Google Groups no longer supports new Usenet posts or subscriptions. Historical content remains viewable.
Dismiss

Why do you buy Snap-on tools?

613 views
Skip to first unread message

Uwe Knie

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 12:43:29 PM4/17/03
to
Hey guys!

For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
tools, in contrast to other brands.
Do you buy just the quality, or an image the brand has, or additional
service compared to other companies, or convenience, or something
else?
Or why don't you buy Snap-on and prefer another brand (like Craftsman
or maybe European brands like Facom or Stahlwille etc.)?
Does a higher price pay off on the long run? Are you a pro or had you
been one?
It would be nice if you could get me a rough overview or some other
comments, which helps me with my research paper. Thanks a lot and
Happy Easter.

Uwe

Clark Magnuson

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 12:47:27 PM4/17/03
to
I buy used tools at garage sales.
I pay extra for Snap-on tools because they cost extra when they were new.
For wrenches I would pay:
Snap-on... $2
American made... $1
Taiwanese ... pass

Spehro Pefhany

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 1:48:06 PM4/17/03
to
On 17 Apr 2003 09:43:29 -0700, the renowned uwe....@web.de (Uwe Knie)
wrote:

>Hey guys!
>
>For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
>Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
>tools, in contrast to other brands.

I know some people (largely of the female persuasion) pay insane
prices for them in their fancy shopping mall stores because they think
they make nice gifts, and they think they are high quality because of
the insane prices.

Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
sp...@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com

Bill Higdon

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 1:51:33 PM4/17/03
to
Spehro Pefhany wrote:
> On 17 Apr 2003 09:43:29 -0700, the renowned uwe....@web.de (Uwe Knie)
> wrote:
>
>
>>Hey guys!
>>
>>For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
>>Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
>>tools, in contrast to other brands.
>
>
> I know some people (largely of the female persuasion) pay insane
> prices for them in their fancy shopping mall stores because they think
> they make nice gifts, and they think they are high quality because of
> the insane prices.
>
> Best regards,
> Spehro Pefhany

I know a technician at the Utah Army Aviation Support Facility (the Army
Guard Aviation Facility at Air Port 2) (West Jordan) that bought a
bunch because of a fast talking salesman, and "generous" credit.
Bill Higdon

The Older Gentleman

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 2:08:48 PM4/17/03
to
Uwe Knie <uwe....@web.de> wrote:

<snip>

When I buy them it's usually second-hand, if I can find them.

Why? Utter quality, feel good in the hand.


--
XJ900S 750SS SR500 CB400F ST70 GAGARPHOF#30
GHPOTHUF#1 WUSS#5 YTC#3 IHABWTJ#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 OSOS#1
BOF#30 www.btinternet.com/~Chateau.Murray/homepage2.html

Stuart

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 2:17:01 PM4/17/03
to
I am a Commercial Transport Mechanic, and I find most of my co-workers do
not buy Snap-On tools after their first purchase. When you are first
starting the truck shows up with a salesman who is friendly and ready to
give you a huge line of credit on tools. What alot of people don't really
realize at the start is that you can go to Sears, Canadian Tire, Home Depot
and get the same quality tool at a lower cost, and they also come with a
lifetime garentee. It has been my experience that Snap-On salesmen are
happy to sell you tools, but are very unhappy when you try to get warrenty.
As for Air Tools, You can get the exact same tools from Ingersol Rand, or
Chicago Pneumatics. ( IR or CP ).
From what I have found, talking to other mechanics, as long as you can get a
lifetime garentee, who cares about the brand name. And sometimes, if its
inexpensive enough, who cares about the garentee, sometimes you won't use a
tool very much.

Uwe, hmmm U&I Tools perhaps? VW Bug with a trailer?


"Uwe Knie" <uwe....@web.de> wrote in message
news:94672b91.0304...@posting.google.com...

Tom Gardner

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 2:05:49 PM4/17/03
to
1. I trust Snap-On with my knuckles
2. When I bought all my tools, the wagon jobber delivered and gave lots of
credit.
3. Shiny!
4. Mark of a pro...at one time that was important.

Did you know that Snap-on has a minimum of 300% mark-up?


"Uwe Knie" <uwe....@web.de> wrote in message
news:94672b91.0304...@posting.google.com...

Barnyard BOb --

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 2:24:48 PM4/17/03
to

>Or why don't you buy Snap-on and prefer another brand (like Craftsman
>or maybe European brands like Facom or Stahlwille etc.)?
>Does a higher price pay off on the long run? Are you a pro or had you
>been one?
>It would be nice if you could get me a rough overview or some other
>comments, which helps me with my research paper. Thanks a lot and
>Happy Easter.
>
>Uwe

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I've been on the planet for 64 years.
Been twisting wrenches much of my life.
Not a single one is Snap-On. However...

