The Young Ones

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Mike ---- Schneider

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Dec 4, 1990, 10:14:18 PM12/4/90
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YOU WROTE--------------------->

Has anyone ever seen this show? How many episodes of it did they make?
What are all the guys from the show doing now? What was your favorite episode?
Is it on anywhere now? Is there anyplace I could get back episodes? I love this
show, as do many of my friends.
I figured I'd post to rec.arts.tv.uk even though I hear that British folks
don't like all those British comedy shows (Monty Python, Young Ones, etc.) like
us silly Americans.
What is anyones opinion/information on this?
<-------------------
Well lets see, I believe they made a some where around fifteen shows.
I know that after the Young Ones ended they went on to do a show called
The Comic Strip which puts out hilarious short story type comedies every
once and a while, the famous of which was "BAD NEWS" the British Version of
Spinal Tap. Bad News is available on Video Tape in the U.S. via Rhino Records.
My favorite Young Ones episode is when they go on the University Challenge game
s show, although the final episode is good also.
After MTV dropped it, I don't believe it aired anywhere else. But the good news
is that CBS/FOX video has started selling the episodes on video tape. The firs
t tape contains the epsiodes callled OIL, BORING, and FLOOD. The catalog number
is5402. If sales for this inital tape are good CBS/FOX intends to release futu
re spisodes.q
:wq
H

shack

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Dec 4, 1990, 5:32:10 PM12/4/90
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Has anyone ever seen this show? How many episodes of it did they make?
What are all the guys from the show doing now? What was your favorite episode?
Is it on anywhere now? Is there anyplace I could get back episodes? I love this
show, as do many of my friends.
I figured I'd post to rec.arts.tv.uk even though I hear that British folks
don't like all those British comedy shows (Monty Python, Young Ones, etc.) like
us silly Americans.
What is anyones opinion/information on this?
Thanks


Sime revolution
(Tom @psuvm on mxs144 =
courtesy of shack) power

Mike Godfrey

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Dec 5, 1990, 2:01:17 PM12/5/90
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MuchMusic (Canadian MTV) showed "More Bad News" a few months ago.
Is this the same as "Bad News" or is it the sequel?

(Or am I confused again?)

--
Mike Godfrey "I spy, with my mind's eye,
Dept of Comp Sci, UofT something beginning with `G'".
mi...@csri.toronto.edu -- Rene Descartes

Erik-jan Vens

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Dec 6, 1990, 5:40:52 AM12/6/90
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Do not forget "The Dangerous Brothers" that Rik Mayall and Adrian Edmonson
(as I recall his name was, but I mean Vivian from the Young Ones) did
after The Young Ones. Where Rik sort of was the manager and Adrian gotten
fired off by canons or was set fire to. I especially remember the show
where Adrian was supposed to be fired by a canon, had to break through a
brick wall go through a couple of glass walls through a hoople and
finally land in a bucket of water..

Last evening on BBC I episode 4 of Blackadder IV, which had Rik as the
too-jolly lighthearted English flyer ("There are 2 million women and there
is only one Flashheart") and Adrian as the evil German pilot Baron von
Richthofen ("Ha... ha... ha... you British have such humor! Ha..").

But I think we should note that The Young Ones *and* Filthy, Rich and
Catflap *and* Blackadder were written by Ben Elton (some with others).
Mr. Elton is the real genius. I didn't like his book "Stark", but I very
much liked his one-man shows "The Man From A.U.N.T.I.E.". (rerunning on
BBC now).

Erik-Jan.

Joan McGalliard

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Dec 6, 1990, 5:03:13 PM12/6/90
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In article <90338.173...@psuvm.psu.edu> MXS...@psuvm.psu.edu (shack) writes:
>Has anyone ever seen this show? How many episodes of it did they make?
>What are all the guys from the show doing now? What was your favorite episode?
>Is it on anywhere now? Is there anyplace I could get back episodes? I love this
>show, as do many of my friends.

1) Yes.

2) 12.

3) I don't know about Mike (can't even remember the
actor's name) as no reports of him reach here but the
others:

They all appear in Comic Strip Presents - look out for this,
it is a very good British comedy series. Each episode is
totally independent and completely different. Themes range
from parodies of heavy metal (a la spinal tap) to Hollywood
comes to England ( the making of a film about the British
miners strike with Arthur Skargill (sp?) played by "Al
Pacino")

Nigel Planer (Neil) has done some serious acting. His
latest work is somewhere between the two. He has "become"
Nicholas Craig, a rep actor and total wanker. There is a
book out "I, An Actor" by Nicholas Craig which is written
very seriously and is very funny. The only mention of the
real authors is in the copyright note inside the title page
[(c) Christopher Douglas and Nigel Planer]. A series based
on this character is being screened in England "The Naked
Actor" and Nigel Planer's name appears on the end credits as
"assistant to Mr Craig."

Rick Mayall (Rick) is still making The New Statesman, a
series about a young Tory MP.

Haven't seen much Ade Edmundson (Vyvyan) stuff recently. I
have seen him in a couple of teleplays (Honest Decent and
True was very good) but I don't know what else he is up to.

Ben Elton (scripts, plus bit parts) is still working hard.
He writes Black Adder, has his own tv show, wrote a book
last year (Stark), he has a stage play on currently (I
think) and is generally keeping busy.

Alexei Sayle (the Bolovsky family) also has his own show
(Stuff) which is very funny and really worth seeing (and
taping and rewatching and rewatching and rewatching . . .)

4) Bambi (about University Challenge) with Summer Holiday
(the _last_ episode) a runner up.

5) I don't know

6) I've got them, but I guess that doesn't help (no, I am
not going to run a mail order service on pirate videos)

joan
--
"A hedgehog is a gerbil Joan McGalliard,
designed by Baptists." Latrobe University,
Department of Computer Science.
Melbourne, Australia.

PML3@lehigh

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Dec 6, 1990, 7:30:47 PM12/6/90
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YES! What an excellent show. I so dearly miss the show since MTV
yanked it off the air a couple years back. I would DO ANYTHING to get
my hands on the episodes. Thank god they put the Prisoner on video, I
was hoping that they'd do the same for the Young Ones.

PML3@lehigh

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Dec 6, 1990, 7:32:28 PM12/6/90
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I love Summer Holiday too, and you're right, the bus scene at the end
is a CLASSIC.

My other favorite episode is the one with the game show (where on the
way, Adrian gets his head cut off when he looks outside the train
window). If I'm not mistaken , that one was called 'Bambi'.

'We're full-bottomed anarchists!'
-Ric, Summer Holiday

PML3@lehigh

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Dec 6, 1990, 7:35:22 PM12/6/90
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Thaks for the info! I'm definitely snagging that first tape...

Daniel Bowen

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Dec 6, 1990, 6:36:32 AM12/6/90
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In article <1990Dec5.1...@jarvis.csri.toronto.edu>, mi...@csri.toronto.edu (Mike Godfrey) writes:
> MuchMusic (Canadian MTV) showed "More Bad News" a few months ago.
> Is this the same as "Bad News" or is it the sequel?
>
> (Or am I confused again?)

"More Bad News" is the sequel; which has NOT been shown in Australia..
(ABC BASTARDS!!!) Thank God for the invention of video tapes,
and overseas mail...

In the sequel there's a bit where they show Bad News on a UK Music
show (The Tube, I think). Does anyone know if this is genuine footage?

