[DS9] Lynch's Spoiler Review: "Resurrection"

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Corbin E. Thomas

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Nov 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/22/97
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Timothy W. Lynch wrote in message <65829c$s...@gap.cco.caltech.edu>...

<snip, snip>

>
>-- I liked the continued reference to Dax's old paramour with the
>transparent skull (first mentioned in "The Maquis", if memory
>serves). However, the suggestion of "well, maybe you could bring
>Odo [to dinner] as a friend" was extremely out of line, and further
>suggests that the Kira/Odo difficulties of the "retaking the station" arc
>are being swept under the rug.


<and snip>

I agree with just about everything except the above. I thought that Kira's
response to Dax's suggestion actually pointed out that Kira and Odo did not
patch things up in Dax's closet during "...Cordially Invited." I really
liked how the writers slipped in that update on how things stand between
those two. I also assume from this remark that Kira has not mentioned to
anyone Odo's actions. What really surprises me is that Quark hasn't
mentioned anything to anyone yet. However, I think you are on the mark on
everything else. Well written.
----------------------------------------------------
Corbin Thomas
c...@netdoor.removethis.com
----------------------------------------------------

Timothy W. Lynch

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Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
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WARNING: Face-huggers, chest-bursters, and ... oh, wait. Sorry,
wrong "Resurrection"; the spoilers below are for DS9.

In brief: Long on character, but a bit too short on plot and far too
prone to excess.

======
Written by: Michael Taylor
Directed by: LeVar Burton
Brief summary: Kira receives a visitor from the mirror universe: a
very alive Bareil.
======

When Vedek Bareil was unceremoniously killed off back in DS9's
third season, mine was certainly one of the strongly disapproving
voices; granted, I wasn't one of the groups forming petitions or
insisting that history be rewritten, but I certainly felt the move was a
mistake. "Resurrection" still leaves me thinking that killing off Vedek
Bareil was a mistake, but it's brought into sharper focus why I liked
Vedek Bareil so much.

The original Bareil was a perfect resident of DS9's early, intimate
years: he and then-Vedek Winn were both symbols of possible paths
down which Bajor could walk. Bareil's relationship with Kira was
interesting, but it was the political and spiritual choices he represented
that made the character compelling.

Given that, bringing back a different Bareil was a challenging concept.
Since Vedek Bareil's role in DS9's story is over, the political
overtones were bound to be missing from this story. That left two
possibilities -- the romantic and the spiritual. As it happens, both of
those went fairly well -- the problems came in mostly when other
elements were brought in to "make things more exciting".

Bareil's very first scene in "Resurrection" left me cold, basically
because there was no reason for it. Fortunately, the episode didn't
revolve around his hostage-taking in Ops, but the idea that anyone can
beam into Ops without so much as a force-field being put up or a
phaser being pointed is completely unacceptable, especially after a
recent war. The fact that Bareil wasn't actually a threat was helpful
later on, but all it meant was that Our Heroes were lucky rather than
smart. Not a good sign.

After that, the show moved away from the trite "jeopardy" angle and
started focusing on characters: Bareil, the fish out of water, and Kira,
stuck with all sorts of inner conflict about this man. While this part of
the show was one of the quieter things DS9's done in a while, I rather
liked it; there were a lot of powerful moments and things you'd really
expect to see from Bareil's return. Bareil's unease at the attention he
was getting on the Promenade was one, and Kira's slow (and
possibly not entirely conscious) attempt to get Bareil to examine a
spiritual life was another. It wasn't full of surprises, but the quiet
shows often don't need to be; they're successful when the characters
feel like people, and for the most part they did.

The emphasis on Bajoran religion was among the best parts of the
show. We've seen Kira's faith get her through hard times before, but
it's often been linked to particular people -- first Opaka, then Bareil,
and occasionally Sisko. This time, we saw her in services with others
who felt the same way, and her beliefs were more general and less
personality-driven. We've known for a long time that she believes in
the Prophets, but the happiness in her face when she talked about
them, and the reverence she held for Orb experiences, brought home
her overall faith in a way we've seen only very rarely.

(I was a little frustrated that we didn't get to see Bareil's Orb vision,
but within the context of Kira's faith it ended up working quite well.
Some experiences aren't meant to be shared, and she made that point
quite eloquently.)