My flight instructor of choice is a retired Snap-On
dealer and is now quite wealthy...
and he didn't make it from flight instruction.


Craftsman BOb -

Kevin Bukowski

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 1:45:54 PM4/17/03
to
I purchase mostly craftsman. I have used both professionally and found that
I break just as many snap-on as craftsman. My reasoning is price. Snap-on
does have a few tools that other brands don't make. Most of the people I
know purchase snap-on just because of the name. They feel the more expensive
tools are better.

Just my opinion.

Kevin B.
SE Michigan

Walt LeRoy

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 2:41:58 PM4/17/03
to
In 1940 I bought a set of Snap-On sockets, long handle ratchet, and 6 inch
extension for $15. 50 cents down, and 50 cents per week. Of course over the
years I added many more. Used them daily as a heavy eqpt. mechanic for 42
years. They are still in fine working order and still in use in my little
home shop.
Walt

Stuart <taylo...@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:xcCna.147466$vs.16...@news3.calgary.shaw.ca...

RobertR237

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 2:41:38 PM4/17/03
to
I also purchase and use Craftsman for several basic reasons.

1. Good Basic Quality
2. Reasonable Price
3. Ready availability anywhere and just about anytime.
4. Lifetime Guarantee (and I have taken advantage of it on several occasions
even when a few of those occasions it was MY fault.)


Bob Reed
www.kisbuild.r-a-reed-assoc.com (KIS Builders Site)
KIS Cruiser in progress...Slow but steady progress....

"Ladies and Gentlemen, take my advice,
pull down your pants and Slide on the Ice!"
(M.A.S.H. Sidney Freedman)

Jeff Dantzler

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 2:43:47 PM4/17/03
to
I buy Snap-on because of feel, fit, and function. I also buy Mac, Matco,
Cornwell, S&K, Allen, Diamond, Proto, Craftsman etc. Most of these
tools are simple hand tools (wrenches, ratchets / sockets, pliers, snips,
screwdrivers etc.) for working on my motorcycle/car/bicycle/etc. I have a
huge pile of import hand tools for loaning out, giving away, and making
"scupture" out of when I'm bored. Crappy hand tools caused me many a
stripped fitting or busted knuckle before a friend introduced me to
Snap-on/etc.

I rarely buy hand tools new. I've gotten stuff from Ebay, pawn shops,
classified ads, and garage sales. I have only had to use the replacement
policy a few times and the guys in the truck have always been
accomodating. I don't usually pay more than 1/2 to 2/3 new price for used
tools.

I also have a weak spot for old tools that still work well. Brands
made in Chicago or other old steel towns that have long since been
gobbled up or gone out of business. Ones that are usually dirt cheap and
need 10 minutes with a wire wheel and then some oil. Often these end up
being far superior to most current tools.

Mainly I buy stuff that functions well so I can concentrate on the job at
hand.

As far as power tools go, I stick with name brands like Porter Cable or
Bosch, etc. I usually buy these new.

Snap-on power and air tools are often obscenely over-priced and are made
by someone else, with the Snap-on logo. Things like their MIG welders come
to mind as examples of stuff I wouldn't go near.

The tool truck guys have pretty aggressive marketing tactics and are
generous with credit. I have known more than one tech who got in way over
his head financing $10k+ worth of fancy tools.

I must say that I really like Snap-on toolboxes.

Cheers,

Jeff Dantzler
Seattle, WA

M. MacDonald

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 2:31:53 PM4/17/03
to
Sometimes they are "the only one" who has the certain tool for the job.
Like a 24mm hex socket for the really big stuff. Other than that, some
people need the tax write-off for their job. Oh, the credit line is good
too.
Mack


Flightdeck

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 3:02:39 PM4/17/03
to
Hi,

First complete set of Snap-On 35 years ago. At that time the quality was
top-notch, better than most, and they had some good specialty tools. It got
harder and harder to get replacement of broken or worn items without a
hassle and a very pushy sales pitch to buy more. But, I still have all of
the the ratchet wrenches and they are still silky smooth in operation.

I switched to "SK" for a while and then bought any brand that prove to have
good quality in specific items. Quality is important because a replacement
warrantee does you no good when it is 2230 hours and you need to finish a
job before morning. However, with other quality tools available, the price
of Snap-on is too high these days just to get a shiny native finish.

Mobile dealers seemed to come and go quickly for a while. One A&P mechanic
I know bought a full set of tools with tool boxes years ago right from the
truck when he got his first job with a major airline. The dealer took the
down payment, never filed the credit paperwork, and dissapeared. He phoned
Snap-on and they gave him a hard time (very snotty) before he could get it
through their heads that he wanted to give THEM money. He finally hung up
on them. Now, THAT turned out to be an inexpensive set of Snap-On for the
mechanic.

J

"Uwe Knie" <uwe....@web.de> wrote in message
news:94672b91.0304...@posting.google.com...

