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Tom Kunich

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Sep 30, 2021, 12:56:33 PM9/30/21
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While checking on my Craigslist postings I discovered that 4 of my items had been "removed" for no reason whatsoever. There wasn't anything offensive in the postings and they had clear pictures of what was for sale. This is rather different than a large number of Craigslist postings.

I reverted to Craigslist not because it was free but because the rates charged by Ebay were preposterous.

There doesn't seem to be ANY way of contacting Craigslist to discover why this was. This pretty much shows what absolute garbage these sites are and how someone that would put up an Ebay-like site that doesn't charge excessive rates couldn't help but be successful.

William Crowell

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Sep 30, 2021, 1:02:45 PM9/30/21
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"There doesn't seem to be ANY way of contacting Craigslist to discover why this was."

Tom, pardon me for the digression from your topic, but did you ever try to get any telephone or email support from Google when you can't get one of their sites to work properly? Good luck with that.
What kind of a viable business model provides for absolutely no customer support?

Jeff Liebermann

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Sep 30, 2021, 11:24:25 PM9/30/21
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That's easy. Sites that don't want to deal with clueless users. The
problem is that 90% of the support calls and effort serve 10% of their
users. So, the site owners are willing to tell 10% of their users
that they can hire someone (like me) to fix the users problem because
90% of the users are not having any similar problem, then they can
safe a fortune by not offering phone, email, chat, text, and
outsourced support.

This is nothing new. The last time Tom had a problem was an inability
to "access" (I hate that vague word) Amazon from computah. Of course,
he declared that Amazon must be offine. This is sorta the middle of
the thread:
<https://groups.google.com/g/rec.bicycles.tech/c/6vYL7JsVilE/m/yZox1iONAgAJ>
The final solution appeared here:
<https://groups.google.com/g/rec.bicycles.tech/c/6vYL7JsVilE/m/3dbMB90eAwAJ>
"OK, it turned out to be a very simple problem. A couple of updates
were added to the computer and screwed the system up unless it was
restarted. Restarting the computer fixed everything."

So, now Craigslist won't talk to Tom. Craigslist probably saw him
coming and went into hiding.

Hey Tom. While you're building up steam for the next round of
insults, I suggest that you:
1. Reboot your computer. It worked once and it might work again.
2. Check if anyone else is having problems with Craigslist at:
<https://downdetector.com/status/craigslist/>
If there is no deluge of user complains, it's quite likely that the
problem is at your location, not at Craigslist.
3. Check the Craigslist system status at:
<https://www.craigslist.org/about/help/system-status>
Looks like they'll be down tonight between 11:00PM and 11:30PM.
There's a good chance this is to fix a database index corruption
problem, which will require some re-indexing. If you're lucky, your
missing listings should be there in the morning.
4. Stop blaming everyone, every company, and everything in sight for
every problems. You might actually be right this time, but that's no
reason to waste everyone's time with your stupid accusations and
conspiracy theories. Act like the professional you claim to be.

[Time wasted 25 minutes]

--
Jeff Liebermann je...@cruzio.com
PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

sms

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Oct 1, 2021, 10:05:40 AM10/1/21
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On 9/30/2021 8:24 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

<snip>

> That's easy. Sites that don't want to deal with clueless users. The
> problem is that 90% of the support calls and effort serve 10% of their
> users. So, the site owners are willing to tell 10% of their users
> that they can hire someone (like me) to fix the users problem because
> 90% of the users are not having any similar problem, then they can
> safe a fortune by not offering phone, email, chat, text, and
> outsourced support.

I once heard someone from Dell state that if a user calls tech support
even once then that the margin on the sale of the computer they bought
goes negative. They probably regret selling computers to those 10% of
users that lack any technical skills.

You helped Tom for free, but a lot of non-technical people don't have
free support available. I remember my mother and step-father calling my
brother for support until 10 p.m. Eastern Time, then west coast tech
support took over and they called me.

That said, I've had reasonable success in reporting actual web site
problems to the site owner by including a lot of detail, including
screen shots. Also, I often find sites that don't display properly in
one browser but that work fine in other browsers. I've reported errors
in Google Maps and received responses thanking me. In one case they
acknowledged the problem, but said that they had no way to fix it.

jbeattie

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Oct 1, 2021, 10:32:16 AM10/1/21
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On Friday, October 1, 2021 at 7:05:40 AM UTC-7, sms wrote:
> On 9/30/2021 8:24 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
>
> <snip>
> > That's easy. Sites that don't want to deal with clueless users. The
> > problem is that 90% of the support calls and effort serve 10% of their
> > users. So, the site owners are willing to tell 10% of their users
> > that they can hire someone (like me) to fix the users problem because
> > 90% of the users are not having any similar problem, then they can
> > safe a fortune by not offering phone, email, chat, text, and
> > outsourced support.
> I once heard someone from Dell state that if a user calls tech support
> even once then that the margin on the sale of the computer they bought
> goes negative. They probably regret selling computers to those 10% of
> users that lack any technical skills.
>
> You helped Tom for free, but a lot of non-technical people don't have
> free support available. I remember my mother and step-father calling my
> brother for support until 10 p.m. Eastern Time, then west coast tech
> support took over and they called me.

Gawd, this is a huge area for scammers. Old folks and not-so-old folks calling what look like customer service lines only to be told that they have some bug or malware or something that needs to be fixed, and then getting sold some multi-hundred dollar bogus fix, etc., etc. I did pro bono work for old folks and half of it was chasing down scammers -- including somewhat reputable, old-school businesses engaged in cramming (phone company). The vigilance required these days is beyond the capacity of many elderly consumers.

-- Jay Beattie.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 1, 2021, 10:44:30 AM10/1/21
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Jeff, we realize that you don't understand anything at all. Tell us you stupid ass - WHY did they delete an add that had been running for 2 weeks? I can tell you why, because some asshole like you complained about the product for no other reason than to eliminate my add.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 1, 2021, 10:46:23 AM10/1/21
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What has this to do with an ad posted on Craigslist?

