History of drugs in cycling-NO OPINIONS

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The Great Kornholio

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Jun 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/10/99
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Hi gang. I am writing a brief overview of the history of
performance-enhancing compounds in cycling for my club's newsletter. I
have a few questions that I'd love to hear from you on:

1) Who was the Brit who died in the TdF (TIOOYK) as a result of
amphetmanine use? What year (approx.)?
2) Was it Merckx or Anquetil who said "you can't win the tour on mineral
water alone"?
3) What was Abdujaparov busted for a couple years back?

I'd also be interested to know any facts that you think would be
interesting about the HISTORY of drugs in cycling. I am not going to
include editorializing or opinions in my piece since there's plenty of
that already. Just an informative piece which I'll post here when done.
I

In the article I talk about caffiene, nicotine (The Smokers), alcohol,
steroids, amphetamines, xanthines, recombinants (rHGH and rEPO), blood
doping, ephedrine, B-12 injections, creatine, etc.


Eric Harvey

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Jun 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/10/99
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The Great Kornholio (horn...@west.net) wrote:
: Hi gang. I am writing a brief overview of the history of

: performance-enhancing compounds in cycling for my club's newsletter. I
: have a few questions that I'd love to hear from you on:

: 1) Who was the Brit who died in the TdF (TIOOYK) as a result of
: amphetmanine use? What year (approx.)?

Tom Simpson, in the Tour de France during the late-60s (1967 or 1968 I
think).

: 2) Was it Merckx or Anquetil who said "you can't win the tour on mineral
: water alone"?

This was indeed Jacques Anquetil.

: 3) What was Abdujaparov busted for a couple years back?

I believe the main substance was Clenbuterol, an anabolic steroid.
Popular among horse trainers IIRC. The year was 1997.

Eric.
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Dept. of Medical Physics eric....@cancerboard.ab.ca
Cross Cancer Institute
11560 University Avenue phone: (780)432-8618
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JP

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Jun 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/10/99
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This is an interesting header: "No opinions." Philosophical even.

Can crime or history ever be reduced to science? Can the facts ever
be known really? Other than incidental incidents, that is.
"Tommy Simpson"---does that really tell us much?
Crime, history, culture, none of it can be really reduced.
It's utilitarian and relational. BASED on opinion, among
other things. (I'll leave it at that.)

Can you find enough facts to REALLY know a culture?
Maybe, but how about facts about CRIME? By its nature
it's hidden. It's informal.

Even the best set of facts need interpreting. Facts on
crime are far more open to any conclusion that suits the writer.
Whether their conclusion is accurate, helpful or any good at all
is due to their judgment not science per se.

I'm not sure where all this leads, but trying to avoid opinion
when discussing crime seems fruitless in the long run.
Maybe not. It's just a hunch.

Regardless of what facts we have on drug use, now or in the past,
what remains is what we fans and racers THINK about it
...our opinions, in other words. Do we accept it? Do we refuse it?
Did we label it as drugs? How was the line drawn? What were the
values? Were there double standards, blindspots?

We COULD create a culture where drugs weren't used, weren't
a part of its value system. You wouldn't need any testing whatsoever.
The facts wouldn't matter either. A glance at the scene would
tell you all you needed to know.

You know, the culture of bike racing didn't have to fall apart
due to DRUGS, it could have been anything related to its values.

As values get worked on, the facts will adjust. If the values
stay flawed, a hundred corks in the dike won't stop it from bursting.

It's a LITTLE like training races where everyone refuses
to chase the guy who breaks away due to a traffic or
other ethical/etiquette violation. Such events work.
In a culture where violations are tolerated (or
even present in its values), such events FALL APART
no matter how thick the rule book or how strict the
testing of whatever you want to test.

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Jay Beattie

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Jun 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/10/99
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Eric Harvey wrote in message <7jp3du$jvg$1...@pulp.ucs.ualberta.ca>...

>The Great Kornholio (horn...@west.net) wrote:
>: Hi gang. I am writing a brief overview of the history of
>: performance-enhancing compounds in cycling for my club's newsletter. I
>: have a few questions that I'd love to hear from you on:
>
>: 1) Who was the Brit who died in the TdF (TIOOYK) as a result of
>: amphetmanine use? What year (approx.)?
>
>Tom Simpson, in the Tour de France during the late-60s (1967 or 1968 I
>think).

