Great, Blatant Typo

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Brent Jones

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Apr 14, 1993, 11:24:37 AM4/14/93
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I was wandering through a used book store yesterday evening and came across
a paperback book called _Chains of Light_ published by ROC. Never really
seen that imprint before--the book looked like a really trashy piece of
junk, written by Quentin Thomas, or something like that.

Anyway, in 24 pt text across the top of the front cover it read "In the
virtual reality of the Datenet, He-Man could rule forever with an iron
fist" or words to that effect.

Note the misspelling of "Datanet." I even looked inside the book to make
sure that they *meant* datanet, and not datenet. Somebody was *not* on the
ball.....

Any other favorite typos out there?

--
Brent Jones, Lead Technical Editor, U S WEST Information Technologies.
bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com. U S WEST sez, "nuh uh, his opinion only."
"Pule's mind wrenched and clanked like a broken engine."--James P. Blaylock

Dave Isaacs

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Apr 14, 1993, 2:45:26 PM4/14/93
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>I was wandering through a used book store yesterday evening and came across
>a paperback book called _Chains of Light_ published by ROC. Never really
>seen that imprint before--the book looked like a really trashy piece of
>junk, written by Quentin Thomas, or something like that.

>Anyway, in 24 pt text across the top of the front cover it read "In the
>virtual reality of the Datenet, He-Man could rule forever with an iron
>fist" or words to that effect.

>Note the misspelling of "Datanet." I even looked inside the book to make
>sure that they *meant* datanet, and not datenet. Somebody was *not* on the
>ball.....

>Any other favorite typos out there?

I've got a Arthur C. Clarke book which contains 2 or 3 different stories
in one volume (2001, Rendezvous with Rama, and maybe something else). It was
really cheap and it is peppered with typos. My favourite is in 2001, where
one of the chapters starts with something like (this is from memeory)

"Even from twenty miles away, Jupiter was the most dominant feature
in the sky"

I should hope so! What's a factor of 10^6 anyways? :-)

Dave
--
__________________________________________________________________________
____ ____ __ David Paul Isaacs ________________________________________
_____ _____ __ Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ________
_____ ____ __ Carleton University ________________________________________
____ __ __ Ottawa, Ontario ___________________________________________
_________________dis...@ccs.carleton.ca __________________________________

Laura Johnson

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Apr 14, 1993, 3:35:35 PM4/14/93
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I believe it's Roc that does the U.S. paperbacks of Terry Pratchett
novels. They have more than once misspelled poor (yeah, right) Terry's
name at the top of each page throughout the book. (The last one
was, I think, "Terry Pratchet".) It doesn't spoil your reading, but
I think it really p*sses Terry off...(or is that T*rry)?
--
Laura Johnson
l...@col.hp.com
Opinions expressed are my own, but may be licensed for a nominal fee.

coz...@garnet.berkeley.edu

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Apr 14, 1993, 4:11:03 PM4/14/93
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In article <bjones-14...@130.13.26.212> bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com (Brent Jones) writes:
>
>Any other favorite typos out there?
>
Poul Anderson got a beaut in one of his Polesotechnic League stories.
I've blocked on the title, but it was the one with the barbaric race
who looked like minotaurs and had half-a-dozen pet humans. Anyway,
somebody suddenly shows up with some exciting news whose content
van Rijn doesn't know but which, he observes, "has set eggbeaters
turning in everybody's guts."

When it was serialized in _Analog,_ some innocent (?) typesetter
substituted "nuts" for "guts."

When Poul found out, he said, "I'm going to leave it that way," but
I'm not certain if he did.


Dorothy J. Heydt
UC Berkeley
coz...@garnet.berkeley.edu

Disclaimer: UCB and the Cozzarelli lab are not responsible for my
opinions, and in fact I don't think they know I have any.

Ojvind Bernander

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Apr 14, 1993, 4:40:13 PM4/14/93
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In <bjones-14...@130.13.26.212> bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com (Brent Jones) writes:
>
>>Any other favorite typos out there?

Ray Bradbury, in one of his short stories, tried to show off
his knowledge of Scandinavian languages (after all, his favorite
uncle, Einar, was Swedish). He had a smorgasbord (which is Swedish
for "sandwich table") and wanted to get all the umlauts right:
.. o
SMORGASBORD

But instead ended up writing:

.. ..
SMORGASBORD
..
-- Ojvind

P.S. This might not be fully appriciated by non-Swedes.

