Anyone using Adobe Illustrator for patterns?

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Bart Veerman

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Jul 26, 2002, 2:31:18 PM7/26/02
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Hi folks,
If any of you is using Adobe Illustrator to make patterns I'd
appreciate comparing notes on it as I'm running into weird measurement
problems. It'll probably be beyond the scope of the group so private
email might be in order.
Thanks so much,
Bart.

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Javahut

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Jul 26, 2002, 4:39:21 PM7/26/02
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Hey Bart,
I don't use Illustrator, so I can't really help with your problem, but I do
have a question of you.

Is Illustrator a vector or paint program? Just asking for my own curiosity.

By the way, I use Canvas 8 from Deneba software in Miami FL. Have used it
since version old and really like it.
Look at http://www.deneba.com/ when you get your problem solved with
Illustrator, just to stay aware.

"Bart Veerman" <in...@haruteq.com> wrote in message
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db

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Jul 26, 2002, 6:55:59 PM7/26/02
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I use Illustrator v10 to make patterns

"Bart Veerman" <in...@haruteq.com> wrote in message
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Bart Veerman

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Jul 26, 2002, 8:05:54 PM7/26/02
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>Is Illustrator a vector or paint program? Just asking for my own curiosity.
It's a vector jobbie, can paint too. steep learning curve :(

>Look at http://www.deneba.com/ when you get your problem solved with
>Illustrator, just to stay aware

always interested in gauking at other stuff, thanks

SB

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Jul 27, 2002, 1:41:21 PM7/27/02
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I use Illustrator 8 sometimes. Mainly when I need resizing help, or a
very regular shape, or any of the other things a vector program
handles so easily.. What is the problem you're having?

--SB

On Fri, 26 Jul 2002 18:31:18 GMT, in...@haruteq.com (Bart Veerman)
opined:

John D. Armstrong

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Jul 27, 2002, 7:41:04 PM7/27/02
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Base on the fact that you're inquiring in the glass newsgroup, I assume you
are trying to make patterns for stained glass. If this is the case, try
www.dfly.com , http://sgdesigns.com/ , or
http://www.americanbevel.com/designer.html for some softwares that will
solve your problem. Adobe Illustrator is not a good software to use for
accurate measurements. You'll need some sort of CAD based software to
achieve this. The three web sites I provided above will do this for you.
The last web site above by American Bevel has a free software that you can
download called "Designer I". This is a good piece of software and is fee
because of American Bevel's upgrade to Designer II. American Bevel's
"Designer II" will cost around $200. Dragon Fly's software will cost about
$200 as well. This is a good software also. I'm not really familiar with
the software provided by http://sgdesigns.com .

Good luck

John

"Bart Veerman" <in...@haruteq.com> wrote in message
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Bart Veerman

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Jul 28, 2002, 10:35:06 AM7/28/02
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>I use Illustrator 8 sometimes ~ What is the problem you're having?
Version 8 for Windows is also the one I'm using. When I draw a
curve and copy it so I can flip (reflect) it to make a pointy hat or
something, the curve is sometimes the same, but more often than not it
is visually different. Replicated (duplicated) items I create look the
same but most often are different in size, sometimes by as much as 1
cm. Last week I made a pattern for the lattice panel for my backyard
fence (yup, it's finished, installed, looking cool and hasn't been
stolen yet!!!) and figured since all pieces were duplicated, I could
simply score and cut the glass using the same portion of the pattern.
Good thing I checked to see if the first piece of glass I cut would
actually fit at other location on the pattern. Most of them not even
close!
No problem doing the tracing on the actual places on the pattern but
wouldn't it be nice if etc... Scotch taping 24 tiled pages while
hoping to get them aligned properly was annoying enough... yeah go
ahead Moon, chuckle by all means :)))
All in all, I'm having loads of fun,

irexx

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Jul 28, 2002, 10:43:05 AM7/28/02
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I have and do use the software from sgdesign.com. It works reasonable well
for inexpensive (around 50). The image as printed is maybee a 32'd
undersized or it could be my printer interface that is losing the size.

"John D. Armstrong" <jarm...@elp.rr.com> wrote in message
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Dianne & Brent

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Jul 28, 2002, 12:23:02 PM7/28/02
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Adobe Illustrator is a vector-based program. Photoshop is Adobe's version
of a paint program. They are both used by professional graphic
designers--kind of considered the "industry standard".

