Energy Bars and Drinks

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Tom Kunich

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Sep 21, 2021, 7:30:40 PMSep 21
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Most of this stuff I tried would give you a real quick boost but would disappear just as rapidly. Have you tried anything that works well? The last thing I tried was Monster which gave me a good boost but those cans don't fit in a water bottle holder.

AMuzi

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Sep 21, 2021, 8:41:02 PMSep 21
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On 9/21/2021 6:30 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
> Most of this stuff I tried would give you a real quick boost but would disappear just as rapidly. Have you tried anything that works well? The last thing I tried was Monster which gave me a good boost but those cans don't fit in a water bottle holder.
>

No.
As Chalo Cholina wrote here, 'I eat actual food instead.'

--
Andrew Muzi
<www.yellowjersey.org/>
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Tom Kunich

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Sep 21, 2021, 9:01:45 PMSep 21
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On Tuesday, September 21, 2021 at 5:41:02 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
> On 9/21/2021 6:30 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
> > Most of this stuff I tried would give you a real quick boost but would disappear just as rapidly. Have you tried anything that works well? The last thing I tried was Monster which gave me a good boost but those cans don't fit in a water bottle holder.
> >
> No.
> As Chalo Cholina wrote here, 'I eat actual food instead.'
For some reason I stopped stopping at coffee shops or cafe's and eating half way through a ride. This is a LARGE mistake and I will have to revert. If I had stopped at my previous cade before Niles Canyon I wouldn't be in the shape I'm presently in - dead tired

Mark cleary

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Sep 22, 2021, 3:27:55 PMSep 22
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I always like to ride without stopping or unclipping if I can. Generally that can be possible for rides up to 100 miles. I have road a century and never stopped the bike. I don't plan to eat anything on a ride unless I am going out for a century. I ride many 50-60 miler rides and never even take a drink, even when it can be warmer. Generally in summer of course I drink but today I road 50 miles no drinks no stops. I never eat energy bars or the foods that many cyclist seem to gravitate toward. On a timed century I make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and then throw in some crackers like Ritz or Wheat thins. A few sugar soft sugar cookies will also do the job and fig newtons.

When finish I simply eat regular food and good beer is always part of the diet. Right now I am in the Octoberfest and Great Lakes Octoberfest is the best at the moment. Even better than Paulaner Octoberfest. Pizza, ice cream, and I eat a huge amount of breakfast cereal as a treat dry. My favorite is Cinnamon Toast Crunch. My guess is these foods are not what the Tour riders a eating.

Deacon Mark

William Crowell

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Sep 22, 2021, 4:14:09 PMSep 22
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I like to stop at my favorite Italian restaurant on my way back home from the ride and have a plate of their sauteed chicken with a couple of side orders of gnocchi with pesto sauce (with plenty of parmesan), followed by a gelato. This will usually cure any feelings of faintness that I may have had, and tide me over until I get home and can prepare a proper meal.

AMuzi

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Sep 22, 2021, 4:43:59 PMSep 22
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On 9/22/2021 3:14 PM, William Crowell wrote:
> I like to stop at my favorite Italian restaurant on my way back home from the ride and have a plate of their sauteed chicken with a couple of side orders of gnocchi with pesto sauce (with plenty of parmesan), followed by a gelato. This will usually cure any feelings of faintness that I may have had, and tide me over until I get home and can prepare a proper meal.
>

'proper meal?? WTF does THAT mean??

[Italians stop reading, roll eyes, slap forehead]

Lou Holtman

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Sep 22, 2021, 4:51:29 PMSep 22
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On Wednesday, September 22, 2021 at 10:14:09 PM UTC+2, William Crowell wrote:
> I like to stop at my favorite Italian restaurant on my way back home from the ride and have a plate of their sauteed chicken with a couple of side orders of gnocchi with pesto sauce (with plenty of parmesan), followed by a gelato. This will usually cure any feelings of faintness that I may have had, and tide me over until I get home and can prepare a proper meal.


Wow. Like the deacon I don't need any food during a for me normal 80-90 km ride, but this year I allow myself a short break (10 min) to give my back and hip a short rest. For that I choose a nice and quiet place and eat whatever I took with me:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/3obx4YhjVS2ret6i8
or I stop at a bakery were the pastry is fresh and you don't get ripped off like in a lot of restaurants over here:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/kFNgW48TxnPAw8UB9
I always take two water bottles with me in the summer.