In smaller scenes, there were a few gaffes here and there in the first
half of "Resurrection" that had me feeling a little impatient (most
particularly the story of Bareil's lost love, which felt like every thief-
with-a-heart-of-gold story ever written), but there were also moments
that just shone. One of them had to be dinner at Worf and Dax's;
Worf's huffy reaction to anyone claiming to get the best of a Klingon
was typical, and even if telegraphed, Bareil's casual slicing of the
dessert followed by "I believe ... this is yours" was just priceless.

Almost exactly halfway into the show, however, the focus changed
sharply. Now, instead of a look at Bajoran faith and Bareil's attempt
to adjust his life, we had a pair of masquerading schemers and another
visit from the Intendant, aka an opportunity to have Nana Visitor
vamp it up several notches beyond belief. As you might guess from
my not-quite-impartial summary, I found that a substantial step down
from the first half of the show, for several reasons.

The primary reason I found the "plot to steal an Orb" so uninteresting
was that we know nothing about the mirror universe's Bajor. The
Bajorans of that universe certainly don't know about the wormhole,
aka the Celestial Temple; do they have any belief in the Prophets? Do
they know what an Orb *is*? If not, does the Intendant expect them
to be swayed simply because of the visions the Orb would provoke?
If so, why haven't we heard about this before? The Orbs and the
Prophets are so inextricably linked to Bajor as a culture that an attempt
to use them on another culture feels *wrong* -- and given how little
we know about them, the other Bajorans might as well be another
culture.

The other reason I couldn't get behind the Evil Intendant Plot (TM) is
that I'm finding the Intendant less and less interesting with every
appearance she makes. Every time someone has tried to write a mirror
episode since "Crossover" in season 2, they've decided that what
makes the Intendant interesting is her skin-tight outfit and her endless
sexuality. Well, perhaps from a ratings standpoint they're right -- but
it's not the main thing that made her worth watching in "Crossover"
for me, by any stretch. The original Intendant was conflicted,
publicly strutting while privately starved for any real affection -- there
was a core of real vulnerability to her which made her a far more
interesting villain than a simple scheming temptress. For the third
time in a row, that core has been jettisoned -- and for the third time in
a row, it's been the episode's loss as a result, dragging some
Intendant/Bareil scenes down in the process.

Just as a few low points punctuated an otherwise good first half,
though, the second half did have one major bright spot -- one named
Quark. Quark was put to excellent use here; his "heroism", if it can be
called that, is most effective when it involves listening and then
conveying information. (Compare it to "Sacrifice of Angels", when
he goes gunslinging; this felt a lot better.) His observation to Kira that
he liked the idea of her with Bareil, followed up by his warning that
Bareil was "one of the tormented ones" served to put Kira on her
guard, but also just rang true in its description of Bareil *and* in the
way Quark handled the situation. I liked both of his scenes a great
deal -- and it's somewhat rare for Quark to be the bright spot of an
episode where I'm concerned.

Despite that bright spot, though, "Resurrection"'s second half was a
disappointment, particularly due to a really by-the-numbers fifth act.
Intendant appeals to Bareil's lack of self-worth, Kira says he's better
than that, Bareil agrees and shoots the Intendant, then decides that
he's so low that he deserves no better than her in the first place -- it's
such a typical ending that I kept hoping for some change, *any*
change from the norm. The closest thing to a surprise came when
Bareil wasn't killed for his disobedience; anyone expecting him to
remain true to the scheme was fooling themselves.

Some shorter takes:

-- For the record, writer Michael Taylor also did "The Visitor" and
"Things Past". The former focused on a character who no longer
exists (the adult Jake), and the latter focused on a situation that never
quite existed ... and this one focused on a character who wasn't one
of the regular cast. Is Taylor ever going to write a story with a core
cast member as its regular focus? (Just curious; it's not a criticism.)

-- I liked the continued reference to Dax's old paramour with the
transparent skull (first mentioned in "The Maquis", if memory
serves). However, the suggestion of "well, maybe you could bring
Odo [to dinner] as a friend" was extremely out of line, and further
suggests that the Kira/Odo difficulties of the "retaking the station" arc
are being swept under the rug.

-- I did rather like the understated confusion in the final scene about
which Kira Bareil initially thought he was hearing.