Also look out for the Bad News album (EMI Records) and video-clip
for their single "Bohemian Rhapsody". Very funny stuff indeed.


"You are fucking near to fucking having your fucking head kicked in"
Vim Fuego

--
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/ | DANIEL BOWEN |but it's pronounced Throat-Wobbler-Mangrove"
_/__|__ MONASH UNIVERSITY |NOW AT TWO BRAND_\ vac...@vx24.cc.monash.edu.au
\_____/=MELBOURNE==AUSTRALIA==|NEW ADDRESSES!! /vac...@monu6.cc.monash.edu.au

Matthew Haikin

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Dec 7, 1990, 5:25:19 AM12/7/90
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>I figured I'd post to rec.arts.tv.uk even though I hear that British folks
>don't like all those British comedy shows (Monty Python, Young Ones, etc.) like
>us silly Americans.

What a load of complete crap! I've nevber met ANYONE (well, anyone under
50 anyway) who doesn't think that The Young Ones and Monty Python
are hysterically funny, in fact (at the risk of being vehemently anti-american)
I'm surprised you find it funny over in the states, I mean lets face it, a
nation who's most popular TV show is The Cosby's hasn't got much to offewr
the world in the name of humour (ok, so the simpsons is good, but theres
always exceptions)...

Matthew Farwell

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Dec 7, 1990, 10:31:27 AM12/7/90
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In article <93...@latcs1.oz.au> j...@latcs1.oz.au (Joan McGalliard) writes:
>In article <90338.173...@psuvm.psu.edu> MXS...@psuvm.psu.edu (shack) writes:
>>Has anyone ever seen this show? How many episodes of it did they make?
>>What are all the guys from the show doing now? What was your favorite episode?
>>Is it on anywhere now? Is there anyplace I could get back episodes? I love
>> this show, as do many of my friends.
>1) Yes.

Me too.

>2) 12.

Correct.

>3) I don't know about Mike (can't even remember the
>actor's name) as no reports of him reach here but the
>others:

Christopher Ryan. He appeared in a black comedy about discrimination
called 'Small World' (or something like that) where everyone under 5
foot 2 had to live in ghettoes etc.

>They all appear in Comic Strip Presents - look out for this,
>it is a very good British comedy series. Each episode is
>totally independent and completely different. Themes range
>from parodies of heavy metal (a la spinal tap) to Hollywood
>comes to England ( the making of a film about the British
>miners strike with Arthur Skargill (sp?) played by "Al
>Pacino")

Scargill. There is also 'More Bad News' + they have produced a couple
of albums to date.

>Rick Mayall (Rick) is still making The New Statesman, a
>series about a young Tory MP.

Rik Mayall.

>Haven't seen much Ade Edmundson (Vyvyan) stuff recently. I
>have seen him in a couple of teleplays (Honest Decent and
>True was very good) but I don't know what else he is up to.

At the moment he's doing a Stage version of The Rocky Horror Picture
Show (as Brad).

>Alexei Sayle (the Bolovsky family) also has his own show
>(Stuff) which is very funny and really worth seeing (and
>taping and rewatching and rewatching and rewatching . . .)

A L E X E I - S A Y L E , Alexei Sayle, Alexei Sayle, who's as fat and ugly
as can be?

>4) Bambi (about University Challenge) with Summer Holiday
>(the _last_ episode) a runner up.

Either Bambi or Horror. You really have to have watched University Challenge
to know some of the in-jokes though.

>5) I don't know

Not in this country.

>6) I've got them, but I guess that doesn't help (no, I am
>not going to run a mail order service on pirate videos)

Try contacting the Beeb. I know they've released at least 6 episodes on video,
possibly more.

Dylan.
--
Matthew J Farwell | Email: dy...@ibmpcug.co.uk
The IBM PC User Group, PO Box 360,| ...!uunet!ukc!ibmpcug!dylan
Harrow HA1 4LQ England | CONNECT - Usenet Access in the UK!!
Phone: +44 81-863-1191 | Sun? Don't they make coffee machines?

David Pautler

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Dec 7, 1990, 3:47:46 PM12/7/90
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In article <93...@latcs1.oz.au>, j...@latcs1.oz.au (Joan McGalliard) writes:
> 3) I don't know about Mike (can't even remember the
> actor's name) as no reports of him reach here but the
> others:

I asked on the monty-python group a few months ago about the current
whereabouts of Christopher Ryan (Mike, the cool one) but I didn't get
any response. I haven't seen him in any Comic Strip episodes, and my
British friends, who don't follow the show, don't know anything about
him.



> They all appear in Comic Strip Presents - look out for this,
> it is a very good British comedy series.

"Five go mad in Dorset" has to be one of the funniest programs I have ever
seen on television. For those of you not rolling on the floor at the mere
mention of it, it is a parody of the popular fictional adventures of two
girls, two boys, and their long-suffering dog Timmy with all kinds of
scoundrels while on a countryside bicycling tour.

> Nigel Planer (Neil) has done some serious acting.

I just saw "Brazil" again last night. Planer is one of the workmen installing
a circular floor segment to replace the hole cut in the ceiling of the
Buttle's apartment.

Rik Mayall hosts a program of children's fairytales on cable channel
BRAVO here in the US.

C. Kurt Svihla

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Dec 7, 1990, 6:24:02 PM12/7/90
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In article <26...@gould.doc.ic.ac.uk>, m...@doc.ic.ac.uk (Matthew Haikin) writes...

Ahem. First let me say touche. Then let me explain a couple of things.

1. Cosby is apparently very popular. People like to watch it for the
same reasons they've always liked to watch genial, harmless sitcoms. I
don't watch it and I've never heard too many people say they thought it
was hilarious. Mostly harmless, mainly.

2. There are only about two shows on American currently on American
television which can make me laugh: Murphy Brown and the aforementioned
Simpsons. They are both quite funny, but in ways very different from
the more anarchic shows from Britain. I don't know why, but the constant
repetition of the word "bastard" on the Young Ones was often enough to
reduce me to a state of quivering hilarity. It must touch some unseen
funnybone in the cosmic unconscious.

3. British shows are generally funnier than American shows, because, I
suspect, the British sense of humour is more developed than ours. A
short list of recent British hilarity:

1. Monty Python
2. The Young Ones
3. The Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy
4. Fawlty Towers
5. Blackadder

What have we in the States to offer? The Church Lady? Wayne's World?
Fat people insulting each other? The funniest show on American TV in recent
memory (SCTV) was *Canadian*. For some reason, people don't seem to stay
funny very long here in America. The guys on the original SNL were funny at
the time, but couldn't make a Chesire cat grin today. Cosby used to be
very funny in the 60's, now he seems like a self-parody. Even Dudley Moore,
who used to be hysterical with Peter Cooke, made a funny movie or two here,
but lately anything he touches turns to dross. On the other hand, I'm not
sure that everything across the ocean is as funny as the above-cited.
Benny Hill, for example, *is* pretty lame.

Nick Sayer

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Dec 8, 1990, 12:15:29 AM12/8/90
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svi...@evax0.eng.fsu.edu (C. Kurt Svihla) writes:

>1. Monty Python
>2. The Young Ones
>3. The Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy
>4. Fawlty Towers
>5. Blackadder

Let us not forget "Alexy Sayle's Stuff." There's something terribly
funny about, "A lot of my friends say I should go to the States... But
then a lot of them tell me, 'Sod off, you bastard!'"

