Unusual Road Signs

18 views
Skip to first unread message

Kris Schludermann

unread,
Dec 30, 1993, 5:56:30 PM12/30/93
to
I was wondering about the unusual signs that different states put up slong
the roads. Like why does California give the elevation with everytown?
In texas frequently under the town name there is usually a sign that
posts 'water supply aprooved" or water supply Superior" i guess that
could be taken to indicate where it's safe to drink. Well what other interresting
signage is out there unique to a state?

kris

Jeff A. Kester

unread,
Dec 30, 1993, 7:01:54 PM12/30/93
to

Ayup, we've got a few good ones here in Massachusetts. Most of the local
town line signs state the incorporation date of the city/town
like:
"Incorporated 1634" I guess their proud of how old they
are around here.

----------------------------------------------------------------
| Jeff Kester | "The only time I open my |
| Product Development | mouth is when I have to |
| GreenWheels Electric Car Co. | change feet." |
| 181 Elliott St., #605 | |
| Beverly, MA 01915 USA | Internet: |
| Voice: (508) 927-7148 | kes...@northshore.ecosoft.com |
----------------------------------------------------------------

Peter Tang

unread,
Dec 31, 1993, 9:10:29 AM12/31/93
to
In article <CIvEE...@news.ssc.gov> qwe...@tunisia.ssc.gov (Kris Schludermann) writes:

>Well what other interresting signage is out there unique to a state?

While driving through Vermont I saw a few signs that said "Reduced salt
area".

--Peter

Neil G. Unger

unread,
Dec 31, 1993, 4:31:21 PM12/31/93
to

Somewhere between I-79 and Dubois, Pennsylvania, on Interstate 80
heading east, there is a sign which reads "Next modern facilities
45 miles" or some such mileage. Anybody from around there who
knows the area?

--
NEIL G. UNGER = "I'M SO EXCITED, AND I JUST CAN'T
PENN STATE UNIVERSITY = HIDE IT, I'M ABOUT TO LOSE
NGU...@PSUVM.PSU.EDU = CONTROL AND I THINK I LIKE IT."
CZ...@CLEVELAND.FREENET.EDU = - THE POINTER SISTERS

umbra

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 11:17:18 AM1/3/94
to
The funniest I know of was in Texas, they have a a traffic sign that says
"Obey all Traffic Signs" or something like that. Bit recursive don't
you think? A Godel sentence for sure.

joe
--
(UMBRA) Black as midnight,| UMBRA (jo...@iastate.edu) and The GREAT GRENDLE
Black as Pitch, Blacker |KHAN(arg...@iastate.edu) are now your internet
than the foulest witch |presidents. Please be patient while we prepare our
-BLIX |15 point plan to make internet a cool&froody place.

Scott Spetter

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 2:11:19 PM1/3/94
to
My personal favorite: I-5 in San Diego: "CRUISE SHIPS USE AIRPORT EXIT"

I wonder what CalTrans had in mind when that one went up.

And first runner up .... which may already be gone: On I-87 in upstate
New York, there was one that said: "EXIT XXX - TO BE BUILT"
(I don't remember which exit XXX) was.)

Happy New Year,

Scott

Gail Oxton

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 1:49:38 PM1/3/94
to
I like Texas' folding signs. In winter, they're open to the standard
sign of "Warning Watch for Ice on Bridge", and in summer, they're closed
but with a bumper sticker that says "Don't Mess With Texas", the
anti-litter campaign. Even if they didn't have the bumper sticker, I
like that fact that these signs close--who wants to see a warning about
ice in August when it's 102 outside!

---
--Gail
All comments are mine mine mine!! However, they may be borrowed
free-of-charge at your own risk for up to 2 weeks, $0.25/day late fee.

Dale Maurice

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 2:41:29 PM1/3/94
to
When I was going to School in England, there were two signs that
I always though were hilarious (especially when drunk):

One said, "ADVERSE CAMBER". haa haa.. what the hell is that :-)

And another that was a picture of a motorcycle overtop of a car,
with a red slash through it (supposed to be no vehicles), but when
drunk its: No motorcycles jumping over cars.

dale

--
_____________________________________________________________________________
Dale Maurice UNIX(tm) Systems Manager, Competitive Media Reporting
Virginia Beach, VA da...@infi.net, da...@adtellnet.com

Dale Maurice

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 2:44:35 PM1/3/94
to

Another funny one I just thought of, when getting on the
Penn/Ohio turnpike (forget the name of the town) there is
a billboard that says: "Buses, RVS, Salads."

E. Michael Smith

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 3:36:16 PM1/3/94
to
>In article <CIvEE...@news.ssc.gov> qwe...@tunisia.ssc.gov (Kris Schludermann) writes:
>
> >Well what other interresting signage is out there unique to a state?

Some of the best I've seen were in other countries. New Zealand
comes to mind... 'Side Track Ahead' (ever been side-tracked before?
They use this to mean 'Detour Ahead'. And then there was the rather
cryptic to Americans 'Metaled Road' that it turns out means 'Gravel
Road' and has nothing to do with Metal at all..

