OFF-ROAD BIKE SLANG wanted by author

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Chad O'Hara

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Mar 25, 1995, 2:24:28 AM3/25/95
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the only ones i can think of off the top of my head are a 'fred' for an
unexperienced rider and 'roadie' refering to those losers who ride on the
road.

chad

Rusty Yarnall

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Mar 25, 1995, 8:37:57 PM3/25/95
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In <1995Mar25....@galileo.cc.rochester.edu>
af0...@uhura.cc.rochester.edu (Andrew Falconer) writes:

>
>"potato-chipping" your wheel, involves bending the rim to resemble a
potato
>chip.
>

AKA taco in the S.W.
--


ryar...@ix.netcom.com
72377...@compuserve.com

mec131

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Mar 26, 1995, 11:02:38 PM3/26/95
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-I've always heard it as "taco", which is when the wheel bends
-over onto itself, resembling Taco Bell's 49-cent wonder.
---
- Adrenaline starts to flow!
- You're thrashing all around,
- acting like a maniac.... WHIPLASH!
49¢!!! where do you live?! i think i'll pack my bags!

chad moore

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Mar 27, 1995, 1:33:51 PM3/27/95
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Chad,
I am one of those losers and I also ride mountain bikes...I would be more
than happy to crush you on your mountain bike any day of the week.
Chad...

Coal into Diamonds

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Mar 27, 1995, 2:37:48 PM3/27/95
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>I am one of those losers and I also ride mountain bikes...I would be more
I'm not Chad and I don't play him on T.V. but "roadie" is still the
term that I and many others use for a road bound person. By the way I am
a mountain biker who also rides road bikes.
In anycase. Some more slang. The most used one I've heard is
"trick" used in designating a part on a bike as "cool" or "pretty damn
expensive little anodized aluminum or titanium doo-dad that still is cool
because it looks neat and no one else has one."
"endo" is used to refer to that favorite maneuver of getting
ejected forcibly from your bike by way of going over the handlebars.
"bail" or "gettin off" also works but these are used for more
general crashes.
"wash" is often used in reference to having your front tire lose
traction, more specifically around a corner. Such as "having your tire
wash out"
Hmm most of the slang I know is in reference to crashing or slosing
control. Maybe that's a bad sign. 8)

These are a few that I've heard around here. May vary from place
to place.
Later
Rich
--
"Whoever rides with o : Coal into Diamonds is
the most toys wins!" _/\, : robi...@isuux.isu.edu is
(*)>(*) : Rich Robinson

Paul Robert Brown

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Mar 27, 1995, 6:20:44 PM3/27/95
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In article <3l746c$q...@isuux.isu.edu>,

Coal into Diamonds <robi...@isuux.isu.edu> wrote:
>I am one of those losers and I also ride mountain bikes...I would be more
>...

Ditto.

Now, I was planning to post some slang:

hammer (v) ride hard; specifically to "hammer" on the pedals.
hammer (n) someone who hammers
shred similar, borrowed from skateboarding/snowboarding,
but not really referring to pedalling hard.
singletrack trail that is one biker/hiker/horse wide, generally
considered the choicest stuff and the antithesis of
a firetrail.
scrub, biff crash
technoweenie someone with more bike than they have the skills to
use, specifically someone who buys lots of gadgets
to add supposed iotas of performance to their bike.
bunnyhop to hop the bike, used to clear smallish to largish
obstacles
powerslide a two-wheel sideways slide with the opposite foot
(that is, the foot opposite the direction of travel)
on the ground.

pb

Jonathan Byrd

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Mar 28, 1995, 12:19:33 PM3/28/95
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Some more slang:

Dab (v): To take a foot off the pedal, and touch the ground to avoid a
crash. Example: "I made it without crashing, but I had to dab once."

Clean (v): To successfully negotiate a trail, without crashing or
dabbing. Example: "Did you clean that last section?"

--
jonathan byrd
j...@isu.edu

Shaun C. Murray

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Mar 28, 1995, 6:28:23 AM3/28/95
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In article <3l746c$q...@isuux.isu.edu>, robi...@isuux.isu.edu says...

> "endo" is used to refer to that favorite maneuver of getting
>ejected forcibly from your bike by way of going over the handlebars.

