FS: Amek-Neve 9098 EQ & Mic pre

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Rick Hull

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Mar 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/21/97
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EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

AMEK-NEVE 9098 EQ/MIC PRE - NEW - This wonderful sounding EQ and Mic Pre
is a
completely NEW unit in a factory box with full warranty. Purchased for
a project that
never happened. $1750.

EL-8 "DISTRESSOR" by Empirical Labs - NEW - An incredible compressor
that can
sound like vintage units such as the LA-2A, LA-3, DBX-160, Fairchild 660
ect...see review
in Mix Mag December '96. This is a completely NEW unit with full
warranty. Purchased
for a project that never happened. $1190.

ADC Pro Patch Bay 96 point TT (bantum) full normalled. Excellent
condition, over half
this unit never used. Features 96 TRS Long frame jack points in a 2-rack
space unit. The
fully enclosed Pro Patch chassis protects all the internal patchbay
wiring. Front panel and
rear panels remove easily for service without removing the unit from the
rack. Pro Patch
features ADC's Ultra patch termination panels with QCP connectors that
provide a gas
tight connection that will not deteriorate over time. New List price
$1108, will sell for
$250. ADC patch cords (30" TT) $10 each.

Reply by e-mail or call Rick at 214-742-5485
Rick Hull Creative Services - Dallas

scotf...@aol.com

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Mar 28, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/28/97
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Are there any special construction procedures that should be followed concerning the enclosed air between double panes of glass in the studio? My concern is that any moisture or atmospheric sludge
(this is in Los Angeles) that is trapped when the airspace is sealed will condense or deposit itself on the insides of the glass where I can't clean it. Should I drop some silica gel into the frame
first? Is it a non-issue? Thanks for any info.
Scott

Westbrook Finlayson, Jr.

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Mar 29, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/29/97
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I'm in Alabama where the humidity is infamous. I've never noticed a
condensation problem on the three or four project studio type control
room window installations I'm familiar with. Just took two pieces of
glass of different thicknesses and set one so not to be quite parallel
with the other, siliconed, and no real problems. Someone with more
experience may know better, but I'd say that if you installed on a day
with low humidity so you don't trap any moisture, you won't have a
problem. About "atmospheric sludge," I couldn't say. The thing I love
most about L.A. is the lack of humidity. Where I live, however, there is
little of that sludge. No experience there. Get some other opinions, but
maybe this $.02 helps.

Jonathan Burtner

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Mar 29, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/29/97
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I Think if you covered the silica gel bags with some sort of unobtrusive
aesthetically-pleasing cloth, or wooden carved/slotted enclosures you
would have made a wise choice in covering your ass without too much
physical or mental expenditure......

aud...@ix.netcom.com

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Mar 30, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/30/97
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On 28 Mar 1997 17:55:34 GMT, scotf...@aol.com wrote:

>Are there any special construction procedures that should be followed concerning the enclosed air between double panes of glass in the studio? My concern is that any moisture or atmospheric sludge
>(this is in Los Angeles) that is trapped when the airspace is sealed will condense or deposit itself on the insides of the glass where I can't clean it. Should I drop some silica gel into the frame
>first? Is it a non-issue? Thanks for any info.
>Scott


We have a 3'x7'x1' space between the two panes.....silica is a very
good, cost effective way to prevent moisture build up (get a sample
gallon from W.R. Grace Co.) put it a 4"x6"x1" tray ....do three of
them!.....our studio is in Atlanta, GA...lots of humidity....its been
installed since 6/92 with no problems.

Jeff Olsen

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Mar 31, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/31/97
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In <333eade3...@nntp.ix.netcom.com> aud...@ix.netcom.com writes:

>On 28 Mar 1997 17:55:34 GMT, scotf...@aol.com wrote:

>>Are there any special construction procedures that should be followed concerning the enclosed air between double panes of glass in the studio? My concern is that any moisture or atmospheric sludge
>>(this is in Los Angeles) that is trapped when the airspace is sealed will condense or deposit itself on the insides of the glass where I can't clean it. Should I drop some silica gel into the frame
>>first? Is it a non-issue? Thanks for any info.
>>Scott

I VERY carefully cleaned the 2nd window to be installed and sealed the
woodwork to prevent anything from getting in there. Unfortunatly, a gnat
or something got trapped and, even more unfortunatly, was pregnant. I
now have about 40 or 50 tiny dead gnats in there- no one ever notices but
me, but I just can't wait to have an excuse to pull that window off.

When putting in the window for my iso boot, I didn't have that problem
but I did get some condensation in there a few days later- so it can
happen. Use dry wood and dry framing wood too.

-jeff

RamTazz

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Mar 31, 1997, 3:00:00 AM3/31/97
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I also had the same concerns, seal/paint the areas between the windows
& let dry a few days before proceeding. Make sure you angle the two
pieces of glass like an "A" to cut down in parrellel transfers. Two
different thicknesses is best but not a rule.