Tom Kunich

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Oct 4, 2021, 11:26:10 AM10/4/21
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While I agree with you, doesn't this blend in with my comments about people like Russell, Jeff, Frank or Jay citing opinions on Google searches as fact beyond controversy? I was part of the group that built the computer that was the basis of Arcnet that became the Internet. IF you published sheer lies via opinion on the Arcnet you would be hung out to dry. Turning this thing into a public convenience allowed people like our small group of morons to published anything they wanted and call if fact. I want you to imagine people like Russell pretending to know anything scientific. As a bookkeeper you might expect him to know rudimentary mathematics but he has shown that either he doesn't or that he is willing to lie about it in order to claim that I am wrong. Now consider this multiplied by 100 million on the Internet and exactly how could you ever expect to have the slightest references to anything that even might be true?

Jeff Liebermann

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Oct 4, 2021, 1:41:35 PM10/4/21
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On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 08:26:08 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
<cycl...@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Thursday, September 30, 2021 at 10:02:45 AM UTC-7, William Crowell wrote:
>> "There doesn't seem to be ANY way of contacting Craigslist to discover why this was."
>> Tom, pardon me for the digression from your topic, but did you ever try to get any telephone or email support from Google when you can't get one of their sites to work properly? Good luck with that.
>> What kind of a viable business model provides for absolutely no customer support?

>I was part of the group that built the computer that was the basis of Arcnet that became the Internet.

Ummm, that should be ARPANET:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARPANET>
and not Arcnet, which is a networking protocol:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARCNET>
There was an Air Force ARCNet:
<https://www.afrc.af.mil/About-Us/Innovation/Community/ARCNet/>
but that was well after the founding of the internet and had more to
do with USAF scheduling than todays internet.

Like your inability to correctly spell two prior alleged employers
(Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National
Laboratory), I find it rather odd that someone who had worked for
ARPANET would be unable to produce the correct name. You don't seem
to have much difficulty spelling obscure bicycle vendor and component
names, yet former employers seem to be a problem. Perhaps that's
because you were never an employee at those places?

>IF you published sheer lies via opinion on the Arcnet you would be hung out to dry.

Please let me know where and when you expect to be hung out to dry? I
want to watch.

>Now consider this multiplied by 100 million on the Internet and exactly how could you ever expect to have the slightest references to anything that even might be true?

Ummm... More than 4 billion internet users world wide:
<https://www.statista.com/statistics/617136/digital-population-worldwide/>
Please update your fabricated numbers to resemble reality.

Do you really think that anyone in R.B.T. believes you without
providing substantiation? Name dropping famous individuals,
companies, and institutions will only go so far. When challenged, you
will need to backup your statements or your credibility will rapidly
deteriorate. Think of R.B.T. as a peer review.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 4, 2021, 3:03:29 PM10/4/21
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So sue me dumby. I was still a member of the team that made the BCC Model 1 time sharing computer that would handle 100 simultaneous users. The largest time sharing computer at that time was an IBM that could handle 3 users. But as a snake you wouldn't know anything about anything and every day you show it. I now have 3800 miles on the bike and 72,000 feet of climbing. What do you have and if you don't ride a bike why are you on a technical group when you couldn't even lube your own chain?

Tell me you snake - why are you on this group? As a cripple you can't ride so what do you suppose you're going to learn here? How to dix a flat? Maybe you are going to believe that crap about how many people have been vaccinated because your mind wanders since you got your vaccinations and that destroys your immune system and makes you the perfect target for a real disease?

jbeattie

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Oct 4, 2021, 3:46:27 PM10/4/21
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Berkeley Computer Corporation went bankrupt in >two years. BUT OMG, I found a reference to you: http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/pdf/bcc/originals/Admin/

Go to the file: BCC_A-11.pdf 2001-12-05 00:00 2.5M

"Kunich" appears on page 27 in "engineering support" whatever that was. Holy smokes, I think this is the first evidence of your professional existence outside your own Linked-In page. Did you ever get to drive the company Mercury station wagon?

-- Jay Beattie.



Jeff Liebermann

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Oct 4, 2021, 9:41:29 PM10/4/21
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On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 12:03:27 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
<cycl...@gmail.com> wrote:

>I was still a member of the team that made the BCC Model 1 time sharing computer that would handle 100 simultaneous users. The largest time sharing computer at that time was an IBM that could handle 3 users.

Ummmm.... BCC was incorporated on Mar 9, 1969 and closed on Apr 17,
1972. Presumably, you worked for BCC during this time period. The
1972 publication of the Auerbach Guide to Timesharing lists 125 time
share services and systems that were in operation by 1972.
Unfortunately, the publication does not list the number of users. I
assume most had more then 3 users/terminals/ports/modems.
<http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/pdf/auerbach/GuideToTimesharing_Jan73.pdf>

>I now have 3800 miles on the bike and 72,000 feet of climbing. What do you have and if you don't ride a bike why are you on a technical group when you couldn't even lube your own chain?

I see. You expect me to demonstrate my bicycle riding and chain
lubrication abilities in order to validate my competence in
demonstrating that your are full of excrement. Sorry, but I fail to
see a connection between miles ridden, feet climbed and chains lubed
with your inability to survive a fairly simple fact checking.

>Tell me you snake - why are you on this group?

I'm your personal fact checker and peer reviewer. You're welcome.

>As a cripple you can't ride so what do you suppose you're going to learn here?

I've learned quite a bit about bicycles. Primarily, I'm interested in
bicycle lighting and electrification. However, that was all before
you returned to R.B.T. I probably should do something more useful,
but I occasionally need to unload my frustrations on a willing victim.
You seem to be enjoying the attention, so you were the obvious
candidate.

>How to dix a flat?

What is a "dix"?

>Maybe you are going to believe that crap about how many people have been vaccinated because your mind wanders since you got your vaccinations and that destroys your immune system and makes you the perfect target for a real disease?

