Getting old

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Joy Beeson

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Dec 3, 2021, 10:10:00 PM12/3/21
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I'm not making a map snippet for the well-worn route that I plan to
ride tomorrow, so I checked the map I always carry to make sure it was
appropriate.

It isn't a good map -- for openers, it's printed on coated paper meant
to show off full-color photographs, and the gloss makes it hard to
read one-color lines. Coated paper is also brittle, not at all
suitable for repeated folding and unfolding.

But it does show sufficient (barely!) detail in the area where I plan
to be, so I put it back into the cut-off newspaper sleeve and put it
back into the pannier. I haven't had reason to insulate a pannier
yet, so I can't slip it between the newspapers of the insulation.

I'm planning to buy frozen food tomorrow, but it's going to be cold
and I'll be almost home when I get to the grocery store.

Studying a map that I carry on general principles reminded me that I
used to carry a regional map in case I wandered into a county I hadn't
brought a county map for.

I hope to ride a few miles into Whitley County before spring, but to
venture into Marshal County I'd have to drive the truck to Nappanee or
Rentown, and I've never touched wheel to Noble or Elkhart.

--
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGESEW/
The above message is a Usenet post.

John B.

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Dec 3, 2021, 10:31:27 PM12/3/21
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Why not a hand phone map? I use OsmAnd
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OsmAnd
which has a free version and (I believe) runs on Iphones and Android
phones and shows streets/roads down to the small street in the
residential development that our house is on.
It navigates using GPS, which most phones have, and has both bicycle
and walking support.
--
Cheers,

John B.

Joy Beeson

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Dec 4, 2021, 10:11:16 PM12/4/21
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On Sat, 04 Dec 2021 10:31:20 +0700, John B. <sloc...@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Why not a hand phone map?

Because a hand phone is too huge to carry around and too teensy to be
of any use.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

John B.

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Dec 4, 2021, 11:40:44 PM12/4/21
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On Sat, 04 Dec 2021 22:11:13 -0500, Joy Beeson
<jbe...@invalid.net.invalid> wrote:

>On Sat, 04 Dec 2021 10:31:20 +0700, John B. <sloc...@gmail.com>
>wrote:
>
>> Why not a hand phone map?
>
>Because a hand phone is too huge to carry around and too teensy to be
>of any use.

I carry mine in one of the rear pockets in my cycling jersey and as
for small... wear glasses (:-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

Joy Beeson

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Dec 6, 2021, 11:26:28 PM12/6/21
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On Sun, 05 Dec 2021 11:40:35 +0700, John B. <sloc...@gmail.com>
wrote:

> I carry mine in one of the rear pockets in my cycling jersey and as
> for small... wear glasses (:-)

All three of my rear pockets are fully occupied -- the left one with a
pair of +3.25 glasses and a handkerchief.

More seriously, the screen on a smartphone is less than a quarter the
size of a map snippet, and the battery life is unusably short. One
can't, for example, read a book on one's smart phone while sitting out
an unexpected wait because one is going to need the phone to summone
one's ride when the wait is over.

John B.

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Dec 6, 2021, 11:48:53 PM12/6/21
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Yes, you are correct but my "bike phone" had no books loaded and was
simply a phone and a mapping device. And for pockets I carried, lets
see, a small purse with some money and my I.D. card, a smallish towel
for wiping sweat and my phone, and a small packet of something to
nibble on and in the rainy season a rain cloak, rather like a full
length gown. It all went in the three rear pockets without much
"stretching".

As for the small viewing screen and maps, I never remember riding
somewhere that I didn't know where I was going, at least in a general
way, so the map was more of a "is it this street or the next where I
turn for home".
--
Cheers,

John B.

Frank Krygowski

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Dec 7, 2021, 11:35:36 AM12/7/21
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On 12/6/2021 11:47 PM, John B. wrote:
>
>
> As for the small viewing screen and maps, I never remember riding
> somewhere that I didn't know where I was going, at least in a general
> way, so the map was more of a "is it this street or the next where I
> turn for home".


My riding has been much more, um, adventurous. I remember riding in
England, following a crappy "tourist" map that left out dozens of roads
and sent us over steep hills so tall they hosted microwave towers.

I remember trying to follow a map hand-drawn by a Tourist Information
lady, and riding a gravel road up a mountain in Ireland until we hit
barricades that stopped our progress and forced us to turn back. All
this was as a storm was blowing in.

I remember following a beautifully quiet road shown on a highly detailed
Ohio map, then finding that the road had been taken over by some sort of
mining company. We chose not to backtrack, so for miles we walked and
biked on some of the worst gravel I've encountered.