-- I agree that this Bareil wasn't supposed to be much like the old one,
but I'm not sure Philip Anglim's delivery helped that. Most of the
time, he sounded just as controlled as the Vedek was.

-- I'm not even going to *touch* the innuendo in the Kira/Bareil
bedroom scene. Nope. Mm-mm. Not going there. No way.

That seems to cover things. "Resurrection" had a number of bright
moments here and there, but in the end fell prey to a lot of typical
mirror-universe excess which drowned out some otherwise good
characterization. Sigh. I've felt a lot of "well, okay, but they can do
so much better" about DS9 in the last few weeks; hopefully that
feeling will change soon.

So, wrapping up:

Writing: Good character work early on, but some silliness and
overblown dialogue mars it a lot later on.
Directing: A few pedestrian scenes (like Bashir's token bit of
dialogue), but generally good.
Acting: Fine, though not top-drawer.

OVERALL: Yet another 6; that's three straight, for three completely
different reasons. This is why I don't like numerical ratings.

NEXT WEEK:

Bashir winds up in a think-tank to help with the war effort. (My
review of this will likely be a couple of days late, incidentally; the
episode airs on Thanksgiving Day, and my weekend is rather
booked.)

Tim Lynch (Harvard-Westlake School, Science Dept.)
tly...@alumni.caltech.edu <*>
"I suppose I am a lot more like you than I am like Vedek Bareil."
"Perfect. Then we have a deal?"
"I'm afraid not."
"Why?"
"Because right now I don't like either one of us."
-- Bareil and Quark
--
Copyright 1997, Timothy W. Lynch. All rights reserved, but feel free to ask...
This article is explicitly prohibited from being used in any off-net
compilation without due attribution and *express written consent of the
author*. Walnut Creek and other CD-ROM distributors, take note.

Nelson Lu

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Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
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In article <65829c$s...@gap.cco.caltech.edu>,

Timothy W. Lynch <tly...@alumni.caltech.edu> wrote:

>Bareil's very first scene in "Resurrection" left me cold, basically
>because there was no reason for it. Fortunately, the episode didn't
>revolve around his hostage-taking in Ops, but the idea that anyone can
>beam into Ops without so much as a force-field being put up or a
>phaser being pointed is completely unacceptable, especially after a
>recent war. The fact that Bareil wasn't actually a threat was helpful
>later on, but all it meant was that Our Heroes were lucky rather than
>smart. Not a good sign.

But I think we can cut the DS9 staff a little slack in that they *might* have
an energy field of some sort surrounding Ops, but the mirror-Bareil was beaming
in from another dimension, and that is presumably either unexpected or even
unpreventable. If the Jem'Hadar tried to beam in to Ops, presumably they would
have had a much harder time.

Thomas j. Evans

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Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
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tly...@alumnae.caltech.edu (Timothy W. Lynch) wrote:

>Just as a few low points punctuated an otherwise good first half,
>though, the second half did have one major bright spot -- one named
>Quark. Quark was put to excellent use here; his "heroism", if it can be
>called that, is most effective when it involves listening and then
>conveying information. (Compare it to "Sacrifice of Angels", when
>he goes gunslinging; this felt a lot better.)

I definitaly agree here. It's similar to how he expertly aquired
information from Dumar in "Behind the Lines" and again in "Favor the
Bold". When the writers make Quark the hero by using his sneakiness
and observation skills, which are aspects of the character we already
know (rather than gun-slingin'), the result is very effective. He
suddenly becomes a really good character.

>-- I liked the continued reference to Dax's old paramour with the
>transparent skull (first mentioned in "The Maquis", if memory
>serves). However, the suggestion of "well, maybe you could bring
>Odo [to dinner] as a friend" was extremely out of line, and further
>suggests that the Kira/Odo difficulties of the "retaking the station" arc
>are being swept under the rug.

I'm not so sure. Kira's reply, "I'm not ready for that, Odo's not
ready for that. Let's just forget that you brought *that* one up,"
continues to acknowledge that things aren't peachy between them. It
would appear that Dax & the others still do not know what happened.
I'm still hopeful that the tension between them will spark to life in
a later episode this season. It could still go either way.


