Ford OEM Keychain

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devnu11

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Dec 24, 2004, 10:00:27 AM12/24/04
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I'm trying to purchase a Ford Keychain like you would get when you bought a
new Explorer from the dealer. It was silver and had "Explorer" engraved on
the oval tube which was in the center and it had a ring on each end, one of
which would snap free.

There was an address in the owners manual where you could order additional
keychains but I don't have the older manuals. I have checked the manuals at
this link:
http://www.motorcraftservice.com/vdirs/ownerlit/default_retail.asp?year=1996&vehCode=exp
but haven't located any information.

Does anyone have the address and information or know where I can acquire one
of these Ford keychains?
TIA.


Fred 2

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Dec 24, 2004, 11:12:09 AM12/24/04
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There is a post card that come in the owner's manual package, the
address is:

Ford Truck Regisration Headquarters
P.O. Box 760546
Latthrup Village, Michigan, 48076-9851

or call 800-735-0482

$15.00 each

Jim Warman

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Dec 24, 2004, 5:37:54 PM12/24/04
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Try your dealers parts "showroom". Our store has many gewgaws on display...


"devnu11" <n...@0ne.org> wrote in message
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John Riggs

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Dec 24, 2004, 8:26:59 PM12/24/04
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You wouldn't happen to be a black powder shooter would you, Jim. The
only place I seem to hear the term "gewgaw" is around the reenactors and
muzzle loaders.


"Jim Warman" <mech...@telusplanet.net> wrote in message
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Jim Warman

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Dec 24, 2004, 9:42:45 PM12/24/04
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I went black powder shooting 4 or 5 times backs in the '70s - meaning I
learned "gewgaw" in ordinary life rather than in black powder. Most everyone
at work is much younger than I..... Being the oldest person in the building
and having a decent sense of humour has me creditted with inventing things
like muzzle loaders, electricity and such as well as the odd dig about doing
warranty repairs on the Model A 8^)


John Riggs

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Dec 25, 2004, 2:41:05 AM12/25/04
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At least you don't hold the patent on dirt....besides, how old can you
be anyway?

Merry Christmas to you and yours, Mr Jim


"Jim Warman" <mech...@telusplanet.net> wrote in message

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Jim Warman

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Dec 25, 2004, 5:39:36 AM12/25/04
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That may be.... but I'm told that I'm at least as old as dirt. I am indeed
old enough to know better, but at least I'm young enough to do it again....

All the best to you and yours in this holiday, John. Thanx for the card....
ya make an old guy glad.


"John Riggs" <johnr...@netzero.net> wrote in message
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John Riggs

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Dec 25, 2004, 1:07:58 PM12/25/04
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Yup, just had my 48th on the 23rd....so you ain't all that old.
...and careful with that mistletoe, it'll get ya into trouble.


"Jim Warman" <mech...@telusplanet.net> wrote in message

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Jim Warman

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Dec 25, 2004, 4:35:20 PM12/25/04
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Heading for 55..... not too old to ride the Harley...


"John Riggs" <johnr...@netzero.net> wrote in message

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John Riggs

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Dec 25, 2004, 5:37:55 PM12/25/04
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Harley's are nice tinker toys. Fun to look at, not overly complicated to
work on, however, way over priced since the early 70's. I have been
eye-balling Victory's. Nice styling, decent price, American made.
My present bike is an oddity. It's a Honda CB 900 Custom, air shocks
front and rear, dual disk brakes, shaft drive, 5 speed gear box, and a 2
speed sub transmission ( a total of 10 forward gears ), top end around 160+
for as long as you want to hold it.
Bloody thing is a nightmare to work on with 16 valves and enough horse
power to launch out from under a guy if he's not careful....but it sure is
fun to ride.
It's presently down for a cam chain and valve work.


"Jim Warman" <mech...@telusplanet.net> wrote in message

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Mark Olson

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Dec 25, 2004, 5:47:38 PM12/25/04
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John Riggs <johnr...@netzero.net> wrote:

> My present bike is an oddity. It's a Honda CB 900 Custom, air shocks
> front and rear, dual disk brakes, shaft drive, 5 speed gear box, and a 2
> speed sub transmission ( a total of 10 forward gears ), top end around 160+
> for as long as you want to hold it.