Isn't an "Endo" a voluntary thing?. ie. you pull your front brake and hop
up onto your front wheel. If you go too far you do go over the handlebars
but that isn't the idea. That I normally call a "faceplant" as you've
just planted your face in the ground.

> "bail" or "gettin off" also works but these are used for more
>general crashes.

Again "Bail" is a deliberate thing for me. You bail out because you are
about to crash.

One I heard yesterday which is going straight into my dictionary is
"Gutter Bunny" for a commuter cyclist.

Shaun

doin nothin

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Mar 28, 1995, 1:37:37 PM3/28/95
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Paul Robert Brown (pbr...@asparagus.berkeley.edu) wrote:

| technoweenie someone with more bike than they have the skills to
| use, specifically someone who buys lots of gadgets
| to add supposed iotas of performance to their bike.

this would also be a poser.

| pb

-

Alan Goldman

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Mar 27, 1995, 10:30:57 PM3/27/95
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Here's some slang for you:

HOHA

Hateful Old Hikers Association. And, of course, Hoha's are members
of this organization, which hates mountain bicyclists with a fervor
exceeding that of rabid wolverines.

And, if you'd like a little song:

(To the tune of "Camptown Racers")

Hoha haters howl this song
Hoha! Hoha!
Haters howling all night long
All the Hoha day.
All the Hoha night
All the Hoha day
See a bike on the Hoha trail
Howl till it goes away


See ya

Tom L. Wallace

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Mar 27, 1995, 6:58:30 PM3/27/95
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OK, Ok, but what's the "real" def. of *proj* ????

-Tom

Christopher Wahl

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Mar 28, 1995, 8:43:11 AM3/28/95
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In <3l8rsn$4...@icebox.mfltd.co.uk> s...@mfltd.co.uk writes:

> In article <3l746c$q...@isuux.isu.edu>, robi...@isuux.isu.edu says...
> > "endo" is used to refer to that favorite maneuver of getting
> >ejected forcibly from your bike by way of going over the handlebars.
>
> Isn't an "Endo" a voluntary thing?. ie. you pull your front brake and hop
> up onto your front wheel. If you go too far you do go over the handlebars
> but that isn't the idea. That I normally call a "faceplant" as you've
> just planted your face in the ground.


Regardless of whether it is voluntary or not, my personal favorite (in
reference to endos) is the "CAPTAIN OF THE SHIP" endo:
Those are the ones in which the ever-faithful rider refuses to abandon his
trusty steed...and follows his/her bike to the tarmac still attached with both
feet...even better if you can manage to squeal out "I'M GOIN DOWWWWN WITH
HERRRRRRR"

On those unfortunate days when you manage to have more than 2 C.O.T.S.endos,
you can be pronounced "Admiral" (not to be confused with "admirable")



> > "bail" or "gettin off" also works but these are used for more
> >general crashes.

Only for those prone to mutiny...


Stay loose,
CJW

Shaun C. Murray

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Mar 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/29/95
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In article <3l9at5$q...@isuux.isu.edu>, robi...@isuux.isu.edu says...

>
>>Isn't an "Endo" a voluntary thing?.
> Well around here and Endo refers to "End over End". Getting
>ejected.

Perhaps it's because I'm English or maybe my old BMX background showing
through. An Endo was always something you did on purpose back in 83-84. I
remember now, Cherrypickers, 180's, Ollies.... Perhaps it's changed with
the ever increasing globalization of language.

> Faceplant is used around here more in reference to rollerblading
>or skiing but again I have heard it used for biking

Not a lot of rollerblading or skiing happens in deepest Berkshire,
England so perhaps that's why we use it for biking. Apart from kids
younger than 14-ish I've only ever seen one adult roller blader. Some sad
bloke with flowery patterned fluoro tights.

Shaun


David Kurensky

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Mar 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/29/95
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Mantrap: Commonly found in heavily wooded areas in autumn. Refers to a
hole covered with leaves disguising itself as a solid piece of earth.
Very effective at eating the front wheel of the unsuspecting rider. See
tigger-trap.