--
## ##
# .. _~ __ .. #
@ > / ) , , _/) /_) _ _ _ _ _ _/)_ _ < @
| ^ (_/ /_|/_/_/)_(/_ __/_) _(/_/(_/)_(I_/)_(/_(/_/(_ v |

Jacob C Kesinger

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Apr 14, 1993, 5:13:40 PM4/14/93
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>Ray Bradbury, in one of his short stories, tried to show off
>his knowledge of Scandinavian languages (after all, his favorite
>uncle, Einar, was Swedish). He had a smorgasbord (which is Swedish
>for "sandwich table") and wanted to get all the umlauts right:
> .. o
> SMORGASBORD
>But instead ended up writing:
> .. ..
> SMORGASBORD
> ..
>-- Ojvind

>P.S. This might not be fully appriciated by non-Swedes.

Um, it isn't (at least not by me)

Can you explain?

Is this some sort of obscene pun?


--
Jake Kesinger n914...@henson.cc.wwu.edu Seganirith!
"I feel strongly that society needs to condemn a little more
and understand a little less"--John Major
"God bless those pagans"--Homer Simpson

Phil Trodwell

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Apr 15, 1993, 12:04:36 PM4/15/93
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In article <bjones-14...@130.13.26.212> bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com (Brent Jones) writes:
>Note the misspelling of "Datanet." I even looked inside the book to make
>sure that they *meant* datanet, and not datenet. Somebody was *not* on the
>ball.....
>
>Any other favorite typos out there?
>

The one I really remember is on the back of early editions of Dickson's "
Tactics of Mistake". The text refers to the exploits of Donal Graeme
instead of Cletus Graeme the book's main character. Donal came a few
generations later...

Not quite a typo, but in the same theme.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Phil Trodwell
*** This space ***
*** for rent. ***
*** (cheap) ***

Andrew C. Plotkin

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Apr 15, 1993, 12:58:18 PM4/15/93
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I dimly recall some story, in which the plot involved psionics -- some
zealot of an editor had carefully corrected each instance of "empathic"
to "emphatic". Oh well.

--Z

"And Aholibamah bare Jeush, and Jaalam, and Korah: these were the borogoves..."

David Levine

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Apr 15, 1993, 1:34:51 PM4/15/93
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My personal favorite typo is on the title page of "Time Travelers Strictly
Cash" by Spider Robinson, which says in letters about 3/8" high "TIIME
TRAVELERS STRICTLY CASH". My copy is autographed by "Spiider Robiinson."

- Daviid D. Leviine, Intel Supercomputer Systems Division = dav...@ssd.intel.com
"I was walking on the Moon one day... in the merry merry month of December..."

Leif Magnar Kj|nn|y

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Apr 15, 1993, 6:52:38 PM4/15/93
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In article <1993Apr14....@henson.cc.wwu.edu> n914...@henson.cc.wwu.edu (Jacob C Kesinger) writes:
>>Ray Bradbury, in one of his short stories, tried to show off
>>his knowledge of Scandinavian languages (after all, his favorite
>>uncle, Einar, was Swedish). He had a smorgasbord (which is Swedish
>>for "sandwich table") and wanted to get all the umlauts right:
>> .. o
>> SMORGASBORD
>>But instead ended up writing:
>> .. ..
>> SMORGASBORD
>> ..
>>-- Ojvind
>
>>P.S. This might not be fully appriciated by non-Swedes.
>
>Um, it isn't (at least not by me)
>
>Can you explain?
>
>Is this some sort of obscene pun?
>

Well, although *I* am a Norwegian (and thus, by definition, not a
Swede), I believe I can say that it is probably not an obscene pun
(or any pun), although of course I could conceivably be wrong. (I
rely here on my default knowledge of Swedish, which after all is
quite close to Norwegian when compared to, for instance, Swahili.)

HOWEVER, if one was to pronounce the word as it was mistakenly
printed, one would sound not like a sane Swede (or Norwegian, for
that matter) with a sound grasp of the language, but rather like
a brain-damaged moron on drugs (or possibly like the "Swedish Chef"
on the Muppet Show). In effect, it would sound totally hilarious
to any Scandinavian.

-Leif.


Bill Higgins-- Beam Jockey

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Apr 15, 1993, 9:40:11 PM4/15/93
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Typos? Let's see...

At a crucial point near the end of *The Mote in God's Eye* one of the
Moties is contemplating infanticide aboard a spaceship. The line "The
children should have been spaced" (i.e., shoved out the airlock) is
rendered in the book as "The children should have been spared."

In Joe Haldeman's *Worlds Enough and Time* somebody did a global
search-and-replace and turned every appearance of the word
"cryobiology" (freezing living things) into "cryptobiology" (study of
possibly-fictional beings such as Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster).
Same for "cryobiosis." Drove me nuts, as these words figure a lot in
the text. I haven't talked to Joe about it, but Gay Haldeman was
startled when I mentioned the error at Worldcon, so I presume Joe was
surprised too.