But my favorite was the sign at the (Australian?) rail road
grade/crossing that lead me to picture a crafty train hiding in the
bushes waiting for the un-suspecting motorist: "Beware of Train"
Never know when an evil train will be looking for the unwary to
pounce upon...

--

E. Michael Smith e...@apple.COM

'Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has
genius, power and magic in it.' - Goethe

I am not responsible nor is anyone else. Everything is disclaimed.

Chuck Charlton

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 3:50:38 PM1/3/94
to
I like the collection of signs on the on-ramp to I-780 from Military West
in Benicia, California, which say

Freeway Entrance

Toll Crossing

Free Direction

--
Chuck Charlton ch...@crl.com

E. Michael Smith

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 3:44:17 PM1/3/94
to

Oh, and there USED to be a sign where I-280 and I-101 intersected
in a freeway cloverleaf that advised the folks merging onto 280 from
101 who were merging with folks leaving 280 for 101: 'Weave'

This was intended to imply weaving as threads in a tapestry, it
often caused folks to think they were being advised to have a drink
or two before taking on the other freeway ;-)

This sign, alas, was taken down a few years ago due to lack of
understanding by the public and lack of humor by CalTrans...

Then there are the speed signs on Quito Road in Saratoga. Each
curve is precisely marked. One is 19 mph. Another is 16 mph, and 22...
Guess they were done by a precision freak... most curves out
here get a nice number rounded to the lower 5mph bound...

E. Michael Smith

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 3:55:36 PM1/3/94
to
In article <joebg.7...@vincent2.iastate.edu> jo...@iastate.edu (umbra) writes:
>The funniest I know of was in Texas, they have a a traffic sign that says
>"Obey all Traffic Signs" or something like that. Bit recursive don't
>you think? A Godel sentence for sure.

I saw something like this in Australia. It said, roughly:
"Obey the next traffic sign" It was a sign pointing out that
there was a sign coming up that you ought to read and follow...

Not a recursive sign, but still a bit of a Godel type of reference...

Andrew Fano

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 5:10:31 PM1/3/94
to
Once, driving with my grandmother who doesn't speak english very well, we
passed a sign which outraged her greatly. She knew New York was rude, but
she simply couldn't believe it had gotten to the point that there were
official road signs proclaiming: "GO SLOW BUM"

Scott N. Dickson

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 3:23:18 PM1/3/94
to
In article <CJ2K1...@wyvern.wyvern.com> da...@wyvern.wyvern.com (Dale Maurice) writes:
>When I was going to School in England, there were two signs that
>I always though were hilarious (especially when drunk):
>
>One said, "ADVERSE CAMBER". haa haa.. what the hell is that :-)
>
>And another that was a picture of a motorcycle overtop of a car,
>with a red slash through it (supposed to be no vehicles), but when
>drunk its: No motorcycles jumping over cars.

Yeah, those "slippery when wet" signs look like "tire-eating snakes
ahead".

Here in Indiana we have some old speed limit signs that say
Begin
50 mile
speed

I guess you need a good cruise control.

Clarke Ferber

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 6:31:48 PM1/3/94
to
In article <CJ2K1...@wyvern.wyvern.com>,

Dale Maurice <da...@wyvern.wyvern.com> wrote:
>When I was going to School in England, there were two signs that
>I always though were hilarious (especially when drunk):
>
>One said, "ADVERSE CAMBER". haa haa.. what the hell is that :-)
>
It means offset bank, where the road is banked with the curve so it's
easier to tip over.

-C


Bradford Kellogg

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 5:44:09 PM1/3/94
to

In Vermont, US Route 7 is THE major north/south route along the western
side. It carries a great deal of traffic from the Mass border to Canada.
Before the interstates, most everyone heading up that way would be looking
for Route 7. It goes through many centers of small towns and cities along
the way, and there were (and still are) numerous places where one could
stray off this route and on to something that might be called Mountain
Farm Road, which might turn into one lane washboard dirt and carry you
for miles until you reached a place that might be called Drummondville
Center, population 23.

In the interest of keeping cars with NY plates from running out of gas in
Drummondville Center, where the nearest gas station is 22 miles north by
northwest, the state apparently felt they should give the hapless outsider
a helpful hint by posting a sign.

I haven't seen this sign myself, but I heard from a believeable source
that there is (or was) a sign along some road in Vermont which announced:

This is not Route 7

- BK

Dave Orth

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 6:47:52 PM1/3/94
to
...or the sign over near University of Oregon that says:

"No movements on red light"

Tom Harwood

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 6:08:48 PM1/3/94
to
spe...@photon.swdc.stratus.com (Scott Spetter) writes:

>And first runner up .... which may already be gone: On I-87 in upstate
>New York, there was one that said: "EXIT XXX - TO BE BUILT"
>(I don't remember which exit XXX) was.)

Exit 7, I think. The sign has been there since 1968 [at least],
so I've never minded the Mass. DPW putzing around with their bridges
for a mere three years...

>Scott
--
Tom Harwood har...@bedford.progress.com

SELECT ":-)"
FROM Progress.Disclaimers;

Richard Hyde

unread,
Jan 3, 1994, 8:23:43 PM1/3/94
to

How about "SLOW CHILDREN AT PLAY" ?