Yet another change of topic. I just realized something about you that
I had previously missed. In any discussion, when someone points out
that you are misled, misinformed, lying, or fabricating numbers, you
never really respond to the topic under discussion. Is I recall, my
first disagreement with you was when you declared that the average
size of a farm in the US was 40 acres, and several people demonstrated
that this was not the case. You never really replied and simply
changed the topic. I should have caught it then. I must be getting
old. Lately, it seems that you're wrong about almost any topic. So,
instead of changing the topic, you revert to something you are
familiar with such as Former President Trump, Covid-19, vaccines, CDC,
President Biden, various conspiracies, and your stable of bicycles.
However, these are getting old and you are probably in need of new
material. Therefore, I suggest you look at the news for what is
happening in China with electrical power, power shortages, Tofu Dreg
infrastructure (collapsing buildings due to inferior materials and
construction), exit of many large international businesses, high
taxes, and various shortages. I would be interested in seeing how you
might distort those problems.

Frank Krygowski

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Oct 4, 2021, 9:42:00 PM10/4/21
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Hmm. Mr. Kunich was one of 19 in that role. I wonder if all the others
are now claiming to be geniuses, like Tom? And how strange that our
local rock star didn't even qualify for "engineering" or "programming."

When my students got jobs in "engineering support" they were doing
things like drafting, typing data into forms or spreadsheets, acting as
runners between different offices, etc. Those would have been part time
jobs while they were still students, before they got their degrees.

--
- Frank Krygowski

ritzann...@gmail.com

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Oct 4, 2021, 10:58:20 PM10/4/21
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But Tommy boy, I have used website links such as Yahoo Finance, Vanguard, Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, IRS, Treasury Department and many others to show the facts of GDP, stock market returns, election results, and other things to prove my FACTS. Yet you continue to believe facts that disprove your lies are not facts. Odd.

ritzann...@gmail.com

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Oct 4, 2021, 11:02:24 PM10/4/21
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On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 12:41:35 PM UTC-5, jeff.li...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Mon, 4 Oct 2021 08:26:08 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
> <cycl...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >On Thursday, September 30, 2021 at 10:02:45 AM UTC-7, William Crowell wrote:
> >> "There doesn't seem to be ANY way of contacting Craigslist to discover why this was."
> >> Tom, pardon me for the digression from your topic, but did you ever try to get any telephone or email support from Google when you can't get one of their sites to work properly? Good luck with that.
> >> What kind of a viable business model provides for absolutely no customer support?
> >I was part of the group that built the computer that was the basis of Arcnet that became the Internet.
> Ummm, that should be ARPANET:
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARPANET>
> and not Arcnet, which is a networking protocol:
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARCNET>
> There was an Air Force ARCNet:
> <https://www.afrc.af.mil/About-Us/Innovation/Community/ARCNet/>
> but that was well after the founding of the internet and had more to
> do with USAF scheduling than todays internet.
>
> Like your inability to correctly spell two prior alleged employers
> (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National
> Laboratory), I find it rather odd that someone who had worked for
> ARPANET would be unable to produce the correct name. You don't seem
> to have much difficulty spelling obscure bicycle vendor and component
> names, yet former employers seem to be a problem. Perhaps that's
> because you were never an employee at those places?

Well, in defense of Tommy boy (HaHa), in two prior posts he did misspell "ad" with "add" in one of them. I'm guessing this has a whole lot to do with his lack of any education at all. Ad and Add are not too difficult to spell. And have no similarity in meaning.

ritzann...@gmail.com

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Oct 4, 2021, 11:06:37 PM10/4/21
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On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 2:03:29 PM UTC-5, cycl...@gmail.com wrote:
> I now have 3800 miles on the bike and 72,000 feet of climbing.
>

Good job Tommy. I will admit under duress that you have bested me in cycling mileage this year. And most likely last year too. My mileage has been way down the past couple years for a few reasons.

jbeattie

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Oct 4, 2021, 11:56:29 PM10/4/21
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Hey, its still fun to play in the majors, even if you're just a bat-boy. I took the depositions of various guys dying of asbestos related diseases who worked on the Hanford B Reactor during WII. It was fascinating hearing about it, but they didn't know what they were building. A half-dozen guys out of thousands knew what was going on.
-- Jay Beattie.

Frank Krygowski

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Oct 5, 2021, 11:38:37 AM10/5/21
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I'm sure it's fun to be even a bat boy in baseball's major leagues, and
I'm sure a bat boy would learn a lot about the workings of a baseball team.

Similarly, it was very common for my students to get part-time jobs
doing things like "engineering support" while they were still in school.
That gave them a chance to see company engineering departments and
factory production in action, and demonstrate to them that the things we
did in class and in labs really mattered.

That system also gave the companies a chance to learn the students'
abilities, characters, work ethics, etc. It was _very_ common for those
students to get full time jobs from those companies upon graduation.

Sadly, Tom seemed to be on a different path.

--
- Frank Krygowski

Tom Kunich

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Oct 5, 2021, 11:41:43 AM10/5/21
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You, like Russell or Jeff, none of you who know anything about engineering will say absolutely anything in an attempt to belittle my accomplishments. Do you suppose I give one shit what you think? I'm the one sitting here now worth a million and a half. I'm the one sitting with a garage full of bicycles with modern groups. I'm the one without a fear addiction as you three have. I really cannot even begin to understand how the minds of you three operate. Russell is probably like Jeff and hasn't ridden a bicycle in 20 years. You are now a cripple and a fear addict and want everyone to be the same as you. Too bad the world doesn't work that way. Maybe like Russell you can deny that was an entire football stadium chanting "Fuck Joe Biden" You and your kind is ended.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 5, 2021, 11:47:26 AM10/5/21
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More of a desire to show your high intellect by cutting and pasting off of the Internet? You are so unimpressive it is funny. We built the computer before 1971 and the prototype was sold by the owners whenever. The entire staff was gone so precisely why should I care then they technically closed? You will pretend anything to look like some sort of expert at something.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 5, 2021, 11:51:41 AM10/5/21
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On Monday, October 4, 2021 at 6:42:00 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
That was my second job out of the Air Force and it was a technician job and I have said that many times before. Do you suppose that the computer could have been built by someone like you? Or maybe you want to pretend that I went from the Air Force directly into an engineering position. If that is your pretense tell me why I stated MANY times that I went from technician to senior technician to engineer to senior engineer. Your hated simply dribbles out of your lips and actually it is rather funny.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 5, 2021, 11:54:11 AM10/5/21
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Until my concussion, I was putting in 10,000 miles a year. And just three years ago before the Biden, I put in 250,000 feet of climbing.