160 km/hr, not 160 mph.

> Bloody thing is a nightmare to work on with 16 valves and enough horse
> power to launch out from under a guy if he's not careful....but it sure is
> fun to ride.

I owned a 1981 CB900C. Nothing special in the hp stakes, any modern
600c sportbike has a good 25 hp on it.

Jim Warman

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Dec 25, 2004, 6:31:03 PM12/25/04
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I'm a cruiser..... the Sporty will take me down the road at 130 km/h without
breaking a sweat but at that speed I miss too much (I live in a small town
in the middle of a big forest).

I ride my scooter more for the sake of riding my scooter.... actually going
somewhere is just a bonus....

The only paraphenalia I possess is a leather ball cap with "Harley Davidson
Motorcycles" on it. Everyone else at work does the OCC/West Coast Choppers
thing.... I'm the only biker in the crowd. I've always been a fan of
vertical twins but last year I finally realized a long time dream and got a
V twin. An all black 100th anniversary model and it didn't cost much more
than some Jap wannabe clone. This was my Xmas present from Mrs. mechanic
last year (though we know who is making the payments).

Bottom line... if I'm riding something I like to ride - I'm happy. Colour me
happy (well, colour me happy when spring gets here).


"Mark Olson" <ols...@tiny.invalid> wrote in message
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Jim Warman

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Dec 25, 2004, 5:28:35 PM12/25/04
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cabbage leaves
1 lb. lean ground newborn human filets, or ground chuck
Onions
peppers
celery
garlic
soy sauce
salt pepper, etc
Olive oil
breadcrumbs
Tomato Gravy (see index)

Boil the cabbage leaves for 2 minutes to soften.
In skillet, brown the meat in a little olive oil,
then add onions, peppers, and celery (all chopped finely)
and season well.
Place in a large bowl and cool.
Add seasoned breadcrumbs and a little of the tomato gravy,
enough to make the mixture pliable.
Divide the stuffing among the cabbage leaves then roll.
Place seam down in a baking pan.
Ladle tomato gravy on top,
and bake at 325° for 30 - 45 minutes.

Umbilical Cordon Bleu

Nothing is so beautiful as the bond between mother and child,
so why not consume it?
Children or chicken breasts will work wonderfully also.

4 whole umbilical chords (or baby breasts, or chicken breasts)
4 thin slices of smoked ham, and Gruyere cheese
Flour
eggwash (milk and eggs)
seasoned bread crumbs
1 onion
minced
salt
pepper
butter
olive oil

Pound the breasts flat (parboil first if using umbilical
cords so they won?t be tough).
Place a slice of ham and cheese on each, along with some minced onion
then fold in half, trimming neatly.
Dredge in flour, eggwash, then seasoned breadcrumbs;


Mark Olson

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Dec 25, 2004, 7:41:11 PM12/25/04
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sherry, add the reduced broth.
Finally, put in the root vegetables and simmer for 15 minutes.
Allow to cool slightly.
Place the pie pan in 375 degree oven for a few minutes so bottom crust is not soggy,
reduce oven to 325.
Fill the pie with stew, place top crust and with a fork, seal the crusts together
then poke holes in top.
Return to oven and bake for 30 minutes, or until pie crust is golden brown.

Sudden Infant Death Soup

SIDS: delicious in winter, comparable to old fashioned Beef and Vegetable Soup.
Its free, you can sell the crib, baby clothes, toys, stroller... and so easy to
procure if such a lucky find is at hand (just pick him up from the crib and
he?s good to go)!

SIDS victim, cleaned
½ cup cooking oil
Carrots
onions
broccoli
whole cabbage
fresh green beans
potato
turnip
celery
tomato
½ stick butter
1 cup cooked pasta (macaroni, shells, etc.)

Remove as much meat as possible, cube, and brown in hot oil.
Add a little water, season, then add the carcass.
Simmer for half an hour keeping the stock thick.
Remove the carcass and add the vegetables slowly to the stock,
so that it remains boiling the whole time.
Cover the pot and simmer till vegetables are tender
(2 hours approximately).
Continue seasoning to taste.
Before serving, add butter and pasta,
serve piping with hot bread and butter.