--
Nick Sayer | Disclaimer: "Don't try this at home, | RIP: Mel Blanc
mra...@quack.sac.ca.us | kids. This should only be done by | 1908-1989
N6QQQ [44.2.1.17] | trained, professional idiots." | May he never
209-952-5347 (Telebit) | --Plucky Duck | be silenced.

Marlon Cole

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Dec 10, 1990, 9:34:12 AM12/10/90
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In article <93...@latcs1.oz.au> j...@latcs1.oz.au (Joan McGalliard) writes:
>
>3) I don't know about Mike (can't even remember the
>actor's name) as no reports of him reach here but the
>others:
>
Christopher Ryan - he appears once in awhile in the occasional program,
invariably with a cry from the assembled audience of "That's Mike from the
Young Ones - wassisname?"
For instance he appeared as one of the Driscoll Brothers in an episode of
"Only Fools and Horses", and I can recall him appearing in a couple of other
programs whose names escape me (and hearing him occasionally in commercial
voiceovers....).

>They all appear in Comic Strip Presents - look out for this,
>it is a very good British comedy series. Each episode is
>totally independent and completely different. Themes range
>from parodies of heavy metal (a la spinal tap) to Hollywood
>comes to England ( the making of a film about the British
>miners strike with Arthur Skargill (sp?) played by "Al
>Pacino")
>

Ditto! They've subsequently made a similar episode called "GLC" (I hope!),
with Robby Coltraine playing Charles Bronson playing Ken Livingstone, doing
battle against the dreaded "Ice Maiden" played by Jennifer Saunders! Superb.

>Nigel Planer (Neil) has done some serious acting.

He certainly has, not least his role in the TV production of Dennis Potters
"Blackeyes", and his lead role in a play called (correct me, someone, if I'm
wrong here) "Frankensteins Baby" in which he fell victim to a female Dr.
F.'s experiment in making a man pregnant.

>Haven't seen much Ade Edmundson (Vyvyan) stuff recently. I
>have seen him in a couple of teleplays (Honest Decent and
>True was very good) but I don't know what else he is up to.
>

He was also in a 1988ish series called "Happy Families" in which he played
a dimwit sent out into the world to find each of his 6 sisters (all played by
Jennifer Saunders) and return them to his supposedly dieing granny (also played
by J.S.) - Dawn French played the batty family cook and Steven Fry the doctor
- can't remember if Hugh Laurie put in a appearance in there somewhere as
well :-)
I suspect this series was also written, at least in part, by Ben Elton.
I've vague recollections of seeing him in something serious fairly
recently (anybody help me out here?).

Cheers,

Marlon

Iain D. Sinclair

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Dec 11, 1990, 7:29:13 PM12/11/90
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ccz...@clan.nott.ac.uk (Marlon Cole) writes:

> He was also in a 1988ish

Mid-1985.

>series called "Happy Families" in which he played
>a dimwit sent out into the world to find each of his 6 sisters (all played by
>Jennifer Saunders) and return them to his supposedly dieing granny (also played
>by J.S.) - Dawn French played the batty family cook and Steven Fry the doctor
> - can't remember if Hugh Laurie put in a appearance in there somewhere as
>well :-)

There was also a fairly characteristic performance from Rik Mayall as
a French Nazi vicar. The whole thing smacks of the Comic Strip Presents stuff.
I remember the episode where one of Saunders' characters (who was in prison)
was being interviewed by a documentary-maker; the documentary-maker was
fabricating jargon used by the inmates to make the doc seem more authentic!

I really loved _Happy Families_ and I wish that someone, somewhere, would
repeat it.

--
Iain Dick // axolotl@ultima. // Every dark cloud has an acid rain lining. //
Sinclair // socs.uts.edu.au // (NB: my email address is unreliable.) //

Marc Wiener

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Dec 11, 1990, 9:27:29 AM12/11/90
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In article <1990Dec10.1...@cs.nott.ac.uk> ccz...@clan.nott.ac.uk (Marlon Cole) writes:
>In article <93...@latcs1.oz.au> j...@latcs1.oz.au (Joan McGalliard) writes:
>>
>>
> Christopher Ryan - he appears once in awhile in the occasional program,
>invariably with a cry from the assembled audience of "That's Mike from the
>Young Ones - wassisname?"

He also appeared in an episode of Dr. Who as an alien in heavy makeup and
costume. If not for his name in the credits I wouldn't have recognized him.
--

Marc Wiener | ma...@pinet.aip.org
American Institute of Physics | ma...@aip.bitnet
500 Sunnyside Blvd. |

Jeff Sullivan

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Dec 17, 1990, 7:24:13 PM12/17/90
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What a bunch of nationalist bullshit! When was Python made? How long
since they did a TV series?

America hasnothing to offer in humor? How many British film comedies
have even made a dent over here? Give me a break.

Comedy is very cultural. Some comedies break the culture barrier;
some don't. Monty Python is not very popular at all over here. There
is, however, a small but fanatical following.

Over here, right now, we have several very funny shows:

1. Get a life.

2. Parker Lewis Can't Lose (very quirky and, dammit, funny)

3. The Simpsons (but not as good as last year, IMHO)

4. Murphy Brown (ditto)


One thing you'll notice about British comedies is their seasons are
much shorter. All things considered, if they had to do 24-26 episodes
a year, they might not be as "brilliant" as even (gasp) American
sitcoms.

Think about it. All of the Blackadders combined (and I've only seen a
few, but liked them a lot -- are they playing in SoCal at all?) total
ONE season of a US sitcom. How long did it take to produce them?


jas

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jeffrey A. Sullivan | Senior Systems Programmer
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S.S.Sturrock

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Dec 18, 1990, 5:03:42 AM12/18/90
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In article <16...@venera.isi.edu> j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:
>
>What a bunch of nationalist bullshit! When was Python made? How long
>since they did a TV series?
>
>America hasnothing to offer in humor? How many British film comedies
>have even made a dent over here? Give me a break.
>
>Comedy is very cultural. Some comedies break the culture barrier;
>some don't. Monty Python is not very popular at all over here. There
>is, however, a small but fanatical following.
>
>One thing you'll notice about British comedies is their seasons are
>much shorter. All things considered, if they had to do 24-26 episodes
>a year, they might not be as "brilliant" as even (gasp) American
>sitcoms.
>
>Think about it. All of the Blackadders combined (and I've only seen a
>few, but liked them a lot -- are they playing in SoCal at all?) total
>ONE season of a US sitcom. How long did it take to produce them?
>
>
>jas
>

No doubt you're expecting this but:

We only have 4 TV stations, much of the time the programmes are not comedy,
so not much time can be spent on making the programmes.

Quality not quantity is the name of the game (old cliche but what the hell)

Maybe we know when an idea is getting tired.

Britain is very much smaller than America.

I find American humour simplistic and dull, personal opinion only.
(maybe humour says more about a country than I thought :-) )

I don't see that we should take lessons in humour from a country that can't
even spell the word :-)


Now thats Nationalistic!!!!


Shane Sturrock, Biol Lab., University of Kent, Canterbury, Great Britain.

Jimmy Aitken

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Dec 18, 1990, 7:27:14 AM12/18/90
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In article <16...@venera.isi.edu> j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:
>What a bunch of nationalist bullshit! When was Python made? How long
>since they did a TV series?

>America hasnothing to offer in humor? How many British film comedies
>have even made a dent over here? Give me a break.