Sydney D. Hoeltzli

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 4:02:10 PM4/17/03
to
Uwe Knie wrote:

> For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
> Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
> tools, in contrast to other brands.
> Do you buy just the quality, or an image the brand has, or additional
> service compared to other companies, or convenience, or something
> else?

I have a Snap-on ratcheting screwdriver which is one my prize
possessions because it fits my hand better than other screwdrivers
I've met

I suppose that would be a reason like "superior design of tool"?

It's the only Snap-on tool we have, even most of the bits for
it are another brand but I wish we had another my husband keeps
stealing mine. I suppose I need to buy him one.

> Or why don't you buy Snap-on and prefer another brand (like Craftsman

Most of our hand tools are Craftsman because of the warranty and the
much lower price esp. if you hit a sale combined w/ extra "Craftsman
club" discount.

> Does a higher price pay off on the long run?

Higher price for Craftsman vs. some cheap stuff from Taiwan certainly
pays. Most of our cheaper tools have worn out by now. For something
not used much cheap might be fine.

> Are you a pro

No

FWIW
Sydney

Leon McAtee

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 3:16:48 PM4/17/03
to
>For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
>Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
>tools, in contrast to other brands.

When I made my living using tools I bought mostly Snap-On because it was the
most cost efective way. The time it took to search out other tools cost more
in the long run than Snap-On's higher price, they were usually of pretty good
quality. (except their screw drivers.... Sears lasts at least 4 times as
long), and the truck stopped by each week, and was also "on call" if you needed
something fast.

Warranty means little to a pro. Breakage is simply unacceptable.

Now that I have a good assortment of tools and don't make my primary income
from them I buy the most cost efective tool that will get the job done. This is
a slightly different set of parameters than when you are using themj
professionally. My second set of tools is primarly Sears.

My favorites are my Stahlwille - they fit where even Snap-On won't.

jim

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 3:30:36 PM4/17/03
to Uwe Knie
i dont buy snap on because it am not a pro and my living does not depend
on it..... but as a homeowner/handyperson who had been doing it for
about 40 yrs. i buy craftsman... the tools fit each time and are not the
general cheaper tools that break or bend when in use.. and it the
craftsman tool does break then you just bring it back to any sears store
and get a replacement on the spot.... i did and will continue to buy
some other brands, like when i needed to make a special wrench i did not
have on and the sears catalog did not show one.. i needed a 13 mm
open end wrench with a cureved handle.. something like an obstrction
wrench and could not find any 13 mm sized ones, only 1/2 in. 5/8 in,
9/16 in.. i then bought a cheap no name brand tool and heated it with
the act. torch and began to bend the handle to what shape i needed and
it worked fine and the cost of the tool was like $3.00 so it was
cost/cheap is what made me buy this wrench, but i only needed it one
time and if i was using it in a trade, jobe type operation i would have
went with the higher priced sears for quality..... i also figured the
lower quality no name brand would not take as much heat and would bend
quickeer and that is what i was looking for... i have some snap on
tools, but they were given to me i did not buy them as the delivery vans
that sell snapon only goes to places like repair shops, so i never
worked in any shops and never had much contact with these sale trucks...
that would be the major reason why i dont have any(that i bought)... the
second reason would be the higher cost and the lack of need for a
better quality tool....
thats about it...

kawasaki Bob

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 3:49:02 PM4/17/03
to

Uwe Knie wrote:

I buy Craftsman tool because of quality, availability, pluse you always
can find a Sears store.

Rick Sisney

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 4:52:07 PM4/17/03
to
>
>I have a Snap-on ratcheting screwdriver which is one my prize
>possessions because it fits my hand better than other screwdrivers
>I've met

That really is an incredible screwdriver. I couldn't part with mine.
Most of what I have purchased new from Snap-on are unique and superior design
items such as this.
I have a friend that was a Snap-on dealer. He described his job as 20% tool
salesman, 80% finance man. They basically will offer a huge credit line to
anyone with a job and a heartbeat. Of course, this creates a lot of time and
leg work chasing down payments, skips and repos and the expense has to be
absorbed somewhere. So, you have highly inflated retail prices.
Too bad they don't offer reasonable pricing for cash sales, and show an
interest rate for what it really is.
In answer to the original poster, I think most of the Snap-on sales comes from
a glistening box full of new tools rolling off the truck to anyone stupid
enough to sign the bottom line.
Rick S
OKR...@AOL.com

Bob Chilcoat

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 5:11:16 PM4/17/03
to
"Walt LeRoy" <wle...@darientel.net> wrote in message
news:lwCna.139$V2....@eagle.america.net...

