium
hypochlorite) or similar chlorine compounds. If your's does, this is very bad
for gold alloys, especially white gold ones. It can cause stress cracking that
can lead to prongs breaking off and stones being lost. This same chemistry is
why you're not supposed to put sterling silver in the dishwasher. The
detergents can be too harsh. Not all of them, but some, and it's hard to know
whether your's does or not.

Second, while you say the settings are secure, it's a risk. If a stone falls
out in your ultrasonic cleaner, it stays in the tank and you can find it. If it
falls out in your dishwasher, I suspect it would remain in the innards of the
machine's filter, never likely to be seen again without major disassembly of the
machine. Are you proficient enough as a goldsmith or jeweler to be certain the
stones are safe? Even if prongs look OK, are you sure? It can be deceptive
sometimes.

And a comment, do you actually have an ultrasonic cleaner, or is it just one of
the "sonic" ones that merely vibrate the solution with audible frequencies
(usually something near the 60 hz of line current. There's a big difference,
both in cleaning efficiency and in cost. Most ultrasonic cleaners cost over a
hundred dollars to start, and good ones are several hundred. The reason I say
this is that it would be surprising if an actual ultrasonic cleaner had trouble
cleaning your ring while the dishwasher managed it. If that's the case, then
either something is wrong with your ultrasonic, or you're not using a proper
cleaning solution for the job. The water in an ultrasonic cleaner should be
(just like your dishwasher) hot in order to do the job well. Better ultrasonics
have a heater for just this reason. If yours does not, heat the solution first
(microwave it, if you like). The cleaning solution needs to be a decently
strong detergent, or a cleaning solution specifically made to clean jewelry in
an ultrasonic. You can do the same for less money with decent strong kitchen
liquid detergents such as Mr. Clean or Top Job, to which, if they don't already
have it, you add a bit of ammonia. Do that, and your ultrasonic should be able
to do anything your dishwasher does, or better. Also, give the ultrasonic
enough time to work. less expensive ones can take ten or fifteen minutes to do
a good job. The simple "sonic" cleaners that are not ultrasonic types will
need longer. Even they are not so bad, if the right cleaning agents are used,
and the water is hot, and you give it time.

Hope that helps.

Peter Rowe
moderator

Nelly

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Oct 18, 2010, 10:20:23 PM10/18/10
to

"Peter W. Rowe" <rec.craft...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:11bnb613mbi6hb70v...@4ax.com...

> On Sun, 17 Oct 2010 19:07:40 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry "Nelly"
> <dont...@bother.com> wrote:
>
>>>
>>>Last time I bought a pre-owned ring from non-jeweler I ran it through the
>>>dishwasher. For that matter, that's how I regularly clean one ring which has
>>>no good access to the pavilion facets, and doesn't respond well to my
>>>ultrasonic cleaner. Strategically clamped & placed over jet holes (making
>>>sure shank clears the washer arm), voila. Sparkly clean every time. And
>>>safe to eat off too.
>>>
>>>I do this probably at least once a week to this ring. The setting is secure,
>>>the stones (diamond in this case) are nothing someone would ever balk at
>>>putting in any other type of cleaner. Opinions?
>
> First thought.
>
> Geez, I wish my new dishwasher worked that well. Just bought a portable
> GE dishwasher from Home Depot. It's a piece of junk. They sent a repair guy
> to take a look, which he did, and pronounced it working fine (just listened
> to it run, opened the door to see the wash arms moving, and that was enough for
> him...) I'm trying to get Home Depot to take it back, but you wouldn't believe
> the hassles. So much for their happy customer claims in their so called return
> policy.. The darn thing won't even get a load of dishes clean when I pretty
> much prewash them... And I'm certain it wouldn't get even a bit of lotion off
> a ring's shank. So I'm jealous...

Having once had to put up with a totally lame (new) dishwasher, I'm amazed
any manufacturer would still produce something that's gotten so many
complaints.

> But anyway. That's off topic, but I couldn't resist. And I'm the
> moderator,
> so...
>
> But for your situation, the main things that occur to me are that some
> dishwashing detergents contain what amounts to a bit of bleach (sodium
> hypochlorite) or similar chlorine compounds. If your's does, this is very
> bad for gold alloys, especially white gold ones. It can cause stress cracking
> that can lead to prongs breaking off and stones being lost. This same
> chemistry is why you're not supposed to put sterling silver in the dishwasher. The
> detergents can be too harsh. Not all of them, but some, and it's hard to
> know whether your's does or not.

Sounds like the thinness of the metal in prongs puts them at particular
risk. So now I have to ask about long term effects of chlorine in tapwater.
My mother's water, for instance, makes her kitchen smell like a swimming
pool after the faucet's been turned on. (And I wouldn't wear gold in a pool,
either.)
Would a new white gold ring, with rhodium layer intact be harmed? (The
question's purely academic since I don't own any white gold, plated or
otherwise.)

