Toronto school board leftists said memorializing the Queen could be "triggering."

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RichA

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Sep 15, 2022, 8:28:22 PM (10 days ago) Sep 15
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Joshua Freeman

Joshua Freeman, CP24 Web Content Writer

@Josh_F

Published Thursday, September 15, 2022 1:26PM EDT
Last Updated Thursday, September 15, 2022 2:24PM EDT

Ontario Education Minister Stephen Lecce has ordered school boards across the province to commemorate the Queen's death after the York Region District School Board issued guidance to schools to avoid the topic.

"The entire world is marking the profound loss of a graceful and dutiful Queen who dedicated her whole life to the service of our country and the Commonwealth, upon ascending to the Throne at 25 years old,” Lecce said in a statement Thursday.

“We have made clear our direction that all schools are to recognize the profound impact of Queen Elizabeth II’s lifelong and unwavering devotion to public service.”
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His comments come after a "tip sheet" was distributed to school administrators in York Region which advised that discussions about the Queen might be "triggering” and that the topic should be avoided.

“If students are not initiating discussions about this subject, please maintain the focus of their interests and learning in the classroom,” advises the memo, a copy of which was obtained by CTV News Toronto. “It is important that schools remain neutral environments. Staff raising the topic of the death of a prominent societal figure in a classroom can be triggering for some students and remind them of previous losses they have experienced, it is therefore not encouraged.”

The memo further requested that school staff “refrain from developing tributes or activities to memorialize the death of the Queen, as well as displaying objects associated with the Queen for the purposes of memorializing.”

It advised to refrain from playing ‘God save the Queen’ or live streaming any events around the Queen's death as “this may be received differently by varying members of your school community” and noted that “monarchies are steeped in problematic histories of colonialism which connect to ongoing present day oppression of individuals and groups.”

A spokesperson for Lecce said Thursday that he has spoken with all school board chairs, directors and board leaders and has stated the expectation that all schools participate in a moment of silence at 1 p.m. on Sept. 19, the day the Queen’s state funeral will be held. However students who do not wish to participate do not have to.

“I have directed this board to implement the province's expectation, honour the Queen on the date of her funeral, and enrich students with a strong understanding of the values and enduring legacy of Canada's constitutional democracy,” Lecce said in his statement.

In a statement to CP24, the YRDSB said its focus “is always to ensure children are supported while in our classrooms.”

The board noted that “in a region as richly diverse as ours, there will be different reactions to news of the death of Queen Elizabeth II,” but said it will comply with the new provincial directive to commemorate her death.

While millions have been mourning the passing of Queen Elizabeth II, her death has also triggered renewed conversation about the ongoing relevance of the monarchy in many countries and has renewed conversation in some places which have a complicated and troubled history with Great Britain.

An Angus Reid survey conducted earlier this year found that most Canadians (63 per cent) had a favourable view of the Queen herself, though opinions of other members of the royal family were less favourable.

While polls have registered mixed feelings about Canada’s ongoing ties to the monarchy, the British sovereign remains Canada’s head of state and no serious proposals for severing ties have been put forward by federal politicians in recent memory.

Premier Doug Ford said earlier this week that while Ontario will not have a holiday to mark the Queen’s funeral, the province will observe a day of mourning, with a moment of silence at 1 p.m. for those who wish to observe it

trotsky

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Sep 16, 2022, 6:26:59 AM (9 days ago) Sep 16
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On 9/15/2022 7:28 PM, RichA wrote:
>
> Joshua Freeman
>
> Joshua Freeman, CP24 Web Content Writer
>
> @Josh_F
>
> Published Thursday, September 15, 2022 1:26PM EDT
> Last Updated Thursday, September 15, 2022 2:24PM EDT
>
> Ontario Education Minister Stephen Lecce


ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ


jgro...@hotmail.com

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Sep 22, 2022, 2:28:10 PM (3 days ago) Sep 22
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The US Post Offices still has the flag at half mast. Very inclusive of ABC to allow commoners to comment during the parade. Some people threw flowers with magnets that stuck to the Jaguar's front hood.
I was amazed by the rural road to Windsor having street lighting lamps. How pompus.

Ed Stasiak

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Sep 22, 2022, 2:55:51 PM (3 days ago) Sep 22
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> RichA
>
> It advised to refrain from playing ‘God save the Queen’ or live streaming any events around the Queen's death
> as “this may be received differently by varying members of your school community” and noted that “monarchies
> are steeped in problematic histories of colonialism which connect to ongoing present day oppression of individuals
> and groups.”

WTF, Canada? You used to be cool...