This is not really a typo, but in the first page or two of Forward's
*Dragon's Egg*, as a caveman is looking at a supernova in the sky, the
word "ancestors" is used as a synonym for "descendants."

Bill Higgins, Beam Jockey | "Based on the antiproton
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory | decay, I would estimate the
Bitnet: HIG...@FNAL.BITNET | incident occurred
Internet: HIG...@FNAL.FNAL.GOV | within the last 4.3 hours."
SPAN/Hepnet: 43011::HIGGINS | --Mr. Data
(Somebody tell Cdr. Data to check his vacuum!)

Ahrvid Engholm

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Apr 16, 1993, 12:27:43 AM4/16/93
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In article <1993Apr15....@ugle.unit.no> lei...@lise.unit.no (Leif Magnar Kj|nn|y) writes:
>>>Ray Bradbury, in one of his short stories, tried to show off
>>>his knowledge of Scandinavian languages (after all, his favorite
>>>uncle, Einar, was Swedish). He had a smorgasbord (which is Swedish
>>>for "sandwich table") and wanted to get all the umlauts right:
>>> .. o
>>> SMORGASBORD
>>>But instead ended up writing:
>>> .. ..
>>> SMORGASBORD
>>> ..
>>>-- Ojvind
>>
>>>P.S. This might not be fully appriciated by non-Swedes.
>>
>>Can you explain?

>
>Well, although *I* am a Norwegian (and thus, by definition, not a
>Swede), I believe I can say that it is probably not an obscene pun
>(or any pun), although of course I could conceivably be wrong. (I
>rely here on my default knowledge of Swedish, which after all is
>quite close to Norwegian when compared to, for instance, Swahili.)
>
>HOWEVER, if one was to pronounce the word as it was mistakenly
>printed, one would sound not like a sane Swede (or Norwegian, for
>that matter) with a sound grasp of the language, but rather like
>a brain-damaged moron on drugs (or possibly like the "Swedish Chef"
>on the Muppet Show). In effect, it would sound totally hilarious
>to any Scandinavian.
Well, "smoergasboerd" ("oe" substituted for "o" with two dots) includes
two possible puns. "Gas" is just about what is sounds like - it could
be interpreted as something coming from your stomach. And "boerd" means
"comes from" or "heritage". ("Smoer" means "butter".) All in all, it
could mean "the results of butter-gas".
It isn't incredibly funny, but you smile a bit.

Patrick Nielsen-Hayden

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Apr 16, 1993, 7:30:03 AM4/16/93
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bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com (Brent Jones) writes:

>Any other favorite typos out there?

Not precisely a typo, but one of my favorite Tor covers reads

NOT THIS AUGUST
A NOVEL OF THE CONQUEST OF NORTH AMERICA BY C. M. KORNBLUTH

-----
Patrick Nielsen Hayden, senior editor, Tor Books
p...@panix.com * CIS: 72701,1344 * GEnie: PNH * opinions mine

Rolf Wilson

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Apr 16, 1993, 2:58:51 PM4/16/93
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Speaking of typos in Joe Haldeman's work, in one book he wrote that a
ship had been accelerating at 1 1/2 gravities, which gave everyone sore
feet. Some helpful copyeditor changed it to 112 gravities. Ouch!
--
Rolf Wilson Illinois State Geological Survey ro...@geoserv.isgs.uiuc.edu

Dan Hartung

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Apr 16, 1993, 2:22:15 PM4/16/93
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p...@panix.com (Patrick Nielsen-Hayden) writes:
>bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com (Brent Jones) writes:
>
>>Any other favorite typos out there?
>
>Not precisely a typo, but one of my favorite Tor covers reads
>
> NOT THIS AUGUST
>A NOVEL OF THE CONQUEST OF NORTH AMERICA BY C. M. KORNBLUTH

Aha, a sotry about a mild-mannered sf author using his superior
knowledge to accomplish great deeds in a simpler time. ;-)

--
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Christopher J. Henrich

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Apr 16, 1993, 12:06:00 PM4/16/93
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In article <C5JCu...@SSD.intel.com> dav...@ssd.intel.com (David Levine) writes:
>My personal favorite typo is on the title page of "Time Travelers Strictly
>Cash" by Spider Robinson, which says in letters about 3/8" high "TIIME
>TRAVELERS STRICTLY CASH". My copy is autographed by "Spiider Robiinson."
>
>- Daviid D. Leviine, Intel Supercomputer Systems Division = dav...@ssd.intel.com
Iin my copy, the creative spelling is apparently not a typo, but
hand-lettered. The block of lettering is wider at the bottom than
the top, so that it "zooms" at you - a Start Wars effect. I pity the
lettering artist when he or she realized...

