Stained glass vs "Regular" glass Difference?

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Oneal Smith

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Aug 7, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/7/99
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I got the glass FAQ but need an answer this week sometime.

BASICALLY: What is the difference between glass and "stained" glass?

--
Oneal (feelin' kinda' dumb) can be reached at: osm...@qnet.com

The Anthonys

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Aug 8, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/8/99
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Originally the term "Stained Glass" referred to the silver-stained glass
of medieval time. Silver stain was used to add more detail to pieces of
glass in a "stained glass window." Now stained glass generally refers to
colored glass and the things made with it. The glass is manufactured
with color, although it is possible to add detail and extra colors with
vitreous paints, enamels and silver stain. The typical stained glass
artist does not color the sheet of glass -- it is made that way.

--SB

Karen Rathbun

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Aug 8, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/8/99
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Also, it seems that stained glass generally has a lower melting point
than, say, window pane glass -- right? Why?

Feel free to correct me here -- I'm just a newbie in the art glass
world, having experimented a bit with slumping (mostly scrap window pane
glass) and glass paints (enamels).

Karen


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The Anthonys

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Aug 9, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/9/99
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yes, when you get down to it there are many differences besides just
color. The production techniques differ and the chemistry is different
also. But only in degree, it is all still glass. I mainly do cold glass
work, so am not as familiar as I could be with the details. Surely one
of the group chemists will chime in soon? (assuming that the original
post was not a troll....)

--SB

Karen Rathbun wrote:
>
> Also, it seems that stained glass generally has a lower melting point
> than, say, window pane glass -- right? Why?

> Karen
>

Terry Harper

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Aug 9, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/9/99
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Karen Rathbun wrote in message <7oku4l$88a$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>...

>Also, it seems that stained glass generally has a lower melting point
>than, say, window pane glass -- right? Why?
>
>Feel free to correct me here -- I'm just a newbie in the art glass
>world, having experimented a bit with slumping (mostly scrap window pane
>glass) and glass paints (enamels).
>
Probably because the working requirements for hand-making sheet are
different from those for machine made sheet, so the formulation is different
to make the glass a little softer and with a longer working range.
--
Terry Harper
Acting Webmaster, The Omnibus Society http://www.omnibussoc.org
E-mail: terry....@btinternet.com
URL: http://www.btinternet.com/~terry.harper/

MikeFirth1

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Aug 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/10/99
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>BASICALLY: What is the difference between glass and "stained" glass?
>

Most importantly, window glass is made to
be clear, even, unblemished and to set
at the right rate as it is made in a huge long
sheet. Stained glass is largely made in small
batches, ladled out onto a rolling table and
often hand rolled where sparkle and color
excitement is praised and small unevenness
and distored images are ignored.


simon_...@my-deja.com

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Aug 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/22/99
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Stained glass is made by adding metal oxides to
the molten glass to give it color. The particular
metal oxide used determines the color the glass
will become. Once the oxide is added to the glass
it is fired in the furnace, it is here where the
magic occurs because the lenght of time it spends
here determines the qualities of the colors. For
some additional info see Theophilus' book "On
Divers Arts" published by Dover Books. This is a
translation fron the original Latin, so some of
it will obviously be dated. This book is the
source for most of what we know about how
medieval crafts were done, so it should be in
every glasscrafters library. You may want to look
at "Stained Glass Craft" by J.A.F. Divine and G.
Blanchford also a Dover Book, this is a circa
1940's tome also with dated material.


In article <37ad2...@news.qnet.com>,


"Oneal Smith" <osm...@qnet.com> wrote:
> I got the glass FAQ but need an answer this
week sometime.
>

> BASICALLY: What is the difference between glass
and "stained" glass?
>

> --
> Oneal (feelin' kinda' dumb) can be reached at:
osm...@qnet.com
>
>

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/

Jeffrey Castaline

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Aug 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/22/99
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Actually, stained glass does not have oxides incorporated into it.
The original "stained glass" was made by taking hand blown sheet glass,
painting it with a stain, then firing the stain onto the glass.
Glass made with metal oxides incorporated into the structure of the
glass itself is properly called "art glass"
The term "stained glass" as it is used today is a misnomer. Colloquially
when we use it it has been generalized to any type of project made using
colored glass whether it be stained glass or art glass.

simon_...@my-deja.com wrote:

--
*********************************************************

Jeffrey Castaline
Partner/Artisan
AANRAKU STAINED GLASS & HOBBY WORKSHOP
2323 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo, CA 94403

*********************************************************

Tel: (650) 372-0527
Email: aan...@earthlink.net
Webpage: http://www.estainedglass.net


*********************************************************

Eat a frog first thing each morning and nothing worse can
happen to you all day. (-:

*********************************************************


The Anthonys

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Aug 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/23/99
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J & J wrote:
>
> Which leads me to another question. The glass in my house (circa
> 1940ish) has many imperfections. It's wavy and has a few bubbles. I'm
> told it's "Depression Glass", though it was probably made way past the
> Great Depression. The shadows it makes are quite beautiful. I'm told
> this glass is quite desirable. Simply put, I plan to tear the house
> down someday. Should I preserve the windows?
> Julia

Yes, a larger glass studio that does restoration work will be glad to
have that glass. Heck, I'm just a hobbyist and I'd be glad to have it!