Rhino

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Sep 22, 2022, 4:52:45 PM (3 days ago) Sep 22
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That was the old Canada. Today's Canada is woker than woke, thanks to
our Liberal Party and their enablers, the New Democratic Party.



--
Rhino

Rhino

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Sep 22, 2022, 5:55:25 PM (3 days ago) Sep 22
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On 2022-09-22 2:55 PM, Ed Stasiak wrote:
Here's another current example of wokeness at a Toronto school:

https://nationalpost.com/news/toronto/school-mural

--
Rhino

RichA

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Sep 22, 2022, 6:27:38 PM (3 days ago) Sep 22
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How about a mural in all french schools showing the Plains of Abraham?

The Horny Goat

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Sep 23, 2022, 4:09:10 AM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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Thought I recognized that story.

It seems the "offence" was saying that European explorers discovered
Canada.

Though to be sure I thought the Brits had forgotten Franklin before I
went to England and found two statues of him there (there may be
others - these are the ones I saw personally) (1) in the lobby of the
chapel at the now former Royal Navy Academy at Greenwich and (2) on
the SE corner of Picadilly Circus next to a statue of "Scott of the
Antarctic". Both are fairly prominent positions to memorialize
somebody.

But in 2022 Canada it is apparently abhorrent to talk of discovering
land already occupied by aboriginal peoples.

suzeeq

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Sep 23, 2022, 10:28:55 AM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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In one sense they did discover it - for the Europeans who didn't know
the lands existed.

RichA

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Sep 23, 2022, 10:47:33 AM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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Vikings got there before that. After they went home, I'm sure some of them talked about the place.

Rhino

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Sep 23, 2022, 12:26:32 PM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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Nor did the ancestors of the aboriginals. Assuming the Bering land
bridge theory hasn't been totally disproven yet - I gather there is some
controversy about it - those ancestors just kept travelling east (for
whatever reason) ON FOOT and eventually found themselves on land which
eventually became separated from Asia once the Bering land bridge got
submerged beneath the sea.

There's no reason to believe that they were looking for a new continent.
In fact, the Americas and Asia were not yet separate continents when
they found the Americas.

--
Rhino

suzeeq

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Sep 23, 2022, 12:34:50 PM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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They think now that most of them actually traveled down the coast in
boats, rather than walking.
>
> There's no reason to believe that they were looking for a new continent.
> In fact, the Americas and Asia were not yet separate continents when
> they found the Americas.

Yes.

Rhino

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Sep 23, 2022, 12:58:47 PM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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I've heard that theory but I'm not sure if the anthropologists are
generally agreed that's what happened or if it is only an outlier theory
still waiting on acceptance from the majority of anthropologists.

>>
>> There's no reason to believe that they were looking for a new
>> continent. In fact, the Americas and Asia were not yet separate
>> continents when they found the Americas.
>
> Yes.

Even if the new boat theory is correct, the people in those boats
weren't specifically seeking a new continent, they just happened to bump
into it as they paddled/sailed across the sea.

--
Rhino

The Horny Goat

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Sep 23, 2022, 1:08:16 PM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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On Fri, 23 Sep 2022 12:26:19 -0400, Rhino
There is also the theory that one reason there are few artifacts from
that area was that 12000 years ago sea levels were lower than now and
that travellers could easily make it from Siberia down the coast of
Alaska and British Columbia by canoe thereby bypassing some fairly
large and hungry critters (bears and big cats) in the Northern BC and
Yukon area while crossing the area believed to have been the land
bridge.

Any artifacts you understand not being found as they are now under
20-200 fathoms of water.

suzeeq

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Sep 23, 2022, 1:40:21 PM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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Or they thought they'd follow the coast a ways and see what was there.

The Horny Goat

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Sep 23, 2022, 3:53:03 PM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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On Fri, 23 Sep 2022 12:58:34 -0400, Rhino
<no_offlin...@example.com> wrote:

>Even if the new boat theory is correct, the people in those boats
>weren't specifically seeking a new continent, they just happened to bump
>into it as they paddled/sailed across the sea.

The suggestion I heard was that they were hunters (in this case of
fish and marine mammals) chasing their prey.

Ed Stasiak

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Sep 23, 2022, 3:57:55 PM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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> Rhino
> > suzeeq
> >
> > In one sense they did discover it - for the Europeans who didn't know
> > the lands existed.
>
> Nor did the ancestors of the aboriginals.

Indeed and not only were the ancient Indians (and probably ancient Europeans)
unaware they had wandered into an undiscovered continent, their descendants
for thousands of years were also totally unaware that here was anything outside
their tribal lands until Europeans showed up.

Adam H. Kerman

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Sep 23, 2022, 4:24:29 PM (2 days ago) Sep 23
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How... xenophobic all those ancient peoples were
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