Offspring Rolls

Similar to Vietnamese style fried rolls, they have lots of meat
(of course this can consist of chicken, beef, pork, or shrimp).
Who can resist this classic appetizer; or light lunch served with
a fresh


John Riggs

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Dec 25, 2004, 5:04:03 PM12/25/04
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classic stew that makes natural gravy,
thus it does not have to be thickened.
Brown the meat quickly in very hot oil, remove and set aside.
Brown the onions, celery, pepper and garlic.
De-glaze with wine, return meat to the pan and season well.
Stew on low fire adding small amounts of water and
seasoning as necessary.
After at least half an hour, add the carrots and potatoes,
and simmer till root vegetables break with a fork.
Cook a fresh pot of long grained white rice.

Pre-mie Pot Pie

When working with prematurely delivered newborns (or chicken) use sherry;
red wine with beef (buy steak or roast, do not pre-boil).

Pie crust (see index)
Whole fresh pre-mie; eviscerated, head, hands and feet removed
Onions, bell pepper, celery
½ cup wine
Root vegetables of choice (turnips, carrots, potatoes, etc) cubed

Make a crust from scratch - or go shamefully to the frozen food section
of your favorite grocery and select 2 high quality pie crusts (you
will need one for the


Jim Warman

unread,
Dec 25, 2004, 8:39:41 PM12/25/04
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then stripping off.
Season generously, rubbing the mixture into the baby?s flesh.
Place 1 quart water in a baking pan, the meat on a wire rack.
Bake uncovered in 250° oven for 1½ hours.
When browned, remove and glaze,
return to oven and bake 20 minutes more to form a glaze.
Cut ribs into individual pieces and serve with extra sauce.

Fresh Sausage

If it becomes necessary to hide the fact that you are eating
human babies, this is the perfect solution.
But if you are still paranoid, you can substitute pork butt.

5 lb. lean chuck roast
3 lb. prime baby butt
2 tablespoons each:
salt
black, white and cayenne peppers
celery salt
garlic powder
parsley flakes
brown sugar
1 teaspoon sage
2 onions
6 cloves garlic
bunch green onions, chopped

Cut the children?s butts and the beef roast into pieces
that will fit in the grinder.
Run the meat through using a 3/16 grinding plate.
Add garlic, onions and seasoning then mix well.
Add just enough water for a smooth consistency, then mix again.
Form the sausage mixture into patties or stuff into natural casings.

Stillborn Stew

By definition, this meat cannot be had altogether fresh,
but have the lifeless unfortunate available immediately after delivery,
or use high quality beef or pork roasts (it is cheaper and better to
cut up a whole roast than to buy stew meat).

1 stillbirth, de-boned and cubed
¼ cup


John Riggs

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Dec 25, 2004, 5:58:51 PM12/25/04
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Get the grill good and hot while placing meat, vegetables, and
fruit such as pineapples or cherries on the skewers.
Don?t be afraid to use a variety of meats.
Grill to medium rare,
serve with garlic cous-cous and sautéed asparagus.
Coffee and sherbet for desert then walnuts, cheese, and port.
Cigars for the gentlemen (and ladies if they so desire)!

Crock-Pot Crack Baby

When the quivering, hopelessly addicted crack baby succumbs to death,
get him immediately butchered and into the crock-pot, so that any
remaining toxins will not be fatal. But don?t cook it too long,
because like Blowfish, there is a perfect medium between the poisonous
and the stimulating. Though it may not have the same effect on your
guests, a whole chicken cooked in this fashion is also mighty tasty.

1 newborn - cocaine addicted, freshly expired, cleaned and butchered
Carrots
onions
leeks
celery
bell pepper
potatoes
Salt
pepper
garlic, etc
4 cups water

Cut the meat into natural pieces and brown very well in olive oil,
remove, then brown half of the onions, the bell pepper, and celery.
When brown, mix everything into the crock-pot, and in 6 to 8 hours you
have turned a hopeless tragedy into a heartwarming meal!

George?s Bloody Mary

Don?t shy away from this one, it is simply a cocktail variation of
good old Blood Stew. When a pig is killed, its throat is slit and
those present quaff a cup of hot blood to soften the wintry air.
From the dawn of man to this day, humans have always drunk blood!
American deer hunters are a prime example.