I remember being sent on a gravel road detour in North Dakota and
realizing that we were so remote, I couldn't even guess the direction of
the closest human being.

Perhaps I'm not as good a navigator as I like to think?

--
- Frank Krygowski

John B.

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Dec 7, 2021, 5:28:27 PM12/7/21
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I don't know about England but remember the maps that you could get at
every filling stations? I navigated across the U.S., admittedly in a
MG sports car using them.

What I did here for bicycling was go to the book store and buy a
proper map which you can get here by sections of the country and if I
was going to try a new route I'd first plot it on the "good Map" and
in one case even make notes "highway 1 to highway 2, etc.
--
Cheers,

John B.

Frank Krygowski

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Dec 7, 2021, 8:13:19 PM12/7/21
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I've used various maps at various times. Of course, I've used ordinary
county maps to navigate rides around here. And I was the prime mover on
our city's, then our Planning Organization's bike transportation map.

Way back in the 1980s, our state DOT Bicycling Coordinator hired
engineering student one summer to pore over detailed county maps. They
used traffic data and other information (in those pre-GIS days) to
choose "recommended roads" for touring cyclists, shooting for roughly a
grid with five mile spacing. I used the resulting maps for many decades.

For one tour (from the Ohio River to Lake Erie, following the route of
the historic canal) I used the Gazeteer book of super-detailed maps.
(They do one for every state.) That involved lots of detective work,
since I was trying to ride as close to the old canal route as possible,
and much of the southern part of its route is poorly documented. I was
scouring the map for things like "Canal Road" or "Lock Street."

For our Coast to Coast ride, I used Adventure Cycling's route maps for
their then-new Lewis & Clark route, at least for the western portion of
our ride. Those maps are usually excellent, showing not only well chosen
roads, but campgrounds, other lodging, bike shops, sources of food, and
even elevation profiles.

I've done some touring following U.S.G.S. Topo maps, the 1:250,000
series. In fact, if you dig back into the 1970s, you can find an article
I wrote for _Bicycling_ magazine explaining the use of topo maps. (That
was back when the magazine was interested in practical stuff, not just
gee-whiz technology and cycling fashion.)


--
- Frank Krygowski

Joy Beeson

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Dec 8, 2021, 11:16:39 PM12/8/21
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On Tue, 7 Dec 2021 11:35:34 -0500, Frank Krygowski
<frkr...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

> I remember following a beautifully quiet road shown on a highly detailed
> Ohio map,

I sent off for a lot of county maps when we were planning our trip
from Albany, New York, to Winona Lake, Indiana. (Ended up going
through Canada -- that was allowed back then -- and didn't need any of
the county maps.)

I think it was Ohio that had roads marked on the maps that were
labeled a couple of grades *below* "unimproved".

I'm not sure there wasn't one below "impassible".

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

Frank Krygowski

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Dec 9, 2021, 11:20:20 AM12/9/21
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On 12/8/2021 11:16 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:
> On Tue, 7 Dec 2021 11:35:34 -0500, Frank Krygowski
> <frkr...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>
>> I remember following a beautifully quiet road shown on a highly detailed
>> Ohio map,
>
> I sent off for a lot of county maps when we were planning our trip
> from Albany, New York, to Winona Lake, Indiana. (Ended up going
> through Canada -- that was allowed back then -- and didn't need any of
> the county maps.)
>
> I think it was Ohio that had roads marked on the maps that were
> labeled a couple of grades *below* "unimproved".
>
> I'm not sure there wasn't one below "impassible".

Oh, I've been on bad roads!

Back when I was strong, I took pride in _never_ walking a hill. Never!
Until on one multi-day tour, I tried climbing a steep gravel road out of
a valley. My legs and low gearing were adequate but traction failed me.
In fact, I had trouble pushing the bike up the steepest part of the grade.

Of course, that's not the last hill I've walked!

But it's not that uncommon to find roads marked on paper maps that don't
exist in real life. In some cases (like on certain city maps in my area)
the roads are legal rights of way, perhaps for intended housing
developments, that were never actually constructed.

Others are streets or roads that were gradually abandoned, or were well
along in that process. I remember once exploring such a "street" on my
bike ride to work. It was on the map and still sort of existed, but was
barely passable. (Google Maps now shows it as just a gap in the property
lines.)

And some missing roads are deliberate "errors" put into maps by their
publishers, intended to catch copyright violators. Or so I've read.


--
- Frank Krygowski
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