Frank Krygowski

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Oct 5, 2021, 12:08:18 PM10/5/21
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You claim there were MANY times you went from technician to senior
technician to engineer to senior engineer, all while working for no
company for more than three years?

Your resume is that of a job hopper. You left most companies within two
years. That doesn't jibe with the advancements you brag about above. It
seems more plausible that you were competent enough to keep a low level
job ("Engineering Support") for a while, but so difficult to get along
with that you were repeatedly told to clean out your desk.

And BTW, being one of 19 "engineering support" staff way down at the
bottom of the organization chart doesn't justify your claim that YOU
built some sophisticated computer. It's more likely you had the job of
ordering the rolls of solder. (Which in those days contained lead, and
which may explain some of your other problems.)
- Frank Krygowski

jbeattie

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Oct 5, 2021, 12:17:59 PM10/5/21
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Why do you think I'm belittling your accomplishments? I actually found an indication that you had an accomplishment. You should be thanking me for dredging up this reference to your employment at BCC as a tech. Although short lived as a company, the principals went on to accomplish a lot, and the one prototype BCC-500 produced by the company went on to become part of the backbone for ALOHAnet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Genie You can legitimately say you were employed by one of the pioneering companies. I wouldn't dwell on your net worth, however, since any cat-lady living in a beaten-down ranch house in Cupertino is sitting on >$2M.

-- Jay Beattie.

funkma...@hotmail.com

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Oct 5, 2021, 12:51:02 PM10/5/21
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lol....yup


Jeff Liebermann

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Oct 5, 2021, 1:47:42 PM10/5/21
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On Tue, 5 Oct 2021 08:47:24 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
<cycl...@gmail.com> wrote:

>More of a desire to show your high intellect by cutting and pasting off of the Internet?

Hardly. Please note that I have minimized my cutting and pasting of
URL's to substantiate my claims when discussing anything with you.
This is to reduce any embarrassment you might experience by
demonstrating that you are unable or unwilling to cut and paste a URL
which identifies your source of misinformation. When discussing
something with others, my including of URL's is for the readers
benefit should they want to dig further into the topic and perhaps
learn a few new things. Obviously, you haven't taken advantage of
this service.

>We built the computer before 1971 and the prototype was sold by the owners whenever.

Really? BCC missing from the 1972 Aurbach guide to time share service
and equipment vendors. The Directory of Suppliers start on Pg 177:
<http://bitsavers.trailing-edge.com/pdf/auerbach/GuideToTimesharing_Jan73.pdf>
I suspect that BCC closed in 1971, the year before Aurbach published
their guide. Therefore, the company existed for 2 years and closed,
possibly because the prototype was deemed acceptable, which prevented
BCC from obtaining development capital. Also, the timing may have
been bad. Spending on aerospace projects dropped rapidly after the
end of the Apollo program.
<https://history.nasa.gov/SP-4221/p292.htm>
If the prospective buyer was affected by the spending drop, that might
explain what happened. I graduated from college in 1971 and walked
directly into a recession in progress. I ended up with a series of
odd jobs for about 2 years until the economy recovered.

>The entire staff was gone so precisely why should I care then they technically closed?

You should care because one might suspect that you only worked for BCC
for a very short time.

>You will pretend anything to look like some sort of expert at something.

Yep. I'm quite good at fact checking. However, I always wonder why
it's so easy to do with your false claims and contrived numbers.
Perhaps I'm not an expert at fact checking and you're just awful at
lying and fabricating numbers? What a horrible thought.

BTW, I was serious about you looking at what's going on in China now.
If true, then China might be heading for yet another revolution. In
any case, the delays and shortages seem to be getting worse.

[32 minutes wasted]

sms

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Oct 5, 2021, 2:00:13 PM10/5/21
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On 10/5/2021 9:17 AM, jbeattie wrote:

<snip>

> Why do you think I'm belittling your accomplishments? I actually found an indication that you had an accomplishment. You should be thanking me for dredging up this reference to your employment at BCC as a tech. Although short lived as a company, the principals went on to accomplish a lot, and the one prototype BCC-500 produced by the company went on to become part of the backbone for ALOHAnet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Genie You can legitimately say you were employed by one of the pioneering companies. I wouldn't dwell on your net worth, however, since any cat-lady living in a beaten-down ranch house in Cupertino is sitting on >$2M.

That's a darn lie. This one is under $2 million:
<https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/10684-S-Tantau-Ave-Cupertino-CA-95014/19644924_zpid/>.
I have two friends who bought these tear-downs and built beautiful new
houses.

I know several people that have cashed out and moved away. Once their
children were done with the public schools they moved to less crowded,
less expensive, areas.

Tom's house has a Zillow estimate of $870,400, not sure what he's
claiming as his net worth, but unless someone plans to leave and move to
a less expensive area, it's immaterial. That neighborhood is ripe for
redevelopment now that Gavin Newsom signed SB9, allowing lot splits.
Despite the small lots, those single family homes can now have at least
six units built on them (one main house, one detached ADU, and one
junior ADU), and real estate investors are already swooping in to scoop
up single family homes in some areas.