Any kids I saw always looked like they were normal to me.

-r

--
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Richard Hyde | R...@netcom.com | This space intentionally left blank |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Merrill St. Marys

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 12:00:09 AM1/4/94
to
One I saw in Ontario at the edge of a subdivision of sorts:

CAUTION - Children being children.

clend...@usuhsb.ucc.usuhs.nnmc.navy.mil

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 11:42:24 AM1/4/94
to
My personal favorite is "HOT FAGS". It is usually a dark blue diamond
with dark red letters (almost illegible) and frequents roads crossing
active runways at Dhaka International Airport. The first time I saw that
one, I had to pull over, having just spent several hours adjusting to the
usual Bangli custom of draping oneself upon any known male in sight.

Jeff A. Kester

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 11:14:39 AM1/4/94
to

How `bout:
HIGHWAY ENDS
500 FEET

Ooo, I hate when that happens.

Then there's:
MEN IN TREES

I think the best traffic lights are in downtown Boston. See if you
can figure this mess out:

Red Light on top (on)
Yellow Light below it (on steady)
Yellow Light below it (blinking)
Green Arrow below it (blinking, pointing to 2 o'clock)

(It means: tonnage rules, good luck)
This is across from a 6 lane wide, one-way road on a 10 ft. high post,
at a 5 street intersection. Boston drivers aren't as terrible as most
folks believe, if we were, we'd all be dead by now.

Or, on I-94 Eastbound in SW Michigan:

CLIMAX
1 Mi.

Better hurry up, honey! (Geez, talk about weaving!! ;-) )

*Best I've seen so far on this list is Smith's "Beware of Train" :-)

--Jeff

Mark Crafts

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 1:30:51 PM1/4/94
to

>How `bout:
> HIGHWAY ENDS
> 500 FEET
>

I saw a sign like that once...

A friend and I were doing some exploring one night near Edisto Island, SC.
There's lots of dirt roads around, so we got used to seeing signs that
said "Road Ends 500 Feet" at which point the pavement would end and it
would continue on as a dirt road.

Well, we were driving along, saw the familiar sign and kept going.
As we continued it occurred to me that I couldn't see where the road
went, figuring it was a dip or a downgrade, I kept going. Suddenly I
realized where the road went! I stomped on the brakes and stopped about
20 feet from the end of the road. Whereupon it dropped down about 15
feet into a saltwater river! No signs other than the initial one,
no barricade or anything!

Mark

--
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
Mark Crafts :: mcr...@dale.ksc.nasa.gov
Harris Space Systems :: Melbourne, FL

Mike Jones

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 1:20:45 PM1/4/94
to

It was probably 8A, just north of Albany. It opened (finally) last week.

Mike Jones | jon...@crd.ge.com

Some years ago, when COBOL was the great white programming hope, one
heard much talk of the possibility of executives being able to read
programs...nobody can seriously have believed this! ...even programmers
do not read programs.
- Gerald Weinberg, The Psychology of Computer Programming


Greg Smith

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 1:19:27 PM1/4/94
to
A sign on I-71 near Cleveland, OH directs motorists to the "OIHO Turnpike."

Greg Smith
NCR/AT&T

Greg.N...@DaytonOH.NCR.COM

Opinions expressed don't necessarily represent those of NCR/AT&T

Douglas Tsang

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 2:54:52 PM1/4/94
to

Once I was in Maine on I-95. I saw a sign in a distance with rather small
letters. I kept staring at it trying to figure out what's on it.
When I passed by it, it read:

"Concentrate On Your Driving"

--
doug.

*****************************************
Douglas Hok-Chung Tsang
h...@lems.brown.edu

At mine unworthiness, that dare not offer
What I desire to give, and much less take
What I shall die to want
*****************************************

James=Utz%M...@bangate.compaq.com

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 3:03:22 PM1/4/94
to

In Texas, we have signs that tell drivers where
they can exit to find gas, food, hotels, etc. One said:

GAS FOOD LODGING

Galagher (the comedian) said:

"I thought that's what gas was?"

Later,
James

Bob Goudreau

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 2:22:52 PM1/4/94
to
>In article <CJ454...@northshore.ecosoft.com> kes...@northshore.ecosoft.com (Jeff A. Kester) writes:
>
>>How `bout:
>> HIGHWAY ENDS
>> 500 FEET

Is this really all that unusual?...


In article <1994Jan4.1...@dale.ksc.nasa.gov> mcr...@dale.ksc.nasa.gov (Mark Crafts) writes:
>
>A friend and I were doing some exploring one night near Edisto Island, SC.
>There's lots of dirt roads around, so we got used to seeing signs that
>said "Road Ends 500 Feet" at which point the pavement would end and it
>would continue on as a dirt road.
>
>Well, we were driving along, saw the familiar sign and kept going.

>...


>Whereupon it dropped down about 15 feet into a saltwater river!

This proves the danger of imprecise signs! I hope the SC DOT takes
note.