1967 on Mont Ventoux 2k from the top. His supposed last words were "put me
back on my bike." -- Jay Beattie.

John Forrest Tomlinson

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Jun 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/10/99
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Benjamin Maso wrote in message <7jpqg2$2krq$1...@beast.euro.net>...

>1924: Albert Londres interviews the Pelisssier brothers after they
have
>quitted the Tour. They show him a battery of little bottles, pills
and
>tables: "We ride on dynamite"

Do you know where I could find an English language translation of
that interview?

JT

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Steven L. Sheffield

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Jun 10, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/10/99
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In article <7jpqg2$2krq$1...@beast.euro.net>, "Benjamin Maso"
<benj...@euronet.nl> wrote:

> 1989: The whole PDM team has to leave the Tour, having used contaminated
> intrapelid, a drug masking the use of testeron.


This actually happened in 1991, rather than 1989 ... and nowhere have
I heard that IntraLipid masks the use of testosterone ... source, please?


> 1989: The miracolous resurrexion of Greg Lemond. He suffered from anemia,
> but claimed to have been cured by an iron injection. Not many people believe
> him. The rumour says he used blood-doping. Or was it EPO?


If he was anaemic, as he claims, an iron injection would allow his
red blood cells to better carry oxygen ... and iffy conjecture either
way ...


> 1990: The talented Gilles Delion wins the Tour of Lomardy, but has to stop
> professional racing a few years later: he is really clean and can't compete
> anymore now that all the strong riders are taking EPO, steroids, etc.


Don't forget all of Gert Jan Theunisse's problems in the late 80s
and early 90s with his testosterone levels,

Abdoujaparov's expulsion from the 1997 Tour for doping.

Chiappucci's expulsion from the Tour of Romandie and Giro d'Italia
for too high haemotocrit levels in 1997.

Whichever rider that won the Criterium International in 1998 later
being disqualified for a positive drug test, ultimately giving
Bobby Julich the title.

The 1994 dominance of Gewiss-Ballan in the Tirreno-Adriatico,
Ardennes Classics, Giro d'Italia, etc.

Paola Pezzo testing positive for Nandrolone in 1998.

Daniele Pontoni testing positive for cocaine a few days before
the 1997-8 cyclocross world championships.

> 1998: The soigneur Willy Voet is arrested, and his team Festina is expelled
> from the Tour de France.
>
> Benjo Maso

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| Steven L. Sheffield (BOB #1765/IBOB #3) Disclaimer? What's that? |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Benjamin Maso

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Jun 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/11/99
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The Great Kornholio wrote in message <375FC3E1...@west.net>...

>Hi gang. I am writing a brief overview of the history of
>performance-enhancing compounds in cycling for my club's newsletter. I
>have a few questions that I'd love to hear from you on:
>
>1) Who was the Brit who died in the TdF (TIOOYK) as a result of
>amphetmanine use? What year (approx.)?
>2) Was it Merckx or Anquetil who said "you can't win the tour on mineral
>water alone"?
>3) What was Abdujaparov busted for a couple years back?
>
>I'd also be interested to know any facts that you think would be
>interesting about the HISTORY of drugs in cycling. I am not going to
>include editorializing or opinions in my piece since there's plenty of
>that already. Just an informative piece which I'll post here when done.
>I
>
>In the article I talk about caffiene, nicotine (The Smokers), alcohol,
>steroids, amphetamines, xanthines, recombinants (rHGH and rEPO), blood
>doping, ephedrine, B-12 injections, creatine, etc.

Small history of doping:

1897. The Welsh rider Linton, co-winner of Bordeaux-Paris dies not long
after the race. Cause of death: probably doping. At that time riders took
cafeine, derivatives of strychnine, cocaine and arsenic, and above all
alcohol. For a race like Bordeaux-Paris: one bottle of cognac and some
glasses white wine, port, and champagne.