Where people like Tom make out well is in property taxes. Someone buying
that house for $870,400 would be paying about about $11,000 per year in
property taxes and other fees and bonds. Tom is paying around $2400 per
year. With Prop 19, he could take his low assessed value and transfer it
to any house in California that he bought. Low-cost counties hate Prop
19, high-cost counties love it because it encourages homeowners with low
assessed values to sell their homes at market prices, greatly increasing
property tax revenue.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 5, 2021, 6:01:27 PM10/5/21
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The names, Mel Pirtle, Chuck Thacker and Project Genie ring a bell. Having an idea is all well and fine and the theory behind the BCC-500 (Model 1) may have been from these guys but the VP of the firm is the guy that actually ran everything. As far as I knew, Mel was figurehead. The VP of the firm is the guy that actually ran everything. Can't remember his name (Jesse something) but he was a short guy that ended up in a company that continued to buy up all of the companies I was employed at and he only recently retired. The actual project was run by Archy Stanley who would take all of the time necessary to explain the engineering behind anything we were doing. A week with him was the equivalent of 2 years of engineering school.

IBM used to be one of those places where you had to have a PhD to work at their R&D site which was on the extreme south end of San Jose. They sent me an email about a year ago asking me to go to work for them. That travel was WAY too far - almost to Gilroy. The commute would have been an hour and a half if I started at 6 am.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 5, 2021, 6:05:12 PM10/5/21
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If there's something that Scharf really relies on it is a Zillow estimate. The house around the corner that is 300 sq ft smaller went for 990,000. I wonder where Scharf thinks he is or who he is.

John B.

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Oct 5, 2021, 7:36:46 PM10/5/21
to
On Tue, 5 Oct 2021 08:41:40 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
Tommy Boy, you really have lost contact with reality - "batty as a
bedbug" as my grandmother used to say.

So spectators at a ball game chanted "fuck Biden"?

Is that any different then all the folks on the Internet shouting that
"Tom Kunich is an Ass"?

Googling on the above gives 16,600,000 "hits" by the way. See below
for examples
https://www.cyclingforums.com/threads/tom-kunich-is-a-ass.258640/
https://rec.bicycles.tech.narkive.com/oKoXRwKO/tom-kunich-is-a-ass

In contrast I googled "fuck joe biden and got only 13,900,000 "hits"
so apparently Tommy Boy is ~16% more disliked then Biden.
--
Cheers,

John B.

ritzann...@gmail.com

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Oct 5, 2021, 11:10:51 PM10/5/21
to
On Tuesday, October 5, 2021 at 1:00:13 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
> On 10/5/2021 9:17 AM, jbeattie wrote:
>
> <snip>
> > Why do you think I'm belittling your accomplishments? I actually found an indication that you had an accomplishment. You should be thanking me for dredging up this reference to your employment at BCC as a tech. Although short lived as a company, the principals went on to accomplish a lot, and the one prototype BCC-500 produced by the company went on to become part of the backbone for ALOHAnet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Genie You can legitimately say you were employed by one of the pioneering companies. I wouldn't dwell on your net worth, however, since any cat-lady living in a beaten-down ranch house in Cupertino is sitting on >$2M.
> That's a darn lie. This one is under $2 million:
> <https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/10684-S-Tantau-Ave-Cupertino-CA-95014/19644924_zpid/>.
> I have two friends who bought these tear-downs and built beautiful new
> houses.
>

That's a tear down house? Gosh, it looks pretty good to me. I'd live there just fine.





> I know several people that have cashed out and moved away. Once their
> children were done with the public schools they moved to less crowded,
> less expensive, areas.
>
> Tom's house has a Zillow estimate of $870,400,

NO NO NO NO NO!!!!!!!!!
Tommy's MOMMA has a house valued at $870,000. Tommy has zip, squat, nada.

John B.

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Oct 5, 2021, 11:51:33 PM10/5/21
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On Tue, 5 Oct 2021 20:10:49 -0700 (PDT), "russell...@yahoo.com"
<ritzann...@gmail.com> wrote:

>On Tuesday, October 5, 2021 at 1:00:13 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
>> On 10/5/2021 9:17 AM, jbeattie wrote:
>>
>> <snip>
>> > Why do you think I'm belittling your accomplishments? I actually found an indication that you had an accomplishment. You should be thanking me for dredging up this reference to your employment at BCC as a tech. Although short lived as a company, the principals went on to accomplish a lot, and the one prototype BCC-500 produced by the company went on to become part of the backbone for ALOHAnet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Genie You can legitimately say you were employed by one of the pioneering companies. I wouldn't dwell on your net worth, however, since any cat-lady living in a beaten-down ranch house in Cupertino is sitting on >$2M.
>> That's a darn lie. This one is under $2 million:
>> <https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/10684-S-Tantau-Ave-Cupertino-CA-95014/19644924_zpid/>.
>> I have two friends who bought these tear-downs and built beautiful new
>> houses.
>>
>
>That's a tear down house? Gosh, it looks pretty good to me. I'd live there just fine.
>
>
>
>
>
>> I know several people that have cashed out and moved away. Once their
>> children were done with the public schools they moved to less crowded,
>> less expensive, areas.
>>
>> Tom's house has a Zillow estimate of $870,400,
>
>NO NO NO NO NO!!!!!!!!!
>Tommy's MOMMA has a house valued at $870,000. Tommy has zip, squat, nada.


But, is his home worth $870,000? Just because the place around the
corner is valued at a price doesn't mean his house is. In fact the
house we live in, the house next door and the house across the road
are all valued at different prices (:-)

Then, of course, you have to look at quality. The roof needs fixing
the hot water doesn't work, air con broke...
--
Cheers,

John B.

jbeattie

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Oct 6, 2021, 12:16:07 AM10/6/21
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Zillow estimates are blunt tools, and the market is going nuts with low mortgage rates and legions of buyers. I've seen prices go up by 20% or more in a matter of months in some local markets. I think the bubble will burst in less than a year. Anyway, at this moment, Tom's house may be worth more than the Zillow estimate, putting aside any issues peculiar to the house.

-- Jay Beattie.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 6, 2021, 10:54:54 AM10/6/21
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So you're offering something from when Jobst Brandt was alive as proof of anything since he was the Internet bicycle God and I showed him for what he was?