The British fuilm indusry (if you can call it that) is considerably
smaller and has less infrasctructure than the US. With films costing
so much to make, two that don't make their money back can push a
production company into bankrupcy, so you tend to get less people
willing to take risks.

>One thing you'll notice about British comedies is their seasons are
>much shorter. All things considered, if they had to do 24-26 episodes
>a year, they might not be as "brilliant" as even (gasp) American
>sitcoms.

>
>Think about it. All of the Blackadders combined (and I've only seen a
>few, but liked them a lot -- are they playing in SoCal at all?) total
>ONE season of a US sitcom. How long did it take to produce them?

I don't think the producing of them was a problem, but the writing
was. Seasons 2,3 and 4 of Black Adder were written by two people who
were doing a lot of other work at the same time. Coming up with good,
amusing ideas on demand can't be easy. I don't know how many people
are involved in the writing of, say, an episode of Cheers as the
credits usually fly by too fast for any normal human to read and
digest, but I'd guess that it's not the same one each week.

Personally I'd prefer comedy that was good every so often, than
mediocrity the whole time with inspired brilliance very now and then.

Jimmy
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Jeff Sullivan

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Dec 18, 1990, 7:13:31 PM12/18/90
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In article <661523233.AA4454@flaccid> ji...@pyra.co.uk (Jimmy Aitken) writes:

>In article <16...@venera.isi.edu> j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:
>>What a bunch of nationalist bullshit! When was Python made? How long
>>since they did a TV series?
>
>>America hasnothing to offer in humor? How many British film comedies
>>have even made a dent over here? Give me a break.
>
>The British fuilm indusry (if you can call it that) is considerably
>smaller and has less infrasctructure than the US. With films costing
>so much to make, two that don't make their money back can push a
>production company into bankrupcy, so you tend to get less people
>willing to take risks.

So? They claim superiority, then make excuses?


>
>>One thing you'll notice about British comedies is their seasons are
>>much shorter. All things considered, if they had to do 24-26 episodes
>>a year, they might not be as "brilliant" as even (gasp) American
>>sitcoms.
>
>>
>>Think about it. All of the Blackadders combined (and I've only seen a
>>few, but liked them a lot -- are they playing in SoCal at all?) total
>>ONE season of a US sitcom. How long did it take to produce them?
>
>I don't think the producing of them was a problem, but the writing
>was. Seasons 2,3 and 4 of Black Adder were written by two people who

In TV, producing IS writing.

>were doing a lot of other work at the same time. Coming up with good,
>amusing ideas on demand can't be easy. I don't know how many people

You're right. It isn't. Try having to put out a show every week.
It's been likened to writing a play on a typewriter that's on a
conveyor belt. You type and type as the typewriter moves toward a
hole in the wall, and whatever you have done by the time the
typewriter hits the hole is what you have. It's a grueling business.

>are involved in the writing of, say, an episode of Cheers as the
>credits usually fly by too fast for any normal human to read and

Except, of course, that credits for writing are up front, and are up
for about 5 seconds.

>digest, but I'd guess that it's not the same one each week.
>

That's right. It isn't. It's usually onew of the writing staff.
Occasionally, it's a freelancer. The writers guild has regulations
that keep a show from monopolizing all of the writing on a show. It
keep other writers sort of "in work."

>Personally I'd prefer comedy that was good every so often, than
>mediocrity the whole time with inspired brilliance very now and then.
>

But what would you watch the other 45 weeks a year? Reruns?

Matthew Farwell

unread,
Dec 19, 1990, 2:39:49 AM12/19/90
to
In article <16...@venera.isi.edu> j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:
>In article <26...@gould.doc.ic.ac.uk> m...@doc.ic.ac.uk (Matthew Haikin) writes:
>>In article <90338.173...@psuvm.psu.edu> MXS...@psuvm.psu.edu (shack) writes:
>>>I figured I'd post to rec.arts.tv.uk even though I hear that British folks
>>>don't like all those British comedy shows (Monty Python, Young Ones, etc.) like
>>>us silly Americans.
>>What a load of complete crap! I've nevber met ANYONE (well, anyone under
>>50 anyway) who doesn't think that The Young Ones and Monty Python
>>are hysterically funny, in fact (at the risk of being vehemently anti-american)
>>I'm surprised you find it funny over in the states, I mean lets face it, a
>>nation who's most popular TV show is The Cosby's hasn't got much to offewr
>>the world in the name of humour (ok, so the simpsons is good, but theres
>>always exceptions)...
>
>What a bunch of nationalist bullshit! When was Python made? How long
>since they did a TV series?

Late 60's Early Seventies. And it actually wasn't very popular at the time
certainly not when it started.

>America has nothing to offer in humor? How many British film comedies


>have even made a dent over here? Give me a break.

I wouldn't say that. But a lot of the 'American Humour' that comes over here
is very mainstream and IMHO boring.

>One thing you'll notice about British comedies is their seasons are
>much shorter. All things considered, if they had to do 24-26 episodes
>a year, they might not be as "brilliant" as even (gasp) American
>sitcoms.

Umm, yes. The usual season for shows over here is six episodes.

>Think about it. All of the Blackadders combined (and I've only seen a
>few, but liked them a lot -- are they playing in SoCal at all?) total
>ONE season of a US sitcom. How long did it take to produce them?

As has already been mentioned, this is because the writers were doing
other things in between writing for the episodes.

It seems to me that American TV networks are less willing to stick their
necks out and mainly put out mainstream stuff. ie going for the ratings

Sweeping generalisation coming up:-

In American soaps + comedies + tv shows generally, if people are nasty
to one another, then everyone eventually makes up in the end, or there
is a 'moral to the story', which is spelled out in nice clear terms so
people can understand it. In our house, its usually accompanied by
several of us running to the toilet to throw up. In the british
comedies under discussion presently in this newsgroup (ie Blackadder,
the Young Ones, Red Dwarf), there is no sickly moralising at the end of
the program, which to me makes it better to watch.

I dread to think what The Young Ones would have been like if we'd
had moralistic overtones thrown in too.

"Yes, Rick, I'm sorry I chopped your head off with that chainsaw, it was
very nasty of me."
'Yes well vyvyan, I was a bit nasty to you, nailing you to the wall that
way, just because you called me a poof, and thats a word that nasty
people use to insult people just because they happen to be different'
"Yes Rick, and I'm sorry"

Matthew Farwell

unread,
Dec 19, 1990, 3:07:49 AM12/19/90
to
In article <16...@venera.isi.edu> j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:
>You're right. It isn't. Try having to put out a show every week.
>It's been likened to writing a play on a typewriter that's on a
>conveyor belt. You type and type as the typewriter moves toward a
>hole in the wall, and whatever you have done by the time the
>typewriter hits the hole is what you have. It's a grueling business.

So maybe its a better idea to do the writing beforehand?

>That's right. It isn't. It's usually onew of the writing staff.
>Occasionally, it's a freelancer. The writers guild has regulations
>that keep a show from monopolizing all of the writing on a show. It
>keep other writers sort of "in work."

So you get a lot of people who may not know the characters in the show
writing for the show?

>>Personally I'd prefer comedy that was good every so often, than
>>mediocrity the whole time with inspired brilliance very now and then.
>But what would you watch the other 45 weeks a year? Reruns?

Sometimes. But, you see, although we get repeats of Blackadder, and the
Young Ones (sometimes), we hardly ever get repeats of the American
Comedies we get over here (Cheers is a notable exception, but that has a
special place in Channel 4's history, since it was the program that
almost single-handedly kept it on its feet). I've never seen a repeat
of The Cosby Show, or Roseanne.