Lou

ritzann...@gmail.com

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Sep 22, 2021, 4:57:20 PMSep 22
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On Tuesday, September 21, 2021 at 6:30:40 PM UTC-5, cycl...@gmail.com wrote:
> Most of this stuff I tried would give you a real quick boost but would disappear just as rapidly. Have you tried anything that works well? The last thing I tried was Monster which gave me a good boost but those cans don't fit in a water bottle holder.

For short rides, anything and everything should and does work fine. Calories are all that matter. Get calories in your body. For long events such as randonneur rides. 200, 300, 400, 600, 1000, 1200 kilometer events over a set amount of time, the eating of regular food is encouraged. But due to the extended length of the rides and your body, this may or may not be possible. When I rode these events, on the longer events 400k and up, where I sometimes did not stop for a sleep break, I used various powder energy drinks with added protein powder. As well as lots of sugary drinks. When exercising constantly, liquid energy works and settles better than solid food. On Paris Brest Paris, the 1200 km, 750 mile, randonneur event in France every four years in August. They have kitchens set up at the main control stops to feed the 5000 riders. They serve and cook regular type food for the riders. I never ate anything from these kitchens when I rode PBP 2007. I lived for three days on just energy drinks as I described before. And sugary drinks such as orange juice, grape juice, soda pop. No solid food for me.

Ralph Barone

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Sep 22, 2021, 9:12:46 PMSep 22
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AMuzi <a...@yellowjersey.org> wrote:
> On 9/22/2021 3:14 PM, William Crowell wrote:
>> I like to stop at my favorite Italian restaurant on my way back home
>> from the ride and have a plate of their sauteed chicken with a couple of
>> side orders of gnocchi with pesto sauce (with plenty of parmesan),
>> followed by a gelato. This will usually cure any feelings of faintness
>> that I may have had, and tide me over until I get home and can prepare a proper meal.
>>
>
> 'proper meal?? WTF does THAT mean??
>
> [Italians stop reading, roll eyes, slap forehead]
>

“The problem with Italian food is that you eat it and two days later,
you’re hungry again.”

Tom Kunich

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Sep 23, 2021, 10:57:19 AMSep 23
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The difference between slav food and Italian food is a small difference in the sauces.

William Crowell

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Sep 23, 2021, 1:12:02 PMSep 23
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"Wow."

As the man says at about 4:50 into the following video, Russell, every outfit needs a comedian, and I didn't notice anyone else applying for the position:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fH_qoPlbXI

Roger Merriman

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Sep 23, 2021, 1:37:58 PMSep 23
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Difference between need and want!

Stopping at a cafe on MTB/Gravel is one of life’s pleasures!

Roger merriman.

Sir Ridesalot

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Sep 23, 2021, 8:18:17 PMSep 23
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No cafes on any of the dirt or gravel roads around here. I have a small butane stove that very nearly fits into my jersey pocket. I keep the stove and fuel canister inside a small pannier or in my handlebar bag mounted on my seatpost. I can stop anywhere and brew up a coffee, hot chocolate or tea. I have a small pot that the stove sits inside of when being transported.

Cheers

Frank Krygowski

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Sep 23, 2021, 8:38:37 PMSep 23
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On Thursday, September 23, 2021 at 5:18:17 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
> On Thursday, September 23, 2021 at 1:37:58 p.m. UTC-4, Roger Merriman wrote:

> No cafes on any of the dirt or gravel roads around here. I have a small butane stove that very nearly fits into my jersey pocket. I keep the stove and fuel canister inside a small pannier or in my handlebar bag mounted on my seatpost. I can stop anywhere and brew up a coffee, hot chocolate or tea. I have a small pot that the stove sits inside of when being transported.

I keep thinking about building a Coke can alcohol stove for such duty. But I'll admit my wilderness riding is not what it
used to be.

- Frank Krygowski

Tom Kunich

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Sep 24, 2021, 3:28:50 PMSep 24
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Yesterday's 76 mile ride had a stop in the middle in which I consumed a sandwich and a coffee. Well, that doesn't work well. It didn't digest until after I got home and hence offered no help over the grade. So I guess I will have to stick with a pastry and coffee so that my stomach has some easy to digest and rapidly available calories. It is a bad idea to carry things along to cook in the middle of a ride because it weighs so much, offers a fire danger and forces you to bring food that requires cooking.

Now the energy bars and energy drinks I've used are short term. A metric century is short term and a couple of bars or drinks more than lasts you to the end where you can get a real meal and driving home digest it.

Roger Merriman

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Sep 25, 2021, 7:02:51 PMSep 25
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I tend to travel lighter than that, to be fair cafes even stuff from vans
is rarely off road, uk gravel is for most part not gravel roads, so I tend
to connect up stuff.