In case you missed it you moronic fool - I'm not in public office nor running for it. People like you actually are willing to allow election fraud because Trump made "mean tweets" calling people like Fauci out for his absolute lies.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 6, 2021, 10:57:43 AM10/6/21
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Explain this - since I pay the taxes, my name is on the ownership papers and my mother died 20 years ago and I bought her the house in the first place - how is this my mother's house? Or don't you understand any of this? Is it too complicated for your poor little brain to wrap around these complicated ideas?

Tom Kunich

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Oct 6, 2021, 11:09:53 AM10/6/21
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At the moment that yards are a total mess since if you water them you end up paying 4 times the going rate for water. There is a couple of people within a couple of blocks that are willing to pay for this but I suspect they have a large income. The guy across the street and over a house bought a home in Mexico city close to his father's home after Obama took all of the criminals out of the Mexican prisons and the city again became safe. The guy down the street is retired on a union pension. You know - that sort of thing that Frank claims is only available to college graduates.

Read a report this morning. Studies like the one Frank quoted are incorrect 80% of the time. None of their results are reproducible but science publications will not publish any studies showing studies wrong. Only "original studies". The problem is that most of what is called science is nothing of the kind.

Then there are comparative studies that aren't published either. LA and Orange county are next to each otherr. LA requires masks and Orange county does not. The population density of these areas is similar. LA with their mask mandates has a higher rate of covid positives. But be sure and wear your mask. If it doesn't help give you covid, it will probably give you hypercapnia and destroy your lungs. I think that more people should suffer from this since that will be the end of the growth of athletic records.

sms

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Oct 6, 2021, 12:39:54 PM10/6/21
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On 10/5/2021 8:51 PM, John B. wrote:

> But, is his home worth $870,000? Just because the place around the
> corner is valued at a price doesn't mean his house is. In fact the
> house we live in, the house next door and the house across the road
> are all valued at different prices (:-)

Due to very recent California legislation, just signed last month, it
probably is worth even more. That legislation allows a homeowner with no
mortgage to split their lot into two lots. On those two lots they can
build two houses, each with an attached ADU, plus two detached ADUs
(ADU=accessory dwelling unit).

This new law has made old houses very attractive to large real estate
developers with the capital to buy a property, tear it down, and build
two houses, with a total of six units, where there was originally one
unit. Each of those new houses will likely sell for at least as much as
what they pay for the single old house. Portland did the same thing and
the new homes sell for as much or more as the old house, even though the
lot is now half the size.

An individual homeowner probably doesn't have the money to move out for
six months, pay for demolition and new construction, plus they likely
have a mortgage, so this new law primarily benefits real estate investors.

> Then, of course, you have to look at quality. The roof needs fixing
> the hot water doesn't work, air con broke...

Those expenses are lost in the noise, and don't apply at all when the
house is going to be torn down.

That said, Tom's lot is very small, and San Leandro's public schools are
not highly rated, and that would affect the price. Move Tom's house to
my city and the price would more than double.

sms

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Oct 6, 2021, 12:45:19 PM10/6/21
to
On 10/5/2021 8:10 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
> On Tuesday, October 5, 2021 at 1:00:13 PM UTC-5, sms wrote:
>> On 10/5/2021 9:17 AM, jbeattie wrote:
>>
>> <snip>
>>> Why do you think I'm belittling your accomplishments? I actually found an indication that you had an accomplishment. You should be thanking me for dredging up this reference to your employment at BCC as a tech. Although short lived as a company, the principals went on to accomplish a lot, and the one prototype BCC-500 produced by the company went on to become part of the backbone for ALOHAnet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Genie You can legitimately say you were employed by one of the pioneering companies. I wouldn't dwell on your net worth, however, since any cat-lady living in a beaten-down ranch house in Cupertino is sitting on >$2M.
>> That's a darn lie. This one is under $2 million:
>> <https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/10684-S-Tantau-Ave-Cupertino-CA-95014/19644924_zpid/>.
>> I have two friends who bought these tear-downs and built beautiful new
>> houses.
>>
>
> That's a tear down house? Gosh, it looks pretty good to me. I'd live there just fine.

Yeah, but you wouldn't spend nearly $2 million on such a house.

Nearly all of the original houses in that part of town are torn down
when sold, and a new, larger house, is built. This will accelerate due
to new state laws passed last month.

As the U.S. recovers from Trump, construction costs, which are very high
right now due to material cost increases due to Trump's tariffs, as well
as due to Trump's mismanagement of the Covid-19 pandemic, will begin to
fall when the pandemic ends as vaccination rates go up.

sms

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Oct 7, 2021, 10:53:31 AM10/7/21
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On 10/4/2021 12:46 PM, jbeattie wrote:

<snip>

> "Kunich" appears on page 27 in "engineering support" whatever that was. Holy smokes, I think this is the first evidence of your professional existence outside your own Linked-In page. Did you ever get to drive the company Mercury station wagon?
>
> -- Jay Beattie.

Hey, when I worked at one company, I had to get our equipment through
FCC Class A and UL certification, and I did drive the equipment, in the
company station wagon, about a mile over to the testing lab that we
used. It was not a Mercury, I can't remember what it was, but I think it
was some GM brand. So don't insult people that drive the company station
wagon.

jbeattie

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Oct 7, 2021, 10:26:31 PM10/7/21
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No insult intended. The folks at BCC were so enamored of their Mercury station wagon that they devoted two pages of their "supervisor's manual" to discussing it. It must have been one sweet station wagon. I drove some monster Oldsmobile station wagon with no side windows and landaus as a removal car, going out to fetch dead bodies when I worked for a funeral home/ambulance company in LG. There was no divider between the driver's seat and the cargo area, and if you hit the brakes too hard, you ended up with some body in a bag breathing down your neck . . . literally. Dead bodies can exhale. It's creepy. And it was a double duty job -- I was still working ambulance, and if a call came in, my partner was behind me in the ambulance and would hit the lights. I'd pull over, lock up the station wagon and go do a call. You had to remember where you left the car and hope nobody steals the body. I hated getting up at o-dark-thirty to go fetch a dead person. They're dead. They're not going anywhere. Call me in the morning.