(A quick aside on the different styles of program making. Both sides of the
atlantic made versions of 'The Life and Loves of A She-Devil', in the States
it was called 'She-Devil' and was actually a film, whereas here it was a TV
series made shown on (and made by?) the Beeb.

The american version starred Meryl Streep and wassername from Roseanne, and
from what I've seen (admittedly not all) wasn't nearly as well done as
the beeb production, which starred Jane Asher???, Tom Baker and (for the
life of me I can't remember her name). This was much more atmospheric
and more in keeping with the book.)

I'm not saying that Americans don't produce good series, far from it. All
The American networks seem to be much more prepared to put out stuff
which offends the minimum amount of people.

Dylan. (Incoherent at this time in the morning)

Matthew Farwell

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Dec 19, 1990, 3:10:48 AM12/19/90
to
In article <64...@harrier.ukc.ac.uk> ss...@ukc.ac.uk (S.S.Sturrock) writes:
>Maybe we know when an idea is getting tired.

Oh, I don't know. Look at Terry + June. Hand up everyone who said
'Well thank god thats over' when they finally stopped repeating them?

For once I was glad to see Wogan on the box.

Dylan.

Matthew Farwell

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Dec 19, 1990, 3:47:45 AM12/19/90
to
In article <1990Dec19....@ibmpcug.co.uk> dy...@ibmpcug.CO.UK (Matthew Farwell) writes:
>Oh, I don't know. Look at Terry + June. Hand up everyone who said
^^^^^^^

Thats hands up in the air, for anyone who was wondering...

Chris Cooke

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Dec 19, 1990, 6:06:37 AM12/19/90
to
In article <16...@venera.isi.edu>, j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:

> America hasnothing to offer in humor? How many British film comedies
> have even made a dent over here? Give me a break.

We don't have a film industry to speak of, so it's pretty unlikely
you'd see many British films of any type anywhere in the world.
Nothing to do with lack of talent, everything to do with British
investors' short-sighted attitudes.

Please don't follow up nationalist bullshit with more of the same...
--
-- Chris. c...@cs.ed.ac.uk (on Janet, c...@uk.ac.ed.cs)

"He's not the sort of chap you'd want to invite to dinner. Or even lunch."
Edward Heath on Saddam Hussein

Philip Stylianos

unread,
Dec 19, 1990, 2:20:38 PM12/19/90
to
Notes on Analysis

o Law and Order just made the Popular Twenty by rating, pitted against
thirtysomething, which didn't do relatively bad. Is Law and Order the
second hit of the season? (America's Funniest People was the first.)
o A repeat of the I Love Lucy christmas episode came in 30th by rating.
Will CBS ever sink so low as to necessitate rerunning the other epi-
sodes?
o Something's Got to Give, a documentary on Marilyn's last movie efforts,
came in a disappointing 73rd by rating, losing to Cheers, Gabriel's
Fire and The Flash. I have a feeling if this interesting show were on
another network, it would have done better, even in the Th9 timeslot.
o The Simpsons disappoint again. A repeat got clobbered by The Cosby
Show. This may not sound so bad, but The Simpsons always have a higher
viewership, repeat or not, but this time they were trounced soundly
(27.1 million v 21.4 million).
o Twin Peaks is like a liability on ABC's books, which I'm sure they
would like to erase. This week, it ranked 67th by rating, and only
scored a 15 share.
o Is the fad over? America's Funniest hour (!), Su8, is slipping. Ameri-
ca's Funniest People did not even make the Popular Twenties.
o As football gets more exciting, CBS Mo9 - Mo 10 suffers. Formerly
Popular Five shows, they now barely crack the Popular Twenties.
o Who *deserves* the Tu8:30 slot more - Head of the Class (yea, right),
or The Wonder Years? Ask yourselves that, ABC.
o Plug of the week: Seinfeld, NBC We9:30. No, it's not on yet, but
remember this for future reference, Nielsen viewers.


POPULAR TWENTY by Rating (Number of households tuned in divided by 931,000)


Show Network RATING Viewers Slot
---- ------- ------ ------- ----
1 Cheers NBC 22.6 33.8 Th9
2 60 Minutes CBS 20.6 29.4 Su7
3 A Different World NBC 18.2 27.8 Th8:30
Monday Night Football ABC 18.2 25.9 Mo9
5 Empty Nest NBC 18.1 27.0 Sa9:30
6 The Cosby Show NBC 17.7 27.1 Th8
In the Heat of the Night NBC 17.7 25.7 Tu9
8 Roseanne ABC 17.5 26.4 Tu9 repeat
9 The Golden Girls NBC 17.2 25.6 Sa9
10 Unsolved Mysteries NBC 16.9 25.6 We8
11 Murder, She Wrote CBS 16.5 23.0 Su8
12 Designing Women CBS 16.4 21.7 Mo9:30
13 L.A. Law NBC 15.9 22.1 Th10
14 Coach ABC 15.8 23.4 Tu9:30
15 Grand NBC 15.6 22.6 Th9:30
Sinatra's 75th Birthday CBS 15.6 21.9 Su9 special
17 America's Funniest
Home Videos ABC 15.4 27.0 Su8
18 Matlock NBC 15.3 22.2 Tu8
19 Murphy Brown CBS 15.0 20.2 Mo9
20 Law and Order NBC 14.4 19.8 Tu10

POPULAR TWENTY by Audience Share (percent of households watching TV tuned
into the show)


Show Network SHARE Rating Rat. Rank Slot
---- ------- ----- ------ --------- ----
1 Cheers NBC 36 22.6 1 Th9
60 Minutes CBS 36 20.6 2 Su7
3 Empty Nest NBC 32 18.1 5 Sa9:30
4 Monday Night Football ABC 31 18.2 3 Mo9
The Golden Girls NBC 31 17.2 9 Sa9
6 A Different World NBC 29 18.2 3 Th8:30
The Cosby Show NBC 29 17.7 6 Th8
8 In the Heat of the Night NBC 28 17.7 6 Tu9
Roseanne ABC 28 17.5 8 Tu9
Unsolved Mysteries NBC 28 16.9 10 We8
11 L.A. Law NBC 27 15.9 13 Th10
Bob Hope's Christmas Special NBC 27 14.1 22 Sa10
13 Murder, She Wrote CBS 26 16.5 11 Su8
Law and Order NBC 26 14.4 20 Th10
Hunter NBC 26 13.5 26 We10
16 Coach ABC 25 15.8 14 Tu9:30
Grand NBC 25 15.6 15 Th9:30
Sinatra's 75th Birthday CBS 25 15.6 15 Su9
Matlock NBC 25 15.3 18 Tu8
20 Designing Women CBS 24 16.4 12 Mo9:30
America's Funniest
Home Videos ABC 24 15.4 17 Su8
20/20 ABC 24 12.7 32 Fr10


BEST TEN THEME SONGS WORST TEN THEME SONGS

Show Show
---- ----
BEST Twin Peaks WORST Doogie Howser, M.D.
2 Family Matters 2 America's Funniest Home Videos
3 The Simpsons 3 Who's the Boss?
4 thirtysomething 4 Murphy Brown (closing theme)
5 Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 5 A Different World
6 Grand 6 Cheers
7 Coach 7 L.A. Law
8 Full House 8 The Golden Girls
9 Get a Life 9 The Wonder Years
10 In Living Color 10 Amen
----------------------------------- -------------------------------
Hunter ALSO Married . . . with Children
ALSO The Cosby Show RAN
RAN Married . . . with Children
Babes
Dallas
L.A. Law
60 Minutes :>

Allen Halsell

unread,
Dec 19, 1990, 2:33:39 PM12/19/90
to
I know this is for all our entertainment, but can we please get back
to the point or drop it? _The Young Ones_ was a great show, of
course, as was Monty Python. I'm sure many of the readers here loved
them (and others, yes). But this "did not - did too!" exchange is
really boring!