On the MTB depends where, some places once your up and on the hills there
is nowhere to stop as such.

Roger Merriman.

Tom Kunich

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Sep 25, 2021, 8:11:01 PMSep 25
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But my experience was although my MTB rides tended to be as long or longer than my road rides with much harder climbing, that the actual distances were rather short. I think I did about 100 offroad rides for an average distance of 20 miles per ride.

Roger Merriman

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Sep 26, 2021, 2:21:10 PMSep 26
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Generally yes, 15/20 miles longer distances tends to be on terrain that
favours the Gravel bike, which I have done 70 or so miles which is a big
day out!

Roger Merriman

Tom Kunich

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Sep 26, 2021, 2:28:12 PMSep 26
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On flat gravel rides I have often done 60 miles mostly on gravel, but that is a LONG day in the saddle bouncing along.

AMuzi

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Sep 26, 2021, 2:49:29 PMSep 26
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On 9/26/2021 1:28 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
> On Sunday, September 26, 2021 at 11:21:10 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
>> Tom Kunich <cycl...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> On Saturday, September 25, 2021 at 4:02:51 PM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
>>>> Sir Ridesalot <i_am_cyc...@yahoo.ca> wrote:
>>>>> On Thursday, September 23, 2021 at 1:37:58 p.m. UTC-4, Roger Merriman wrote:
>>>>>> Lou Holtman <lou.h...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>>> On Wednesday, September 22, 2021 at 10:14:09 PM UTC+2, William Crowell wrote:
>>>>>>>> I like to stop at my favorite Italian restaurant on my way back home
>>>>>>>> from the ride and have a plate of their sauteed chicken with a couple of
>>>>>>>> side orders of gnocchi with pesto sauce (with plenty of parmesan),
>>>>>>>> followed by a gelato. This will usually cure any feelings of faintness
>>>>>>>> that I may have had, and tide me over until I get home and can prepare a proper meal.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Wow. Like the deacon I don't need any food during a for me normal 80-90
>>>>>>> km ride, but this year I allow myself a short break (10 min) to give my
>>>>>>> back and hip a short rest. For that I choose a nice and quiet place and
>>>>>>> eat whatever I took with me:
>>>>>>> https://photos.app.goo.gl/3obx4YhjVS2ret6i8
>>>>>>> or I stop at a bakery were the pastry is fresh and you don't get ripped
>>>>>>> off like in a lot of restaurants over here:
>>>>>>> https://photos.app.goo.gl/kFNgW48TxnPAw8UB9
>>>>>>> I always take two water bottles with me in the summer.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Lou
>>>>>>>
>>>>>> Difference between need and want!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Stopping at a cafe on MTB/Gravel is one of life’s pleasures!
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Roger merriman.
>>>>>
>>>>> No cafes on any of the dirt or gravel roads around here. I have a small
>>>>> butane stove that very nearly fits into my jersey pocket. I keep the
>>>>> stove and fuel canister inside a small pannier or in my handlebar bag
>>>>> mounted on my seatpost. I can stop anywhere and brew up a coffee, hot
>>>>> chocolate or tea. I have a small pot that the stove sits inside of when
>>>>> being transported.
>>>>>
>>>>> Cheers
>>>>>
>>>> I tend to travel lighter than that, to be fair cafes even stuff from vans
>>>> is rarely off road, uk gravel is for most part not gravel roads, so I tend
>>>> to connect up stuff.
>>>>
>>>> On the MTB depends where, some places once your up and on the hills there
>>>> is nowhere to stop as such.
>>>>
>>>> Roger Merriman.
>>> But my experience was although my MTB rides tended to be as long or
>>> longer than my road rides with much harder climbing, that the actual
>>> distances were rather short. I think I did about 100 offroad rides for an
>>> average distance of 20 miles per ride.
>>>
>> Generally yes, 15/20 miles longer distances tends to be on terrain that
>> favours the Gravel bike, which I have done 70 or so miles which is a big
>> day out!
>
> On flat gravel rides I have often done 60 miles mostly on gravel, but that is a LONG day in the saddle bouncing along.
>

You're lancing that windmill unnecessarily.

Mr Beattie is of sorta leftish opinions but hardly a hard
left outlier, not even extreme among RBT contributors. I
talk with actual communists on a regular basis and he's not
that.

Tom Kunich

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Sep 26, 2021, 2:54:57 PMSep 26
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I am quite aware that Jay cycles between reasonable and unreasonable middle to hard left. What has always surprised me about him is how hard he would work against his own best interests. Does he think that his own best interests aren't the same as those of everyone else?
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