> In 1940 I bought a set of Snap-On sockets, long handle ratchet, and 6 inch
> extension for $15. 50 cents down, and 50 cents per week. Of course over
the
> years I added many more. Used them daily as a heavy eqpt. mechanic for 42
> years. They are still in fine working order and still in use in my little
> home shop.
> Walt

So are the Craftsman tools I bought to start my box in 1960. The ones that
survived the infamous toolbox purge by my brothers when I was overseas in
graduate school, that is. The ones that are left are much better quality
than more recent Craftsman I've bought, but all are still guaranteed. I
have a few Snap-On sockets that I've collected, but the older Craftsman
sockets seem to have thinner walls and fit into tight places better. I
wouldn't pay the extra for Snap-On.

--
Bob (Chief Pilot, White Knuckle Airways)


Carl Byrns

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 5:19:27 PM4/17/03
to

I used to work as a mechanic and bought Snap-On (and Mac) at a time when
there was a huge difference in quality between the 'pro' tools and the
stuff Sears sold.
Today, the quality gap between the pro grades and the homeowner grades
is much narrower- the quality of some brands of home owner tools has
gotten much better, while the pro stuff has slipped a bit.

-Carl

Harry Balzak

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 5:32:13 PM4/17/03
to
Here's something to think about. What is the ratio of white snap on
salesman to black snap on sales man. I have never seen a black snap on
person in my life, in Detroit area.

Racist bastard company.


"Carl Byrns" <carl....@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:3E9F19C9...@verizon.net...

Kyle Boatright

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 5:48:54 PM4/17/03
to

"RobertR237" <rober...@aol.composit> wrote in message
news:20030417144138...@mb-m10.aol.com...

Craftsman hand tools (i.e. non-powered) are a fine value. Unfortunately,
their power tools are priced like *nice* power tools, but built like the
cheap ones. I will never buy another craftsman power tool.

I use Snap-On when I need a special tool. The local Sears just doesn't have
some of the neat/wierd stuff that comes in handy when you're in a jam.

KB


Kai St-Louis

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 4:34:11 PM4/17/03
to
Nifty calendars??

Kai


"Uwe Knie" <uwe....@web.de> a écrit dans le message de news:
94672b91.0304...@posting.google.com...

Mike Romain

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 6:15:08 PM4/17/03
to
I used to be a 'pro' back in the '70's and early 80's and used to buy
Snap-on parts from the mobile truck. My main set was a mix of other
brands, still with lifetime warranties on some of them.

I mostly bought specialty and high wear tools from them like a really
cool rad hose remover (I recently 'lost' it and am going to chase the
next mobile truck I see for another) and u-joint knuckles. Some high
wear sockets too. My knuckles are still thanking me... One ratchet
too, that still works smooth 20+ years later. They also were the first
I think to have 'wobbler' extentions that can be worth their weight in
gold somedays.

The main reason was convinience because the truck showed up. They had
cool stuff that was very time or knuckle saving so he got me as a
customer. I never had a warranty issue, never a question asked on a
return.

They also figured me out pretty quick. I only buy tools I need for a
specific job, so trying to sell me anything with my existing set was
pretty much useless.

I always paid cash and never even realized they offered credit (or
thought about it) until today.

I do believe the higher price is justified in lots of cases to have the
warranty and service I got. Especially when I was a mechanic in a small
town were the nearest city to shop was a 4 hour drive away. The local
hardware store sold junk. The no name sockets would split with less
than 100 ft lb on them and bang, off goes your knuckle...

Gotta give the mobile guys a lot of credit for that. I would maybe buy
or exchange something every 2-3 stops... I got charged the same prices
as the folks in the city.

One socket or screwdriver sure don't pay his gas.... Good job there were
other garages in town, or I never would have seen him.

Mike
86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00
88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's

TBBlakeley

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 7:01:58 PM4/17/03
to
>Here's something to think about. What is the ratio of white snap on
>salesman to black snap on sales man. I have never seen a black snap on
>person in my life, in Detroit area.
>
>Racist bastard company.
>

Maybe it's because the salesmen are working for themselves..I might be wrong,
just ask my wife, but to sell you must purchase a franchise...correct me if I
am wrong. This DOES NOT make Snap On a racist company. Trust me..I am sure
they will sell a franchise to anyone, green, purple or even polka dot....I
personally do not purchase Snap On as the price is a bit steep compared to
Craftsman.....Craftsman has worked for my family for decades.

TBBlakeley

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 7:04:35 PM4/17/03
to
>Craftsman hand tools (i.e. non-powered) are a fine value. Unfortunately,
>their power tools are priced like *nice* power tools, but built like the
>cheap ones. I will never buy another craftsman power tool.

I totally agree...I will NEVER buy a powered Craftsman tool.. This is a whole
different ball park compared to their hand tools.

Nick Funk

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 6:47:30 PM4/17/03
to
I buy Sear's Craftmens tool when they are on sale!

Etz

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 7:48:42 PM4/17/03
to
Spehro Pefhany wrote:
> I know some people (largely of the female persuasion) pay insane
> prices for them in their fancy shopping mall stores because they think
> they make nice gifts, and they think they are high quality because of
> the insane prices.