Bill

Sam Bennett

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Apr 1, 1997, 3:00:00 AM4/1/97
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>I VERY carefully cleaned the 2nd window to be installed and sealed the
>woodwork to prevent anything from getting in there. Unfortunatly, a gnat
>or something got trapped and, even more unfortunatly, was pregnant. I
>now have about 40 or 50 tiny dead gnats in there- no one ever notices but
>me, but I just can't wait to have an excuse to pull that window off.

I think that has to be the top double pane installation nightmare
story I've heard. Number two is a friend who ran his snake parallel to
one side of the frame. While he was snaking through the ceiling he
noticed he suddenly got more slack than he expected. Once back on the
floor he noticed he'd pulled the snake hard enough to break through
the ceiling tile he installed in the middle of the window. He now has
a snake running through the rightmost third of his otherwise lovely
window. Ouch.

On the subject of windows - has anyone used insulated glass on one
side of a double pane window? I don't know if it would be more cost
effective, but having a 1/4" piece on one side and a insulated piece
on the other side seems like it would have as good if not a better STC
rating than 3/8" glass. My window is all ready for the glass but my
budget won't allow at this point. 3/8" glass isn't stocked around
here, I would think that insulated glass would be easier to get
although I don't know what the cost factor is.

Comments?

Marty Atias

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Apr 2, 1997, 3:00:00 AM4/2/97
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aud...@ix.netcom.com wrote:
>
> On 28 Mar 1997 17:55:34 GMT, scotf...@aol.com wrote:
>
> >Are there any special construction procedures that should be followed concerning the enclosed air between double panes of glass in the studio? My concern is that any moisture or atmospheric sludge
> >(this is in Los Angeles) that is trapped when the airspace is sealed will condense or deposit itself on the insides of the glass where I can't clean it. Should I drop some silica gel into the frame
> >first? Is it a non-issue? Thanks for any info.
> >Scott
>
> We have a 3'x7'x1' space between the two panes.....silica is a very
> good, cost effective way to prevent moisture build up (get a sample
> gallon from W.R. Grace Co.) put it a 4"x6"x1" tray ....do three of
> them!.....our studio is in Atlanta, GA...lots of humidity....its been
> installed since 6/92 with no problems.


Hold on, It has been some time since my studio design days, but unless I
missed some ammendment in the laws of physics, since when does the
airspace between the two panes get sealed? If you have a properly built
wall, it is actually two layers of wall, one physically isolated from
the other (with inssulation between), each with one pane of glass in
it's own frame. Between the frames should be a flexible, acoustically
transparent fabric for aesthic appearance. Or have I missed something?

Marty

Barry Corliss

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Apr 3, 1997, 3:00:00 AM4/3/97
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In article <5huqq3$d...@news.microsoft.com>, Xchr...@microsoft.comX wrote:

> Damn, I can't find my copy of it, but I had instructions (originally
> posted here I think) on how to create a lava-lamp in control-room
> window space. Does anyone have that (please forward)? It was
> basically the ingredients of the fluids and design specs for the
> heating required. I thought it would make a great mood enhancer
> for the engineer and performer alike.


I remember that post - it was by our old friend Pelicore. I'm sure deja
news will point you to it with an author search.

______________________________________
Barry Corliss
MASTER WORKS CD Mastering
Seattle, WA (206) 282-2274
bcor...@halcyon.com
______________________________________

Dave P.

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Apr 3, 1997, 3:00:00 AM4/3/97
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Xchr...@microsoft.comX (Not A Speck of Cereal.) wrote:


>Damn, I can't find my copy of it, but I had instructions (originally
>posted here I think) on how to create a lava-lamp in control-room
>window space.

That would be nice, but I'd rather turn my studio window into a highly
pressurized aquarium filled with those monstrous creatures from the
bottom of the mid-atlantic rift, with the enourmous nightmarish fangs
and glow-in-the-dark razor-sharp poison spines. The metal & gothic
bands would be beating down the doors. . . .wait. . . they sometimes
do that already, and we don't like it. Never mind.

Dave Peck
Aftershock Productions


David J MacKenzie

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Apr 3, 1997, 3:00:00 AM4/3/97
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bcor...@halcyon.com (Barry Corliss) writes:

> In article <5huqq3$d...@news.microsoft.com>, Xchr...@microsoft.comX wrote:
> > Damn, I can't find my copy of it, but I had instructions (originally
> > posted here I think) on how to create a lava-lamp in control-room

> > window space. Does anyone have that (please forward)?

> I remember that post - it was by our old friend Pelicore. I'm sure deja


> news will point you to it with an author search.

Yup.

Subject: --- Lava Lamp Control Booth Window Instructions ---
From: Peli...@holli.com (--- Drew Star)
Date: 1996/01/12
Message-Id: <Pelicore-120...@rus-ts2-19.holli.com>
Newsgroups: rec.audio.pro

Hey everyone. I dropped out of a PhD Chemistry program about 2/3 done to
go into the music biz. At least that masters degree in Chemistry isn't
completely useless! Here is a little studio chemistry for you. We are
putting in a giant lava window between our main control room and
instrument room. Thought I would share the recipie. Proceed at your own
risk!