> Second, while you say the settings are secure, it's a risk. If a stone
> falls out in your ultrasonic cleaner, it stays in the tank and you can find it.
> If it falls out in your dishwasher, I suspect it would remain in the innards of
> the machine's filter, never likely to be seen again without major disassembly
> of the machine. Are you proficient enough as a goldsmith or jeweler to be
> certain the stones are safe? Even if prongs look OK, are you sure? It can be
> deceptive sometimes.

You're right of course. And I'm no jeweler but I do take the ring in about
every 3 months to have prongs checked & retightened. And sooner if anything
starts getting the least bit "catchy."

> And a comment, do you actually have an ultrasonic cleaner, or is it just
> one of the "sonic" ones that merely vibrate the solution with audible frequencies
> (usually something near the 60 hz of line current. There's a big difference,
> both in cleaning efficiency and in cost. Most ultrasonic cleaners cost
> over a hundred dollars to start, and good ones are several hundred. The reason I
> say this is that it would be surprising if an actual ultrasonic cleaner had
> trouble cleaning your ring while the dishwasher managed it. If that's the case,
> then either something is wrong with your ultrasonic, or you're not using a
> proper cleaning solution for the job. The water in an ultrasonic cleaner should
> be (just like your dishwasher) hot in order to do the job well. Better
> ultrasonics have a heater for just this reason. If yours does not, heat the solution
> first (microwave it, if you like). The cleaning solution needs to be a decently
> strong detergent, or a cleaning solution specifically made to clean
> jewelry in an ultrasonic. You can do the same for less money with decent strong
> kitchen liquid detergents such as Mr. Clean or Top Job, to which, if they don't
> already have it, you add a bit of ammonia. Do that, and your ultrasonic should be
> able to do anything your dishwasher does, or better. Also, give the ultrasonic
> enough time to work. less expensive ones can take ten or fifteen minutes
> to do a good job. The simple "sonic" cleaners that are not ultrasonic types
> will need longer. Even they are not so bad, if the right cleaning agents are
> used, and the water is hot, and you give it time.

I did mean to enquote "ultrasonic," sorry. Yes it is the cheap vibrating
kind. It's probably the first time I used the thing in 15 years, since for
everything else I've found that a little dental brush pick works nicely. I
left the ring in there for more than an hour using softened, very warm water
(120�F or so) with the prescribed cleaning powder. I suppose if I had been
willing to to pay retail price for the ring (the only ring I wear anymore) I
couldt justify getting a better unit to clean it with.

> Hope that helps.

As always.

>
> Peter Rowe
> moderator


Peter W. Rowe

unread,
Oct 18, 2010, 10:52:48 PM10/18/10
to
On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 19:20:23 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry "Nelly"
<dont...@bother.com> wrote:

>>
>>"Peter W. Rowe" <rec.craft...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
>>news:11bnb613mbi6hb70v...@4ax.com...
>>> On Sun, 17 Oct 2010 19:07:40 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry "Nelly"
>>> <dont...@bother.com> wrote:
>>>

>>> Geez, I wish my new dishwasher worked that well. Just bought a portable

>>> GE dishwasher from Home Depot. It's a piece of junk. ...

>>
>>Having once had to put up with a totally lame (new) dishwasher, I'm amazed
>>any manufacturer would still produce something that's gotten so many
>>complaints.

Agreed. You'd think that if GE can build good jet engines (they do), they'd be
able to figure out a dishwasher. Maybe this is a faulty unit and the repair guy
just wasn't in a position to do more than look and decide whether to have it
replaced or not... Interestingly, today I got an email from Home Depot
corporate office responding to a somewhat bitchy response I sent them along with
a "review" of the dishwasher (they rejected the review, though. Seems I wasn't
supposed to mention Sears name (sears doesn't charge that restocking fee...) But
the email sounds like at least someone there is going to try and make me happy.
And even the response is a pleasant surprise. We'll see how it turns out.

>>
>>Sounds like the thinness of the metal in prongs puts them at particular
>>risk. So now I have to ask about long term effects of chlorine in tapwater.
>>My mother's water, for instance, makes her kitchen smell like a swimming
>>pool after the faucet's been turned on. (And I wouldn't wear gold in a pool,
>>either.)

The thinness of the metal in prongs is a bit consideration even if there are no
issues with chlorine or stress corrosion. People wear a ring for years, and it
looks the same, day to day, so they don't realize just how much metal has been
worn off. When the metal gets too thin, it no longer has the strength to resist
being peeled back if for some reason, something catches or knocks the edge of
the stone, so then stones can loosen or be lost. That, of course, can be
serviced, especially with diamonds. Any decent jeweler, if the prongs are too
worn, can build them up or replace them if needed.