More strictly a typo was the reprinting of _Rogue Queen_ (by Lester
del Rey?) as _Rouge Queen_.

Regards,
Chris Henrich

Kent Sandvik

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Apr 18, 1993, 1:42:29 AM4/18/93
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In article <1993Apr14....@henson.cc.wwu.edu>,

n914...@henson.cc.wwu.edu (Jacob C Kesinger) wrote:
>
> >Ray Bradbury, in one of his short stories, tried to show off
> >his knowledge of Scandinavian languages (after all, his favorite
> >uncle, Einar, was Swedish). He had a smorgasbord (which is Swedish
> >for "sandwich table") and wanted to get all the umlauts right:
> > .. o
> > SMORGASBORD
> >But instead ended up writing:
> > .. ..
> > SMORGASBORD

> >P.S. This might not be fully appriciated by non-Swedes.


> Um, it isn't (at least not by me)
> Can you explain?
> Is this some sort of obscene pun?

No puns, but he just didn't get it, and placed the umlauts at
the wrong places, producing a gibberish Swedish word. He
should have consulted his favourite uncle.

Cheers,
Kent
---
san...@newton.apple.com. ALink: KSAND -- Private activities on the net.

Geoffrey A. Coulter

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Apr 19, 1993, 2:23:44 AM4/19/93
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As someone earlier in this thread pointed out, global search and
replace causes problems from time to time. I was just rereading The
Seeress of Kell, which has an instance of this. For two-thirds of the
book (this is a paperback copy, I have no idea if this problem extends
throughout all editions) the name of the God of Arendia/Perivor is
given as Chamdar, and only in the last part of the book is it
correctly given as Chaldan.

[For anyone who cares, Chamdar was the real name of Asharak the Murgo
from teh first couple books of the Belgariad.]

The name apparently looked familiar, so it got inserted...

Geoffrey
cou...@gusun.georgetown.edu


David Dyer-bennet

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Apr 19, 1993, 5:43:15 AM4/19/93
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In a message to All <16 Apr 93 12:30> in Usenet rec.arts.sf.written Patrick
Nielsen-hayden wrote:

PN> bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com (Brent Jones) writes:

>>Any other favorite typos out there?

PN> Not precisely a typo, but one of my favorite Tor covers reads

PN> NOT THIS AUGUST
PN> A NOVEL OF THE CONQUEST OF NORTH AMERICA BY C. M. KORNBLUTH

I like that one a lot. And I didn't know that book was back in
print, either. Thanks. That's an old favorite of mine that I
consider (undeservedly) obscure.

* Origin: Terraboard, Mpls MN: Home of the SFCON echo (RA 1:282/341)

Lee Schumacher

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Apr 19, 1993, 10:37:34 AM4/19/93
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In article <1993Apr16....@tinton.ccur.com> c...@tinton.ccur.com (Christopher J. Henrich) writes:

[munch]

>More strictly a typo was the reprinting of _Rogue Queen_ (by Lester
>del Rey?) as _Rouge Queen_.
>
>Regards,
>Chris Henrich

My recollection is that Rogue Queen was by L. Sprague DeCamp. The thing I
remember much more clearly was that I hated it. I thought it was
highly mysognistic... it read like a 1950's lets keep women in their place
type book.

Lee

coz...@garnet.berkeley.edu

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Apr 19, 1993, 12:43:01 PM4/19/93
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In article <1993Apr19.1...@schaefer.math.wisc.edu> schu...@schaefer.math.wisc.edu (Lee Schumacher) writes:
>
>My recollection is that Rogue Queen was by L. Sprague DeCamp. The thing I
>remember much more clearly was that I hated it. I thought it was
>highly mysognistic... it read like a 1950's lets keep women in their place
>type book.

Uh, this is probably none of my business, but are you a male Lee or a
female Lee?

Because I read _Rogue Queen_ as a young, impressionable female person
and I loved it. Far from "keeping women in their place," it moved from
showing whole societies run by females (and the males are used only
for breeding and killed off when they get feisty) to showing two
happily married couples (one Terran, one Avtinyk) in each of which the
female partner deftly manages her mate for his own better health and
happiness. The female-dominated societies should please the more
extreme feminists among us; the marital interactions bring reminiscent
smiles to the faces of old married women like me. In fact, you could
probably more easily make out a case for misandry, except that DeCamp
is not only male but a veteran of at least fifty years of successful
marriage.

Kathryn Whitworth

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Apr 19, 1993, 12:59:47 PM4/19/93
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I've heard a number of times that McCaffrey's *Get Off the Unicorn* was
supposed to have been *Get of the Unicorn*. Gives it a whole 'nother
meaning, if true.