Would you please introduce me to some of these people?


Roy Hauer

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 8:00:26 PM4/17/03
to
I normally don't, but I did sort of come accross a pretty large lot of
Snap on Tools for free, and they are tools so what the heck. I really
do not like their wrenchs and some other items as trhey are too slick
to use if you have damp or oily hands. My personal choice is Easco or
Bonny or Blackhawk. All have lifetime waranty as well. Even KAL tools
have a lifetime warranty and are about 1/4th the price of a snapon
tool and are quite decent.


On Thu, 17 Apr 2003 17:47:30 -0500, Nick Funk <nf...@rtconline.com>
wrote:

>x<>-I buy Sear's Craftmens tool when they are on sale!
>x<>-
>x<>-
>x<>-Uwe Knie wrote:
>x<>-
>x<>->Hey guys!
>x<>->
>x<>->For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
>x<>->Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
>x<>->tools, in contrast to other brands.
>x<>->Do you buy just the quality, or an image the brand has, or additional
>x<>->service compared to other companies, or convenience, or something
>x<>->else?
>x<>->Or why don't you buy Snap-on and prefer another brand (like Craftsman
>x<>->or maybe European brands like Facom or Stahlwille etc.)?
>x<>->Does a higher price pay off on the long run? Are you a pro or had you
>x<>->been one?
>x<>->It would be nice if you could get me a rough overview or some other
>x<>->comments, which helps me with my research paper. Thanks a lot and
>x<>->Happy Easter.
>x<>->
>x<>->Uwe
>x<>->
>x<>->

--
Visit my website:
http://www.frugalmachinist.com
Contents: foundry and general metal working and lots of related projects.
Regards
Roy aka Chipmaker // Foxeye
Opinions are strictly those of my wife....I have had no input whatsoever.
Remove capital A from chipmAkr for correct email address

Nathan Nagel

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 8:05:46 PM4/17/03
to

Does she have a sister?

nate

JDupre5762

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 8:08:43 PM4/17/03
to
>For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
>Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
>tools, in contrast to other brands.

I buy Snap On hand tools for the quality and the convenience of having the
dealer show up every week. Though after 20 year I don't buy as much as I used
to. These are the tools that I can count on using every day. I have also
bought MAC tools as well for the same reasons. I have Craftsman tools as well
though generally they are larger wrenches that are nice to have but I use only
rarely. I will buy off brand tools that I can cut, bend and grind on to make
special ultra thin wrenches or sockets as needed for occasional use.

There are always some application that one company does not provide for. For
example Continental fuel injection nozzles take a half inch socket but the
interior of a Snap On 1/4 inch drive socket is milled incorrectly for the
application and won't reach the hex portion, a Craftsman socket will.

For air tools, multi meters and precision measuring tools I will generally go
with a better independent brand rather than buy a dealer name brand. Usually
the big dealers buy these things from a name maker and simply rebadge them and
charge more.

I think that Snap On hand tools have a definite edge in quality and feel to the
hand. Next I would put MAC and Matco as a tie for second and Cornwell and
Craftsman a close tie for third. I have seen Craftsman Professional Series
tools that seem to rival Snap On for fit and function but have no idea on long
term quality.

I have been told that Snap On is the only tool maker that makes tools from its
own forging equipment to packaging. Supposedly MAC, Matco, Craftsman and
Cornwell all use the same forging plant to make their tool blanks and then they
finish them in house. Does this arrangement really affect quality? I don't
know but you could ask Lycoming....

John Dupre'

Craig

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 8:13:40 PM4/17/03
to
uwe....@web.de (Uwe Knie) wrote in message news:<94672b91.0304...@posting.google.com>...
> Hey guys!

>
> For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
> Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
> tools, in contrast to other brands.

Besides all the other good reasons people have given, with the guys
that I bought from, they would gladly open the truck up at 3 in the
morning to replace a broken tool if I had an emergency. Try that with
Sears or any other big retailer.

Also, almost every time I've had a Crapsman tool that failed, I would
have to spend a couple of hours calling every store in a 75 mile
radius to find one that had a replacement and was open. They are
perpetually out of stock on about 90% of the tools that I have had
fail.
In over 22 years, the only Snap-On tool that I have had trouble with
is a 32 tooth, 1/4 drive ratchet. Had to overhaul it about 15 years
ago, and due to it being submerged in linseed oil and having been
severely used over the years, it is going to have to be done again
pretty soon.


Craig C.
cvair...@ev1.net

larry g

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 8:32:33 PM4/17/03
to
Two personal stories about Snap-On

When my father-in-law, a life long diesel mechanic, died in a car wreck the
Snap-On guy came in and bought any tool that we wanted to sell back at 75%
of current list price. Some of these tools were 30 years old and well used.
Probably cost a small fraction of the current price. Some of those 1" drive
sockets were over $100 each. Sears won't do that!