-- Jay Beattie.

ritzann...@gmail.com

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Oct 8, 2021, 1:40:14 AM10/8/21
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My family had a Mercury station wagon in the 1970s and maybe up into the 1980s too. Blue. Then we got a white station wagon. I think it was a GM model but can't remember the brand. We owned it in the 1980s but it must have been from the 70s.

Frank Krygowski

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Oct 8, 2021, 11:13:08 AM10/8/21
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Back then, so many station wagons! So practical!

But now, so few station wagons. One must buy an SUV instead.

Fashion is weird and powerful.


--
- Frank Krygowski

jbeattie

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Oct 8, 2021, 12:07:32 PM10/8/21
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Fashion is great! Did you actually drive an olde-tyme station wagon? It was like driving a boat. Back in the day, station wagons were used for hauling children like bulk cargo along with endless bags of groceries. https://blog.consumerguide.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/04/1985a-1-745x1024.jpg And tiny fishing boats. Nowadays, one gets a mini-van, which is better by any metric. Go drive a Toyota Sienna -- then jump in a '60s Olds Vista Cruiser and tell me which you prefer. https://i.etsystatic.com/20991861/r/il/a7363e/2514424622/il_794xN.2514424622_5nj3.jpg The front suspension on those things was like a playground horse on a giant spring. I don't own one and have no affiliation with the company, but a Sienna sure seems a lot better than a Vista Cruiser. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FU3SlmK2DVI&ab_channel=KelleyBlueBook

-- Jay Beattie.

sms

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Oct 8, 2021, 12:42:09 PM10/8/21
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On 10/8/2021 9:07 AM, jbeattie wrote:

<snip>

> Fashion is great! Did you actually drive an olde-tyme station wagon? It was like driving a boat. Back in the day, station wagons were used for hauling children like bulk cargo along with endless bags of groceries. https://blog.consumerguide.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/04/1985a-1-745x1024.jpg And tiny fishing boats. Nowadays, one gets a mini-van, which is better by any metric. Go drive a Toyota Sienna -- then jump in a '60s Olds Vista Cruiser and tell me which you prefer. https://i.etsystatic.com/20991861/r/il/a7363e/2514424622/il_794xN.2514424622_5nj3.jpg The front suspension on those things was like a playground horse on a giant spring. I don't own one and have no affiliation with the company, but a Sienna sure seems a lot better than a Vista Cruiser. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FU3SlmK2DVI&ab_channel=KelleyBlueBook

The Vista Cruiser was a classic automobile. Still see them around once
in a while. The ones with fake wood paneling contact paper are
especially nice. A used one in good condition fetches $40K or more
<https://classiccars.com/listings/view/1436443/1969-oldsmobile-vista-cruiser-for-sale-in-cadillac-michigan-49601>.

AMuzi

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Oct 8, 2021, 12:52:18 PM10/8/21
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Say what you will but one format parks in standard parking
spaces ( especially parallel) much easier than the other.

--
Andrew Muzi
<www.yellowjersey.org/>
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Tom Kunich

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Oct 8, 2021, 1:38:09 PM10/8/21
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Jay, what was it like driving a '60 Buick four door?

sms

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Oct 8, 2021, 1:39:41 PM10/8/21
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On 10/8/2021 9:52 AM, AMuzi wrote:

<snip>

> Say what you will but one format parks in standard parking spaces (
> especially parallel) much easier than the other.

Station wagons are especially impractical compared to SUVs. Most SUVs
are really MTVs (Mall Terrain Vehicles) these days anyway, even the ones
with AWD are not 4WD.

There are still plenty of station wagons available in the U.S. for those
that really want one. Subaru, Volvo, Audio, Mercedes, Mini Cooper. A lot
more in other countries. At least in the U.S., no more Mazda, BMW, or
Toyota wagons.

There's also a big disadvantage to station wagons and SUVs which is the
lack of secure trunk storage. If you park in San Francisco you have to
remove everything from a station wagon or SUV and leave any cargo covers
open so thieves see that there is nothing to steal. Look at this map
<https://www.sfchronicle.com/projects/sf-car-breakins/> just for the
past 30 days, and these are just the reported break-ins.


Tom Kunich

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Oct 8, 2021, 1:41:48 PM10/8/21
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Imagine that these people don't know that station wagons were built on the SAME chassis as the four door cars. Gee, we have so many experts around here that never even saw these cars. Jay telling us that they "drove like a boat" when they weighed almost identical to four door sedans. I think that the Chevy station wagon was lighter than the four door.

Frank Krygowski

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Oct 8, 2021, 1:59:58 PM10/8/21
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On 10/8/2021 12:07 PM, jbeattie wrote:
> On Friday, October 8, 2021 at 8:13:08 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
>> On 10/8/2021 1:40 AM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
>>>
>>> My family had a Mercury station wagon in the 1970s and maybe up into the 1980s too. Blue. Then we got a white station wagon. I think it was a GM model but can't remember the brand. We owned it in the 1980s but it must have been from the 70s.
>> Back then, so many station wagons! So practical!
>>
>> But now, so few station wagons. One must buy an SUV instead.
>>
>> Fashion is weird and powerful.
>
> Fashion is great! Did you actually drive an olde-tyme station wagon? It was like driving a boat.

But it was fashionable to want a car to handle like an ocean liner!

> Back in the day, station wagons were used for hauling children like bulk cargo along with endless bags of groceries. https://blog.consumerguide.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/04/1985a-1-745x1024.jpg And tiny fishing boats. Nowadays, one gets a mini-van, which is better by any metric. Go drive a Toyota Sienna -- then jump in a '60s Olds Vista Cruiser and tell me which you prefer. https://i.etsystatic.com/20991861/r/il/a7363e/2514424622/il_794xN.2514424622_5nj3.jpg

Back in those days, my buddies thought drag racing was cool. One friend
had a Chevy Nomad wagon that he'd stuffed some immense engine in it. It
was scary fast for its day - but he drove it into a telephone pole and
died in it.