Here in NC, when a paved road becomes a dirt or gravel road, the
sign says "PAVEMENT ENDS". This is quite a different thing than
"ROAD ENDS" or "HIGHWAY ENDS", so it's important to use distinct
signs for each of the two situations.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Bob Goudreau Data General Corporation
goud...@dg-rtp.dg.com 62 Alexander Drive
+1 919 248 6231 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA

Sudhendar H

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 4:41:16 PM1/4/94
to
Route 2 from upstate NY to Boston which features a number of 'deer'
signs also features a "THICKLY SETTLED" signpost in Mass (near
Erving I think). I use this road almost once a month and am yet to
see anybody other than fellow motorists.

Beautiful road though, esp. in Fall.

Regards,
-sudhendar

Sterling McLane

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 3:38:51 PM1/4/94
to
In Hayward CA on I-880 there is an exit marked

A STREET DOWNTOWN

Seems they would have been able to give it a name by now :-)

*********************************************************************
* The above is my personal opinion and does not reflect an opionion *
* of Loral Corporation <Sterling McLane> *

*********************************************************************

Steven W. Engle

unread,
Jan 4, 1994, 11:37:54 PM1/4/94
to
jon...@crd.ge.com (Mike Jones) writes:

>In article 11...@stratus.SWDC.Stratus.COM, spe...@photon.swdc.stratus.com (Scott Spetter) writes:
>>My personal favorite: I-5 in San Diego: "CRUISE SHIPS USE AIRPORT EXIT"
>>
>>I wonder what CalTrans had in mind when that one went up.

My favorite is a sign I spotted somewhere between Houston and Austin (TX)
along some country road. It was suspended across the road, with six or so
short lengths of pipe suspended verfically along each side of the sign.
It's about 100 yards before a bridge.

IF YOU HIT THIS SIGN
YOU WILL HIT THE BRIDGE

What was so funny was the sign was an absolute wreck; bent, dented, and
scarred. Obviously hit many times. I don't know, maybe you had to be
there, but I ended up laughing so hard I about ended up in some farmer's
field.

Steve Engle
sen...@blkbox.com

Randy Casciola

unread,
Jan 5, 1994, 8:42:38 AM1/5/94
to
Well, I guess this sign isn't unusual, but I still don't quite get it.
It seems that on many rural W. Pennsylvania roads (and maybe in most
areas for that matter) under the speed limit sign they will put another
sign that says BEGIN or END. I understand the BEGIN part means that this
is a new speed limit, but the END part I don't understand. OK, so this
is the end of the area with speed limit XX, but what is the new limit?
Is it faster or slower?

Randy

Lorne Vaught

unread,
Jan 5, 1994, 10:23:29 AM1/5/94
to
In article <rahCJ2...@netcom.com> r...@netcom.com (Richard Hyde) writes:
>
>How about "SLOW CHILDREN AT PLAY" ?
>
>Any kids I saw always looked like they were normal to me.
>
>-r
How about this sign: "slow DEAF children at play"

That's sad. Doesn't this child have enough problems just being deaf? Now
he is slow too. Maybe this is one sign you should disobey?? ;)

--Lorne

Tom Reingold

unread,
Jan 5, 1994, 11:52:02 AM1/5/94
to
The road forks on Cape Cod, and the sign says, "Provincetown, either
way". Lots of accidents happen there because people can't decide.
Maybe they don't believe that it really doesn't matter which way they
go.
--
Tom Reingold
AT&T Bell Labs, Crawford Hill Facility, Holmdel, NJ, USA
to...@big.att.com or att!big!tommy

Dana Kamerud

unread,
Jan 5, 1994, 2:47:00 PM1/5/94
to
On I-696 in the Detroit suburbs there is a big sign declaring CENTERLINE, to
which the out-of-town motorist might legitimately respond "so what?". Locals
know that Centerline, Michigan is the suburb reached from the next exit.

+-------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Dana Bruce Kamerud, General Motors R & D Center, Warren MI 48090 (USA) |
| dkam...@cmsa.gmr.com -- phone 810 986-1335 -- fax 810 986-0574 |
| * ALL POSSIBLE DISCLAIMERS APPLY TO THIS MESSAGE * |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Guy Richard Spivack

unread,
Jan 5, 1994, 5:18:46 PM1/5/94
to


END of a posted speed limit usually means the new
limit is 55. For instance, you will be driving on
a 55 road, and you may come up to a town or an area
with more cross traffic, and a sign will say BEGIN 40.
When you are back to "open road", there will be a sign
that says END 40.

It may be that END means "revert to previous posted limit",
but I believe that always means 55. Personally, I'm with
you, if they're going to put up an "END 40" sign, why not
just put up a conventional "55" sign?

-Guy
spi...@hal.com

Lee Hetherington

unread,
Jan 5, 1994, 6:03:00 PM1/5/94
to
In article <2gfec6$5...@hal.com> spi...@hal.COM (Guy Richard Spivack) writes:
| It may be that END means "revert to previous posted limit",
| but I believe that always means 55. Personally, I'm with
| you, if they're going to put up an "END 40" sign, why not
| just put up a conventional "55" sign?