At work we were purchasing some new tool sets and took in bids from various
vendors as well as Snap-On industrial sales. Snap-On matched the Crapsman
bid so we went with Snap-On. If you can check out Industrial sales, they
will negoiciate!
lg
no neat sig line

"Uwe Knie" <uwe....@web.de> wrote in message
news:94672b91.0304...@posting.google.com...

> Hey guys!
>
> For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
> Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
> tools, in contrast to other brands.

> Do you buy just the quality, or an image the brand has, or additional

> service compared to other companies, or convenience, or something

> else?


> Or why don't you buy Snap-on and prefer another brand (like Craftsman

> or maybe European brands like Facom or Stahlwille etc.)?

> Does a higher price pay off on the long run? Are you a pro or had you

> been one?


> It would be nice if you could get me a rough overview or some other

> comments, which helps me with my research paper. Thanks a lot and

> Happy Easter.
>
> Uwe


James P Crombie

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 9:00:12 PM4/17/03
to
Been years since they had the good calenders. They arn't politialy
correct now. Grrrrrrrrrrrrr :-) Still have a couple in the basement
somewhere. And I also have some of the mugs from the earlier 90's with
the calender girls on them.

James P Crombie

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 9:12:59 PM4/17/03
to
We also had a deal with the Industrial Snap-On dealer, list less 25%
Fairly good deal and we used a fair bit of stuff at work. For myself I
have a set of 1/4 to 1-1/4 wrenches, and 4 sets of 3/8 drive sockets,
short and long in metric and sae. plus lots of other stuff. I got most
of the stuff through a company tool plan so I didn't have to go through
the snap-on credit thing. I use the tools every day and have never had
a problem with them. Most of my stuff is also the industrial(black
oxide) finish stuff as well. They stay in my toolbox and don't go
outside so I felt getting the chrome stuff was unnessesary plus there
was a $200 difference between the chrome and industrial finish wrench
set. It's not just for impact sockets :-)
I also think their screwdriver sets have the best handles I have seen.
Another plus I think is the speed in getting a replacement from the
dealer. I can call and usually have it the next day.

Dick Steel

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 9:30:07 PM4/17/03
to

"Nathan Nagel" <njn...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:3E9F41C5...@earthlink.net...

If there's a women out there buying Snap-On tools for guys I vote we make
her the newsgroup "Poster Girl."

Dick


Dick Steel

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 9:31:56 PM4/17/03
to

"The Older Gentleman" <chateau...@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:1ftkoeq.1fj...@dial81-135-63-53.in-addr.btopenworld.com...
> Uwe Knie <uwe....@web.de> wrote:
>
> <snip>
>
> When I buy them it's usually second-hand, if I can find them.
>
> Why? Utter quality, feel good in the hand.
>

Work all day with Snap-Ons and then work a day with anything else and tell
me which one make your hands the most sore.

Dick
>
> --
> XJ900S 750SS SR500 CB400F ST70 GAGARPHOF#30
> GHPOTHUF#1 WUSS#5 YTC#3 IHABWTJ#1 BOTAFOT#60 ANORAK#06 OSOS#1
> BOF#30 www.btinternet.com/~Chateau.Murray/homepage2.html


Burnout

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 9:40:24 PM4/17/03
to
On 17 Apr 2003 09:43:29 -0700, uwe....@web.de (Uwe Knie) wrote:

>Hey guys!
>
>For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
>Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
>tools, in contrast to other brands.
>Do you buy just the quality, or an image the brand has, or additional
>service compared to other companies, or convenience, or something
>else?
>Or why don't you buy Snap-on and prefer another brand (like Craftsman
>or maybe European brands like Facom or Stahlwille etc.)?
>Does a higher price pay off on the long run? Are you a pro or had you
>been one?
>It would be nice if you could get me a rough overview or some other
>comments, which helps me with my research paper. Thanks a lot and
>Happy Easter.
>
>Uwe


When I started out as an apprentice I bought Craftsman. Over the years
I learned there is a huge difference in tool quality. It isn't just
the replacement guarantee when you're making your living with tools.
Snap-On fits the fasteners better which means you don't wind up
working for free because your cheap socket rounded the nut off. They
also have a lot of trick tools that can save lots of time. And having
the truck come by every week is a big plus. Snap-On is expensive, but
when you make your living as a mechanic they're worth every penny. The
fact that I could be using the tools while I was still paying for them
helped too.
Craftsman may be the best deal for amateurs, but not when you're
trying to make a living.

Ace

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 9:40:34 PM4/17/03
to
First set of tools were basic Craftsman. After finding a deep socket
would not go onto a sparkplug, and getting a big hassle from the local
store, I started looking at Snapon.