As to your mom's tap water, if ti smells like a chlorinated pool, I'd suggest
getting a home water filter of some sort. That sounds nasty. Chlorine in the
water is important to keep it from harboring various nasty things, but by the
time you drink it, it would be best to not have so much there. Chlorine, after
all, is hardly an essential nutrient... (grin) As to the ring, yes, over time,
that can be a problem if it's that strong. The classic situation where chlorine
causes problems with jewelry is with people who use swimming pools or spas
regularly, so the jewelry gets repeated and sometimes extended exposure. The
damage takes time to occur, but you don't see it happening until the metal
cracks and fails. If her tap water is a strong as a swimming pool (I sure hope
it isn't, though), then it would be just as capable of causing damage. But I'm
guessing that though you may smell chlorine in an enclosed kitchen, you probably
don't have as much as a swimming pool. Still, household tap water really
shouldn't have that sort of smell in most cases. Might be worth a phone call to
the water/utility company ti find out if this is normal. Strong smells in the
water can be caused by other things too, which a plumber might be able to fix.

>>Would a new white gold ring, with rhodium layer intact be harmed? (The
>>question's purely academic since I don't own any white gold, plated or
>>otherwise.)

Yes. Rhodium helps, but does not totally seal a surface from all attack. If it
is really heavy, then maybe it would, but given the cost of rhodium metal and
plating solution, few manufacturers use more than needed.

>>
>>You're right of course. And I'm no jeweler but I do take the ring in about
>>every 3 months to have prongs checked & retightened. And sooner if anything
>>starts getting the least bit "catchy."

You're to be commended. That's far more attentiveness to the welfare of the
jewelry than most people show. Many let it go for years without a thought. Kind
of like not visiting a dentist until you've got a toothache... Regular
checkups will allow a sense of security since the ring gets a professional
examination. Given that the store would like to be able to sell you a needed
service, they seldom miss obvious needs for repair (It helps a lot if the
person who's doing the checking is actually a competent goldsmith rather than
just one of the sales people, by the way. Sales people range from well educated
and qualified to work with jewelry, to those who look nice, talk friendly, can
sell you your own mother if they want, but don't actually know anything about
jewelry...


>>
>>I did mean to enquote "ultrasonic," sorry. Yes it is the cheap vibrating
>>kind. It's probably the first time I used the thing in 15 years, since for
>>everything else I've found that a little dental brush pick works nicely. I
>>left the ring in there for more than an hour using softened, very warm water
>>(120�F or so) with the prescribed cleaning powder. I suppose if I had been
>>willing to to pay retail price for the ring (the only ring I wear anymore) I
>>couldt justify getting a better unit to clean it with.

One of the things about those little vibrating units is that they are sold with
no knowledge on the part of the manufacturer or seller as to what you're going
to put in there. Some jewelry is much more fragile chemically (like pearls, for
example), so the cleaning powders they supply are very gentle detergents,
nothing more. That means they won't harm most types of jewelry, but it also
means they won't harm more stubborn dirt and grime. With gold or platinum, and
diamonds and some other durable stones, you can use considerably more aggressive
means to clean the jewelry.

As I described before, the same sort of liquid kitchen detergents you might use
to clean the wax off that kitchens tile floor, such as Mr. Clean, Top Job, Ajax
liquid, or others, mixed to a pretty strong solution and with, if it's not
already there, a bit of ammonia added... That sort of cleaning solution will do
a lot more than those simple powders they supply with the cleaners. Next, is
temperature. Again, not all jewelry can withstand this treatment, but most of
it can. Don't just gently warm it. Boil it. Put a saucepan of that cleaning
solution on the stove and simmer to just below boiling (you don't want it
boiling over, after all). Unfold a paper clip to a hook so you can hang the
ring on that hook over the side of the saucepan. Let is simmer for a while (15
minutes or so should do the trick). That level of heating will cause most of
the stuff that gets gunked into a ring, to melt (it's grease, wax, dried lotion,
etc), which lets the solution get it off much better. Then rinse and/or brush
off with an old toothbrush or the like.

Prior to the invention of ultrasonic cleaners, goldsmiths were faced with the
same problem they now have after buffing and polishing the jewelry. It's packed
full of the polishing compounds, which are also wax or grease based (the
binders, at least, for the polishing agent). So an aggtessive cleaning method
is needed as part of normal jewelry making and repair. Before ultrasonics, most
jewelers would use what was called a "boil out pot". That amounts to the same
setup I just described, though often, the cleaning agent used would be even
stronger (like straight lye, sometimes... Nasty stuff) Jewelers got along with
that set up for a long time without ultrasonics, and we still use such a method
when cleaning things that cannot withstand the high energy of an ultrasonic.