-T


Dan Flanery

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Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
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On Sun, 23 Nov 1997 06:14:50 GMT, tho...@skyweb.net (Thomas j. Evans)
wrote:

>I'm not so sure. Kira's reply, "I'm not ready for that, Odo's not
>ready for that. Let's just forget that you brought *that* one up,"
>continues to acknowledge that things aren't peachy between them. It
>would appear that Dax & the others still do not know what happened.

I think you're reading too much into that line. It looks to me like
Kira's having a problem dealing with Odo's feelings for her - not with
his actions during the Dominion occupation.

We needed to *see* that conversation Kira and Odo had in "You Are
Cordially Invited . . ." last week. The writers were rat-bastards for
cheating us out of that.

DF
= Remove the "x" from my email address to reply via email
------------------
= I know nobody's gonna show me everything,
= We all come and go unknown.
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------------------
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Chris

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Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
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On Sat, 22 Nov 1997 23:33:43 -0600, "Corbin E. Thomas"
<cet_spa...@netdoor.com> wrote:

>I agree with just about everything except the above. I thought that Kira's
>response to Dax's suggestion actually pointed out that Kira and Odo did not
>patch things up in Dax's closet during "...Cordially Invited." I really
>liked how the writers slipped in that update on how things stand between
>those two. I also assume from this remark that Kira has not mentioned to
>anyone Odo's actions. What really surprises me is that Quark hasn't
>mentioned anything to anyone yet. However, I think you are on the mark on
>everything else. Well written.

That's the way I took it too.. like it was a test to see how well
their relationship was going and that it wasn't "quite there" yet.

CR

Thomas j. Evans

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Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
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sunsp...@hotmail.com (Dan Flanery) wrote:

>On Sun, 23 Nov 1997 06:14:50 GMT, tho...@skyweb.net (Thomas j. Evans)
>wrote:

>>I'm not so sure. Kira's reply, "I'm not ready for that, Odo's not
>>ready for that. Let's just forget that you brought *that* one up,"
>>continues to acknowledge that things aren't peachy between them. It
>>would appear that Dax & the others still do not know what happened.

>I think you're reading too much into that line. It looks to me like
>Kira's having a problem dealing with Odo's feelings for her - not with
>his actions during the Dominion occupation.

Hmm... that may be. Can't really tell from that line. I'm more
hopeful than expectant that they won't sweep it under the rug.

>We needed to *see* that conversation Kira and Odo had in "You Are
>Cordially Invited . . ." last week. The writers were rat-bastards for
>cheating us out of that.

I definitaly agree there. That was a huge mistake.

-T


qzo

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Nov 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/23/97
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qzo

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Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
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Please ignore the trolls sent from this impersonator on Prodigy.

Feel free to forward all such posts to Prodigy to force them to take action
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--
Mike Gasper
******************************************************
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To email me remove "NO_SPAM." from my address
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B.J. Major

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Nov 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/24/97
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Corbin E. Thomas <cet_spa...@netdoor.com> wrote:

> Timothy W. Lynch wrote in message <65829c$s...@gap.cco.caltech.edu>...
>
> <snip, snip>
>
> >

> >-- I liked the continued reference to Dax's old paramour with the
> >transparent skull (first mentioned in "The Maquis", if memory
> >serves). However, the suggestion of "well, maybe you could bring
> >Odo [to dinner] as a friend" was extremely out of line, and further
> >suggests that the Kira/Odo difficulties of the "retaking the station" arc
> >are being swept under the rug.
>
>

> <and snip>


>
> I agree with just about everything except the above. I thought that Kira's
> response to Dax's suggestion actually pointed out that Kira and Odo did not
> patch things up in Dax's closet during "...Cordially Invited." I really
> liked how the writers slipped in that update on how things stand between
> those two. I also assume from this remark that Kira has not mentioned to
> anyone Odo's actions. What really surprises me is that Quark hasn't
> mentioned anything to anyone yet. However, I think you are on the mark on
> everything else. Well written.

I must be missing something here. I didn't hear *any* update of the
relationship between Kira and Odo. What exactly is their status now?!
In fact, Odo was precariously absent most of this entire episode (it
would have been nice to see him spot the two somewhere, maybe on the
promendade, and give a jealous look their way...)

And this guy, Bareil (sp.?)--just how did this guy come to look like the
other Bareil exactly, anyway? I never heard that explained. Or the
other Kira for that matter, ditto. Someone, please enlighten me on
this. I *did* pay attention to the episode.....