Just a few days ago, I dug out the old Craftsman 1/2 inch drive and had
to get a screw driver to pry off the socket after I was finished. My
hands were clean and dry. Back when I used them in the "trade", and
hands were oily, etc. it was simply a pain in the ***.

The quality is in Snapon (or at least was).

Ace

Uwe Knie wrote:
>
> Hey guys!
>
> For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
> Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
> tools, in contrast to other brands.
> Do you buy just the quality, or an image the brand has, or additional
> service compared to other companies, or convenience, or something
> else?
> Or why don't you buy Snap-on and prefer another brand (like Craftsman
> or maybe European brands like Facom or Stahlwille etc.)?
> Does a higher price pay off on the long run? Are you a pro or had you
> been one?
> It would be nice if you could get me a rough overview or some other
> comments, which helps me with my research paper. Thanks a lot and
> Happy Easter.
>
> Uwe

--
----- ------

Many people receive advice; only the wise profit from it

**** author unknown ****

Barnyard BOb --

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 9:52:20 PM4/17/03
to

>> Why? Utter quality, feel good in the hand.
>>
>
>Work all day with Snap-Ons and then work a day with anything else and tell
>me which one make your hands the most sore.
>
>Dick
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Unless Snap-On has changed...
my hands thoroughly despise Snap-On ergonomics.
I'll take a Craftsman over the long haul, regardless of price.

Barnyard BOb - never sore, just sound that way.

Peter Dohm

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 10:02:34 PM4/17/03
to
Well, currently I don't, because I am not using tools much and don't work
on anything that gets used out in the weather, and therefore my Craftsman
tools are good enough; and my Snap-On tools were stolen a few years ago.

However, if I was doing any mechanical work, I would quickly buy Snap-On
again even though they are really inconvenient when you are not on their
route; because they get the job done efficiently and much more safely.

Their sockets, open ends, and box wrenches are all available in six point
and have strain releived corners; resulting in a very strong thin walled
tool. And their strain relief, for which they use the trade name "Flank
Drive", has the beneficial side effect of securely gripping some rather
badly damaged fasteners. In addition, they offer a wider range of socket
sizes for any given drive size than any one else that I know of. That's
especially usefull on aircraft and modern automobiles because so many
parts and assemblies are aluminum and the torque specifications are low
for the fastener size--so that you can use a smaller and more convenient
quarter inch drive in many places which would have required three eighths
inch drive if the major parts were steel.

Worth every penny if you're using them!

Just my .03
Inflation ya'know

Peter

Rich Ahrens

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 10:34:53 PM4/17/03
to
Spehro Pefhany wrote:
> On 17 Apr 2003 09:43:29 -0700, the renowned uwe....@web.de (Uwe Knie)

> wrote:
>
>
>>Hey guys!
>>
>>For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
>>Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
>>tools, in contrast to other brands.
>
>
> I know some people (largely of the female persuasion) pay insane
> prices for them in their fancy shopping mall stores because they think
> they make nice gifts, and they think they are high quality because of
> the insane prices.

You sure you're not thinking of strap-on tools?

Del Rawlins

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 10:10:21 PM4/17/03
to
On 17 Apr 2003 11:02 AM, Flightdeck posted the following:

> Mobile dealers seemed to come and go quickly for a while. One A&P
> mechanic I know bought a full set of tools with tool boxes years ago
> right from the truck when he got his first job with a major airline.
> The dealer took the down payment, never filed the credit paperwork,
> and dissapeared.

For a while, Snap-On was intentionally giving their mobile dealers an
insufficiently sized sales territory to stay in business. When a dealer
inevitably went out of business, they would repossess the truck and tool
inventory, and sell it to the next guy. There is a fairly well known
court case in which they got in trouble for doing this; I remember it
from one of my business law classes.

----------------------------------------------------
Del Rawlins- del@_kills_spammers_rawlinsbrothers.org
Remove _kills_spammers_ to reply via email.
Unofficial Bearhawk FAQ website:
http://www.rawlinsbrothers.org/bhfaq/

Dev Null

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 10:35:31 PM4/17/03
to
uwe....@web.de (Uwe Knie) wrote in
news:94672b91.0304...@posting.google.com:

> Hey guys!
>
> For a school research paper about hand and power tools in
> general and Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are
> buying Snap-on tools, in contrast to other brands.

> Do you buy just the quality, or an image the brand has, or
> additional service compared to other companies, or convenience,
> or something else?
> Or why don't you buy Snap-on and prefer another brand (like
> Craftsman or maybe European brands like Facom or Stahlwille
> etc.)? Does a higher price pay off on the long run? Are you a
> pro or had you been one?
> It would be nice if you could get me a rough overview or some
> other comments, which helps me with my research paper. Thanks a
> lot and Happy Easter.
>
> Uwe

Hello,
I buy the best tools I can afford regardless of brand. To say
specifically why I own many Snap-On tools, it's because I bought
them used and that's what was for sale. Since Snap-On is a defacto
sign of a professional mechanic, many mechanics who want to be seen
as professional buy them. Thus there are a lot of Snap-On tools
"in circulation."