The main thing, though, is that this is for gold and platinum and harder gems.
Don't do this to pearls, amber, turqoise, lapis, malachite, coral, glass
foilbacks, costume jewelry, anything with stones that are glued in, etc. And be
careful with cleaning silver. Some of the stronger cleaning agents can tarnish
it. Above all, don't ever add bleach to the cleaning solution. Ammonia yes,
bleach no.

Cheers

Peter

Ted Frater

unread,
Oct 20, 2010, 10:14:41 PM10/20/10
to

Weve had the same dish washer for some 40 yrs, it does all the
glassess, then the plates then sausepans all in that order,
This type of washer is hard to find , there rare especially here in the uk.
Ours is also self propelled, ie it will use its radar to locate other
left over items , and automatically add them to the process.
It has 2 grippers on its front as well, which it uses to wipe down any
worktops near its reach.
Its very economical on water, and doesnt use much wash up liquid. It
rinses the glasses as well.
All it needs to get it going is a couple of glasses of wine poured into
the right opening in the front.
For instance it has been known to respond to thecommand of wash the
car!! it indicates on its lcd screen it needs 4 glasses of wine and a
roast chicken to undertake that large washing up job.
Keep looking, they are about!!
The only down side to these machines is they want 2 weeks holiday away
from work every year.
dont know whats got into them.

Movi...@home.com

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Nov 6, 2010, 5:01:13 AM11/6/10
to
On Mon, 11 Oct 2010 10:32:15 -0700, Abrasha <abr...@abrasha.com>
wrote:


Suzie,

I'm a gem cutter, and what I use to clean jewelry is Super Glue
Solvent. But if the ring has been worn for a long time, then it's best
to just have the stone removed from the setting and cleaned using the
SG Solvent and a paper towel. I cleaned one diamond ring for a woman
by doing exactly that. When she first gave me the ring to clean, she
didn't want the diamond any longer before it looked really bad. After
it was cleaned though, she changed her mind rather quickly.

Dan Starr

Peter W. Rowe

unread,
Nov 6, 2010, 5:24:35 AM11/6/10
to
On Sat, 06 Nov 2010 02:01:13 -0700, in rec.crafts.jewelry Movi...@home.com
wrote:

>>
>>Suzie,
>>
>>I'm a gem cutter, and what I use to clean jewelry is Super Glue
>>Solvent. But if the ring has been worn for a long time, then it's best
>>to just have the stone removed from the setting and cleaned using the
>>SG Solvent and a paper towel. I cleaned one diamond ring for a woman
>>by doing exactly that. When she first gave me the ring to clean, she
>>didn't want the diamond any longer before it looked really bad. After
>>it was cleaned though, she changed her mind rather quickly.
>>
>>Dan Starr

Super glue solvent is essentially acetone. That's a great grease cutter if that
is the sort of thing one needs to clean. But not as effective on things like
the gunked up mix of dead skin, oils, soaps, lotions, and whatever else gets
packed under the stones in a ring.

Also, be aware that acetone, as with many organic solvents, presents
carcinogenic risks. Use only with good ventillation.

Remove the stone from the ring to clean it? Are you nuts? Totally unnecessary.
In 36 years as a commercial goldsmith and jeweler, I cannot recall ever having
to remove a stone just for cleaning purposes unless it was in a totally sealed
bezel which had allowed something underneath. And I can remember only two of
those, both antique rose cuts where the visible metal behind them needed
polishing as well as cleaning.. Normally though, too much work,and can damage
the mounting causing more headache when it's time to reset the stone. Almost
any jeweler who's capable of competently removing and resetting a stone likely
also has access to an ultrasonic cleaner and/or steam cleaner, which make
extreme measures even less needed. But even without those, it's simply not
required. Acetone is great for precleaning a stone or metal to get it clean
enough for really good glue joints, or for removing light grease, oils, nail
polish, etc. But normally, it simply isn't the best way to clean a ring or a
stone if it's got more than a bit of skin oils on it. It does have one other
very good use that one sometimes encounters. Some ladies use products like hair
spray, which amount to a lacquer like product. If that gets on the back of a
stone or into a ring, it's hard to remove via normal cleaning methods. For
that, or to clean up old super glue or nail polish or some paints, Acetone is a
very good choice. But for normal diamond jewelry cleaning, Use a good strong
detergent (something like Mr. Clean or Top Job liquid cleaners) with a bit of
ammonia, in hot or boiling water, as discussed in other posts in this thread,
and you can get virtually anything clean that any ring will pick up in use. You
really don't need to remove the stones to do it.

Peter Rowe

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