1924: Albert Londres interviews the Pelisssier brothers after they have
quitted the Tour. They show him a battery of little bottles, pills and
tables: "We ride on dynamite"

1938: The Belgian Felicien Vervaecke is a surprisingly strong adversary of
the young Bartali. One of the first times a rider is using amphitamine,
invented in 1930.
1942: Coppi takes seven tablets amphitamine and breaks the hour record.
1948: Gino Bartali wins the Tour de France. Almost certainly the last Tour
winner who was really clean.
1955: Tour de France: the Mont Ventoux. The French rider Jean Mallejac in
coma and almost dies. Ex-winner Ferdi Kuebler is zigzagging and super
climber Charley Gaul has a terrible beakdown: the have the same soigneur.
1964: Danish rider Jensen dies during the road race at the Olympic Games.
1965: The first doping tests.
1966: The first doping tests in the Tour de France. Anquetil leads a strike.
But there is one strikebreaker: Tommy Simpson.
1967: Tommy Simpson dies at the Mont Ventoux. Cause: amphitamine and
alcohol.
1969: In the Giro Eddy Merckx takes doping for the time trial. His doctor
assures him he has nothing to fear: after one hour after he has taken it he
won't test positive, and because the follwoing day is a rest day, next day
there will be no traces in his urine. Wrong. He is caught anyway. He
proclaims crying his innocence, says he has been cheated (he is, by his
doctor). Even the Belgian king expresses his concerns. Merckx' suspension is
lifted, so he can ride and win the Tour de France.
1975 and 1977: Bernard Thevenet wins the Tour. Some years later he admits he
took cortisone.
1977: The Belgian doctor Debackere finds a way to detect the popular doping
Stimul and tries it in the Tour de Belgique. All the riders tested are
positive.
1988: Pedro Delgado wins the TDF. He has used a masking drug which is on the
list of the OC but not of the UCI.
1988-1990: 18 Belgian and Dutch riders die of heart attacks. The first
experiments with EPO?


1989: The whole PDM team has to leave the Tour, having used contaminated
intrapelid, a drug masking the use of testeron.

1989: The miracolous resurrexion of Greg Lemond. He suffered from anemia,
but claimed to have been cured by an iron injection. Not many people believe
him. The rumour says he used blood-doping. Or was it EPO?

1990: The talented Gilles Delion wins the Tour of Lomardy, but has to stop
professional racing a few years later: he is really clean and can't compete
anymore now that all the strong riders are taking EPO, steroids, etc.

Benjamin Maso

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Jun 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/11/99
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Steven L. Sheffield wrote in message ...

>In article <7jpqg2$2krq$1...@beast.euro.net>, "Benjamin Maso"
><benj...@euronet.nl> wrote:
>
>> 1989: The whole PDM team has to leave the Tour, having used contaminated
>> intrapelid, a drug masking the use of testeron.
>
>
>This actually happened in 1991, rather than 1989 ... and nowhere have
>I heard that IntraLipid masks the use of testosterone ... source, please?


My source is the book "Doping. Het circus van list and bedrog" from the
Belgian journalist Paul Keysers. He devotes a whole chapter to the PDM
affair with extensive quotes from a report of Dr. Donike from Cologne.


.
>
>Don't forget all of Gert Jan Theunisse's problems in the late 80s
>and early 90s with his testosterone levels,
>
>Abdoujaparov's expulsion from the 1997 Tour for doping.
>
>Chiappucci's expulsion from the Tour of Romandie and Giro d'Italia
>for too high haemotocrit levels in 1997.
>
>Whichever rider that won the Criterium International in 1998 later
>being disqualified for a positive drug test, ultimately giving
>Bobby Julich the title.
>
>The 1994 dominance of Gewiss-Ballan in the Tirreno-Adriatico,
>Ardennes Classics, Giro d'Italia, etc.
>
>Paola Pezzo testing positive for Nandrolone in 1998.
>
>Daniele Pontoni testing positive for cocaine a few days before
>the 1997-8 cyclocross world championships.

And the list can be much much longer, of course. Some beauties:

1956. Roger Riviere breaks the world hour record without taking doping:
46.923 m.
1957. Riviere takes pervetine and breaks the hour record again: 47.346 m. If
he hadn't had a flat tire, it would have been 300 m more.
1966. After the stage to Bordeaux in the TDF 6 riders are tested. Four of
them are positive. The urine of the French stars Aimar (winner of the Tour)
and Poulidor (third) disappears in a mysterious way.
1978. Michel Pollentier wins the stage to Alpe d'Huez and conquers the
yellow jersey. When he is tested he is caught with a condom filled with the
urine of someone else. Back in Belgium he draws cheering crowds.
1980: Six times world champion cyclo cross Eric de Vlaemynck is arrested. It
appears he is addicted to pervitine and is forced to spent a few month in a
drug rehabilitation centre. He has been tested many times during his
succesfull career, but was never positive.
1984: At the Olmpic Games eight members of the American bicycle team,among
which Alexi Grewal and Steve Hegg, fell ill when blood-doping is
administered to them. A few days later they win 4 of the 9 gold medals.
Etc., etc., etc.