Kathryn Roth Whitworth

Andrew C. Plotkin

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Apr 19, 1993, 10:56:54 PM4/19/93
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Excerpts from netnews.rec.arts.sf.written: 19-Apr-93 Re: Great, Blatant
Typo Kathryn Whitworth@natins (185)

> I've heard a number of times that McCaffrey's *Get Off the Unicorn* was
> supposed to have been *Get of the Unicorn*. Gives it a whole 'nother
> meaning, if true.

True all right; I believe it's mentioned in the introduction to the book.

As I recall, though, she saw the typo and liked it better than her
original title. So it stayed in.

Bruce F. Webster

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Apr 19, 1993, 6:43:59 PM4/19/93
to
In article <bjones-14...@130.13.26.212> bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com
(Brent Jones) writes:
>
> Any other favorite typos out there?
>

Yeah. The first Tor paperback edition of _The Book of Dreams_ by Jack Vance
proclaimed across the bottom "THE FINAL DEMON PRINCESS NOVEL!" It should have
read "THE FINAL DEMON PRINCES NOVEL" (as in the Five Demon Princes). ..bruce..

coz...@garnet.berkeley.edu

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Apr 20, 1993, 12:05:27 PM4/20/93
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In article <UfoqNqW00...@andrew.cmu.edu> "Andrew C. Plotkin" <ap...@andrew.cmu.edu> writes:
"
"> I've heard a number of times that McCaffrey's *Get Off the Unicorn* was
"> supposed to have been *Get of the Unicorn*. Gives it a whole 'nother
"> meaning, if true.
"
"True all right; I believe it's mentioned in the introduction to the book.
"
"As I recall, though, she saw the typo and liked it better than her
"original title. So it stayed in.

Which reminds me of a similar story. Marion Zimmer Bradley was getting
ready to write a Darkover book and she was going to use a telepath who
had close rapport with birds and saw through their eyes as they flew
about. She was going to call it "Wings of Darkover." The contract came
back from the publisher with the title "Winds of Darkover." So, as
Marion puts it, "I shrugged and wrote in a Ghost Wind scene."

Craig Becker

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Apr 20, 1993, 11:53:50 AM4/20/93
to

rolf@geoserv (Rolf Wilson) writes:

> Speaking of typos in Joe Haldeman's work, in one book he wrote that a
> ship had been accelerating at 1 1/2 gravities, which gave everyone sore
> feet. Some helpful copyeditor changed it to 112 gravities. Ouch!

Yes, I noticed this in a British paperback version of _The Forever War_.
Haven't checked to see if it's also in other versions.

Craig
--
-- Craig Becker, Object Technology Products --
-- WE ARE BARNEY. Internet: jlpi...@austin.ibm.com --
-- YOU WILL BE ASSIMILATED. IBM TR: jlpi...@woofer.austin.ibm.com --
-- VNET: JLPICARD at AUSVM1 --

Patrick Nielsen-Hayden

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Apr 20, 1993, 8:27:15 PM4/20/93
to

Come again? I can think of hairier typos perpetrated by Tor, but I'm fairly
sure that we never published THE BOOK OF DREAMS.

Joseph Askew

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Apr 22, 1993, 9:44:20 PM4/22/93
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In article <1993Apr19....@radian.uucp> kathrynw%rad...@natinst.com (Kathryn Whitworth) writes:

>I've heard a number of times that McCaffrey's *Get Off the Unicorn* was
>supposed to have been *Get of the Unicorn*. Gives it a whole 'nother
>meaning, if true.

Yes but who would be going to a Unicorn to be divorced? Who would
*want* to? I suppose the Unicorn must be Reform, I can't see anyone
else making a Unicorn a Rabbi! (Hey it is just that sort of a day)

Joseph Askew

--
Joseph Askew, Gauche and Proud In the autumn stillness, see the Pleiades,
jas...@spam.maths.adelaide.edu Remote in thorny deserts, fell the grief.
Disclaimer? Sue, see if I care North of our tents, the sky must end somwhere,
Actually, I rather like Brenda Beyond the pale, the River murmurs on.