Cheers,
Dianne

On 7/26/02 12:39 PM, in article ahsc1...@enews3.newsguy.com, "Javahut"

Dianne & Brent

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Jul 28, 2002, 12:35:32 PM7/28/02
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On 7/27/02 3:41 PM, in article
kcG09.217326$q53.5...@twister.austin.rr.com, "John D. Armstrong"
<jarm...@elp.rr.com> wrote:

> Adobe Illustrator is not a good software to use for
> accurate measurements. You'll need some sort of CAD based software to
> achieve this.

Actually, there is a plug-in (can't recall what it's called offhand) that
will allow Illustrator to behave more like a CAD program.

It's not so much the measurement of the shapes that's an issue--it's more an
issue of relative positioning to each other and to the page. I believe the
plug-in resolves this problem (or at least makes it easier to handle). It
also allows the file to be exported to CAD formats.

To the poster that commented Illustrator can "paint"--the answer is not
really. There are some functions that allow you do do paint-like effects
such as drop shadows, soft highlights, filters, etc., but you can't really
edit these elements on a pixel level like you can in Photoshop. Photoshop,
incidentally, has some vector functionality (new in version 6). There is
just enough overlap in the two programs to enhance productivity, but not
enough to make one a replacement for the other.

Cheers,
Dianne

Dianne & Brent

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Jul 28, 2002, 6:02:20 PM7/28/02
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On 7/28/02 6:43 AM, in article ZpT09.13297$9U4....@nwrddc01.gnilink.net,
"irexx" <res0...@gte.net> wrote:

> I have and do use the software from sgdesign.com. It works reasonable well
> for inexpensive (around 50). The image as printed is maybee a 32'd
> undersized or it could be my printer interface that is losing the size.

The type of printer and accompanying driver will affect the accuracy of the
output regardless of which software is being used.

Cheers,
Dianne

Dianne & Brent

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Jul 28, 2002, 6:15:56 PM7/28/02
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On 7/28/02 6:35 AM, in article 3d43fd76...@news.cogeco.ca, "Bart
Veerman" <in...@haruteq.com> wrote:

> Version 8 for Windows is also the one I'm using. When I draw a
> curve and copy it so I can flip (reflect) it to make a pointy hat or
> something, the curve is sometimes the same, but more often than not it
> is visually different. Replicated (duplicated) items I create look the
> same but most often are different in size, sometimes by as much as 1
> cm.

By double-clicking on the tool, you can input precise angles and other
measurements to transform your object (a window pops up when you double
click the tool in the tool palette--this is for Mac--with PC you may be able
to use the right mouse button...). If you transform by clicking and
dragging the mouse over the object itself, the chances are far less that you
will have a controlled transformation of the object. As an example, you can
rotate in precise angles by double clicking the rotate tool and inputting
the number of degrees. You can also use this method to duplicate while
transforming so you retain your original object.

I've used Illustrator since version 6 (I started with Freehand 3 and then
made the switch over when Macromedia bought it) and have never had a problem
with sizes changing though no apparent fault of my own. I have output the
files to 4700dpi film plotters and the images look *great*. Illustrator is
a complex program with many potential uses ranging from freeform/artistic to
accurate/tight tolerance. It's up to the user to find their particular
working method within its framework.

Cheers,
Dianne

dohboy

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Aug 10, 2002, 2:23:40 AM8/10/02
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The best i've seen for stained glass is GlassEye 2000 at www.dfly.com.
The instructor at my stained glass class swears by it. I just
downloaded the trial version and am starting to test it.
I'll get back later with my opinion.

-doh


"Ooooo....doughnuts!"
The Prophet Homer


On Fri, 26 Jul 2002 18:31:18 GMT, in...@haruteq.com (Bart Veerman)

wrote:

Javahut

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Aug 10, 2002, 10:02:18 AM8/10/02
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there are several programs that do what is needed, Glasseye is OK, its
benefit is that glass is what it is "for" don't try to edit a photo before
tracing it to create a panel, because that is not what it is "for"

When it comes to design software, keep an open mind, there are plenty of
titles out that do design work and more. Everyone has their own favorite,
the one they use most often, I prefer to look at as many as I can find, and
afford.
American Bevel Designer 2
Adobe Illustrator
Canvas 8
AutoCAD lite
TurboCAD

just to list a few.

"dohboy" <doh...@bollocks.com> wrote in message
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