Benjo Maso

JAVAEYE

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Jun 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/11/99
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>Etc., etc., etc.
>
>Benjo Maso

Add to that Bernard Thevenet admitting that he used steroids in winning the
TdF in 1975 and 1977 and admissons by the late Manuel Fuente that he used
amphetamines in "Spanish" races.
Brian Lafferty

Bob Doyle

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Jun 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/11/99
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Intralipid is not a drug. It is an intravenous food for patients who cannot
take food by mouth.

Benjamin Maso wrote in message <7jqv8s$14bc$1...@beast.euro.net>...

Tom Kunich

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Jun 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/11/99
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Bob Doyle wrote in message <7jrdf5$e2d$1...@autumn.news.rcn.net>...

>Intralipid is not a drug. It is an intravenous food for patients who
cannot
>take food by mouth.


Intralipid was being used in minute (for this purpose) amounts.

It was obviously being used for other reasons. One possible reason is that
the members of the team were being given anabolic steroids and the
interlipids were used to 'capture' these steroids so that they would be
excreted through the bowels instead of evaculated through the kidneys.

'Food' almost sounds good to those people who don't have the details.


Benjamin Maso

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Jun 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/11/99
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h
Tom Kunich wrote in message <7jrnsd$svl$1...@ffx2nh4.news.uu.net>...

>Bob Doyle wrote in message <7jrdf5$e2d$1...@autumn.news.rcn.net>...
>>Intralipid is not a drug. It is an intravenous food for patients who
>cannot
>>take food by mouth.
>
>
>Intralipid was being used in minute (for this purpose) amounts.

Right. They used in three days 500 ml intralipid for six members of the PDM
team. That means for each rider about 50 Kcal a day - two lumps of sugar
would have done the same job.

>It was obviously being used for other reasons. One possible reason is that
>the members of the team were being given anabolic steroids and the
>interlipids were used to 'capture' these steroids so that they would be
>excreted through the bowels instead of evaculated through the kidneys.

That was also the conclusion of Manfred Donike. According to him, it works
when the itralipid is slowly administered by means of infusion at the same
time as testosteron or another steroid.


>'Food' almost sounds good to those people who don't have the details.


`Food' was the first explication of the PDM team doctor. When confronted by
the evidence, he claimed it was administered to the riders for its
`psychological' effect. A likely story.

Benjo Maso

Steven L. Sheffield

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Jun 11, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/11/99
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In article <7jqv8s$14bc$1...@beast.euro.net>, "Benjamin Maso"
<benj...@euronet.nl> wrote:

> Steven L. Sheffield wrote in message ...
> >In article <7jpqg2$2krq$1...@beast.euro.net>, "Benjamin Maso"
> ><benj...@euronet.nl> wrote:
> >
> >> 1989: The whole PDM team has to leave the Tour, having used contaminated
> >> intrapelid, a drug masking the use of testeron.
> >
> >
> >This actually happened in 1991, rather than 1989 ... and nowhere have
> >I heard that IntraLipid masks the use of testosterone ... source, please?
>
>
> My source is the book "Doping. Het circus van list and bedrog" from the
> Belgian journalist Paul Keysers. He devotes a whole chapter to the PDM
> affair with extensive quotes from a report of Dr. Donike from Cologne.

Thanks for the info ... too bad I don't read Dutch very well.
I truly had never heard that Intralipid could be used as a
masking agent for testosterone.

While as the years passed I've grown more suspicious about
PDM's claim that the illness was due to spoiled batches of
Intralipid (which can be used as a recovery fuel), feeling
instead that their withdrawal/illness was due to a spoiled
batch of EPO ... which I'm not sure was actually banned at
the time ... the idea of Kelly, et al using steroids/testosterone
bothers me even more.