--SB

Jim V

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Aug 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/23/99
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The basic rule of all appreciation of "THINGS":

If YOU like it... it IS good. Experts [and their opinions] are only
important to experts and people who can't quite figure out if they like
something. Perhaps this will explain why critics will go into great detail,
as a group, on why a movie is awful... and people will make the owners RICH
going to see it, because the PEOPLE liked it.

This definition has limited acceptance by those who have an vested [and
INvested] interest in having been schooled in what is acceptable as "GOOD".
But it works for those who put their money where their appreciation is.

So - by deduction - if you like those windows - KEEP THEM when you tear
down.
IF you do NOT - post the information here; there WILL be someone who will
want to be able to use the glass in a project!

How many dollars they are worth to someone else is a different thread....

victo...@my-deja.com

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Aug 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/23/99
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In article <37BFC4A4...@earthlink.net>,
> "Stained glass" is a generic term used to discribe objects made with
colored glass.The original colored glass is refered to as "pot glass"
and is colored with oxides. Todays full antique glass is made the same
basic way. Colored glass was first done by the Romans in the 5th
century. The first glazing with colored glass was in France about
675.The earlist painted glass dates from 1060 in England (painted with
black trace paint, no colors). Silver stain (the only paint that realy
stains glass) was introduced in the 1300's, and colored enamels came in
in the 1700's. "Art glass" is a new term from the late 19th century
(Tiffany, LaFarge). The term "stained glass" windows has been with us
for hundreds of years. Theophilus was right.

Michele Blank

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Aug 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/23/99
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There are two types of 'restoration' glass earlier(more imperfections) and
later. Both run wholesale around(loosely) 20/sq. ft. YES keep it. Michele


Brian

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Aug 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/23/99
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YES! If you have an architectural salvage firm nearby, you can sell it
there, or find a buyer through the classifieds.

I have hand made window glass, and I will be buying some replacement
panels myself someday, as many other people have had to do.

J & J wrote:


>
> On 10 Aug 1999 01:41:13 GMT, mikef...@cs.com (MikeFirth1) wrote:
>
> >>BASICALLY: What is the difference between glass and "stained" glass?
> >>
> >

> > Most importantly, window glass is made to
> >be clear, even, unblemished and to set
> >at the right rate as it is made in a huge long
> >sheet. Stained glass is largely made in small
> >batches, ladled out onto a rolling table and
> >often hand rolled where sparkle and color
> >excitement is praised and small unevenness
> >and distored images are ignored.
>

> Which leads me to another question. The glass in my house (circa
> 1940ish) has many imperfections. It's wavy and has a few bubbles. I'm
> told it's "Depression Glass", though it was probably made way past the
> Great Depression. The shadows it makes are quite beautiful. I'm told
> this glass is quite desirable. Simply put, I plan to tear the house
> down someday. Should I preserve the windows?
> Julia

> --"This wasn't in the brochure."--Billy Crystal

Bert Weiss

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Aug 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/24/99
to
I believe you will find that colored enameling was done in the 1500's.
This practice is probably the one that has come the farthest in
technological advances especially during the last 20 years.
Microprocessors allow us to precisely manufacture colors and anneal
large sheets of glass that were not practical in the past.

Bert Weiss

Bert Weiss Glass Studio
http://www.customartglass.com
Painted Art Glass
Custom Productions
Architectural and Sculptural Cast Glass
Collaborative Art Glass
Lighting design

> > *********************************************************
> > "Stained glass" is a generic term used to discribe objects made with
> colored glass.The original colored glass is refered to as "pot glass"
> and is colored with oxides. Todays full antique glass is made the same
> basic way. Colored glass was first done by the Romans in the 5th
> century. The first glazing with colored glass was in France about
> 675.The earlist painted glass dates from 1060 in England (painted with
> black trace paint, no colors). Silver stain (the only paint that realy
> stains glass) was introduced in the 1300's, and colored enamels came in
> in the 1700's. "Art glass" is a new term from the late 19th century
> (Tiffany, LaFarge). The term "stained glass" windows has been with us
> for hundreds of years. Theophilus was right.
> >
>
> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

--


victo...@my-deja.com

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Aug 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/26/99
to
In article <37C29587...@customartglass.com>,
> I stand corrected, you are correct enamels was done in the 1500's.
Can you explain a bit about your comments about microprocessors.
Thanks>

victo...@my-deja.com

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Aug 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/26/99
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> I stand corrected, enamels was indead done in the 1500,s. Can
explain your comment about microprocessors. Thanks

Bert Weiss

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Aug 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM8/26/99
to
Microprocessors have enabled colored glass makers to make and repeat
consistently, glass frits for enameling. Today there are even enamels
available that will work in 4 color printing processes. These did not
exist in the past.

The other big improvement made possible by digital technology is float
glass production of large sheets of glass that can be cut and annealed.
In the 1500's they had small pieces of hand made glass that could be
painted and fired. This work fell out or favor because the enamels were
not as brilliant as colored glasses of the day. This is still somewhat
true, however they have improved quite a bit. I can anneal large or
thick pieces of art glass using my microprocessor kiln controller.

My work includes enameling float glass. I can make really interesting
hand painted, multi-colored art glass on a large scale, relatively
cheaply. I could not afford to do my work with stained glass available
today, because it comes in small sheets and is way very expensive
relative to float glass and enamels. I get around the soft, easy to
scratch surface of enamels by sometimes casing the paintings in 2 layers
of glass.

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