Beyer M88 N(C) Mic Question

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Michael Lauengco

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Jan 11, 2002, 5:20:12 PM1/11/02
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I just bought a mic on eBay which the seller advertised as "Beyer M88
Pro Classic LE" (with the "LE" probably meaning "Limited Edition").
When it arrived, I realized that it's the N(C) version. I thought the
'C' in N(C) meant Classic, so I checked with the manufacturer. They
said it's not the Classic, and that the Classic is all silver/nickel
(mine is black body with silver windscreen). Both the Classic and
N(C) have been discontinued and only the TG is in current production.
But one thing that puzzles me is that, according to the tech support
guy I talked to, the N(C) was the first M88 version, even older than
the Classic?! I really wanted to buy a Classic because I heard it
sounds better than the new TG. But I've never heard of the N(C) until
now. So, could someone please enlighten me on the nature of the N(C)
version? What's the difference between it and the Classic? And most
important of all, does it sound as good as the Classic?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

--Michael

Mike Rivers

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Jan 12, 2002, 1:14:11 AM1/12/02
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> I just bought a mic on eBay which the seller advertised as "Beyer M88
> Pro Classic LE" (with the "LE" probably meaning "Limited Edition").
> When it arrived, I realized that it's the N(C) version. I thought the
> 'C' in N(C) meant Classic, so I checked with the manufacturer. They
> said it's not the Classic, and that the Classic is all silver/nickel
> (mine is black body with silver windscreen).

Well, you see, there's "classic" and then there's "Classic". The
Classic is a model that Beyer released a few years ago after taking
the original (which is now a classic) out of production.

> I really wanted to buy a Classic because I heard it
> sounds better than the new TG.

It probably sounds less hyped. Actually, if it's in good shape, I
think you got the best of the bunch. Try it. If you like it, keep it.
If you don't like it, return it to the seller telling him that it
isn't what he represented it as (because it isn't). And if you don't
know whether you like it or not, learn to like it. It's a very useful
mic. The only problem is that you might not know if it's broken.


--
I'm really Mike Rivers (mri...@d-and-d.com)

Northamusi

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Jan 12, 2002, 1:33:16 AM1/12/02
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Hi Michael:
I can shed a bit of light on the subject... I wrote a brief article for EQ
Magazine in the March 1997 issue on the M88 Classic (though unfortunately I
don't have a copy handy). In any case, the M88 N(C) version which you now have
is the original version (black with a silver grill). In late 1996/early 1997,
Beyerdynamic introduced the Classic as a sort of limited anniversary edition of
the M88. I believe it came with a certificate of authenticity, and was packed
in a wooden presentation box. I recall using the Classic for a couple of
sessions and the difference between it and the M88N(C) was very subtle.

I believe that the M88 N(C) was discontinued in favor of the TGX version. So
the M88 N(C) was first, I believe the Classic came next and when the TG version
came out the 88 N(C) was discontinued.

Hope this helps a bit. If you want to email me directly as a reminder I will
look through my paperwork to see if I have the article.
Best regards
Steve La Cerra

Scott Dorsey

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Jan 12, 2002, 2:35:29 PM1/12/02
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You know, I have heard a lot of different M88s over the years... from the
original N(C) to the TG. And I can't hear a damn bit of difference between
them.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Monte P McGuire

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Jan 13, 2002, 4:32:46 AM1/13/02
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In article <a1q361$rsh$1...@panix2.panix.com>,

Scott Dorsey <klu...@panix.com> wrote:
>You know, I have heard a lot of different M88s over the years... from the
>original N(C) to the TG. And I can't hear a damn bit of difference between
>them.

I'll second that. Aside from small unit to unit variations, which are
quite a bit smaller than many folks are used to with other popular
dynamic mikes, the M88s I've had here have been remarkably uniform.
The TG I bought a few years back sounds basically like the N(C) I
bought in '84.

Differences due to use and abuse are far more significant IMHO...


Regards,

Monte McGuire
mcg...@theworld.com

Ty Ford

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Jan 13, 2002, 9:51:16 AM1/13/02
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In Article <431f260f.02011...@posting.google.com>,

Michael,

N (C) simply means the mic has a 3-pin XLR connector, pin 2 high, and
balanced output.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Ty Ford's web site is http://www.jagunet.com/~tford.
Check it out for voiceover samples and audio equipment reviews.

Chris Seifert

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Jan 13, 2002, 3:09:21 PM1/13/02
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I'll secound that differences in use and abuse are most significant.
I've used many M88's and for a while they seemed popular as live kick
drum mics.
I certainly heard a difference between the M88's used in kick drums
and ones only used for vocals or horns. Seemed like the kick drum
used M88's were far less detailed, IMHO.

I love the M88 though, what a useful dynamic.

Chris,
Wavetrap

Michael Lauengco

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Jan 13, 2002, 4:22:12 PM1/13/02
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Thanks for all your great info! I can now breath a sigh of relief.
BTW, the mic is shining like new and unused. I think the seller kept
it in good storage all these years after a project that didn't
materialize.

Thanks again, guys. This mic is gonna be a keeper!

--Michael

P.S.

I had an earlier posting of this "Thank you" message. I wonder why
that one strayed away from this thread? May because I changed the
title...

Bear

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Jan 13, 2002, 5:25:28 PM1/13/02
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klu...@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in message news:<a1q361$rsh$1...@panix2.panix.com>...


> You know, I have heard a lot of different M88s over the years... from the
> original N(C) to the TG. And I can't hear a damn bit of difference between
> them.

Good to know, 'cause I like my TG plenty and don't need to give it an
inferiority complex. It might be worth knowing, though, that Beyer
issued a technical bulletin that the TG is prone to failure when on
axis to the beater in a kick drum, which I believe they hadn't had
major problems with before, though I could be wrong.

Bear

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