How do I gain ice and glacier experience?

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Nick

ungelesen,
17.04.1998, 03:00:0017.04.98
an Default User

Default User wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> I'm moving to Vancouver from Britain and would love to increase my
> competance and experience in the mountains. How might I go about this?

*You have to start small, get out into the weather, spend a couple
nights in an ice cave (on level ground), practice doing rescue, setting
pro. etc... Then climb something small with a friend, and make sure he
(or she) knows the basics too. Remember to sharpen your crampons real
sharp, wear gaiters, and practice self arrest on small slopes etc.

> What I'm aiming for is perhaps an attempt on something sizable like
> Denali or Logan by the time I've finished my PhD (maybe four or five
> years away).

*Better get crackin. You are talking some serious stuff. I think maybe
Rainier or Baker would be good before attempting a 'Big un'. This of
course is my opinion. Also you can be killed easily on any mountain if
you don't know jack before you go up.

>
> I can scramble with the best of them and have plenty of experience in
> the Rockies doing exactly that (e.g. Temple, Stephen, Whyte - many
> others), but what I lack is experience on ice, glacial travel, rope
> work, technical stuff in general.

*I've never thought about scrambling on Ice.. hehehe.. :) Walking slowly
perhaps. I suggest maybe starting with crampons (Camp Footfangs and
Grivel Rambos are what I personally recommend- I use the Footfang (I
also recommend the anti snow balling plate for the Grivels) and double
boots (For steep ice, get close fitting, and long treks, a little bigger
for thick socks etc. I recommend the Scarpa Invernos, but there are lots
of good boots now days. Check them out) and an alpine axe (70cm is what
I use, and I am 5'8") to get started. Learn to move on ice first. Walk
before climbing... Once you can move on ice, and do some low inclined
slopes, you can try setting some pro.. Black Diamond ice screws, or Camp
screws and snargs are cool. GAB german screws are cool too. Get varied
lengths of protection, for the different thicknesses of ice. The cool
thing about the GAB screws is you can just sling em right at the eye,
and use a single carabiner.
Wear water proof over-pants. If you can budget it, something with
Gore-tex. I know, it's kinda pricey, but you will thank me later.


Being a student I'm on a really tight
> budget and can't afford much in the way of courses. How or where might I
> find some sympathetic soul to 'show me the ropes' (pardon the pun), etc?

*Go buy a couple of books, I recommend "Freedom of the Hills" by The
Mountaineers, and "Climbing Ice" by Yvon Chouinard.
BOTH of these are EXCELLENT to start learning with. Once you have read
and studied these from cover to cover and have it memorized, go look at
some people climbing waterfall ice. Check them out, do they seem
competent to you, with your newfound knowledge? Or do they look like an
'accident waiting to happen'? You should be able to tell after studying
these 2 books whether they are dipsticks or not. The point is, if they
climb waterfall ice, more than likely they climb mountains as well. If
they look ok, and you seem comfortable with the way they handle
themselves, approach them when they are not concentrating, and declare a
sincere interest, and tell them you have studied and are looking for
someone to get with to learn more. You never know, it might just be Jeff
Lowe standing there, and you didn't even know it (hehehe, sure!).

>
> Has anyone any suggestions?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Martin Godwyn


*Good luck man.
Nick.

PS, never skimp on technical gear, or pro. Buy the best you can save
for, even if it takes a little longer to get. You can get CAMP gear
through Adventure 16.

Default User

ungelesen,
18.04.1998, 03:00:0018.04.98
an

Hi,

I'm moving to Vancouver from Britain and would love to increase my
competance and experience in the mountains. How might I go about this?

What I'm aiming for is perhaps an attempt on something sizable like
Denali or Logan by the time I've finished my PhD (maybe four or five
years away).

I can scramble with the best of them and have plenty of experience in


the Rockies doing exactly that (e.g. Temple, Stephen, Whyte - many
others), but what I lack is experience on ice, glacial travel, rope

work, technical stuff in general. Being a student I'm on a really tight


budget and can't afford much in the way of courses. How or where might I
find some sympathetic soul to 'show me the ropes' (pardon the pun), etc?

Has anyone any suggestions?

Thanks,

Martin Godwyn

Robb McLeod

ungelesen,
18.04.1998, 03:00:0018.04.98
an

Default User wrote:

>Being a student I'm on a really tight
>budget and can't afford much in the way of courses. How or where might I
> find some sympathetic soul to 'show me the ropes' (pardon the pun), etc?

There should be an Outdoor club at UBC, and I know there's a chapter
of the Canadian Alpine Club in Vancouver. Try linking to them from
here:

http://www.islandnet.com/~acc/index.htm


--
Robb McLeod
anti...@antispam.uvic.ca
"We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million
typewriters would eventually produce the entire works of Shakespeare.
Now - thanks to the Internet - we know this is simply not true."

William Hersman

ungelesen,
19.04.1998, 03:00:0019.04.98
an

Find a local climbing club. There are usually knowledgeable people
willing to spend time showing others the basics, including ice, glacier
travel, rope craft, etc.

Kairfree

ungelesen,
21.04.1998, 03:00:0021.04.98
an

try a solo climb of Denali or Aconcagua.....bring an ice axe and pack a lunch.

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