WARNING!! This electronic document deals with
and involves subject matter
and the use of materials and substances that
may be hazardous to health
and life. Do not attempt to implement or use
the information contained
herein unless you are experienced and skilled
with respect to such subject
matter, materials and substances. The author
makes no representations as
for the completeness or the accuracy of the
information contained herein
and disclaim any liability for damages or
injuries, whether caused by or
arising from the lack of completeness,
inaccuracies of the information,
misinterpretation of the directions,
misapplication of the information or
otherwise.

Please note: The
information contained in this electronic document can
be found in the 1992
Edition of Popular Electronics Electronics Hobbyists
handbook, published
annually by Gernsback Publications Inc, USA.


Inside a lava lamp are two
immiscible fluids. If it is assumed that fluid 1
is water, then fluid 2
must be:

1) insoluble in water;
2) heavier than water;
3) non-flammable
(for safety);
4) non-reactive with water or air;
5) more viscous than
water;
6) reasonably priced.

Furthermore, fluid 2 must not be:

1) very
poisonous (for safety);
2) chlorinated;
3) emulsifiable in water (for
rapid separation).

In addition, fluid 2 must have a greater coefficient of
expansion than
water. Check a Perry's handbook of Chemical Engineering,
and the above
list eliminates quite a few possibilities.

Here is a list
of possible chemicals to use:

1) benzyl alcohol (sp.g. 1.043, bp 204.7
deg. C, sl. soluble);
2) cinnamyl alcohol (sp. g. 1.04, bp 257.5 deg. C,
sl. soluble);
3) diethyl phthalate (sp. g. 1.121, bp 298 deg. C,
insoluble);
4) ethyl salicylate (sp. g. 113, bp 233 deg. C,
insoluble).

If desired, use a suitable red oil-soluble dye to color fluid
2. A
permanent felt-tip pen is a possible source. Break open the pen and
put
the felt in a beaker with fluid 2.

It is recommended to use benzyl
alcohol as fluid 2. (Caution!! Do not
come into contact with benzyl
alcohol either by ingestion, skin, or
inhalation.) In addition to water,
the following items will be necessary:

1) sodium chloride (table
salt);
2) a clear glass bottle, about 10 inches (25.4 cm) high;
3) a 40
watt light bulb and ceramic light fixture;
4) a 1 pint (473 ml) tin can or
larger;
5) plywood;
6) 1/4 inch (0.635 cm) thick foam-rubber;
7) AC plug
with 16 gauge lamp wire;
8) hardware;
9) light dimmer (optional);
10)
small fan (optional).

The performance of the lava lamp will depend on the
quality of the water
used. A few experiments must be conducted to
determine how much sodium
chloride is necessary to increase the water's
specific gravity. Try a 5%
salt concentration first (50 g of salt to 1
liter of water). Pour the
red-dyed benzyl alcohol mixture in a Pyrex
beaker. Add an equal or
greater amount of water and heat slowly on a hot
plate. If the benzyl
alcohol floats to the top and stays there, decrease
the salt
concentration. If it stays at the bottom, add more salt.


Construct the lamp by fastening the ceramic lamp fixture to a 5 inch
(12.7
cm) diameter piece of plywood. Attach the lamp wire to the fixture.

Screw in the 40 watt bulb. Cut one end off the tin can, remove
its
contents, and clean thoroughly. Drill a hole in the tin can for the
wire
to go through. Invert the can over the bulb (open end down) and affix
to
the plywood with epoxy. Cut a round gasket from the foam-rubber and
fit
it into the top lip of the can.

Fill the bottle partially with brine,
add about 150 ml of benzyl alcohol,
then fill up the bottle with brine.
Leave about 1 inch (2.54 cm) of
airspace on top for expansion. Bubble
size will be influenced by amount
of air space. Tightly cap the bottle
and place on gasket.

The light dimmer is used to control the amount of
heat in the bottle. It
is helpful if the bottle is too short and the 40
watt bulb makes the
benzyl alcohol accumulate at the top.

The fan can
also be used to cool the top of the bottle and help the benzyl
alcohol to
sink to the bottom.

If desired, add a trace of an antioxidant such as BHA
or BHT to the brine
to add color and contrast.

Enjoy and good luck.

--
__
| \ /
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| EL/CORE C R E A T I V E M E D I A G R O U P
| VISIONZ

DIGITAL MASTERING SPECIALISTS SERVING A WORLDWIDE CLIENT BASE INCLUDING ARTISTS
, STUDIOS, AND RECORD LABELS.

5168D South Webster
Kokomo, IN 46902
(317) 864-9684

http://www.holli.com/~pelicore

DIGITAL MASTERING
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TOUR QUALITY GRAPHICS
RECORDING AND PRODUCTION
MULTIMEDIA MASTERING AND DEVELOPMENT
_________________________________________________________________

Fatplanet

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Apr 4, 1997, 3:00:00 AM4/4/97
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Hmmmm - wouldn't do much for the isolation if you FILLED it with fluid.
however a wedged shape tank, hmmmmmmm
heavy metal bands? what heavy metal bands? are there any left?

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