1 pint blood
Stolichnaya vodka
ice
tomato juice
lemon
lime
hot sauce
Worcestershire sauce
pickled green bean
celery
green olives
celery salt

Draw a pint of blood from a very young virgin,
female if possible, and chill.
In a tall glass pour 1 or 2 ounces of vodka,
th


John Riggs

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Dec 25, 2004, 6:47:41 PM12/25/04
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or use high quality beef or pork roasts (it is cheaper and better to
cut up a whole roast than to buy stew meat).

1 stillbirth, de-boned and cubed

¼ cup vegetable oil
2 large onions
bell pepper
celery
garlic
½ cup red wine
3 Irish potatoes
2 large carrots

This is a simple classic stew that makes natural gravy,

Jim Warman

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Dec 25, 2004, 5:20:24 PM12/25/04
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and cook down a bit.
Add some lemon juice and some zest, then de-glaze with stock.
Add a little cornstarch (dissolved in cold water) to the sauce.
You are just about there, Pour the sauce over the cutlets,
top with parsley, lemon slices and cracked pepper.
Serve with spinach salad, macaroni and cheese (homemade) and iced tea...

Spaghetti with Real Italian Meatballs

If you don?t have an expendable bambino on hand,
you can use a pound of ground pork instead.
The secret to great meatballs, is to use very lean meat.

1 lb. ground flesh; human or pork
3 lb. ground beef
1 cup finely chopped onions
7 - 12 cloves garlic
1 cup seasoned bread crumbs
½ cup milk, 2 eggs
Oregano
basil
salt
pepper
Italian seasoning, etc.
Tomato gravy (see index)
Fresh or at least freshly cooked spaghetti or other pasta

Mix the ground meats together in a large bowl,
then mix each of the other ingredients.
Make balls about the size of a baby?s fist
(there should be one lying around for reference).
Bake at 400°for about 25 minutes -
or you could fry them in olive oil.
Place the meatballs in the tomato gravy, and simmer for several hours.
Serve on spaghetti.
Accompany with green salad, garlic bread and red wine.

Newborn Parmesan

This classic Sicilian cuisine can easily be turned into Eggplant Parmesan
If you are planning a vegetarian meal. Or you could just as well use veal -
after all, you have to be careful - Sicilians are touchy about their young
family members...

6 newborn or veal cutlets
Tomato gravy (see index)
4 cups mozzarella, 1cup parmesan, 1cup romano
Seasoned bread crumbs mixed with
parmesan
romano
salt
pepper
oregano
garlic powder
chopped parsley
Flour
eggwash (eggs and milk)
Peanut oil for frying.

Pound the


Jim Warman

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Dec 25, 2004, 6:16:02 PM12/25/04
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Amputee

By all means, substitute lamb or a good beef roast if the haunch
it is in any way diseased. But sometimes surgeons make mistakes,
and if a healthy young limb is at hand, then don?t hesitate to cook
it to perfection!

1 high quality limb, rack, or roast
Potatoes, carrot
Oil
celery
onions
green onions
parsley
garlic
salt, pepper, etc
2 cups beef stock

Marinate meat (optional, not necessary with better cuts).
Season liberally and lace with garlic cloves by making incisions,
and placing whole cloves deep into the meat.
Grease a baking pan, and fill with a thick bed of onions,
celery, green onions, and parsley.
Place roast on top with fat side up.
Place uncovered in 500° oven for 20 minutes, reduce oven to 325°.
Bake till medium rare (150°) and let roast rest.
Pour stock over onions and drippings, carve the meat and
place the slices in the au jus.

Bisque à l?Enfant

Honor the memory of Grandma with this dish by utilizing her good
silver soup tureen and her great grandchildren (crawfish, crab or
lobster will work just as well, however this dish is classically
made with crawfish).

Stuffed infant heads, stuffed crawfish heads, stuffed crab or lobster shells;
make patties if shell or head is not available
(such as with packaged crawfish, crab, or headless baby).
Flour
oil
onions
bell peppers
garlic salt, pepper, etc.
3 cups chicken stock
2 sticks butter
3 tablespoons oil

First stuff the heads, or make the patties (see index)
then fry or bake.
Set aside to drain on paper towels.
Make a roux with butter, oil and flour,
brown vegetables in the roux, then add chicken stock and
allow to simmer for 20 minutes.
Add the patties or stuffed heads, and some loose crawfish,
lobster, long piglet, or w


John Riggs

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Dec 25, 2004, 7:00:59 PM12/25/04
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etc.