I was an outlier. I lusted after small sports cars instead. I had this
crazy idea that when you turned the steering wheel, the car should
briskly change direction.

> The front suspension on those things was like a playground horse on a giant spring. I don't own one and have no affiliation with the company, but a Sienna sure seems a lot better than a Vista Cruiser. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FU3SlmK2DVI&ab_channel=KelleyBlueBook

If I were to get a van, it would probably be this one:
https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a35940134/vw-id-buzz-us-on-sale-date/

I had some great, great times in VW buses or vans. I also had plenty of
misery, chasing down electrical problems and oil leaks, rebuilding
engines, freezing in winter, etc. I hope this new version would be better.

But back to the station wagons: In 1978 we got our first Honda station
wagon, and have stuck with station wagons or the near-equivalent
hatchbacks ever since. I absolutely loved my 1990 Honda Civic station
wagon. The pinnacle of automotive achievement! ;-)

https://www.netcarshow.com/honda/1990-civic_wagon/

Mine was easily old enough to vote when I finally sold it.

--
- Frank Krygowski

jbeattie

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Oct 8, 2021, 2:03:58 PM10/8/21
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Sedans of that era drove like boats, too. Swampy steering, spongy front-ends. Who knows how much of that was bench seats and giant steering wheels, early power steering, tires, etc., but the over-all feeling was vague and nothing like a modern station wagon or SUV. All domestic cars of the era were obese by modern standards.

-- Jay Beattie.



Frank Krygowski

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Oct 8, 2021, 2:09:44 PM10/8/21
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Right, because the size of parking spaces has been reduced to fit the
size of current vehicles.

As I just posted, we drove a series of Honda station wagons. Small,
nimble, good fuel economy but with good cargo space. One of those towed
our pop-up camper out to California, up to Maine, down to Florida, etc.

Speaking of parallel parking, on the first trip to California I had a
stressful Sunday afternoon driving to Los Angeles from Las Vegas. It was
my first experience on a crowded freeway where everyone was tailgating
while doing 80 mph.

In any case, I was pretty frazzled when we had to stop for my kid to
quickly use a restroom. I spotted a parking spot, pulled up alongside
and parallel parked the trailer plus car on the first try. It was lucky,
I admit, but one onlooker almost applauded.

--
- Frank Krygowski

AMuzi

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Oct 8, 2021, 3:15:08 PM10/8/21
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[raises hand]
Wonderful!

No beeping, no electronics, painted steel dash and analog
gauges, chromed bumpers- what's not to like?

AMuzi

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Oct 8, 2021, 3:18:12 PM10/8/21
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True, then again modern versions can't haul 4x8 building
material. Differences don't make one 'better' BTW.

Ralph Barone

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Oct 8, 2021, 3:19:48 PM10/8/21
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So buy a “Crossover Utility Vehicle”. It’s basically a station wagon with
a sexier label.

And while minivans seem to be universally derided as uncool, they are
currently selling above sticker price.

https://motorillustrated.com/demand-for-minivans-is-so-strong-they-are-selling-for-8-above-sticker-price/81905/

Tom Kunich

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Oct 8, 2021, 3:19:55 PM10/8/21
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Well, my point was that station wagons were built on the same chassis as the 4 door sedans. Most station wagons were lighter than the sedans. Yes, they drove like boats, just like all of the cars of that era.

Tom Kunich

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Oct 8, 2021, 3:22:03 PM10/8/21
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Real station wagons are made by Volvo, Audi, Mercedes and Subaru. Probably other manufacturers as well

Frank Krygowski

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Oct 8, 2021, 4:16:51 PM10/8/21
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I loved that my 1990 Honda Civic station wagon (the pinnacle of
automotive achievement) would accept a 4x4 piece of plywood just fine. I
suppose it could carry a 4x8 as well, sticking out the back, but I don't
remember trying that.

> Differences don't make one 'better' BTW.

I believe I've stated that point here before.

--
- Frank Krygowski

Tom Kunich

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Oct 8, 2021, 4:24:58 PM10/8/21
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So, Frank, we're back to "whatever I've got is all that anyone would ever need."? I have now been convinced that you don't even know you're doing this. But it's plain as day to everyone else.

jbeattie

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Oct 8, 2021, 4:58:48 PM10/8/21
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Sure they can. It's easy putting plywood sheets in a mini-van -- easier than old station wagons, only some of which would take plywood sheets, and even a smaller number laying flat. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrEOZVeVCbM&ab_channel=FernandoC I would much rather drive that Honda mini-van than a '60s station wagon. OTOH, I couldn't get a 4X8 sheet into my Outback, and I always use my utility trailer for hauling sheets of plywood or drywall. Then again, I would not take a '60s station wagon skiing, at least not without chains -- whump, whump, whump (creeping up the mountain).

I drove a '73 station wagon back and forth from California to Oregon multiple times to move my stuff. It was the family Ford wagon, and it seems like I was stopping for gas every few hours. It was a gas guzzler. Fun story -- I stopped for gas in Weed, and the car wouldn't start and was super hot, so I crossed a weedy field to a garage and found a nice mechanic working on his day off who fixed the car. The battery had died and a freeze plug was leaking. He whacked in a new one and sold me a used battery, all while I waited. It was awesome. I was probably delayed less than two hours.


-- Jay Beattie.

AMuzi

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Oct 8, 2021, 5:06:25 PM10/8/21
to
I thought the comparison was between classic wagons and
trendy SUVs. Vans have been around forever, probably never
as elegantly as Greenbrier:

https://bringatrailer.com/2015/01/18/immaculate-rarities-restored-corvair-truck-twins/

(note those were in Portand!)

Ted Heise

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Oct 8, 2021, 5:07:35 PM10/8/21