Vermont does this a lot too. However, since the state speed limit (for
non-interstates) is 50mph, "END 40" means 50mph. So, in general, "END
X" means revert to the default speed.
--

Lee Hetherington
i...@lcs.mit.edu

Joseph David Newhouse

unread,
Jan 5, 1994, 6:51:58 PM1/5/94
to
Randy Casciola (r...@ius4.ius.cs.cmu.edu) wrote:

: It seems that on many rural W. Pennsylvania roads (and maybe in most


: areas for that matter) under the speed limit sign they will put another
: sign that says BEGIN or END. I understand the BEGIN part means that this
: is a new speed limit, but the END part I don't understand. OK, so this
: is the end of the area with speed limit XX, but what is the new limit?
: Is it faster or slower?

I think that the default speed limit on rural Pennsylvania roads is 55 MPH,
so when the other speed limit "ends" (usually when you are exiting a village),
it is back up to 55 again.

--
Joseph Newhouse
sra...@wam.umd.edu

_________________
/ /| | |\
/ / | | | \
_____________/ /____|_______|______|____\________________
/ Dodge |_ -- | -- | DART___ O
/ _____ \ | | / \ |
//____________/ o \_|_________|___________|___| o |_______|
\___/ \___/

W. A. Jeffers, Lafayette College

unread,
Jan 6, 1994, 9:35:46 AM1/6/94
to
I don't know if it's still there or not, but there used to be a
large green sign at a town line in Connecticut (along the Merritt
Parkway, as I recall) which boldly proclaimed "THIS IS ORANGE."

ronald.r.tirados

unread,
Jan 6, 1994, 1:34:15 PM1/6/94
to

Back in the 1970's this was once a sign on a NJ local road...


=============================
| Two way lane road. |
| But if today is Sunday |
| its One Way. You're going |
| the wrong direction. |
=============================

131P10000-FranklinKL(DR8219)252

unread,
Jan 6, 1994, 1:52:54 PM1/6/94
to
In article <2gfec6$5...@hal.com> spi...@hal.COM (Guy Richard Spivack) writes:
>

You may get in trouble with the assumption that the "END" sign always
means return to a 55 mph limit. In many areas of the country, the
speed limits are blanketly defined unless otherwise posted. In
Colorado, for example, the motor vehicle code specifies that the
speed limit on mountain roads is 40 mph unless otherwise posted.
The implication here is that if ther is no posted limit on a mountain
road, the limit is 40 mph. An END xx sign would therefore indicate a
return to a 40 mph limit.

Lesley Walker

unread,
Jan 6, 1994, 9:21:55 PM1/6/94
to
E. Michael Smith <e...@michael.apple.com (E. Michael Smith)> wrote:
>
> Some of the best I've seen were in other countries. New Zealand
> comes to mind... 'Side Track Ahead' (ever been side-tracked before?

How many million years ago was this? I've done a far amount of driving
in all parts of NZ, I've been a driver for 16 years, and I've *never*
seen a sign like that.

> They use this to mean 'Detour Ahead'. And then there was the rather
> cryptic to Americans 'Metaled Road' that it turns out means 'Gravel
> Road' and has nothing to do with Metal at all..

Cryptic to me, too! I have never been able to figure out why some
people call that stuff "metal". Perhaps it's a British-ism?

> But my favorite was the sign at the (Australian?) rail road
> grade/crossing that lead me to picture a crafty train hiding in the
> bushes waiting for the un-suspecting motorist: "Beware of Train"
> Never know when an evil train will be looking for the unwary to
> pounce upon...

We should adopt that one here. Have you heard how many level crossing
crashes we've been having recently?

Actually, most of our signs are now the cryptic pictorial international
ones. I don't think this is a good thing, because for visitors from
overseas, different signage used to be yet another reminder of being in
a different country where they drive on the other side of the road.


--
Lesley Walker The Turtle moves! \ Yamaha XV1000
(aka The Leather Goddess) \ Yamaha XV1000
Wellington, New Zealand. les...@actrix.gen.nz \ DoD#258

Lesley Walker

unread,
Jan 6, 1994, 9:37:06 PM1/6/94
to
Bob Goudreau <goud...@batman.rtp.dg.com (Bob Goudreau)> wrote:
>
> Here in NC, when a paved road becomes a dirt or gravel road, the
> sign says "PAVEMENT ENDS". This is quite a different thing than
> "ROAD ENDS" or "HIGHWAY ENDS", so it's important to use distinct
> signs for each of the two situations.

Our equivalent sign says SEAL ENDS, or it used, last time I saw one.
I always wondered how the seals got on without their ends.

Craig Boyle

unread,
Jan 6, 1994, 11:49:16 PM1/6/94
to
In article <CJ8n9...@actrix.gen.nz> lea...@phobos.actrix.gen.nz writes:
>Bob Goudreau <goud...@batman.rtp.dg.com (Bob Goudreau)> wrote:
>>
>> Here in NC, when a paved road becomes a dirt or gravel road, the
>> sign says "PAVEMENT ENDS". This is quite a different thing than
>> "ROAD ENDS" or "HIGHWAY ENDS", so it's important to use distinct
>> signs for each of the two situations.

They use "PAVEMENT ENDS" in Texas too. I come from the UK, where
pavement means sidewalk. The first time I saw "pavement ends",
I though "why do I care?", I soon found out!