Marinate the fetuses in the egg-mustard mixture.
Dredge thoroughly in flour.
Fry at 375° until crispy golden brown.
Remove and place on paper towels.

Holiday Youngster

One can easily adapt this recipe to ham, though as presented,
it violates no religious taboos against swine.

1 large toddler or small child, cleaned and de-headed
Kentucky Bourbon Sauce (see index)
1 large can pineapple slices
Whole cloves

Place him (or ham) or her in a large glass baking dish, buttocks up.
Tie with butcher string around and across so that he looks like
he?s crawling.
Glaze, then arrange pineapples and secure with cloves.
Bake uncovered in 350° oven till thermometer reaches 160°.

Cajun Babies

Just like crabs or crawfish, babies are boiled alive!
You don?t need silverware, the hot spicy meat comes off in your hands.

6 live babies
1 lb. smoked sausage
4 lemons
whole garlic
2 lb. new potatoes
4 ears corn
1 box salt
crab boil

Bring 3 gallons of water to a boil.
Add sausage, salt, crab boil, lemons and garlic.
Drop potatoes in, boil for 4 minutes.
Corn is added next, boil an additional 11 minutes.
Put the live babies into the boiling water and cover.
Boil till meat comes off easily with a fork.

Oven-Baked Baby-Back Ribs

Beef ribs or pork ribs can be used in this recipe,
and that is exactly what your dinner guests will assume!
An excellent way to expose the uninitiated to this highly misunderstood
yet succulent source of protein.

2 human baby rib racks
3 cups barbecue sauce or honey glaze (see index)
Salt
black pepper
white pepper
paprika

Remo


C. E. White

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Dec 25, 2004, 8:48:26 PM12/25/04
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I have one I'll sell you for $5 plus shipping. I am really at
mindspring<dot>com.

Ed

"devnu11" <n...@0ne.org> wrote in message
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John Riggs

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Dec 25, 2004, 9:02:12 PM12/25/04
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No...I said it right. 160+.....I'm not Canadian or European my friend.
For me it's Miles Per Hour....and I like to hot rod whatever machinery I can
get my hands on.


"Mark Olson" <ols...@tiny.invalid> wrote in message
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John Riggs

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Dec 25, 2004, 9:13:03 PM12/25/04
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Yup....I agree on missing too much. In my neck of the woods though, it's
miles to anything and time matters. Even at 75 MPH it takes about 9 hours
to make it to Denver from here, and a lot of open, nothing to see,
interstate highway. At one point there is a stretch with not much more than
70 miles of flatland covered with daisies (summer) or brown grass (winter).
With a little more throttle, a guy can leave in the morning and have dinner
in Denver before nightfall. This beast is an old cruiser from the early
80's, at least, that is how they are marketed. Low slung, sleek, but still
not a Harley.
We have the Kawasaki plant here in town. I've never owned one of those
either.

"Jim Warman" <mech...@telusplanet.net> wrote in message

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Mark Olson

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Dec 26, 2004, 8:16:25 AM12/26/04
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John Riggs wrote:
> "Mark Olson" <ols...@tiny.invalid> wrote in message
> news:41cdee09$0$30057$a186...@visi.com...
> | John Riggs <johnr...@netzero.net> wrote:
> |
> | > My present bike is an oddity. It's a Honda CB 900 Custom, air shocks
> | > front and rear, dual disk brakes, shaft drive, 5 speed gear box, and a 2
> | > speed sub transmission ( a total of 10 forward gears ), top end around
> 160+
> | > for as long as you want to hold it.
> |
> | 160 km/hr, not 160 mph.
> |
> | > Bloody thing is a nightmare to work on with 16 valves and enough
> horse
> | > power to launch out from under a guy if he's not careful....but it sure
> is
> | > fun to ride.
> |
> | I owned a 1981 CB900C. Nothing special in the hp stakes, any modern
> | 600c sportbike has a good 25 hp on it.
> |
>
> No...I said it right. 160+.....I'm not Canadian or European my friend.
> For me it's Miles Per Hour....and I like to hot rod whatever machinery I can
> get my hands on.
>

What mods have you done, out of interest?