Ted Stodgell

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Mar 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/29/95
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There are a bunch of terms for the difficulty level of certain
trails. TECHNICAL is the general word for something that's
though. If the trail or area where the trail ended is incredibly
rough, it's GONZO-ABUSIVE. Things to watch out for on these trails
are BABY HEADS (rocks that are about the size of infants' craniums)
and sticks that jump out and get stuck in your wheels.
know any slang for those sticks--you know, the little ones that
Does anyone know any slang terms for those sticks?? Or what about
logs on heavily used trails that get big notches from everbody digging
their rings?

Ted Stodgell trs...@psuvm.psu.edu

R. Wagner

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Mar 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/29/95
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kure...@lmis.loral.com (David Kurensky) writes:

Here's a related one:
Snowmine: an object (rock, log, hibernating bear, etc) on the trail hidden
by snow.

I did a really good 1 1/2 and slid about 20 ft down a hill because of one
of these critters.

Raydude
--
"Ray, a man unburdened by the rigors of coherent thought."
-a Brannonism quoted by George Heinz
"And the worms ate into his brain." -PF The Wall.

Bruce W. Hoylman

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Mar 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/29/95
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How about "giblets", which are all the colorful bits and pieces that one
can add or change out on a bike.

Then there's "veloporn", which are the full color adds in the bike rags
that show all the cool giblets that you simply *must* have.

A fully suspended bike can be called a "boing-boing", whereas single
suspension is simply "boing".

Running out of gas during a race is called "bonking".

Peace.
--
Bruce W. Hoylman (303-541-6557) -- bho...@advtech.USWest.COM
- __o Speaking for myself... /\/\ /\
- - - -\<, "Please saw my legs off". /~/~~\/\/~~\
- ____O/_O_______________________________/\ / \ \/\ \______

gch...@msu.oscs.montana.edu

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Mar 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/29/95
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>
>One I heard yesterday which is going straight into my dictionary is
>"Gutter Bunny" for a commuter cyclist.
>
>Shaun
>


My favorite slang is "Yeagering" (a verb, obviously) after Chuck Yeager. Used
to describe what happens when you're hauling down a fire road or something, and
get caught in a rut, and get REAL sketchy .....

Case

Michael Fuhrer

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Mar 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/29/95
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Auger (v): to involuntarily take samples of the local geology.
(usually with one's face).

James Landess

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Mar 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/29/95
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Tom L. Wallace (to...@jsb.com) wrote:

: "Trick" and just about every other slang word I've seen here,
: are actually borrowed from dirt motorcycle speak vintage 70`s.
: Other then "unobtaniun" we havn't come up with anything new,
: as far as I can see.

Yes, and we didn't even come up with "unobtanium" (with an "m").

: C'mon guys, an industry that can come up with peace signs
: for brake stays can have a little more creativity and contribution
: to the English Language!

--
James D. Landess
"I've never crashed, but I have had quite a few unplanned moving dismounts"
Sunnyvale, California

Rob Hawkes

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Mar 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/29/95
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In his _FAT_TIRE_TALES_AND_TRAILS_ book, Cosmic Ray includes a
G-narly G-lossary of "Burly Verbage!" that includes some of my
favorites. I quote:

Butt Furr: What gets ruffed on a butt ruff.
Butt Ruff: Not rough enough to stand but too rough
to ride seated.
Curb Grind: Expensive erasure of low hanging shiny bits
on a sticking up stone. As in to "roach it"
on a curb grind.
Kicked In: Crashed. Worn out. Exhausted.
Rookie Mark: Chain grease on leg. Extra points for wrong leg.
Weenie: A whimpering, whining weakling. What a nig-nog!
Weenie Walk: Trail so sketchy as to cause weenies to walk.

There are many more. Illustrations too!

--
Rob Hawkes
Motorola SPS
Tempe, AZ

Coal into Diamonds

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Mar 28, 1995, 10:44:37 AM3/28/95
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>> "endo" is used to refer to that favorite maneuver of getting
>>ejected forcibly from your bike by way of going over the handlebars.
>Isn't an "Endo" a voluntary thing?.
Well around here and Endo refers to "End over End". Getting
ejected. But it is also used like you said (again around here i.e. Idaho
I can't speak for anywhere else.) I've heard that called a controlled
endo or a front wheelie.