I own MAC, Matco, Facom (GREAT ratchets!), PB Bauman, Acu-Min,
Chapman, Ingersoll-Rand, Milwaukee, Etc.

Some of the European brands look very nice but they are
impossible to find locally. They are even hard to find on the web
and very expensive. You just don't see many "All Stahlwille tools
now on sale!!!" ads (I've never even seen one!).

In general I will buy tools from companies whose reputation or
advertising convinces me that the tool offers better performance
than a competitor. If there is no significant difference then I
will buy the tool that is: 1. Available, 2. A better deal, or 3.
Totally rad.

And yes, I can tell the difference between using a top,
professional tool and a consumer grade tool. The general
difference is there is more "slop" with a consumer grade tool, and
they are usually heavier.

One interesting point is that this difference is much less
pronounced in electronic test equipment. I chose to buy a Protek
506 DMM for $140 instead of a Fluke 189 DMM for $300 (big
discount!) because I do not believe there will be $160 worth of
difference between the readings I get.


Carl Byrns

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 10:46:37 PM4/17/03
to

Harry Balzak wrote:
>
> Here's something to think about. What is the ratio of white snap on
> salesman to black snap on sales man. I have never seen a black snap on
> person in my life, in Detroit area.
>
> Racist bastard company.
>

Not likely.

-Carl

Ed Price

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 11:27:53 PM4/17/03
to

"Uwe Knie" <uwe....@web.de> wrote in message
news:94672b91.0304...@posting.google.com...
> Hey guys!
>
> For a school research paper about hand and power tools in general and
> Snap-on in special, I need to know, why people are buying Snap-on
> tools, in contrast to other brands.
> Do you buy just the quality, or an image the brand has, or additional
> service compared to other companies, or convenience, or something
> else?
> Or why don't you buy Snap-on and prefer another brand (like Craftsman
> or maybe European brands like Facom or Stahlwille etc.)?
> Does a higher price pay off on the long run? Are you a pro or had you
> been one?
> It would be nice if you could get me a rough overview or some other
> comments, which helps me with my research paper. Thanks a lot and
> Happy Easter.
>
> Uwe

I buy tools almost exclusively from Harbor Freight! Why?

1. I don't depend on the mechanical tools for my work; I'm not a mechanic.
2. I already own a core set of good tools (a mix, Snap On, SK, Craftsman,
Klein), which I have had nearly forever. They serve me well for my weekend
garage and home work.
3. The Red Chinese HF stuff varies widely in quality, but it's so cheap that
you can afford a big selection of those rarely used tools. And be honest,
rarely used tools obviously last a long time. I have had some HF tools
break, chip or dull quickly. But the great majority of their tools are
decent enough for my level of use.
4. The biggest reason is that I buy tools to replenish the tool selection
used in my company's electronics lab. In this setting, tools are rarely
abused, and the best economics is to have a lot of relatively cheap tools
available.
5. The lab always sees some tool loss due to theft and/or misplacement.

Why buy enduring quality when, typically, in a few months, the 7mm open-end
wrench is missing? If you bought a high end set like Snap On, it will piss
you off, and you will waste valuable peace of mind wondering who took it, or
who was dumb enough to lose it. Next thing you know, you'll start making
asinine written procedures for use and accountability of tools. Instead, go
to HF, and buy two more sets for less than $20. Actually, it's almost a fun
game; most tool thieves are too stuck up to bother stealing the HF tools.

Ed

RellikJM

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 11:44:02 PM4/17/03
to
I like the Snap-On tool line for a few of reasons.
1. I rounded a nut with a craftsman wrench and a Snap-On wrench took that
same rounded nut off. The wrench wasn't even Flank Drive.
2. The screwdriver handles. Also their ratcheting screwdrivers.
3. Website ordering.

--
RellikJM
RellikJM AT Yahoo DOT Com
Don't forget about my "FREE" EPROM programming !
Advice is only worth what you paid for it!

Canuck Bob

unread,
Apr 18, 2003, 12:53:02 AM4/18/03
to
For me it was the convienience of the mobile truck and the credit
program that let me buy the tools on time as an apprentice. As I am
no longer a pro mechanic I still enjoy using my Snap-on tools. The
sockets also had thinner walls and would fit aircraft nuts and bolts
that were countersunk slightly into castings. This meant I didn't
have to grind the sockets and thus void the warranty.

Steve Rayner

unread,
Apr 17, 2003, 10:26:47 PM4/17/03
to
Professional mechanics buy them because the dealer comes to them. When a
tool breaks, a replacement is just a phone call away. They are also one of
the few makers of quality thin wall socket wrenches. These will fit into
places, where a thick walled one would have to be ground, or machined down.


--
Steve Rayner.