--
--bj Auto reply doesn't work; remove "black" to reply.
Proud owner/user of Apple Computers since 1984.
"All my systems are Microsoft-free."

Mike Balkan

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Nov 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/25/97
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B.J. Major wrote:
>
> Corbin E. Thomas <cet_spa...@netdoor.com> wrote:
>
> > Timothy W. Lynch wrote in message <65829c$s...@gap.cco.caltech.edu>...
> >
> > <snip, snip>
> >
> > >
> > >-- I liked the continued reference to Dax's old paramour with the
> > >transparent skull (first mentioned in "The Maquis", if memory
> > >serves). However, the suggestion of "well, maybe you could bring
> > >Odo [to dinner] as a friend" was extremely out of line, and further
> > >suggests that the Kira/Odo difficulties of the "retaking the station" arc
> > >are being swept under the rug.
> >
> >
> > <and snip>
> >
> > I agree with just about everything except the above. I thought that Kira's
> > response to Dax's suggestion actually pointed out that Kira and Odo did not
> > patch things up in Dax's closet during "...Cordially Invited." I really
> > liked how the writers slipped in that update on how things stand between
> > those two. I also assume from this remark that Kira has not mentioned to
> > anyone Odo's actions. What really surprises me is that Quark hasn't
> > mentioned anything to anyone yet. However, I think you are on the mark on
> > everything else. Well written.
>
> I must be missing something here. I didn't hear *any* update of the
> relationship between Kira and Odo. What exactly is their status now?!
> In fact, Odo was precariously absent most of this entire episode (it
> would have been nice to see him spot the two somewhere, maybe on the
> promendade, and give a jealous look their way...)
>
> And this guy, Bareil (sp.?)--just how did this guy come to look like the
> other Bareil exactly, anyway? I never heard that explained. Or the
> other Kira for that matter, ditto. Someone, please enlighten me on
> this. I *did* pay attention to the episode.....
>
Did you see the previous three DS9 episodes concerning the alternate
universe? Everyone in the regular universe has a counterpart there who
looks the same but has a different personality.

--

Mike Balkan
mba...@gl.umbc.edu

B.J. Major

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Nov 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/25/97
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Mike Balkan <mba...@gl.umbc.edu> wrote:

> >
> Did you see the previous three DS9 episodes concerning the alternate
> universe? Everyone in the regular universe has a counterpart there who
> looks the same but has a different personality.

OK, thanks!! No, never saw those episodes--so that explains it.

Ed Alexander

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Nov 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/25/97
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<HTML>
<FONT SIZE=+1>Yes, indeedie doo.&nbsp; Everybody has an exact duplicate
over there and even though they've got different personalities, they're
completely careful to marry the same people as we do over here, so they
can have the same children we do, so each generation will still have exactly
the same people with different personalities.&nbsp;&nbsp; Yes, indeedie.</FONT><FONT SIZE=+1></FONT>

<P><FONT SIZE=+1>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Edd</FONT>
<BR>&nbsp;
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>B.J. Major wrote:
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>Mike Balkan &lt;mba...@gl.umbc.edu> wrote:

<P>> >
<BR>> Did you see the previous three DS9 episodes concerning the alternate
<BR>> universe? Everyone in the regular universe has a counterpart there
who
<BR>> looks the same but has a different personality.

<P>OK, thanks!!&nbsp; No, never saw those episodes--so that explains it.

<P>--
<BR>--bj&nbsp;&nbsp; Auto reply doesn't work; remove "black" to reply.
<BR>Proud owner/user of Apple Computers since 1984.
<BR>"All my systems are Microsoft-free."</BLOCKQUOTE>
&nbsp;</HTML>


DS90210

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Nov 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/26/97
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Tim Lynch wrote:

<<Given that, bringing back a different Bareil was a challenging concept.
Since Vedek Bareil's role in DS9's story is over, the political
overtones were bound to be missing from this story. That left two
possibilities -- the romantic and the spiritual. As it happens, both of
those went fairly well -- the problems came in mostly when other
elements were brought in to "make things more exciting".>>