Marty Moore

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Apr 23, 1993, 12:01:17 PM4/23/93
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Just hit a good one in Suzeete Haden Elgin's YONDER COMES THE OTHER END
OF TIME (the 4th Ozark novel). "unapeakable weakedness" -> "unspeakable
wickedness"

--
The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Campus Office for Information
Technology, or the Experimental Bulletin Board Service.
internet: laUNChpad.unc.edu or 152.2.22.80

SADUN, ERICA LIEBMAN

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Apr 24, 1993, 8:46:40 PM4/24/93
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In article <25...@spam.maths.adelaide.edu.au> jas...@spam.maths.adelaide.edu.au (Joseph Askew) writes:
>In article <1993Apr19....@radian.uucp> kathrynw%rad...@natinst.com (Kathryn Whitworth) writes:
>>I've heard a number of times that McCaffrey's *Get Off the Unicorn* was
>>supposed to have been *Get of the Unicorn*. Gives it a whole 'nother
>Yes but who would be going to a Unicorn to be divorced? Who would
>*want* to? I suppose the Unicorn must be Reform, I can't see anyone
>else making a Unicorn a Rabbi! (Hey it is just that sort of a day)

I believe you are making the possibly incorrect assumption that the
Unicorn is the Rabbi rather than the beloved spouse.
Well it seems to me that the particular VIRTUES which have been established
as per Unicorn/Human relations would make the necessity for getting a get
to be, well, unnecessary. I don't know if the ketuba holds if the
marriage is unconsumated. Anyway, consider a society where you could
take mythical creatures and stick 'em into jail until they released their
'fayre maydens' from contractual obligations.

Besides Dybbks and Golems, what other traditional jewish sci-fi is there?
I know that most of the Sephardic traditions were basically rip offs of
arab/spanish myths (flying rabbis with magical carpets and so forth...)
but I am under the impression that the Ashk. created a rich set of
non-slavic myths...

Wondering,

Erica
--
===========================ERICA SADUN================================
Grep foo whilst ye may, oh daemons of the Spring...
er...@cc.gatech.edu
======================================================================

coz...@garnet.berkeley.edu

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Apr 26, 1993, 12:25:42 PM4/26/93
to
"In article <1993Apr19....@radian.uucp> kathrynw%rad...@natinst.com (Kathryn Whitworth) writes:
"
">I've heard a number of times that McCaffrey's *Get Off the Unicorn* was
">supposed to have been *Get of the Unicorn*. Gives it a whole 'nother
">meaning, if true.
"
"Yes but who would be going to a Unicorn to be divorced? Who would
"*want* to? I suppose the Unicorn must be Reform, I can't see anyone
"else making a Unicorn a Rabbi! (Hey it is just that sort of a day)

I don't see any smilies so I'll take this as straight--not the part about
the unicorn, the other part. McCaffrey (whose roots are Catholic, not
Jewish) was using an archaic meaning of English "get" as "offspring"--
what you beget, or get, is your get, your children. It's an obscure
noun and it's probably just as well that she changed it to something,
_any_thing else.

Your Hebrew word, on the other hand, though equally obscure to non-Jews,
makes a nice pun. I only recognize it from a newspaper article I read
once on the plight of divorced Jewish women whose ex-husbands selfishly
will not give them the _get_, or permission to remarry--without which,
*he* can get married again but *she* can't. (What's the Hebrew for
"dog-in-the-manger"?)

Perhaps the function of the unicorn is to offer to impale the ex-husband
if he doesn't come through with the _get_?

Laura Johnson

unread,
Apr 26, 1993, 6:34:44 PM4/26/93
to
coz...@garnet.berkeley.edu () writes:
> I don't see any smilies so I'll take this as straight--not the part about
> the unicorn, the other part. McCaffrey (whose roots are Catholic, not
> Jewish) was using an archaic meaning of English "get" as "offspring"--
> what you beget, or get, is your get, your children. It's an obscure
> noun and it's probably just as well that she changed it to something,
> _any_thing else.
>

Nah, I recognized the word from my horse-crazy childhood; I think
it's still used pretty commonly to refer collectively to the offspring
of a horse. Or unicorn.
--
Laura Johnson
l...@col.hp.com
Opinions expressed are my own, but may be licensed for a nominal fee.

Lee Ann Rucker

unread,
Apr 26, 1993, 8:35:35 PM4/26/93
to
In "A Stainless Steel Rat is Born" by Harry Harrison, the "porcuswine" are
described as foul-tempered animals with "sharp tushes". Unless he meant
"sharp tusks", it's easy to see why they're so mean <g>.

Dan Blum

unread,
Apr 26, 1993, 10:39:55 PM4/26/93
to

"Tush" means "tusk" (in addition to the other thingy :)), so it's not
a typo.
--
_____________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum Institute for the Learning Sciences Room 334
bl...@ils.nwu.edu 1890 Maple Ave., Evanston, IL 60201 708-491-7149

"It's nothing, honey - the dog's learning how to juggle."
_____________________________________________________________________

Bob Alberti

unread,
Apr 27, 1993, 3:36:31 PM4/27/93
to
: bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com (Brent Jones) writes:
: >
: > Any other favorite typos out there?
: >
My fave typo was not so much a typo as a processing error. I once read a
copy of some Heinlein book (years ago, when I was a boy) in which several
chapters in the center of the book had been double-stamped, slightly offset
of one another.