Does it have a fairing (mine had a Vetter Windjammer V)?

Cheers,
Mark

Big Bill

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Dec 26, 2004, 9:44:16 AM12/26/04
to
On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 21:35:20 GMT, "Jim Warman"
<mech...@telusplanet.net> wrote:

>Heading for 55..... not too old to ride the Harley...

Aww, shoooot! We're still young, and I'll be 58 in Feb!

--
Bill Funk
Change "g" to "a"

John Riggs

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Dec 26, 2004, 12:52:07 PM12/26/04
to
I haven't modified anything save a bit of tweaking of the carburetors,
timing, and only the barest of necessary equipment....which doesn't include
a fairing. Ever get hit by a bug at 160 ? THAT really stings.
This bike was to be a hobby project before I got hit by my divorce. I'm
lucky I even still have it. The ex and her BF had tinkered with the brakes,
and it is only the engine tossing the cam chain that saved me from taking
off much further than the yard with it, or I likely would have had a very
serious "Oops!". God loves me, I can tell.
What I'd like to do when I get the rest of this crap that I have going
on, over with, is have it bored to 1100 cc, a slightly more radical cam, and
a twin turbo setup from a Suzuki or similar.
The weakest part of this bike is the transmission. I'd be interested in
knowing if there is anyone around that specializes in beefing this
particular tranny. Continuous hard acceleration seems to destroy them in the
briefest of times.

"Mark Olson" <ols...@tiny.invalid> wrote in message

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Mark Olson

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Dec 26, 2004, 1:08:30 PM12/26/04
to

> I haven't modified anything save a bit of tweaking of the carburetors,


> timing, and only the barest of necessary equipment....which doesn't include
> a fairing. Ever get hit by a bug at 160 ? THAT really stings.
> This bike was to be a hobby project before I got hit by my divorce. I'm
> lucky I even still have it. The ex and her BF had tinkered with the brakes,
> and it is only the engine tossing the cam chain that saved me from taking
> off much further than the yard with it, or I likely would have had a very
> serious "Oops!". God loves me, I can tell.
> What I'd like to do when I get the rest of this crap that I have going
> on, over with, is have it bored to 1100 cc, a slightly more radical cam, and
> a twin turbo setup from a Suzuki or similar.
> The weakest part of this bike is the transmission. I'd be interested in
> knowing if there is anyone around that specializes in beefing this
> particular tranny. Continuous hard acceleration seems to destroy them in the
> briefest of times.

Well, if all you've done is tweak the timing and adjust the carbs, you have not
ever hit 160 let alone 140 on that bike.

One of the most aerodynamics bikes that Honda has ever made, the RC51, can
barely break 160 with 120 rear wheel hp on tap. Your bike's theoretical top
speed at redline in high range in 5th gear is about 152 mph. My own experience
tells me that without *serious* horsepower improvements that it was actually
faster for top speed in low range 5th gear or high range 4th gear, because it
won't pull to redline in high-5th.

Your bike, even assuming it's been tuned well and had the cam sprockets slotted
to help the top end a bit would be doing well to put out 85 hp at the rear
wheel. If you're lying down on the tank it might _just_ do 130 without a fairing.

Have fun with it, but remember it wasn't intended as a speed machine, it was a
air cooled inline four alternative to the GL1100 (it even uses the exact same
final drive 'differential' as the GL1000/GL1100).

I actually liked the 85 mph speedometer as it was perfectly accurate, unlike most
bike speedos, and once you get above 85 you don't need a speedometer anyway.

Cheers,
Mark

John Riggs

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Dec 26, 2004, 1:27:18 PM12/26/04
to
Whatever, Mark. Believe what you will.


"Mark Olson" <ols...@tiny.invalid> wrote in message

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HarleyVA

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Dec 26, 2004, 6:48:18 PM12/26/04
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"John Riggs" <johnr...@netzero.net> :

> Whatever, Mark. Believe what you will.
>

Not to call anyone a liar but back when the CB's were really popular
(I had a CB750 and with my current bike, I've owned over 20 bikes,
including a V65 and a VMax), but there's *no way* that a CB900
could do 160mph. The top rated speed of a VMax..in *perfect*
conditions with V-Boost wide open, was 160mph and a CB900 wouldn't
even be recognizable in the side mirrors.