If you want to continue, fine. But please change the header so those
of us who really want to read about _The Young Ones_ don't have to wade
through your diatribes.

PS. I am a Yank who grew up outside London and this whole exchange
doesn't appeal to me at all. Now, if you want to talk about the
French, well ... :-).

Ken Staggers

unread,
Dec 19, 1990, 4:44:54 PM12/19/90
to
In article <35...@netnews.upenn.edu> sty...@eniac.seas.upenn.edu (Philip Stylianos) writes:
>o Law and Order just made the Popular Twenty by rating, pitted against
> thirtysomething, which didn't do relatively bad. Is Law and Order the
> second hit of the season?
I think its the surprise hit of the season. It was a great strategy for
NBC to delay LA LAW (those giving it lots of new episodes for the May sweeps,
I hope) and to give L&O a 6 week tryout. Look at it. Its killing
30something. ABC must be pulling out its hair because it cant surround
Roseanne with hits like NBC did with Cosby and Cheers. CBS must be screaming
because it HELPED DEVELOP L&O, and then passed on the show after the pilot!


>o Twin Peaks is like a liability on ABC's books, which I'm sure they
> would like to erase. This week, it ranked 67th by rating, and only
> scored a 15 share.

True, but millions did return to the show after dumping "Hammer, Slammer,
and Slade" at 9pm.

>o Is the fad over? America's Funniest hour (!), Su8, is slipping. Ameri-
> ca's Funniest People did not even make the Popular Twenties.

I hope so!

>o As football gets more exciting, CBS Mo9 - Mo 10 suffers. Formerly
> Popular Five shows, they now barely crack the Popular Twenties.

Did anyone know that the Trials of Rosie is the 2nd lowest rated Monday show
out of ALL the shows on Monday on ABC/CBS/NBC?

Monday Night SEASON-TO-DATE Ratings (9/17-12/9) [Ratings/Share]
----------------------------------------------------------------
MacGyver: 12.1/20
NFL: 17.0/29
Evening Shade: 13.3/20
Major Dad: 15.6/24
Murphy Brown: 17.7/26
Designing Women: 17.9/27
Trials: 12.0/21
Fresh Prince: 13.6/22
Ferris: 11.2/17
NBC Movie: 14.7/23
Fox Movie: 4.7/7

>o Who *deserves* the Tu8:30 slot more - Head of the Class (yea, right),
> or The Wonder Years? Ask yourselves that, ABC.

"Davis Rules" starring Randy Quaid and Jonathon Winters.

>BEST TEN THEME SONGS
Hey...how'd this get in here :^)

>10 In Living Color

This should be #1...this is a song that I would actually buy! Why dont
they release it?

--Ken (The Travelin' Fool)

Steven Grimm

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Dec 19, 1990, 5:20:28 PM12/19/90
to

>In article <35...@netnews.upenn.edu> sty...@eniac.seas.upenn.edu (Philip Stylianos) writes:
>>o Twin Peaks is like a liability on ABC's books, which I'm sure they
>> would like to erase. This week, it ranked 67th by rating, and only
>> scored a 15 share.
>True, but millions did return to the show after dumping "Hammer, Slammer,
>and Slade" at 9pm.

Is it as bad as it looks? The ratings only measure households, not viewers.
And I know that "Twin Peaks" often plays to a packed house at my place on
Saturday nights. I know I'm not the only one who hosts a large group of
TPers every week, and I hope ABC is smart enough to realize that there's
a lot of that going around. (Just to be safe, though, WRITE A LETTER and
tell ABC that you're watching!)

---
" !" - Marcel Marceau
Steven Grimm Moderator, comp.{sources,binaries}.atari.st
kor...@ebay.sun.com ...!sun!ebay!koreth

Philip Stylianos

unread,
Dec 19, 1990, 6:29:02 PM12/19/90
to
In article <6...@grapevine.EBay.Sun.COM> kor...@panarthea.EBay.Sun.COM (Steven Grimm) writes:
>In <22...@casbah.acns.nwu.edu> stag...@casbah.acns.nwu.edu (Ken Staggers) writes:
>
>>In article <35...@netnews.upenn.edu> sty...@eniac.seas.upenn.edu (Philip Stylianos) writes:
>>>o Twin Peaks is like a liability on ABC's books, which I'm sure they

>Is it as bad as it looks? The ratings only measure households, not viewers.

Perspective:

Millions of Viewers Rating Ranking

Doogie Howser, M.D. 18.7 33 (the repeat episode, We8:30)
Primetime Live 12.3 58
Going Places 13.5 67
Twin Peaks 12.1 67
Get A Life 12.1 73

Point: Twin Peaks does not seem to have a lot of viewers as compared with other
comparably ratings-ranked shows.


Excuse the terseness.

The Unknown User

unread,
Dec 19, 1990, 7:05:19 PM12/19/90
to

In article <35...@netnews.upenn.edu> sty...@eniac.seas.upenn.edu (Philip Stylianos) writes:
>o The Simpsons disappoint again. A repeat got clobbered by The Cosby
> Show. This may not sound so bad, but The Simpsons always have a higher
> viewership, repeat or not, but this time they were trounced soundly
> (27.1 million v 21.4 million).

It was a repeat! Jeez.. Maybe "Simpsons" viewers are intelligent
enough to NOT WATCH a show if it's a repeat and so they watch something
else so the ratings go down. Sheesh! Of course I watch reruns of shows I've
seen already sometimes, but I also use that time to watch something else!

>o Twin Peaks is like a liability on ABC's books, which I'm sure they
> would like to erase. This week, it ranked 67th by rating, and only
> scored a 15 share.

Damn I hope they don't cancel it! This show is great! It's probably
the one that I wait with most anticipation for since it's a continuing
story.. (that doesn't mean it's my favorite though).

>o Is the fad over? America's Funniest hour (!), Su8, is slipping. Ameri-
> ca's Funniest People did not even make the Popular Twenties.

Excuuuuuuse me... "America's Funniest Hour"???? America's Funniest
Home Videos IS funny, but the show afterwords is lame 99% of the time..
There's nothing else on at that time, so I occassionaly (sp?) watch it if
there's nothing else to do.
The host of America's Funniest People is worse than the dude on
America's Funniest Home Videos.. (although it was interesting to find
out that he did the voice for the guy who becomes a werewolf when he sees
the moon in the cartoon from ~10 years ago)

>o Who *deserves* the Tu8:30 slot more - Head of the Class (yea, right),
> or The Wonder Years? Ask yourselves that, ABC.

They're BOTH funny shows... Although Head of the Class was MUCH
better with Howard Hessman... Hopefully though now Hessman can go sign up
for the new WKRP!