Craig

Chip Gandy

unread,
Jan 5, 1994, 9:09:00 PM1/5/94
to
UM->The funniest I know of was in Texas, they have a a traffic sign that says
UM->"Obey all Traffic Signs" or something like that. Bit recursive don't
UM->you think? A Godel sentence for sure.

i've got a better one. one night, a buddy of mine and i were driving
around, and we were going down this little side street. anyways, we
were abotu to turn onto a major road, and under the stop sign, there was
another sign that said "speed limit 30" we both kinda went HUH? and as
we got closer to it, the sign CHANGED to read no left turn. well, we
backued up, and looked again, and again. finally realizing that they
did an AWFUL job of reusing the previous speed limit sign.

also, here's another one. on the campus of the a college in abalama
<sic> there was a sign outside the visitor's info center that was a
large blue sign, with a single question mark on it. i want to go back
and claim that sign for my room. :)
---
. SLMR 2.1a . [*] <---- Tribble wearing headphones.

jwg

unread,
Jan 7, 1994, 8:38:50 AM1/7/94
to
In article <CJ2H...@skopen.dseg.ti.com> ox...@skopen.dseg.ti.com (Gail Oxton) writes:
I like Texas' folding signs. In winter, they're open to the standard
sign of "Warning Watch for Ice on Bridge", and in summer, they're closed
but with a bumper sticker that says "Don't Mess With Texas", the
anti-litter campaign. Even if they didn't have the bumper sticker, I
like that fact that these signs close--who wants to see a warning about
ice in August when it's 102 outside!

Our ice-warning signs in Indiana are visible year-round; I remember as a
youngster being very confused. "Dad, why should you have to watch for
ice on the bridge when it's 87 degrees?" The folding sign idea sounds neato.

--

jim grey |beebeebumbleandthestingersmottthehooplerachelsingerslonnie
j...@acd4.acd.com |mackandtwangandeddiehere'smyringwe'regoingsteadytakeiteasy

jwg

unread,
Jan 7, 1994, 9:17:14 AM1/7/94
to
A friend and I were doing some exploring one night near Edisto Island, SC.
There's lots of dirt roads around, so we got used to seeing signs that
said "Road Ends 500 Feet" at which point the pavement would end and it
would continue on as a dirt road.

Well, we were driving along, saw the familiar sign and kept going.
As we continued it occurred to me that I couldn't see where the road
went, figuring it was a dip or a downgrade, I kept going. Suddenly I
realized where the road went! I stomped on the brakes and stopped about
20 feet from the end of the road. Whereupon it dropped down about 15
feet into a saltwater river! No signs other than the initial one,
no barricade or anything!

This reminds me of a particularly scary thing that happened to me once
on a return trip from New Jersey back to Indiana. I got very, very tired of
I-70, so just after entering Ohio I dumped off onto US 40. Boy, did that
ever slow me down, because that road winds through every dot on the map. I
was ready to bail out of that situation, so I consulted Rand McNally, which
showed an exit off 40 onto 70 where the two roads intersected oh, say, 40
miles east of Columbus. Looked good to me. Heck, it even showed that the
road widened to 4 lanes a few miles ahead of the exit.

I come to an intersection. There's a sign that says, "<-- To I70", and
on the other side of the intersection I see the road widen to 4 lanes. Happy
to be free of the two-lane, I goosed it and was cruising at a good 70 mph.
I thought it strange that I had the road to myself; no traffic in either
direction. About then I noticed that all the road signs were either covered
with tarps, or were blank! I was starting to become very concerned about
all this when I rounded a curve and found myself staring at a hillside...
into which the road abruptly ended! I slammed on the brakes. Rand McNally
was wrong. 40 and 70 intersected all right, but only conceptually. 70
was built *on top of* 40. They carted in a gigantic mound of dirt, plopped
it down on that section of 40, packed it down good, paved the top of it,
and called it the Interstate.

The whole thing scared the beejeebees out of me.

Michael D. Griffin

unread,
Jan 7, 1994, 11:33:05 AM1/7/94
to
I sure these must have appeared, but I can't resist..

Sign says: *25 MEN WORKING*....come on, I've NEVER seen 25 men working
there..standing around, watching yeah, but working NOT.

Sign says: *SLOW MEN WORKING*....much more accurate.

Bob Goudreau

unread,
Jan 7, 1994, 12:13:23 PM1/7/94
to
In article <1994Jan7.0...@cactus.org> bo...@cactus.org (Craig Boyle) writes:
>
>They use "PAVEMENT ENDS" in Texas too. I come from the UK, where
>pavement means sidewalk. The first time I saw "pavement ends",
>I though "why do I care?", I soon found out!

So what do Britons call the class of substances used to pave roads,
if "pavement" can't be used for that purpose? Words like "asphalt",
"macadam" and "concrete" all refer to specific materials; is there
a British term for the class as a whole?

Rob Hasker

unread,
Jan 7, 1994, 2:00:48 PM1/7/94
to
j...@SEDV1.acd4.acd.com (jwg) writes:

>In article <CJ2H...@skopen.dseg.ti.com> ox...@skopen.dseg.ti.com (Gail Oxton) writes:
>
>Our ice-warning signs in Indiana are visible year-round; I remember as a
>youngster being very confused. "Dad, why should you have to watch for
>ice on the bridge when it's 87 degrees?" The folding sign idea sounds neato.