Mchronic99

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Jun 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/24/99
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The use of cocaine or any other such drugs can increase blood presure, Some
athletes known for using such drugs have had major heart attacks using these
drugs, because with the rising blood pressure it put's to much strain on the
heart and can cause it to burst and lead to death from internal bleeding

Mark Zavodny 17

Stuart Stebbings

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Jun 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/24/99
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In article <stevens-1006...@velowrks.vip.best.com>,

ste...@veloworks.com (Steven L. Sheffield) wrote:

> > 1989: The miracolous resurrexion of Greg Lemond. He suffered from
anemia,
> > but claimed to have been cured by an iron injection. Not many people
believe
> > him. The rumour says he used blood-doping. Or was it EPO?
>

> If he was anaemic, as he claims, an iron injection would allow his
> red blood cells to better carry oxygen ... and iffy conjecture either
> way ...
>

> --


> +-------------------------------------------------------------------+
> | Steven L. Sheffield (BOB #1765/IBOB #3) Disclaimer? What's that? |
> +-------------------------------------------------------------------+
> | ste...@veloworks.com / 415.296.9893 / "Ride lots." - Eddy Merckx |
> +-------------------------------------------------------------------+
> | Got bike? http://www.gotbike.com/ |
> +-------------------------------------------------------------------+
>

-
But Iron injectionss like EPO takes a few days to work. It isnt an
overnight miracle pick me up.

It was more likely Blood doping.
It really is a shame that ll of the greats of Cycling are tainted by
drugs.

Stuart Stebbings


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

JAVAEYE

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Jun 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/24/99
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>But Iron injectionss like EPO takes a few days to work. It isnt an
>overnight miracle pick me up.
>
>It was more likely Blood doping.
>It really is a shame that ll of the greats of Cycling are tainted by
>drugs.
>
>Stuart Stebbings
>

Two questions:
1. How much time was there between the end of the Giro when his anemia was
discovered to the beginning of the TdF in 1989?
2. Would that allow enough time for iron or EPO to do its work?
Brian Lafferty

Stuart Stebbings

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Jun 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/24/99
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In article <19990624071307...@ng-fk1.aol.com>,

Brian
My memory is a bit sketchy here but I thought that Greg was wasted after
a mountain stage in the Giro then came out the next day after his "Iron
Injection" and rode a fantastic time trial.

If I am wrong then yes the time between the Giro & TDF is plenty

JAVAEYE

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Jun 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/24/99
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>Brian
>My memory is a bit sketchy here but I thought that Greg was wasted after
>a mountain stage in the Giro then came out the next day after his "Iron
>Injection" and rode a fantastic time trial.

Correct. The iron was said to have worked overnight for the itt.

>If I am wrong then yes the time between the Giro & TDF is plenty

I think that year there was something like two and a half weeks between
tours. So what did Greg do to turn around. Like they said in CCD class years
ago, "Its a mystery."
Brian Lafferty


Bikerecker

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Jun 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/24/99
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javaeye said

>I think that year there was something like two and a half weeks between
>tours. So what did Greg do to turn around. Like they said in CCD class
>years
>ago, "Its a mystery."
My memory of the 89 Giro was that Lemond was getting shelled in the first two
weeks, and had the injections somewhere in that time frame.
He was second in the last time trial, on the last day, which was in the middle
of June, to Lech Piasecki (I'm going from memory, maybe it was someone else),
which would indicate that his amazing recovery had taken a few days, not a few
weeks. When I read his of result in that TT, I told all my riding buddies, and
have often reminded them of this, that Greg was going to win ther TdF.
As a huge Lemond fan, I have to wonder at the alacrity with which he recovered.
OTOH, great riders become great by having superlative recuperative
characterisitcs, so maybe he simply rode his way to the fitness that later
carried him to THE greatest TdF victory.
G Miller


kiwi

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Jun 24, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/24/99
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Stuart Stebbings wrote in message <7kt0k5$26p$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>...

>> If he was anaemic, as he claims, an iron injection would allow his
>> red blood cells to better carry oxygen ... and iffy conjecture either
>> way ...


It's my understanding that iron deficiency anemia is very rare
in male athletes. Iron deficiency without anemia is more common,
but still occurs very seldom in male athletes.
I think that a male athlete needs to eat incredibly poorly--like a
badly constructed vegetarian diet--in order to come down with
anemia. I find it hard to believe that Lemond had such a condition.


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