The effect was sort of a three-dimensional vibrational blur, as if the whole
book were shaking rapidly while being read. Since I was the only science-
fiction reader in the small town where I grew up, and this book was one of
the slim pickings the local bookmobile brought 'round, I persisted, getting
terrible headaches but finishing the section. Meanwhile, I told all my
friends that I was reading a "3-D science fiction novel", which confused
them to no end. "How can you READ that stuff!"

Peter Trei

unread,
Apr 28, 1993, 4:21:46 PM4/28/93
to
bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com (Brent Jones) writes:
>
> Any other favorite typos out there?
>

I came in on this one late, but the most egregious error I've seen
was about 10 years ago, when I bought a copy of L Sprague deCamp's
"Rogue Queen".

The COVER, in large, friendly letters, informed me that the book was:

"Rouge Queen" by L. Spraque deCamp.
^^ ^

Getting both the title AND the authors name wrong on the COVER of a book
has got to be some kind of record.

Peter Trei
pt...@Mitre.org

Beth Friedman

unread,
Apr 25, 1993, 10:03:22 PM4/25/93
to
I don't know if it was a typo or a mistake on the author's part that didn't get
caught by the copy editor, but in Varley's book WIZARD, "anterior" used
consistently to mean "posterior," or possibly "ventral." It's particularly
annoying since "anterior" is used as the opposite of "frontal."

* Origin: Beth's Point: Minneapolis, MN (1:282/341.5)

Nancy Lebovitz

unread,
May 2, 1993, 4:30:28 PM5/2/93
to
My favorite typo was in a heroic fantasy (possibly by Lynn Abbey). The
heroine is in a swordfight when suddenly her brain falls out.

My best guess is that the intended word was braid.

Nancy Lebovitz
calligraphic button catalogue available by email
na...@genie.slhs.udel.edu

Coffee makes it possible to get out of bed, chocolate makes it worthwhile

--
Nancy Lebovitz calligraphic button catalogue available by email (170K)
na...@genie.slhs.udel.edu

Donald J. Harlow

unread,
May 3, 1993, 1:15:43 AM5/3/93
to
In article <C5t59...@panix.com> p...@panix.com (Patrick Nielsen-Hayden) writes:
>bweb...@pages.com (Bruce F. Webster) writes:
>
>>In article <bjones-14...@130.13.26.212> bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com
>>(Brent Jones) writes:
>>>
>>> Any other favorite typos out there?
>>>
>
>>Yeah. The first Tor paperback edition of _The Book of Dreams_ by Jack Vance
>>proclaimed across the bottom "THE FINAL DEMON PRINCESS NOVEL!" It should have
>>read "THE FINAL DEMON PRINCES NOVEL" (as in the Five Demon Princes). ..bruce..
>
>Come again? I can think of hairier typos perpetrated by Tor, but I'm fairly
>sure that we never published THE BOOK OF DREAMS.
>
Perhaps TOR is just a typo for DAW.

--

----------------------------------------------
Don Harlow do...@netcom.com
Redaktoro, esperanto usa (510)222-0187
Esperanto League (Info only) (800)828-5944
"Pendigoto ne dronos..." -- L.L. Zamenhof
----------------------------------------------

Evelyn C. Leeper

unread,
May 4, 1993, 11:11:59 AM5/4/93
to
In article <donhC6F...@netcom.com> do...@netcom.com (Donald J. Harlow) writes:
> In article <C5t59...@panix.com> p...@panix.com (Patrick Nielsen-Hayden) writes:
> [someone writes]

> >>Yeah. The first Tor paperback edition of _The Book of Dreams_ by Jack Vance
> >>proclaimed across the bottom "THE FINAL DEMON PRINCESS NOVEL!" It should have
> >>read "THE FINAL DEMON PRINCES NOVEL" (as in the Five Demon Princes). ..bruce..
> >
> >Come again? I can think of hairier typos perpetrated by Tor, but I'm fairly
> >sure that we never published THE BOOK OF DREAMS.
> >
> Perhaps TOR is just a typo for DAW.

And speaking of DAW and Patrick, no one has commented (that I have
seen) that they misspelled Patrick's name in the table of contents of
ALADDIN.

(Actually the worst proof-reading I've seen lately was "The Black
Ferry" by Mark McCloskey in the June F&SF, with thirteen typos in a
nine-page story. This must have been an experiment--the rest of the
issue was fine.)