<Snip>

<<After that, the show moved away from the trite "jeopardy" angle and
started focusing on characters: Bareil, the fish out of water, and Kira,
stuck with all sorts of inner conflict about this man. While this part of
the show was one of the quieter things DS9's done in a while, I rather
liked it; there were a lot of powerful moments and things you'd really
expect to see from Bareil's return. Bareil's unease at the attention he
was getting on the Promenade was one, and Kira's slow (and
possibly not entirely conscious) attempt to get Bareil to examine a
spiritual life was another. It wasn't full of surprises, but the quiet
shows often don't need to be; they're successful when the characters
feel like people, and for the most part they did. >>

This is where I really have to disagree Tim-I thought Kira was rather badly
MIScharacterized
throughout much of this episode, seeming *way* too shallow. After her initial
shock at
the appearance of alt-Bareil, she seems quite ready to pick up with him where
she left off with
his counterpart. Never does it seem to occur to her that there's something
extremely strange
about her actions, or that she might just be insulting the memory of the true
Bareil by dating his
counterpart.. Now it's given that Kira is not usually the introspective
type-but this is taking that
too far. Never once in this story did I feel that the major was either
conflicted or confused about
her feelings for this man...when she definitely should have been.

I know this is science fiction, and on DS9 the impossible is commonplace, but
there should still
be some effort to show the characters reacting plausibly to incredible events.
But after Sisko's
little speech we see no one displaying any concern or unease over the fact that
Kira is becoming
romantically involved with what is, essentially, a ghost. Neither Dax nor Worf
seem perterbed
by Kira bringing this man to their dinner (a confessed thief who had just taken
a hostage in ops).
Dax and Bashir make jokes about Kira's privacy the following morning. My God,
doesn't
anybody see just how potentially *unhealthy* this is?!

But the biggest blunder of the whole episode has to be the decision to have
Kira take this man to
bed. This is Kira Nerys? In the teaser she blows off the idea of inviting Odo
to dinner because
"I'm not ready", but then can turn around and bed alt-Bareil after knowing
him--what?--two
days? We've never seen Kira jump into a relationship this quickly before, and
in the past (as
Quark points out) her lovers have all been decent, admirable men whom she has
taken time to
know first. What sets Antos apart? Is Kira really so superficial that she
makes love to him
simply because he resembles her old boyfriend? Even the morning after Kira
shows no second
thoughts, no concern about her motivations or doubts as to whether she is
moving too fast. And
the worst thing IMHO is she behaves as if no one could possibly be hurt by this
new liason of
hers, when she should damn well know that *someone* will be. (I'm not
necessarily saying that
she would break things off for Odo's sake--particularly after their schism
during the war--but
she should have at least considered his feelings. She owes him that much.)

Even after she discovers Antos' treachery, her emotional responses seem very
muted--contrast
Kira's behavior here with the climax of "Behind the Lines", when she is ready
to rip the constable
a new orifice after she feels he's betrayed her. In the climax of
"Resurrection" all the major
seems interested in is whether this alt-Bareil ever had any real feelings for
her. The fact that he
still betrayed her, feelings or no, doesn't seem to be an issue. And a Kira
who can't even work
up a good head of steam over being betrayed is no Kira that I know of.

I'm sorry, but the Kira I see in "Resurrection" is a woman who judges people on
their
appearances, who lacks any sort of self-analysis, who willingly has sex with a
man who had a
gun to her head 48 hours before, and who gives no thought to the dishonor she
does to the
memory of her deceased lover AND the pain she will cause her closest friend.
If this isn't the
definition of superficial, I don't know what is.

Jerry Folkes


David B. Mears

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Nov 29, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/29/97
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Timothy W. Lynch <tly...@alumnae.caltech.edu> wrote:

>WARNING: Face-huggers, chest-bursters, and ... oh, wait. Sorry,
>wrong "Resurrection"; the spoilers below are for DS9.

Not to mention the fact that the ``Earth: Final Conflict'' episode
the very same week was also called ``Resurrection.''



>Bareil's very first scene in "Resurrection" left me cold, basically
>because there was no reason for it. Fortunately, the episode didn't
>revolve around his hostage-taking in Ops, but the idea that anyone can
>beam into Ops without so much as a force-field being put up or a
>phaser being pointed is completely unacceptable, especially after a
>recent war. The fact that Bareil wasn't actually a threat was helpful
>later on, but all it meant was that Our Heroes were lucky rather than
>smart. Not a good sign.