>but that isn't the idea. That I normally call a "faceplant" as you've

Faceplant is used around here more in reference to rollerblading
or skiing but again I have heard it used for biking

>Again "Bail" is a deliberate thing for me.
Here's a problem with slang. It means something different for
everyone.


>"Gutter Bunny" for a commuter cyclist.

Hmm. Interesting.

bd...@lehigh.edu

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Mar 30, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/30/95
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In article <BHOYLMA.95...@dazzle.advtech.USWest.COM>, bho...@advtech.US

West.COM (Bruce W. Hoylman) writes:
>
>How about "giblets", which are all the colorful bits and pieces that one
>can add or change out on a bike.
>
>Then there's "veloporn", which are the full color adds in the bike rags
>that show all the cool giblets that you simply *must* have.
>
>A fully suspended bike can be called a "boing-boing", whereas single
>suspension is simply "boing".
>
>Running out of gas during a race is called "bonking".
>
>Peace.
>--

I always call my friends full suspension bike the "flying couch." maybe I'm
just poking fun, but it has some truth to it!

brian


Doug Landauer

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Mar 30, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/30/95
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> My favorite slang is "Yeagering" (a verb, obviously) after Chuck
> Yeager. Used to describe what happens when you're hauling down a
> fire road or something, and get caught in a rut, and get REAL sketchy...

So what does it mean? Is it used only when you crash, only when you
don't crash, or in either case? And what in Yeager's test-pilot and
astronaut career inspired the term?

-- Just curious...

Alan Goldman

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Mar 30, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/30/95
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Drillium: Anything with lots of holes drilled in it to make it lighter.
Usually breaks at the worst possible time.

Stephen J. Kramer

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Mar 31, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/31/95
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> Ted Stodgell trs...@psuvm.psu.edu

KIDNEY POUNDER is also a term for incredibly rough trail, and DEATH
COOKIES (skiing vernacular) can be used for those fist-sized rocks
that knock your bike in every direction but the one you want to proceed.
I call those little sticks that get caught up in your wheels, derailleurs,
and brakes HITCHHIKERS. ZINGERS (from the sound they make going by your
ear) are those rocks that get picked up by your tires and flung at your
shins or the guy behind.

Kramer

Stephen J. Kramer

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Mar 31, 1995, 3:00:00 AM3/31/95
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James Landess (lan...@svpal.svpal.org) wrote:
> Tom L. Wallace (to...@jsb.com) wrote:

> : "Trick" and just about every other slang word I've seen here,
> : are actually borrowed from dirt motorcycle speak vintage 70`s.
> : Other then "unobtaniun" we havn't come up with anything new,
> : as far as I can see.

> Yes, and we didn't even come up with "unobtanium" (with an "m").

> : C'mon guys, an industry that can come up with peace signs
> : for brake stays can have a little more creativity and contribution
> : to the English Language!

I haven't seen peace sign brake stays. Maybe you're referring to the
peace sign brake hangers make by Ringle?

Kramer
P.S. Quit whining and add some new crap if you're unhappy with what you
see.

R.J.P. MacKinnon

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Apr 1, 1995, 3:00:00 AM4/1/95
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Here's some slang I've heard around here (Halifax, Nova Scotia,
Canada):
"sweet" - used in the same context as "trick"; usually used when
referring to a bike as a whole
"track!" - yelled at a rider ahead when you're trying to pass; if someone
yells this at you, either speed up or move out of the way

There's a whole list of "Norba Vocabulary" in the March 1994
issue of "Mountian Bike" magazine.
--
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rodrick J.P. MacKinnon | Find the hole in the fence.
rmac...@is.dal.ca | Sprint away like a delirious zoo animal.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

gch...@msu.oscs.montana.edu

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Apr 2, 1995, 4:00:00 AM4/2/95
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The term is used in either case, crash or crash-free. When Yeager and the rest
of the test guys that were in on the Bell X-1 speed of sound thing were trying
the break the sound barrier, they found that near speed of sound, the plane
and pilot experienced severe vibrations due the high speed and compression of
sound waves, and other funky physics things that I won't pretend to know
about....

Thanks for caring :)


Case

Wade Bortz

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Apr 2, 1995, 4:00:00 AM4/2/95
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My favorite has allways been the "head dab", which is an
extension of the "dab"; refers to those oh so enlightening moments when
your head is the first thing to hit the dirt.