--
/Apple II(GS) Forever! unk...@ucscb.ucsc.edu MAIL ME FOR INFO ABOUT CHEAP CDs\
|WRITE TO ORIGIN ABOUT ULTIMA VI //e and IIGS! Mail me for addresses, & info. |
\ "Dammit Bev, is it you inside or is it the clown?" -IT by Stephen King /

Sheryl D. Chapin

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Dec 19, 1990, 11:22:31 PM12/19/90
to
In article <16...@venera.isi.edu>, j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:
>
> One thing you'll notice about British comedies is their seasons are
> much shorter. All things considered, if they had to do 24-26 episodes
> a year, they might not be as "brilliant" as even (gasp) American
> sitcoms.
>
> Think about it. All of the Blackadders combined (and I've only seen a
> few, but liked them a lot -- are they playing in SoCal at all?) total
> ONE season of a US sitcom. How long did it take to produce them?
>
>
> Jeffrey A. Sullivan | Senior Systems Programmer

I do NOT want to get into the middle of a "YOur side of the pond is
disgusting!" debate. Though I disagree with Mr. Sullivan's choices of
exemplary American comedy, I certainly think that American comedy has
something to offer -- even if it's covered over in dross much of the
time.

The point I want to make relates Sullivan's above statements. Am I to
understand that he thinks that the fact that American comedies generally
produce 24 - 26 episodes per season is a good thing? You seem to be
pointing unfavorably towards the British "short seasons," yet you also
seem to indicate that such a work load might mean that the Brits would
have to produce substandard episodes.

To me the American production schedule is the death of all of its comedies.
British comedies (with a few exceptions) seem to bow out at peak
moments. I rarely watch a British show to find myself saying that
it was better the previous season. But this *always* happens with
American shows. Even two of your prime examples of American
comedy suffer from this -- the other two are still in their first
season. The only reason The Simpsons is slumping somewhat in
quality IMHO is because Groenig has been forced to produce to an
unreasonable degree.

American shows tend to run themselves into the ground -- the big
bosses count the profits from syndication sales -- there are very few
shows (even among those that I originally loved) that I watch beyond
the fourth or fifth season. By that time they are invariably tired
and cliched. Despite the fact that Bob Newhart did have one of the
funniest last episodes I've ever seen -- if Larry, Darryl, and Darryl were
to walk through my door today I'd scream, "Shut up! We know what your
fucking names are! And it's just not funny anymore!"

In answer to the question, what do you do the other 46 weeks (after the
six new episodes of [your favorite British show] have been run)? You
watch OTHER shows! In case you haven't noticed there is quite a
variety of shows (thanks to the fact that each only gets six episodes
per year), and because each show only employs one or two writers -- those
writers are kept busy for most of the year. Having so many shows
(especially considering that there are only four channels) is, uh, sort
of a way of keeping writers in work.

Gary Parker Chapin
--
It was only for kicks cracks and flacks plicks and placks and plickers--
Lackplacker Lackplicker loundwadtti Daago--Nickers flickers lackplicker--
Kicks flicks plack and ack lackflacmac ack ack macflackack ...
-- Roscoe Mitchell

Keith Richards

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Dec 20, 1990, 5:05:54 AM12/20/90
to
From article <16...@venera.isi.edu>, by j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan):

> One thing you'll notice about British comedies is their seasons are
> much shorter. All things considered, if they had to do 24-26 episodes
> a year, they might not be as "brilliant" as even (gasp) American
> sitcoms.
>
> Think about it. All of the Blackadders combined (and I've only seen a
> few, but liked them a lot -- are they playing in SoCal at all?) total
> ONE season of a US sitcom. How long did it take to produce them?

I don't remember much about it, but for some reason this reminds me of
an old British sit-com, "Never Mind the Quality, Feel the Width". :-)

---
Keith Richards | RT3321, BT Research Labs, Martlesham Heath, IP5 7RE, UK.
+44 473 642473 | kric...@axion.bt.co.uk (...mcvax!ukc!axion!krichards)

Chris Cooke

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Dec 20, 1990, 6:24:23 AM12/20/90
to
In article <16...@venera.isi.edu>, j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:

> So? They claim superiority, then make excuses?

"They" are several people, with several different points of view.

You can't logically squash them all together into one
amorphous "they" and then claim that "they" are being
inconsistent. Don't be silly.

> But what would you watch the other 45 weeks a year? Reruns?

I have a very low tolerance for bad/boring/indifferent TV.
I watch maybe one or two good programmes a week, then
switch it off.

Neither the US system nor the British system
produces consistently good comedy programmes; most of
both are crud. The British comedy shows you see in the
US are far better than the normal drivel produced by
the BBC, London Weekend, Thames and the rest.
A lot of British sitcoms are now produced by American
methods, with teams of writers, and it shows.

> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Jeffrey A. Sullivan | Senior Systems Programmer
> j...@venera.isi.edu | Information Sciences Institute
> j...@isi.edu DELPHI: JSULLIVAN | University of Southern California

--

Jim Reid

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Dec 20, 1990, 11:02:54 AM12/20/90
to
In article <16...@venera.isi.edu> j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:

One thing you'll notice about British comedies is their seasons are
much shorter. All things considered, if they had to do 24-26 episodes
a year, they might not be as "brilliant" as even (gasp) American
sitcoms.

This is precisely why British TV sitcoms tend to have 6-week runs. The
efforts of the writers are better focussed and produce funnier
scripts. [i.e. They don't have to pad out the scripts or come up with
sufficient "comic" situations to fill up 10 or 12 hours of air time.] To
use the title of an old sitcom, the US approach tends to be "Never
mind the quality, feel the width".

Another reason why American sitcoms are so bad (with a few exceptions)
is the conservatism of the US networks. Everything is reduced to
blandness to avoid even the hint of a risk of offending someone.
The ones broadcast in the UK (the best that can be bought from the US
networks according to out TV bosses) are dreadfully unfunny. [I exempt
Cheers and MASH from this criticism, but they too have their troughs
of mediocrity.]

Jim

Bruce Munro

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Dec 20, 1990, 11:03:13 AM12/20/90
to
In article <1990Dec19....@ibmpcug.co.uk> dy...@ibmpcug.CO.UK (Matthew Farwell) writes:
>The american version starred Meryl Streep and wassername from Roseanne, and
>from what I've seen (admittedly not all) wasn't nearly as well done as
>the beeb production, which starred Jane Asher???, Tom Baker and (for the
>life of me I can't remember her name). This was much more atmospheric
>and more in keeping with the book.)

Tom Baker? Don't you mean Dennis Waterman? He was certainly the wayward
husband in any case.

Cheers,
--
Bruce Munro. <br...@tcom.stc.co.uk> || ...!mcsun!ukc!stc!bruce
STC Telecommunications, Oakleigh Rd South, London N11 1HB.
Phone : +44 81 945 2174 or +44 81 945 4000 x2174
"There are no strangers, only friends we don't recognise" - Hank Wangford

Dave Walker

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Dec 20, 1990, 12:01:09 PM12/20/90
to

Something else to consider is that TP attracts a type of viewer often
coveted by advertisers: people who don't watch very much TV.
(Besides, ABC's partly at fault by sticking it in that *abysmal* time
slot).

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Dave Walker, Detroit Art Services (DAS) |
| marm...@ub.cc.umich.edu "I don't read, I just guess" |
| marm...@mondo.engin.umich.edu -Happy Mondays, "Wrote For Luck" |
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Brothers Gonna Work It Out

unread,
Dec 20, 1990, 2:48:54 PM12/20/90
to
In article <1...@anaxagoras.ils.nwu.edu> pau...@ils.nwu.edu writes:
>I asked on the monty-python group a few months ago about the current
>whereabouts of Christopher Ryan (Mike, the cool one) but I didn't get
>any response. I haven't seen him in any Comic Strip episodes, and my
>British friends, who don't follow the show, don't know anything about
>him.