And there was an extremely simple way around it. Rather than having
the phaser have a cracked coil, all they had to do was say it had been
deactivated by the transporter. We've seen this done before, though
I don't recall which episode (or series) it was now. Bareil wouldn't
necessarily have noticed it until Kira later pointed it out when they
met with Odo.

David B. Mears
Hewlett-Packard
Cupertino CA
me...@cup.hp.com

Timothy W. Lynch

unread,
Nov 30, 1997, 3:00:00 AM11/30/97
to

me...@hpwsdt.cup.hp.com (David B. Mears) writes:
>Timothy W. Lynch <tly...@alumnae.caltech.edu> wrote:

>>WARNING: Face-huggers, chest-bursters, and ... oh, wait. Sorry,
>>wrong "Resurrection"; the spoilers below are for DS9.

>Not to mention the fact that the ``Earth: Final Conflict'' episode


>the very same week was also called ``Resurrection.''

>>Bareil's very first scene in "Resurrection" left me cold, basically
>>because there was no reason for it. Fortunately, the episode didn't
>>revolve around his hostage-taking in Ops, but the idea that anyone can
>>beam into Ops without so much as a force-field being put up or a
>>phaser being pointed is completely unacceptable, especially after a
>>recent war. The fact that Bareil wasn't actually a threat was helpful
>>later on, but all it meant was that Our Heroes were lucky rather than
>>smart. Not a good sign.

>And there was an extremely simple way around it. Rather than having


>the phaser have a cracked coil, all they had to do was say it had been
>deactivated by the transporter. We've seen this done before, though
>I don't recall which episode (or series) it was now. Bareil wouldn't
>necessarily have noticed it until Kira later pointed it out when they
>met with Odo.

That would've helped, but I don't agree that it would have been
enough. Suppose it had been a Klingon who beamed aboard, or a member
of some other race with great physical strength and who could kill
with no weapon other than his/her own body? Particularly during
wartime, no one unauthorized should be able to beam into Ops without a
rather substantial defensive measure being taken.

Tim Lynch

John Paulus

unread,
Dec 2, 1997, 3:00:00 AM12/2/97
to

Timothy W. Lynch (tly...@alumnae.caltech.edu) wrote:

: me...@hpwsdt.cup.hp.com (David B. Mears) writes:
: >Timothy W. Lynch <tly...@alumnae.caltech.edu> wrote:

: >>WARNING: Face-huggers, chest-bursters, and ... oh, wait. Sorry,

: >>wrong "Resurrection"; the spoilers below are for DS9.

: >Not to mention the fact that the ``Earth: Final Conflict'' episode


: >the very same week was also called ``Resurrection.''

:
: >>Bareil's very first scene in "Resurrection" left me cold, basically

: >>because there was no reason for it. Fortunately, the episode didn't
: >>revolve around his hostage-taking in Ops, but the idea that anyone can
: >>beam into Ops without so much as a force-field being put up or a
: >>phaser being pointed is completely unacceptable, especially after a
: >>recent war. The fact that Bareil wasn't actually a threat was helpful
: >>later on, but all it meant was that Our Heroes were lucky rather than
: >>smart. Not a good sign.

: >And there was an extremely simple way around it. Rather than having


: >the phaser have a cracked coil, all they had to do was say it had been
: >deactivated by the transporter. We've seen this done before, though
: >I don't recall which episode (or series) it was now. Bareil wouldn't
: >necessarily have noticed it until Kira later pointed it out when they
: >met with Odo.

: That would've helped, but I don't agree that it would have been
: enough. Suppose it had been a Klingon who beamed aboard, or a member
: of some other race with great physical strength and who could kill
: with no weapon other than his/her own body? Particularly during
: wartime, no one unauthorized should be able to beam into Ops without a
: rather substantial defensive measure being taken.

i don't know much about the transdimensional transporter....but i would
assume that it works differently than a regular transporter. The DS9 crew
would be alerted to an unauthorized transporter attempt from a STARSHIP (or
even within the station). However, alt+Bareil was coming in from an area
that DS9 does NOT monitor, and would not instantly recognize the energy
signature (Holy Technobabble!).


As for security (or lack thereof) in Ops...unless they expected to have
someone transport unannounced into Ops, there's no reason for extra defense
there...

: Tim Lynch


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