"Crash and burn" applies to just about any sport; signifies a
particularily picturesque crash.

And finally, straight from William Nealy's Mountain Bike book,
there's this one:
"boned: to dynamically catch the nose of the seat in the posterior
portion of your anatomy. See "groinplant"."

Check out Nealys book - it's great, and he has seveal others on
whitewater kayaking, with slang glossaries included.


The Cybertiger

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Apr 4, 1995, 3:00:00 AM4/4/95
to
hey there.

I've heard this term before, but I'm not sure what it means. Hug the bunny?


Also, my contribution:
Tabletop: verb, to jump the bike and move the bike itself perpendicular to your
body.

thanks,

Anne
--
*mrowr* (\`--/') _ _______ .-r-. str...@pentagon.io.com
\ >.~.\ `` ` `,`,`. ,'_'~`. Ich habe das Auto gegessen, es hat gut.
(v_," ; `,-\ ; : ; \/,-~) \ visit the Cybertiger's Lair!
`--'_..),-/ ' ' '_.>-' )`.`.__.') http://www.io.com/user/stripes
FL((,((,__..'~~~~~~((,__..' `-..-' Cybertigers byte! Be 8 bit careful!


Lee Albert Green MD MPH

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Apr 9, 1995, 3:00:00 AM4/9/95
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R.J.P. MacKinnon (rmac...@is.dal.ca) wrote:

: "track!" - yelled at a rider ahead when you're trying to pass; if someone

: yells this at you, either speed up or move out of the way

"Track!", "Track up!", or "Track ahead!" is traditionally the polite way
of asking to pass in cross-country skiing. Many MTBers are also XC
skiers (at least around here), and it sounds like the phrase has made the
jump between sports. I use it, more or less reflexively; it was pretty
automatic, as I bike and ski the same trails.

BTW, if you're skiing and you hear "Track below!" it signifies someone
about to come down the hill toward you.

--
Lee Green MD MPH
Dept Family Practice
University of Michigan
gre...@umich.edu

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i.chang

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Apr 20, 1995, 3:00:00 AM4/20/95
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Table Top (n): flat section of a trail that can be used to launch your bike
and get mega air. Often caused by a root growing perpendicular to the
trail.


Pyramid (n): sticks and branches built up around a large log in the shape
of a pyramid to help bikers traverse large logs.

Kurt

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Apr 22, 1995, 3:00:00 AM4/22/95
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Face.plant (v)., to insert or set firmly in or on the ground.

===================================================
Kurt Bottger It's hard making predictions
Lincoln, NE especially about the future.
kbot...@delphi.com - Yogi Berra
===================================================

Cameron McKeel

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Apr 23, 1995, 3:00:00 AM4/23/95
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And then there's

Biffed - a direct hit. "I biffed it into a tree yesterday"

Spewwed - long and drawn out biff. "I lost my traction on the double track and
spewwed it for 20 feet."

Involuntary Dismount - going over the bars but being able to "run off"
and avoid the biff.

Yard Sale - Biffing so hard that you spread all your gear all over the trail so
it looks like a yard sale.

Dork - A stupid fall. "I was just messing around in the parking lot a just
dorked it right there." (usually seen with new SPD's)

Stroking - doing an all out climb where blood pressure and heart rate is at
critical levels. "Man, I was strokin' on that last climb!"

Zoned - Being completely tweaked on endorphins after a ride and having to ask
your buddy what he just said. "What was that? I was zoning!"

Any more out there?

Cameron

Brian H. Zygo

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Apr 23, 1995, 3:00:00 AM4/23/95
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Bloody Annoyed: When you've got a flat, have already used your spare
tube, the patches are useless, and you have to carry your bike back 5
miles back to the trailhead.

Steve Loukin

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Apr 23, 1995, 3:00:00 AM4/23/95
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"SUPERMAN"...name says it all....for about 1-2 seconds (then see "faceplant" (above)).


Matthew Clark

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May 1, 1995, 3:00:00 AM5/1/95
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My latest favorite:

Leaving a "crayon mark" : (more appropriate for roadies) Painting
the ground with flesh on a good wipeout (see Abdujaparov).

--Wouldn't be right to leave a good ride without a sacrificial offering
to the trail gods.


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