John Riggs

unread,
Dec 26, 2004, 7:29:38 PM12/26/04
to
Well, it would appear you are doing just that. Now, if you have a lard
ass and can't get a bike with 84 horses to go that fast, sounds like a
personal problem. I had a bike half that size and it was doing well over
120...you do the math.

Regardless, I'm done listening to ya.


"HarleyVA" <bou...@bounce.ent> wrote in message
news:d9jus0dp093mdlopg...@4ax.com...

Jim Warman

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Dec 26, 2004, 8:20:22 PM12/26/04
to
OK, lads.... out of the sandbox for 10 minutes...... party's gettin' rough
(at Xmas, yet, with the peace and goodwill stuff....).

I would have loved, dearly, to get a SoftTail Springer...... I wasn't about
to try and push "Mrs. Claus" quite that hard. My 03 Sporty cost less new
(with some toys.... forward controls, P-pad, sissy bar and some other little
stuff) than an Intruder. And the Intruder has a smaller motor, a battery
that's near impossible to get at (I have a friend with one) and just doesn't
have that "mystique" that HD possesses. I guess it's whatever floats yer
boat but for my money all that glossy black and shiny silver in a lowish
slung V twin is drop dead gorgeous. (Puffing his chest out) People will walk
past those Tuperware clad crotch rockets with nary a glance and offer up
compliments that gush bad enough to embarrass me.

Due to weather and work constraints, I only managed a little under 4000 km
with one short highway trip last year. Even though I'm in the throws of a 3
year home reno project, I plan on fixing that in the summer to come. If I
can wear this one out, at least I have a trade in that a Harley dealer will
accept and there's always the chance that a Springer will be perched in my
driveway.


"John Riggs" <johnr...@netzero.net> wrote in message

news:3393bnF...@individual.net...

HarleyVA

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Dec 26, 2004, 11:08:10 PM12/26/04
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"John Riggs" <johnr...@netzero.net> :

> Well, it would appear you are doing just that. Now, if you have a lard
>ass and can't get a bike with 84 horses to go that fast, sounds like a
>personal problem. I had a bike half that size and it was doing well over
>120...you do the math.
>
> Regardless, I'm done listening to ya.
>

well buddy, *you* do the math. The difference in hp to go from 120
to 160 is *huge*.

I'm not the one with a personal problem. If you think a CB900's top
speed is 160, show me *anywhere* that shows that besides your
imagination. BTW, the speedo doesn't even register 160 on a
900, how did you even know it was going that fast?

John Riggs

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Dec 26, 2004, 11:28:46 PM12/26/04
to
Mrs. Mechanic got you a Harley for Christmas? Outstanding! They do look
nice, and yes, they do hold their value. I like the old style of the
Harleys, and it's hard to argue with all that bottom end torque, but I'd
like to get my hands on the V-Rod and see how it stacks up. Like you, I
don't care for all the plastic on the sport bikes....just looks wrong, and
there's not a lot you can do with plastic....it's just there
The sad part of the one I have is that unless I restore it, it isn't worth
much, and if I do, it's worth a little less than it sold for new. I always
thought they should be lower and longer, but that's a bit of personal taste.
The challenge of being a po' boy is ya have to learn how to get by without
spending a lot of money, so I try to keep my toys within my non-existent
budget. Everything has to be minimalist, leaving off what isn't absolutely
necessary. Every 10 pounds on a bike is approx to 100 pounds on a car....it
adds up quick if you aren't watching what you're doing. Maybe when the new
year gets kicked off and biz picks up I can put a few more bucks in it to
make it how I'd like, starting with the bore, new pistons and rebalance, and
bigger carbs....but that's just another wish list if biz don't pick up soon.
My buddy has been hammering me to make him a frame so he can park an S&S
engine or something similar in it. Not that I can't, but without a jig, it's
not as easy as it sounds. It's easier to buy one or get a used frame from
salvage and rework it the way he wants. I am not a big fan of hard
tails....they are kidney killers, but they look nice if you are just
wrenching for show.
Well, your instructions worked. The cruise is back online and working
fit an proper. Thanks


"Jim Warman" <mech...@telusplanet.net> wrote in message

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