Given my experiences with Indiana's DOT, folding signs would be a real
hazzard: they'd never get opened up soon enough to help (the DOT would
probably just watch the accident reports to decide when to open them :-).
Besides, the signs would have to be open 9 months out of 12 since you
can have cold snaps pretty close to the summer months, at least north
of Indianapolis.

My favorite signs are the ones on the bridges in Michigan's upper peninsula.
All of these little, ten-foot bridges have a sign on them giving pictures
of three types of trucks (0, 1, or 2 trailers) with weight limits. These
limits were somewhat amusing: you'd see numbers like 105 tons. (First,
I was surprised, though willing to believe, that some trucks weigh more.
Second, are they claiming that the bridge will fail if someone drives a
110 ton truck over it?)

Rob

Unknown

unread,
Jan 7, 1994, 4:08:00 PM1/7/94
to

>
> Yeah, those "slippery when wet" signs look like "tire-eating snakes
> ahead".
>
>


I thought those signs meant to "burn rubber"!!

Or the ones that have the car slightly tipped with the tire marks meant:
"female* driver ahead" *or put in any other applicable victim.

(I know in this day of political correctness, I should not say things
like this but after all I'm only joking.) (My wife is a much better driver
than I)

Steve Wall

unread,
Jan 7, 1994, 12:42:16 PM1/7/94
to
Here in New Jersey, (USA) the legislature created what they call "Drug
Free School Zones", which surround a school building for a few hundred
yards in each direction. Possession or distribution of illegal drugs
within these zones carries a higher penalty. As you enter these zones,
you pass signs informing you that you just entered a drug free school zone.
So far, so good. But it's always bothered me that they don't also post
signs for entering a "School Free Drug Zone" when you exit the school zone.
It just isn't fair. :-)

--
Steve Wall

Craig Boyle

unread,
Jan 7, 1994, 9:39:45 PM1/7/94
to
In article <1994Jan7....@dg-rtp.dg.com> goud...@batman.rtp.dg.com (Bob Goudreau) writes:
>So what do Britons call the class of substances used to pave roads,
>if "pavement" can't be used for that purpose? Words like "asphalt",
>"macadam" and "concrete" all refer to specific materials; is there
>a British term for the class as a whole?

I don't recall. Perhaps "tarmac"? Tarmac = Tarmacadam = macadam which
is the name of the inventor of this stuff.

Craig

The Leather Goddess

unread,
Jan 8, 1994, 5:41:17 AM1/8/94
to
bo...@cactus.org (Craig Boyle) writes:

>They use "PAVEMENT ENDS" in Texas too. I come from the UK, where
>pavement means sidewalk.

Both of those mean "footpath" here!

Words for the actual road surface are seal, tarseal, and less commonly,
bitumen or tarmac.


--
The Leather Goddess The Turtle moves! \ Yamaha XV1000
(aka Lesley Walker) lea...@phobos.actrix.gen.nz \ Yamaha XS650


Wellington, New Zealand. les...@actrix.gen.nz \ DoD#258

c=nz,a=gcsmail,p=gcs,o=gcs,s=walker,g=lesley

Nessa

unread,
Jan 9, 1994, 7:28:45 PM1/9/94
to

Because they are trying to immitate the European method of posting speed
limits but since we don't use the grey circle/slash signs for the national
limit we have to resort to such vague things a "END 40" and the like. ;)
--
Brian & 'Nessa (watched over by) Priscilla & Herman (carpet sharks)
"Maybe it's a gift, a special talent that I, alone, possess!" --Wembley
"Maybe it's a curse, a special weirdness that only you are stuck with!" --Red

Nessa

unread,
Jan 9, 1994, 7:36:52 PM1/9/94
to
bo...@cactus.org (Craig Boyle) writes:
>In article <1994Jan7....@dg-rtp.dg.com> goud...@batman.rtp.dg.com (Bob Goudreau) writes:
>>So what do Britons call the class of substances used to pave roads,
>>if "pavement" can't be used for that purpose? Words like "asphalt",
>>"macadam" and "concrete" all refer to specific materials; is there
>>a British term for the class as a whole?

>I don't recall. Perhaps "tarmac"? Tarmac = Tarmacadam = macadam which
>is the name of the inventor of this stuff.