Evelyn....@att.com
+1 908 957 2070
--
"Godwin's Rule of Nazi Analogies: As a USENET discussion grows longer,
the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one.
"Sircar's Corollary: If the USENET discussion touches on homosexuality
or Heinlein, Nazis or Hitler are mentioned within three days.
[Your propagation may vary.]"

Patrick Nielsen-Hayden

unread,
May 5, 1993, 5:39:13 AM5/5/93
to
e...@cbnewsj.cb.att.com (Evelyn C. Leeper) writes:

>And speaking of DAW and Patrick, no one has commented (that I have
>seen) that they misspelled Patrick's name in the table of contents of
>ALADDIN.

Also on the copyright acknowledgements page. _Everybody_ misspells the
Nielsen part of Nielsen Hayden: Neilsen, Nielson, and so forth. I figure
that by not being crazed about it I'm storing up karma points for the times
I let other people's names get by misspelled. This is probably delusionary
thinking and will get me in deep trouble.

John Hawkinson

unread,
May 6, 1993, 9:49:00 PM5/6/93
to
In <C6Js5...@panix.com> p...@panix.com (Patrick Nielsen-Hayden) writes:
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

>Also on the copyright acknowledgements page. _Everybody_ misspells the
>Nielsen part of Nielsen Hayden: Neilsen, Nielson, and so forth.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


>Patrick Nielsen Hayden, senior editor, Tor Books

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


>p...@panix.com * CIS: 72701,1344 * GEnie: PNH * opinions mine


Umm, so which is it, "Nielsen Hayden" or "Nielsen-Hayden". The formers
would seem to have it, but I dunno...

--
John Hawkinson
jh...@panix.com

Patrick Nielsen-Hayden

unread,
May 7, 1993, 6:20:06 AM5/7/93
to
jh...@panix.com (John Hawkinson) writes:

It's a double unhyphenated last name, like Nunn May (or Von Rospach, for
that matter): Nielsen Hayden. However, I do admit to using the hyphen
sometimes, when _not_ using it results in some computer deciding my last name
is Hayden or Nielsenhayden or somesuch. This may be why the quoting feature
of your newsreader put the hyphen in.

Really, though, with a name like that, if I went through life being annoyed
every time somebody got it wrong, I'd be annoyed all the time.

-----
Patrick Nielsen Hayden * p...@panix.com * CIS: 72701,1344 * GEnie: PNH

Bruce F. Webster

unread,
May 6, 1993, 12:33:04 PM5/6/93
to
In article <donhC6F...@netcom.com> do...@netcom.com (Donald J. Harlow)
writes:
> In article <C5t59...@panix.com> p...@panix.com (Patrick Nielsen-Hayden)
writes:
> >bweb...@pages.com (Bruce F. Webster) writes:
> >
> >>In article <bjones-14...@130.13.26.212>
bjo...@denitqm.mnet.uswest.com
> >>(Brent Jones) writes:
> >>>
> >>> Any other favorite typos out there?
> >>>
> >
> >>Yeah. The first Tor paperback edition of _The Book of Dreams_ by Jack Vance
> >>proclaimed across the bottom "THE FINAL DEMON PRINCESS NOVEL!" It should
have
> >>read "THE FINAL DEMON PRINCES NOVEL" (as in the Five Demon Princes).
..bruce..
> >
> >Come again? I can think of hairier typos perpetrated by Tor, but I'm fairly
> >sure that we never published THE BOOK OF DREAMS.
> >
> Perhaps TOR is just a typo for DAW.
>


Don's right; my own great, blatant typo. :-) ..bruce..

Bruce F. Webster
bweb...@pages.com

sometimes a Wombat

unread,
May 8, 1993, 6:19:39 PM5/8/93
to
In a post up above, p...@panix.com (Patrick Nielsen-Hayden) wrote:

> jh...@panix.com (John Hawkinson) writes:
>
> >Umm, so which is it, "Nielsen Hayden" or "Nielsen-Hayden". The formers
> >would seem to have it, but I dunno...
>
> It's a double unhyphenated last name, like Nunn May (or Von Rospach, for
> that matter): Nielsen Hayden.

Or Elizabeth Moulton Barrett, who hated the Moulton branch of the
family, and never used that first half of her last name. She signed
everything EBB, her middle name being another Barrett -- which worked
out when she became Mrs. Browning and exchanged one Barrett for her
husband's name.

I don't know which Barrett is the one she dropped, tho'.

Larry "Misha" Hammer
--

\ I have striven not to laugh at human actions,
L...@physics.arizona.edu \ not to weep at them, nor to hate them,
sometimes a Wombat \ but to understand them -- Spinoza

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