He was in an episode of Dr. Who a few years back as Kiv, a slug-like
alien.

>"Five go mad in Dorset" has to be one of the funniest programs I have ever
>seen on television. For those of you not rolling on the floor at the mere
>mention of it, it is a parody of the popular fictional adventures of two
>girls, two boys, and their long-suffering dog Timmy with all kinds of
>scoundrels while on a countryside bicycling tour.

There are a few Fabulous Fives, aren't there? I saw one called "Five
go mad on Mescal" which was worth it just to see Adrian Edmondson
strumming his guitar and singing about peace.

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Hal Pomeranz

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Dec 20, 1990, 3:47:21 PM12/20/90
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br...@tcom.stc.co.uk (Bruce Munro) writes:
> In article <1990Dec19....@ibmpcug.co.uk> dy...@ibmpcug.CO.UK (Matthew Farwell) writes:
> >The american version starred Meryl Streep and wassername from Roseanne, and
> >from what I've seen (admittedly not all) wasn't nearly as well done as
> >the beeb production, which starred Jane Asher???, Tom Baker and (for the
> >life of me I can't remember her name). This was much more atmospheric
> >and more in keeping with the book.)
>
> Tom Baker? Don't you mean Dennis Waterman? He was certainly the wayward
> husband in any case.

Tom Baker was the priest she turned to for spiritual guidance. Then they
sortof seduced each other, had an affair for a while, and then he dumped
her because she was "disgusting".

I went to see the American version because I had seen most of the other one,
and wanted to see what we'd done with it. I must say I thought it was among
the worst of American dreck movies, it seemed like all along everyone was
thinking "this movie is a loss let's just get it over with", but it didn't
have to be as bad as it was.

Does anyone know who wrote the book "The life and loves of a she-devil"?
Has anyone read it? I thought from the bbc production the book might be
good...

-Ellen
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posting from a friend's account. Replies either to esa...@sjuphil.uucp or
here with my name in the header somewhere

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posting from a friend's account. Replies either to esa...@sjuphil.uucp or
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Moriland

unread,
Dec 21, 1990, 5:20:03 PM12/21/90
to
I have to agree with the Brits on this one. There isn't a single
American Sitcom that I watch on a regular basis unless you consider
The Simpsons a sitcom, which I don't. It's a cartoon. However, I do
watch several british sitcoms with almost a religious fervor. Fawlty
Towers, Monty Python, Red Dwarf, among others.

I generally don't watch much American TV at all. The Flash is a show I
do watch as I find it mildly entertaining. Beyond that, I usually
watch either an english show or a Movie Channel. (Showtime, The Movie
Channel, etc)

It could be that my decendants are mostly British and therefor I have
it geneticly encoded in me, or that American TV is generally boring.

-Moriland


--
/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
"As if things weren't bad enough already...."| Founder of: "Evil Young
Please excuse my ramblings as they come from | Mutants For A Better Tommorow.
a diseased mind. -Moriland | hast...@vela.acs.oakland.edu

Moriland

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Dec 21, 1990, 5:22:21 PM12/21/90
to

I am sorry to say that I have not seen this show although it
sounds like a good one to catch. Is there anything local to Detroit
that shows it or anything on Satelite that shows it? I have a Satelite
dish so I should be able to pick it up from there. Even better, and
this should sound familiar, is it out on VHS? ;-)

Lester W Yee

unread,
Dec 23, 1990, 12:19:33 AM12/23/90
to
Hi there, have anyone see this new series "She-Wolf of London"? I seen it
once when I was in New York City for the Thanksgiving holiday. It's a
thriller series and it's seems pretty good. It's about this professor
(Ian) who is a prof. of mythology and his student (Randi) who's been bitten
by a werewolf and turns into one on every full moon. Anyway, the two gets
involved in all sorts of super-natural evil forces they must combat.

I have only seen it on WWOR (New York City), tuesdays at 9pm... I was wondering
if anybody else seen this show. It's not on cable-tv either. Any clues?

I think it's a british series, but it's not on public tv.. it's on WWOR which
is a commerical media.

y...@pawl.rpi.edu

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Brian N Butterworth

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Dec 23, 1990, 3:53:18 PM12/23/90
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In article <4...@rick.att.com> s...@rick.att.com (Sheryl D. Chapin) writes:
>In article <16...@venera.isi.edu>, j...@ISI.EDU (Jeff Sullivan) writes:
>>
>> One thing you'll notice about British comedies is their seasons are
>> much shorter. All things considered, if they had to do 24-26 episodes
>> a year, they might not be as "brilliant" as even (gasp) American
>> sitcoms.
>>
>> Think about it. All of the Blackadders combined (and I've only seen a
>> few, but liked them a lot -- are they playing in SoCal at all?) total
>> ONE season of a US sitcom. How long did it take to produce them?
>>
>>
>> Jeffrey A. Sullivan | Senior Systems Programmer
>
>I do NOT want to get into the middle of a "YOur side of the pond is
>disgusting!" debate. Though I disagree with Mr. Sullivan's choices of
>exemplary American comedy, I certainly think that American comedy has
>something to offer -- even if it's covered over in dross much of the
>time.
>
Some British TV comidies have run for more than six weeks at a time, quite
sucessfully, for example "'Allo 'Allo" last year ran for at least 13 weeks
and "Birds Of A Feather" has run for 12 this year.

Historically the likes of "Monty Python" ran for 13 weeks at a time.

the reason for the shorter seasons is more to do with only having four (and
in the 70's three) television channels, whereas those over the other side
of the 'pond' have oodles of them, and always have had.

A program has to be very popular indeed to run for more than 6 weeks, and
is usually then written by several people. The sited "Blackadder" seasons
were written by two people alone in each season (Ben Elton and Richard
Curtis - II, Third and Forth). "Red Dwarf" is written by Grant/Nalor alone.
These people also have other things to do (such as have their own massivly
popular shows or tour the country).

Mike ---- Schneider

unread,
Dec 25, 1990, 10:51:37 PM12/25/90
to
The difference between U.S. and British television boild down to one
word: priorities.
U.S. television----->Money
U.K. television----->entertainment

ANT THE RANT

unread,
Jan 16, 1991, 8:53:59 AM1/16/91
to

NO! Don't forget that over 1/2 UK production is done by the commercial
sector (ITV, independent companies outside ITV...)

Programmes you get like Brideshead Revisited (=quality only?) were made by
ITV. Granada Thames and TVS are the main ones. These companies get large
audience figures and over-seas sales from a few high quality programmes.

BR I never watched, but Granada got LOADSAMONEY from both it's foreign
sales and advertising in it's run/re-runs.

(ok so Thames's quality is suspect, but they have done SOME good stuff, and
they sell that don't they?)

BBC is s'posed to be quality, but ITV HAS to make money to survive.
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Conrad Longmore

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Jan 26, 1991, 1:52:41 PM1/26/91
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The size in order of turnover goes like this: Thames, Central, (over 300
million), Granada, LWT, TVS, Yorkshire (over 200 million), HTV, Anglia,
Scottish (over 100 million), TV-AM, Tyne Tees (over 50 million), TSW, Ulster,
Grampian, Border, Channel (which has just 5 million).
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