Yes, this is correct. My wife and I have this discussion when she first
came to the states. She agrees, when she is not being difficult, that the
term sidewalk is probably best for that surface. Then, you can call the
road surface whatever you want. :)

Rama Nambimadom

unread,
Jan 9, 1994, 8:40:52 PM1/9/94
to

FOR SALE

1986 TOYOTA CELICA GT

HAS NEW ENGINE, NEW BATTERY, NEW MUFFLER, 2 NEW TIRES

FULLY LOADED, FEATURES INCLUDE

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION

POWER STEERING, BRAKES, LOCKS AND WINDOWS

AIR CONDITION

AM/FM CASSETTE STEREO

111 K MILES (0NLY 62K MILES ON NEW ENGINE, WHICH IS AN 87 ENGINE AND MORE
POWERFUL THAN THE ORIGINAL 86 VERSION)

EXCELLENT CONDITION, GREAT FUN TO DRIVE

WELL MAINTAINED (ALL RECEIPTS AVAILABLE)

ASKING $2800 (LESS THAN WHOLESALE PRICE IN ALL THE USED CAR BOOKS THAT I HAVE
SEEN)

CONTACT (216) 295 2039,
email r...@po.cwru.edu

Rama

mrf...@gecko.mits.com.au

unread,
Jan 9, 1994, 9:09:22 PM1/9/94
to

The Best road Sign I ever heard about from a friend was one that read


TREE FELLERS AHEAD


She then stopped and asked the road gang, (in her best Irish brogue)

"I looked to be sure, but i didn't see no three fellows."

It was along the Olinda tourist track, Dandenong ranges Melbourne Victoria
Australia. The signs now now read

TREE LOPPERS AHEAD.

Along the same vein, some years ago they altered all the road signs that read

MEN AT WORK

to

WORKMEN AHEAD

due (possibly) to the number of jokes made.

Regards Richard Farnsworth

Internet: ric...@mits.com.au PSI Mail: psi%0505238730004::richard

Craig Boyle

unread,
Jan 10, 1994, 12:16:07 AM1/10/94
to
In article <nessie.7...@sage.cc.purdue.edu> nes...@sage.cc.purdue.edu (Nessa) writes:
>Because they are trying to immitate the European method of posting speed
>limits but since we don't use the grey circle/slash signs for the national
>limit we have to resort to such vague things a "END 40" and the like. ;)

This grey circle/slash that you refer to is undoubtedly the most beautiful
sign ever invented, when viewed on an Autobahn it means *no speed limit*

Craig

C Phelan

unread,
Jan 11, 1994, 6:42:59 PM1/11/94
to
j...@SEDV1.acd4.acd.com (jwg) writes:

>In article <CJ2H...@skopen.dseg.ti.com> ox...@skopen.dseg.ti.com (Gail Oxton) writes:
> I like Texas' folding signs. In winter, they're open to the standard
> sign of "Warning Watch for Ice on Bridge", and in summer, they're closed
> but with a bumper sticker that says "Don't Mess With Texas", the
> anti-litter campaign. Even if they didn't have the bumper sticker, I
> like that fact that these signs close--who wants to see a warning about
> ice in August when it's 102 outside!

>Our ice-warning signs in Indiana are visible year-round; I remember as a
>youngster being very confused. "Dad, why should you have to watch for
>ice on the bridge when it's 87 degrees?" The folding sign idea sounds neato.

In Pennsylvania, there is the sign

BRIDGE FREEZES BEFORE ROAD SURFACE

It took me forever to figure out what this meant. I thought maybe as you
got to the end of the bridge (just before you got back to the road surface)
things could get icy.


Andy Lynn

unread,
Jan 11, 1994, 10:10:28 PM1/11/94
to

I missed some of this, but I can't resist posting my favorite sign:

PROTECT
xxx
OUR CHILDREN

The kicker is that the sign was sponsored by the local MOOSE lodge and
the "xxx" was a full color drawing of a Moose which had a nose the size of
the state of Maine. Looked like Bullwinkle on steroids, with an evil glint
in its eyes.

This sign was not uncommon in central Virginia circa 1978.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Andy Lynn | Jesus said, "Have you found the beginning, then,
Teratec Systems, Inc. | that you are looking for the end? You see,the end
<al...@maxim.com> | will be where the beginning is. Congratulations to
| the one who stands at the beginning: that one will
IMPUTE NO ONE ELSE! | know the end and will not taste death."
| Gospel of Thomas 18
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Renaissance Man

unread,
Jan 12, 1994, 9:49:01 PM1/12/94
to

Personally, I kind of like the sign you encounter on Highway 1, here in
California, driving south from Monterey. It looks something like this:

__
/ \
/ ) \
/ ( \
/ ) \
/ ( \
\__________/
---------------
| NEXT 63 MILES |
---------------

It's the 'Next 63 miles' that gets me. :-)


--
"I am the NRA." \ "Ultimately, the strongest argument for the people
Alaric Tekiahyn \ to retain the right to keep and bear arms, is to
ala...@netcom.com \ protect themselves against tyranny in government."
The Renaissance Man \ -- Thomas Jefferson

David

unread,
Feb 25, 1994, 11:03:02 PM2/25/94
to
A couple of real stories, from Birmingham, Alabama:

There was a big redwood-stained sign erected by concerned parents in a
residential area that became a rush-hour shortcut. It read,

43 - 44 - 47 - 50 Children Playing Ahead (each previous number was x'd out)

Someone came along, x'd out the 50, and wrote, "Oops-49"

Another, was a residential street sign (standard green metal sign on
galvanized post) named, "Red Bud Lane". Every couple of weeks, the Public
Works would replace it, and every couple of weeks, a stoner would steal it,
presumably displaying the trophy in his bedroom. After awhile, PW just gave
up.

David Liberman
"Remember, Altitude is your Friend"

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages