worst sf book ever

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alanm...@yahoo.com

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Feb 23, 2008, 12:55:35 AM2/23/08
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William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF book ever.

http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time/#more-7

Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire

Terry Austin

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Feb 23, 2008, 1:09:34 AM2/23/08
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"alanm...@yahoo.com" <alanm...@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:a04c1db4-1949-4177...@i12g2000prf.googlegroups.com:

That might actually be worse than everything written by Marion Zimmer
Bradley.

--
Terry Austin
"Dude, we're all your bitch, but only Ken's wearing the juice."
- tussock

"Just throw a rock, and what screams will probably be a moron."
- Elvis (no, not that Elvis)

Lawrence Watt-Evans

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Feb 23, 2008, 1:26:05 AM2/23/08
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On Sat, 23 Feb 2008 06:09:34 GMT, Terry Austin <taus...@gmail.com>
wrote:

>"alanm...@yahoo.com" <alanm...@yahoo.com> wrote in
>news:a04c1db4-1949-4177...@i12g2000prf.googlegroups.com:
>
>> William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF book ever.
>>
>> http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time/#
>> more-7
>>
>> Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire
>>
>That might actually be worse than everything written by Marion Zimmer
>Bradley.

Well, yes -- she's hardly in the same league as Lionel Fanthorpe, or
LaVerne Ross, or H. Turk. (Okay, Ross and Turk wrote fantasy, rather
than science fiction -- does that rule them out?)

Douglas K. Bell surely deserves a mention, as well.

Oh, and perhaps the Steinbergs, pere et fils?


--
My webpage is at http://www.watt-evans.com
The seventh issue of Helix is now at http://www.helixsf.com

Gene Ward Smith

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Feb 23, 2008, 1:30:17 AM2/23/08
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"alanm...@yahoo.com" <alanm...@yahoo.com> wrote in
news:a04c1db4-1949-4177-ba5d-
94d711...@i12g2000prf.googlegroups.com:

Sorry, it's clear from what the review quotes that it isn't
the worst sf book of all time, though it might be the most
deranged. An example of a worse sf book would be The
Christening, by Roger P. Elwood, unless you aren't counting
anything but science fiction. I hear Mission Earth is pretty
awful, and that the later Gor books get progressively worse.
Since the first one is complete trash, this suggests we may
have a winner, or loser. Of course if The Eye of Argon were
only longer, we would have a clear winner in the heroic
fantasy department.


Butch Malahide

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:03:51 AM2/23/08
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On Feb 22, 11:55 pm, "alanmc95...@yahoo.com" <alanmc95...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

> William Briggs wrote this amusing review of  the worst SF book ever.
>
> http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time...

> Buck Alice And The Actor Robot (1988, Guild Press).

Not good, but my nominee for worst sf book ever is still _John Smith,
Emperor_ by S. G. Gallego, Guild Press, 1944. It's so bad that I'm the
only person who has ever heard of it, let alone read it, and the proud
owner of what may be the only copy in existence. I wonder if that's
the same Guild Press, and I wonder what else they've done between 1944
and 1988. It's hard to compare the two works, though, seeing as they
are in different genres; the one is a utopia, the other, er, an
adventure story.

Joseph Nebus

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:20:03 AM2/23/08
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Gene Ward Smith <ge...@chewbacca.org> writes:

>> William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF
>book ever.
>>
>> http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-
>of-all-time/#more-7
>>
>> Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire

>Sorry, it's clear from what the review quotes that it isn't
>the worst sf book of all time, though it might be the most
>deranged.

Heck, the given quotes suggest an interesting book, telling
the story with an amiable enough chuckle along the way. I don't know
why ``Cathleen made several stabs at writing an ironic poem
commemorating the whole ordeal but, in the end, settled for becoming
pregnant'' strikes me as funny, but it does.

Other parts, particularly where the ``Africanized'' names
come in, just leave me feeling uncomfortable, and prescribing orgies
has never appealed to me, but from the evidence provided in the
review the book doesn't seem to qualify as worst-ever.


> An example of a worse sf book would be The
>Christening, by Roger P. Elwood, unless you aren't counting
>anything but science fiction. I hear Mission Earth is pretty
>awful, and that the later Gor books get progressively worse.
>Since the first one is complete trash, this suggests we may
>have a winner, or loser. Of course if The Eye of Argon were
>only longer, we would have a clear winner in the heroic
>fantasy department.

Plus, there's various Star Trek novels written by Sondra Marshak
and Myrna Culbreth.

I realize I can't think of the last science fiction novel that
I read which I really despised, although part of that is that I'm not
reading so much as I used to, and I seem to be getting better at
projecting how good or bad the book should be based on the cover.


--
Joseph Nebus
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

David DeLaney

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Feb 23, 2008, 4:00:16 AM2/23/08
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... Okay, that -does- seem to beat Night Travels of the Elvish Vampire
( http://crevette.livejournal.com/113659.html ) and its rewrite Eternity of
Blood ( http://crevette.livejournal.com/240745.html ). Though it's painful to
try to decide by how much. Eye of Argon never actually got published, did it
(even self-)?

Dave
--
\/David DeLaney posting from d...@vic.com "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
http://www.vic.com/~dbd/ - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.

David DeLaney

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Feb 23, 2008, 4:01:45 AM2/23/08
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Lawrence Watt-Evans <l...@sff.net> wrote:
>Well, yes -- she's hardly in the same league as Lionel Fanthorpe, or
>LaVerne Ross, or H. Turk. (Okay, Ross and Turk wrote fantasy, rather
>than science fiction -- does that rule them out?)

Well, he did say SF, and here that is inclusive...

>Douglas K. Bell surely deserves a mention, as well.

Does it reflect badly on me that I remember this immediately as SPACE BANG !
? (I have an excuse - he's in my FAQ...)

David DeLaney

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Feb 23, 2008, 4:10:43 AM2/23/08
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Joseph Nebus <nebusj-@-rpi-.edu> wrote:
> Plus, there's various Star Trek novels written by Sondra Marshak
>and Myrna Culbreth.

Hey! I liked those! (At one point!) You're referring to the Phoenix pair,
right? Cuz they also edited Star Trek the New Voyages 1-2...

> I realize I can't think of the last science fiction novel that
>I read which I really despised, although part of that is that I'm not
>reading so much as I used to, and I seem to be getting better at
>projecting how good or bad the book should be based on the cover.

The last fantasy I know of that I couldn't finish was Newcomb's The Fifth
Sorceress. Can't think of a corresponding scifi novel right now, though I
did have to struggle a bit through Coney's non-Greataway stuff.

... looking at the banished.bad file I've started keeping recently, for ones
that have been taken back -out- of my collection/listing, I find the four
there are all fantasy - A Princess of Roumania / Park (good GODS does anything
ever HAPPEN while these characters are agonizing? / 8 deadly words / so the
real world is just something one of the villains made up in their spare time?
sorry, they don't have anywhere near the brainpower, by orders of magnitude
OF orders of magnitude, to imagine anything as complex as we live in), Kar
Kalim / Christian (yes, the whole book really is about the protagonist's sexual
abuse - thanks ever so), Bloodwalk / Davis (8 deadly words - okay, so the
protagonist is an Eeeeevil Witchipoo and is doing Eeeeevil Things. I care
why?), and The Crimson Sword / Thompson (let's not only follow Campbell's
heroic journey slavishly, let's have the protagonist think out loud to himself
about the symbolism involved and have conversations dripping with cluelessness
between him and his Eternal Infernal Companion).

Sorry, was compelled to get that all out of my system for some reason.
Apologies if anyone else here liked any of those.

Butch Malahide

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Feb 23, 2008, 3:58:26 AM2/23/08
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On Feb 23, 1:03 am, Butch Malahide <fred.gal...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Feb 22, 11:55 pm, "alanmc95...@yahoo.com" <alanmc95...@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
>
> > William Briggs wrote this amusing review of  the worst SF book ever.
>
> >http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time...
> > Buck Alice And The Actor Robot (1988, Guild Press).
>
> Not good, but my nominee for worst sf book ever is still _John Smith,
> Emperor_ by S. G. Gallego, Guild Press, 1944. It's so bad that I'm the
> only person who has ever heard of it, let alone read it, and the proud
> owner of what may be the only copy in existence.

That part was an exaggeration: I just find two copies for sale online.
The funny thing is, when I google on "John Smith Emperor"+"gallego" I
get two hits, for those two booksellers; but when I just google on
"John Smith Emperor", expecting to get *more* hits, I get only one
hit, not for the book, but for some kind of gambling den. Could one of
you internet-savvy people kindly explain to me how that works?

tphile

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Feb 23, 2008, 9:10:55 AM2/23/08
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On Feb 23, 1:20 am, nebu...@-rpi-.edu (Joseph Nebus) wrote:
> Gene Ward Smith <g...@chewbacca.org> writes:
>
> >"alanmc95...@yahoo.com" <alanmc95...@yahoo.com> wrote in
> >news:a04c1db4-1949-4177-ba5d-
> >94d7110e3...@i12g2000prf.googlegroups.com:
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­---

could their possibly be a worse Star Trek novel than Black Fire
by Sonni Cooper?
Reading it was so awful I didn't touch another Trek book for decades.
AFAIK thats the only book she has been able to get published
I certainly hope so.


tphile

art...@yahoo.com

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Feb 23, 2008, 10:07:29 AM2/23/08
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On Feb 23, 4:01 am, d...@gatekeeper.vic.com (David DeLaney) wrote:
> Lawrence Watt-Evans <l...@sff.net> wrote:
> >Well, yes -- she's hardly in the same league as Lionel Fanthorpe, or
> >LaVerne Ross, or H. Turk. (Okay, Ross and Turk wrote fantasy, rather
> >than science fiction -- does that rule them out?)
>
> Well, he did say SF, and here that is inclusive...

Of course with bad Science Fiction you can combine both bad science
and bad fiction for a one two knockout punch. Alas, while I can think
of some books that are bad at one and atrocious at the other, I'm not
coming up with something that is truly horrid at both, but I have not
read the nominees mentioned here.

Dorothy J Heydt

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Feb 23, 2008, 10:43:47 AM2/23/08
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In article <Xns9A4CE4C0CF6AEge...@207.115.17.102>,
Gene Ward Smith <ge...@chewbacca.org> wrote:

>....Of course if The Eye of Argon were

>only longer, we would have a clear winner in the heroic
>fantasy department.

The Eye of Argon is a strong contender in the bad-writing
category, subset loving the thesaurus not wisely but too well;
but other than that it's NOT that bad a story. It's a classic
sword-n-sorcery with good action and an adequate plot. Pity
Theiss hadn't had a mentor who could've taken away his thesaurus
and made him read more widely; he could have been a writer.

By the way, my contender for worst (or at least, worst I've read
-- I don't, for example, even attempt to read Gor) is one whose
title and author I've forgotten. Something about a veterinarian
in space. The only time I have ever literally thrown the book
against the wall. I did not pronounce the Eight Deadly Words on
that occasion because I had not yet encountered enough people in
it to not care about.

Dorothy J. Heydt
Albany, California
djh...@kithrup.com

Howard Brazee

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Feb 23, 2008, 10:51:09 AM2/23/08
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The First book that I permitted myself to not finish wasn't a bad book -
but the joke was way to long and it got tiresome. Admittedly, it was a
one-book trilogy, so I had the excuse that I wouldn't have bought part
2, but it did teach me that I could quit in the future - way too many
good books I have never read.

(Illuminati trilogy).

mimus

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Feb 23, 2008, 10:55:26 AM2/23/08
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On Sat, 23 Feb 2008 02:20:03 -0500, Joseph Nebus wrote:

> Gene Ward Smith <ge...@chewbacca.org> writes:
>
>>"alanm...@yahoo.com" <alanm...@yahoo.com> wrote in
>>news:a04c1db4-1949-4177-ba5d-
>>94d711...@i12g2000prf.googlegroups.com:
>
>>> William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF
>>book ever.
>>>
>>> http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-
>>of-all-time/#more-7
>>>
>>> Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire
>
>>Sorry, it's clear from what the review quotes that it isn't
>>the worst sf book of all time, though it might be the most
>>deranged.
>
> Heck, the given quotes suggest an interesting book, telling
> the story with an amiable enough chuckle along the way. I don't know
> why ``Cathleen made several stabs at writing an ironic poem
> commemorating the whole ordeal but, in the end, settled for becoming
> pregnant'' strikes me as funny, but it does.

Yes, this did not strike me as an attempt at serious SCI-FI.

If anything, something a little closer but of course greatly inferior to
Thorne Smith, although Smith IIRC never did anything extraterrestrial,
unless you count ghosts or gods as extraterrestrial.

And could apparently use a little more proofing.

--

Mark Twain, whenever sober long enough to permit an
estimate, has been uniformly found to bear a spotless
character.

< Ambrose Bierce


Sea Wasp

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Feb 23, 2008, 11:10:24 AM2/23/08
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For the win, VAN GOGH IN SPACE ! ! !

And in the fantasy department, Eye of Argon pales in comparison with
Night Travels of the Elven Vampire.

The above two are the literary equivalent of the Star Wars Holiday
Special.

--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Live Journal: http://seawasp.livejournal.com

Sea Wasp

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Feb 23, 2008, 11:25:12 AM2/23/08
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David DeLaney wrote:
> Joseph Nebus <nebusj-@-rpi-.edu> wrote:
>
>> Plus, there's various Star Trek novels written by Sondra Marshak
>>and Myrna Culbreth.
>
>
> Hey! I liked those! (At one point!) You're referring to the Phoenix pair,
> right? Cuz they also edited Star Trek the New Voyages 1-2...

Marshak and Culbreath wrote the two Phoenix novels (The Price of the
Phoenix, the Fate of the Phoenix) and had the third planned but it
was never published (alas; I really wanted to know what the resolution
they had in mind was). They also edited Star Trek: The New Voyages 1
and 2, one of which included their novelette "The Procrustean Petard",
which I consider the worst of their output. They also wrote two other
Trek novels: The Prometheus Design, probably the most ambitious of
their works, and Triangle.

In many ways I've considered their work some of the most interesting
of the Trek novels, because they actually explored implications of the
world (e.g., the transporter problem) the original series created in
ways most novels never even thought about.

Brenda Clough

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Feb 23, 2008, 12:43:45 PM2/23/08
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Gene Ward Smith wrote:


Obviously the awards should be set up like the Nebulas or Hugos.
Worst short story, worst novella, and so on. I'd say ARGON
has a lock on worst short story.

Brenda


--
---------
Brenda W. Clough
http://www.sff.net/people/Brenda/

Recent short fiction:
"A Mighty Fortress"
http://www.helixsf.com/archives/Jul07/index.htm

Rich Horton

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Feb 23, 2008, 1:46:21 PM2/23/08
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A few nominees:

Lionel Fanthorpe is too easy, in a way, but still -- try reading
GALAXY 666 (as by "Pel Torro") sometime -- that's pretty darn bad.

A DAW book from the mid-70s that just astonished me with its badness:
THE HAWKS OF ARCTURUS, by Cecil Snyder III (I suspect a pseudonym, and
I wonder if it's someone well known).

A very ambitious book by a pretty fair author, but so terrible:
ALGORITHM, by Jean Mark Gawron. Reduced me to reading sentence by
sentence, with absolutely no comprehension of what was happening, just
to say I finished it.

And more recently, an appalling supposedly comic novel, Second Contact
by J. D. Austin. My review is here:
<URL:http://www.sfsite.com/12b/sc118.htm>.

(The SF writer I mention in the opening sentence is by the way a
sometime regular here at rec.arts.sf.written.)

Christopher Henrich

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Feb 23, 2008, 1:52:45 PM2/23/08
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In article
<a04c1db4-1949-4177...@i12g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
"alanm...@yahoo.com" <alanm...@yahoo.com> wrote:

<http://www.amazon.com/Z-Effect-Marshall-laurens/dp/0671783572/ref=sr_11_
1?ie=UTF8&qid=1203792163&sr=11-1>

I haven't actually read this, but I remember that a reviewer (perhaps
Spider Robinson) condemned it with unusual vehemence (I mean, more than
Spider's usual vehemence) , and the cover blurb "A mad, demented
scientist" etc. is surely one of the low points in the history of cover
blurbs.

--
Christopher J. Henrich
chen...@monmouth.com
htp://www.mathinteract.com

Christopher Henrich

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Feb 23, 2008, 1:58:23 PM2/23/08
to

<http://www.amazon.com/Z-Effect-Marshall-laurens/dp/0671783572/ref=sr_11_
1?ie=UTF8&qid=1203792163&sr=11-1>

I haven't actually read this, but I remember that a reviewer (perhaps
Spider Robinson) condemned it with unusual vehemence (I mean, more than
Spider's usual vehemence) , and the cover blurb "A mad, demented
scientist" etc. is surely one of the low points in the history of cover
blurbs.

Used copies are available, including this one, with the author's
inscription:
<http://www.alibris.com/booksearch.detail?S=R&bid=8795921393&cm_mmc=shopc
ompare-_-base-_-nonisbn-_-na>

Dilbert Perkins

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:02:07 PM2/23/08
to

The Mission Earth series by L. Ron Hubbard. You know you're in trouble
when the title of the first book contains a punctuation error.

Gene Ward Smith

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:11:11 PM2/23/08
to
Dilbert Perkins <dilbert...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in
news:P4_vj.12827$R84....@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net:

> The Mission Earth series by L. Ron Hubbard. You know you're
in trouble
> when the title of the first book contains a punctuation
error.

Has anyone actually read Dijkstra's War? The excerpts on Baen
were encouragingly awful. A State of Disobedience is a
terrible stinker also.

Mike Schilling

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:18:40 PM2/23/08
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Gene Ward Smith wrote:
> Dilbert Perkins <dilbert...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in
> news:P4_vj.12827$R84....@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net:
>
>> The Mission Earth series by L. Ron Hubbard. You know you're in
>> trouble when the title of the first book contains a punctuation
>> error.
>
> Has anyone actually read Dijkstra's War?

Is it considered harmful?


Gene Ward Smith

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:20:36 PM2/23/08
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"Mike Schilling" <mscotts...@hotmail.com> wrote in
news:kk_vj.12951$0w....@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net:

>> Has anyone actually read Dijkstra's War?
>
> Is it considered harmful?

If it explodes when you try to read it.

Bill Snyder

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:23:02 PM2/23/08
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On Sat, 23 Feb 2008 19:11:11 GMT, Gene Ward Smith <ge...@chewbacca.org>
wrote:

>Dilbert Perkins <dilbert...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in

>news:P4_vj.12827$R84....@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net:
>
>> The Mission Earth series by L. Ron Hubbard. You know you're
>in trouble
>> when the title of the first book contains a punctuation
>error.
>
>Has anyone actually read Dijkstra's War?

Yes. But I'm not about to go back, and have to scrub out my cranial
cavity with steel wool and Lysol a second time; so about all I can
tell you at this point is that the plot is as silly as the writing is
clumsy, and the characters are as wooden as the plot is silly, and the
science is as wonky as the characters are wooden.

> The excerpts on Baen
>were encouragingly awful. A State of Disobedience is a
>terrible stinker also.

Not that we're prejudiced or anything.

--
Bill Snyder [This space unintentionally left blank]

Dilbert Perkins

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:22:13 PM2/23/08
to

Wizard's Fist Rule? Pretty cheesy stuff.

Rebecca Rice

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:27:30 PM2/23/08
to
Joseph Nebus wrote:
> Gene Ward Smith <ge...@chewbacca.org> writes:
>
>> "alanm...@yahoo.com" <alanm...@yahoo.com> wrote in
>> news:a04c1db4-1949-4177-ba5d-
>> 94d711...@i12g2000prf.googlegroups.com:
>
>>> William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF
>> book ever.
>>> http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-
>> of-all-time/#more-7
>>> Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire
>
>> Sorry, it's clear from what the review quotes that it isn't
>> the worst sf book of all time, though it might be the most
>> deranged.
>
> Heck, the given quotes suggest an interesting book, telling
> the story with an amiable enough chuckle along the way. I don't know
> why ``Cathleen made several stabs at writing an ironic poem
> commemorating the whole ordeal but, in the end, settled for becoming
> pregnant'' strikes me as funny, but it does.

It's actually rather tragic, given that we are told that this is her
first menses, which means that she is probably 9ish. Younger than the
future mother of humanity, in fact, who is not allowed to participate in
the orgies.

Rebecca

Gene Ward Smith

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:36:59 PM2/23/08
to
Bill Snyder <bsn...@airmail.net> wrote in
news:9ds0s3huonsd9l3je...@4ax.com:

>> The excerpts on Baen
>>were encouragingly awful. A State of Disobedience is a
>>terrible stinker also.
>
> Not that we're prejudiced or anything.

Krapman got on my case because I dumped on it, not the other
way around.

David DeLaney

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Feb 23, 2008, 3:03:06 PM2/23/08
to

I read those in reverse order (because that's the order I found them in used
bookstores at). It seemed to make about as much sense that way, but I did
finish them all.

David DeLaney

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Feb 23, 2008, 3:04:46 PM2/23/08
to
Bill Snyder <bsn...@airmail.net> wrote:
>Yes. But I'm not about to go back, and have to scrub out my cranial
>cavity with steel wool and Lysol a second time; so about all I can
>tell you at this point is that the plot is as silly as the writing is
>clumsy, and the characters are as wooden as the plot is silly, and the
>science is as wonky as the characters are wooden.

Is there a crane, and must the crane dance?

Dave "sorry, having a Hughart flashback for a moment there" DeLaney

David Johnston

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Feb 23, 2008, 2:41:12 PM2/23/08
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On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 21:55:35 -0800 (PST), "alanm...@yahoo.com"
<alanm...@yahoo.com> wrote:

>William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF book ever.
>
>http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time/#more-7
>
>Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire

I won't deny it, that's worse than the worse book I ever read.

David DeLaney

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Feb 23, 2008, 3:07:37 PM2/23/08
to
Dilbert Perkins <dilbert...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

>Bill Snyder wrote:
>> Not that we're prejudiced or anything.
>
>Wizard's Fist Rule? Pretty cheesy stuff.

Well, but at least with those you can see through to the shorter book inside
that would be much better, for each entry in the series. It's the splattering
with politics and theories of human behavior as plot-dumped by the characters
and the showing-us-don't-telling-us over and over again of how Bad the Bad Guys
Are, painted across the studies of the magics and the cultures and the
interesting discoveries, that cause such cognitive dissonance for me. And I'm
still gonna buy the last one once it makes paperback, partly because it IS
the last one and I wanna find out whether the Bad Guy manages to turn the Hero
into a puddle of goo at the end, or not.

Dave

John Schilling

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Feb 23, 2008, 3:29:02 PM2/23/08
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On Sat, 23 Feb 2008 19:11:11 GMT, Gene Ward Smith <ge...@chewbacca.org>
wrote:

>Dilbert Perkins <dilbert...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in

>news:P4_vj.12827$R84....@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net:
>
>> The Mission Earth series by L. Ron Hubbard. You know you're
>in trouble
>> when the title of the first book contains a punctuation
>error.
>
>Has anyone actually read Dijkstra's War? The excerpts on Baen
>were encouragingly awful.

I've read it. It wasn't the worst SF book ever. I'm not sure
it even really qualified as awful.

It definitely didn't qualify as good. Mediocre, maybe. Should
have been written in the Pulp Age.


--
*John Schilling * "Anything worth doing, *
*Member:AIAA,NRA,ACLU,SAS,LP * is worth doing for money" *
*Chief Scientist & General Partner * -13th Rule of Acquisition *
*White Elephant Research, LLC * "There is no substitute *
*John.S...@alumni.usc.edu * for success" *
*661-718-0955 or 661-275-6795 * -58th Rule of Acquisition *

Ted Nolan <tednolan>

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 8:32:04 PM2/23/08
to
In article <d9q0s3l87d0q7hl1p...@4ax.com>,

Rich Horton <rrho...@prodigy.net> wrote:
>
>
>On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 21:55:35 -0800 (PST), "alanm...@yahoo.com"
><alanm...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF book ever.
>>
>>http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time/#more-7
>>
>>Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire
>
>A few nominees:
>
>Lionel Fanthorpe is too easy, in a way, but still -- try reading
>GALAXY 666 (as by "Pel Torro") sometime -- that's pretty darn bad.

I bought that used at a bait & supplies store once, and both a friend and me
ended up reading it. I think I found it so bizarre that it didn't
really register as "bad" for me, and he seemed to like it. (Of course
we were both 14..)

>
>A DAW book from the mid-70s that just astonished me with its badness:
>THE HAWKS OF ARCTURUS, by Cecil Snyder III (I suspect a pseudonym, and
>I wonder if it's someone well known).
>

I remember absolutely nothing about this other than it had a sexy cover,
was a "white edge" era DAW, and that I liked it.


Ted
--
------
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..

_ berge @hotmail.com.invalid Eric D. Berge

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 8:37:47 PM2/23/08
to
On Sat, 23 Feb 2008 19:11:11 GMT, Gene Ward Smith <ge...@chewbacca.org>
wrote:

> A State of Disobedience is a terrible stinker also.

100% agreement. Clumsy prose in the service of drooling hate - a real
turd of abook.

Eye of Argon at least had some cheerfully loopy verve that gave me
some small quantum of pleasure; ASOB left me feeling like I needed a
shower.

Mike Schilling

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 9:33:50 PM2/23/08
to

OK, a bad place to go to.


Mike Schilling

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 9:36:33 PM2/23/08
to
John Schilling wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Feb 2008 19:11:11 GMT, Gene Ward Smith
> <ge...@chewbacca.org>
> wrote:
>
>> Dilbert Perkins <dilbert...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in
>> news:P4_vj.12827$R84....@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net:
>>
>>> The Mission Earth series by L. Ron Hubbard. You know you're
>> in trouble
>>> when the title of the first book contains a punctuation
>> error.
>>
>> Has anyone actually read Dijkstra's War? The excerpts on Baen
>> were encouragingly awful.
>
> I've read it. It wasn't the worst SF book ever. I'm not sure
> it even really qualified as awful.
>
> It definitely didn't qualify as good. Mediocre, maybe. Should
> have been written in the Pulp Age.

ITYM "should have been made into pulpage". (Actually, I've never read
it. Given how much fun the bits James and Bill quoted were to parody,
I think having heard about it but not read it is the sweet spot.)


Ted Nolan <tednolan>

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 9:58:47 PM2/23/08
to
In article <iI4wj.13236$0w....@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net>,

Still better than "come from".

Mike Schilling

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 10:18:12 PM2/23/08
to
Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
> In article <iI4wj.13236$0w....@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net>,
> Mike Schilling <mscotts...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Gene Ward Smith wrote:
>>> "Mike Schilling" <mscotts...@hotmail.com> wrote in
>>> news:kk_vj.12951$0w....@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net:
>>>
>>>>> Has anyone actually read Dijkstra's War?
>>>>
>>>> Is it considered harmful?
>>>
>>> If it explodes when you try to read it.
>>
>> OK, a bad place to go to.
>>
>>
>
> Still better than "come from".

C'mon, boys and girls, this one isn't that difficult.


Ted Nolan <tednolan>

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 11:17:04 PM2/23/08
to
In article <Ul5wj.12254$Ch6....@newssvr11.news.prodigy.net>,

Mike Schilling <mscotts...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
>> In article <iI4wj.13236$0w....@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net>,
>> Mike Schilling <mscotts...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> Gene Ward Smith wrote:
>>>> "Mike Schilling" <mscotts...@hotmail.com> wrote in
>>>> news:kk_vj.12951$0w....@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net:
>>>>
>>>>>> Has anyone actually read Dijkstra's War?
>>>>>
>>>>> Is it considered harmful?
>>>>
>>>> If it explodes when you try to read it.
>>>
>>> OK, a bad place to go to.
>>>
>>>
>>
>> Still better than "come from".
>
>C'mon, boys and girls, this one isn't that difficult.
>
>

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Come_from

Mike Schilling

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 11:27:14 PM2/23/08
to
Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
> In article <Ul5wj.12254$Ch6....@newssvr11.news.prodigy.net>,
> Mike Schilling <mscotts...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
>>> In article <iI4wj.13236$0w....@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net>,
>>> Mike Schilling <mscotts...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Gene Ward Smith wrote:
>>>>> "Mike Schilling" <mscotts...@hotmail.com> wrote in
>>>>> news:kk_vj.12951$0w....@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net:
>>>>>
>>>>>>> Has anyone actually read Dijkstra's War?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Is it considered harmful?
>>>>>
>>>>> If it explodes when you try to read it.
>>>>
>>>> OK, a bad place to go to.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> Still better than "come from".
>>
>> C'mon, boys and girls, this one isn't that difficult.
>>
>>
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Come_from

Let me ALTER my previous statement.


Cosmin Corbea

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 11:35:40 PM2/23/08
to
"David DeLaney" <d...@gatekeeper.vic.com> wrote in message
news:slrnfrvmg...@gatekeeper.vic.com...

> ... looking at the banished.bad file I've started keeping recently, for
> ones
> that have been taken back -out- of my collection/listing, I find the four
> there are all fantasy - A Princess of Roumania / Park (good GODS does
> anything
> ever HAPPEN while these characters are agonizing? / 8 deadly words / so
> the
> real world is just something one of the villains made up in their spare
> time?
> sorry, they don't have anywhere near the brainpower, by orders of
> magnitude
> OF orders of magnitude, to imagine anything as complex as we live in),

Funny, I'm currently reading "The Tourmaline" - the second book of the
trilogy; I don't find it so bad. Rather slow, but I didn't feel like
throwing it at the wall yet :)


>Kar
> Kalim / Christian (yes, the whole book really is about the protagonist's
> sexual
> abuse - thanks ever so), Bloodwalk / Davis (8 deadly words - okay, so the
> protagonist is an Eeeeevil Witchipoo and is doing Eeeeevil Things. I care
> why?), and The Crimson Sword / Thompson (let's not only follow Campbell's
> heroic journey slavishly, let's have the protagonist think out loud to
> himself
> about the symbolism involved and have conversations dripping with
> cluelessness
> between him and his Eternal Infernal Companion).
>

Hmm, haven't read any of the above. Latest "worst ever" fantasy book I read
:) is Sarah Monnet's "The Virtu". I had read "Melusine", the first volume,
and it was ok; unremarkable, but not terrible. The second was however so
awful I just dropped the whole thing right there.

As to worst SF book I read, it's hands down a vile concoction perpetrated by
Niven, Pournelle and Flynn, named "Fallen Angels". I can't understand how
the three of them - whose other work I quite like otherwise - managed to
come up with such a terrible mess.


--
Regards,

Cosmin Corbea


tphile

unread,
Feb 23, 2008, 11:57:31 PM2/23/08
to
On Feb 22, 11:55 pm, "alanmc95...@yahoo.com" <alanmc95...@yahoo.com>
wrote:
> William Briggs wrote this amusing review of  the worst SF book ever.
>
> http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time...

>
> Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire

If not the worse then certainly bad is the cover that has nothing
to do with the story within and is not an abstract.

Zelazny The Trumps of Doom with the robot monk looking thing with
a clock shaped device.
was just some generic piece of art the publisher had on stock and used
to save a buck.
That cover would have worked with an anthology book but not the Amber
series.

tphile

Jon Schild

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 1:54:44 AM2/24/08
to

alanm...@yahoo.com wrote:
> William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF book ever.
>

> http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time/#more-7


>
> Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire

I always thought, after attempting to slog through it, that Piers
Anthony's _Orn_ was the worst ever written. But it wasn't this bad.


--
I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us
with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use.
-- Galileo Galilei

David Goldfarb

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 5:45:56 AM2/24/08
to
In article <06451158-0270-4432...@v3g2000hsc.googlegroups.com>,

tphile <tph...@cableone.net> wrote:
>If not the worse then certainly bad is the cover that has nothing
>to do with the story within and is not an abstract.
>
>Zelazny The Trumps of Doom with the robot monk looking thing with
>a clock shaped device.
>was just some generic piece of art the publisher had on stock and used
>to save a buck.
>That cover would have worked with an anthology book but not the Amber
>series.

Actually, that image worked quite well when Michael Whelan used it
as the cover to Fred Saberhagen's _Brother Assassin_. (Berserkers,
time travel, and monks all figured into the plot.) Why the cover
artist for _Trumps of Doom_ thought he could get away with swiping
it -- and why he wanted to do so -- is unclear.

--
David Goldfarb | The views and opinions expressed here are my own.
gold...@ocf.berkeley.edu | They do not reflect upon Microsoft Corporation or
gold...@csua.berkeley.edu | its employees in any way because, well, I don't
| work for Microsoft.

Sea Wasp

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 10:43:50 AM2/24/08
to
Jon Schild wrote:
>
>
> alanm...@yahoo.com wrote:
>
>> William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF book ever.
>>
>> http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time/#more-7
>>
>> Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire
>
>
> I always thought, after attempting to slog through it, that Piers
> Anthony's _Orn_ was the worst ever written. But it wasn't this bad.
>
>

Piers has many faults, but he can write quite decent prose, and Orn
is FAR from even the worst HE'S written, let alone the worst stuff
EVER written.

--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Live Journal: http://seawasp.livejournal.com

Howard Brazee

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 11:41:59 AM2/24/08
to
On 2/24/08 Sea Wasp wrote:
> > I always thought, after attempting to slog through it, that Piers
> > > Anthony's _Orn_ was the worst ever written. But it wasn't this
> bad.
> > >
> > >
>
> Piers has many faults, but he can write quite decent prose, and
> Orn
> is FAR from even the worst HE'S written, let alone the worst stuff
> EVER written.

I have the impression that Orn was Piers' attempt to be really literate.
When it wasn't appreciated, he gave up and decided to be popular instead.

For lots of us "bad literature" is harder to take than "bad story", even
if the the "bad literature" was close to being successful.

ppint. at pplay

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 12:53:50 PM2/24/08
to
- hi; in rasfwr article, <fpr0nc$ime$1...@news.xmission.com>,
j...@xmission.com "Jon Schild" commented in awe:

> alanm...@yahoo.com wrote:
>
>>William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF book ever.
>>http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time/
>>#more-7
>>Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire
>
>I always thought, after attempting to slog through it, that Piers
>Anthony's _Orn_ was the worst ever written. But it wasn't this bad.
>
- but how does it compare with the _Runts of 61-Cygni-C_ ?

(this emwftrw)

- love, a ppint. happy to have even half a shop open again
[please drop the "v", and change the "f" to a "g",
should you wish to cc. to, or email, me]
--
"What are your fees?" inquired Guyal cautiously. "I respond to three
questions," stated the augur. "For twenty terces I phrase the answer
in clear and actionable language; for ten I use the language of cant,
which occasionally admits of ambiguity; for five, I speak a parable
which you must interpret as you will; and for one terce, I babble in
an unknown tongue." "Guyal of Sfere", _The Dying Earth_- Jack Vance

Karl Johanson

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 2:48:21 PM2/24/08
to
"Cosmin Corbea" <cosminc@spa_mtrap.canada.com.invalid> wrote

> As to worst SF book I read, it's hands down a vile concoction
> perpetrated by Niven, Pournelle and Flynn, named "Fallen Angels". I
> can't understand how the three of them - whose other work I quite like
> otherwise - managed to come up with such a terrible mess.

A friend read "Fallen Angels" in his young teen young teen years. He was
so stunned that anyone would put that much effort into vilifying a
specific group of people ('greens' in this case), that he looked into
'green' causes. Some year later he ran for city council with the local
Green Party & was elected.

Karl Johanson


Karl Johanson

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 2:51:43 PM2/24/08
to
"Brenda Clough" <clo...@erols.com> wrote

> Obviously the awards should be set up like the Nebulas or Hugos. Worst
> short story, worst novella, and so on. I'd say ARGON has a lock on
> worst short story.

The Elron Awards have run since 1971. http://www.vcon.ca/elron

Karl Johanson


John Pelan

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 3:11:32 PM2/24/08
to
On Sat, 23 Feb 2008 18:46:21 GMT, Rich Horton <rrho...@prodigy.net>
wrote:

>On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 21:55:35 -0800 (PST), "alanm...@yahoo.com"

><alanm...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>William Briggs wrote this amusing review of the worst SF book ever.
>>
>>http://wmbriggs.com/blog/2006/12/06/worst-science-fiction-of-all-time/#more-7
>>
>>Are there any challengers for place and show?- A. McIntire
>

>A few nominees:
>
>Lionel Fanthorpe is too easy, in a way, but still -- try reading
>GALAXY 666 (as by "Pel Torro") sometime -- that's pretty darn bad.
>

Fanthorpe's pretty bad, as was his crony John Glasby. Sadly, both
authors could write well when they wanted to. Fanthorpe has about
two-dozen exceptional ghost stories to his credit and Glasby's also
done some pretty good supernatural horror. Neither was much good at
SF, but unfortunately certain publishers encouraged them by giving
them checks...

I used to have quite a collection of awful SF titles, but over the
years I've sold off a lot of it. The remants are up on eBay right now
under seller ID darknemoblackcat. Even with three bedrooms devoted to
the book collection, space is always a consideration and since I doubt
that I'm ever likely to want to re-read this stuff, I might as well
make room for other things.

Cheers,

John
www.darksidepress.com

Sea Wasp

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 4:05:28 PM2/24/08
to
Karl Johanson wrote:
> "Cosmin Corbea" <cosminc@spa_mtrap.canada.com.invalid> wrote
>
>
>>As to worst SF book I read, it's hands down a vile concoction
>>perpetrated by Niven, Pournelle and Flynn, named "Fallen Angels". I
>>can't understand how the three of them - whose other work I quite like
>>otherwise - managed to come up with such a terrible mess.
>
>
> A friend read "Fallen Angels" in his young teen young teen years. He was
> so stunned that anyone would put that much effort into vilifying a
> specific group of people

Truly an innocent. Even as a young teen I was quite aware that people
would put INFINITE effort into vilifying groups of people they didn't
like. "Fallen Angels" doesn't represent much effort on that level at all.

> ('greens' in this case), that he looked into
> 'green' causes. Some year later he ran for city council with the local
> Green Party & was elected.

While I've read Fallen Angels several times and enjoyed it immensely
each time.

David DeLaney

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 4:36:48 PM2/24/08
to
Cosmin Corbea <cosminc@spa_mtrap.canada.com.invalid> wrote:
>Funny, I'm currently reading "The Tourmaline" - the second book of the
>trilogy; I don't find it so bad. Rather slow, but I didn't feel like
>throwing it at the wall yet :)

For me, I'm not even bothering to buy it. Usually I'll give another chance
if the first book was slow or somewhat boring, but this was force-myself-to-
finish icky.

>Hmm, haven't read any of the above. Latest "worst ever" fantasy book I read
>:) is Sarah Monnet's "The Virtu". I had read "Melusine", the first volume,
>and it was ok; unremarkable, but not terrible. The second was however so
>awful I just dropped the whole thing right there.

Huh. Our tastes obviously differ then; it was a page-turner for me, and I
await volume 3.

David DeLaney

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 4:38:43 PM2/24/08
to
Sea Wasp <seawasp...@sgeObviousinc.com> wrote:

>Jon Schild wrote:
>> I always thought, after attempting to slog through it, that Piers
>> Anthony's _Orn_ was the worst ever written. But it wasn't this bad.
>
> Piers has many faults, but he can write quite decent prose, and Orn
>is FAR from even the worst HE'S written, let alone the worst stuff
>EVER written.

Agreed. I'd give that to his Bio Of A Really Icky Space Tyrant series. (And
this is from someone who owns and has reread all of Xanth, as well as
Macroscope, Omnivore/Orn/Ox, Mercycle, and has been looking for Neq the Sword
to complete the Battle Circle for the last couple decades.)

Mike Schilling

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 4:19:10 PM2/24/08
to
David DeLaney wrote:
> Sea Wasp <seawasp...@sgeObviousinc.com> wrote:
>> Jon Schild wrote:
>>> I always thought, after attempting to slog through it, that Piers
>>> Anthony's _Orn_ was the worst ever written. But it wasn't this
>>> bad.
>>
>> Piers has many faults, but he can write quite decent prose, and Orn
>> is FAR from even the worst HE'S written, let alone the worst stuff
>> EVER written.
>
> Agreed. I'd give that to his Bio Of A Really Icky Space Tyrant
> series. (And this is from someone who owns and has reread all of
> Xanth, as well as Macroscope, Omnivore/Orn/Ox, Mercycle, and has
> been
> looking for Neq the Sword to complete the Battle Circle for the last
> couple decades.)

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&tn=neq+the+sword&x=0&y=0


Mike Schilling

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 4:20:03 PM2/24/08
to
David DeLaney wrote:
.
>
> Agreed. I'd give that to his Bio Of A Really Icky Space Tyrant
> series. (And this is from someone who owns and has reread all of
> Xanth, as well as Macroscope, Omnivore/Orn/Ox, Mercycle, and has
> been
> looking for Neq the Sword to complete the Battle Circle for the last
> couple decades.)

"The first rule of Battle Circle is you don't talk about Battle
Circle!"


tphile

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 4:49:13 PM2/24/08
to

In Footfall I enjoyed the SF writers think tank
In Fallen Angels I enjoyed the exploration of a subversive SF fan
underground
movement.and all the trivia and stuff that was new to me (like SF
using greek letters)

but in SF science has often wore both white and black hats, been hero
or villian.

It does make a point about "good intentions", that it can pave the
path to hell.
we think something like "green" is all good without considering the
long term consequences
or dealing with them.
Like Atomic power is good, without thinking about what to do with the
nuclear waste.

a case in point is the surge of raging out of control forest fires we
have been having.
I saw a 60 minutes report recently pointing out that the conservation
movement was
partly responsible for them.
Our protect the forests efforts were to good. that a forest needs to
burn occassionally
to get rid of the underbrush and "tinder" that builds up on the ground
and becomes instant
fuel that will even take down trees that are capable of surviving
small fires.

tphile

Gene Ward Smith

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 5:13:16 PM2/24/08
to
d...@gatekeeper.vic.com (David DeLaney) wrote in
news:slrnfs3mm...@gatekeeper.vic.com:

> Agreed. I'd give that to his Bio Of A Really Icky Space
Tyrant series. (And
> this is from someone who owns and has reread all of Xanth,
as well as
> Macroscope, Omnivore/Orn/Ox, Mercycle, and has been looking
for Neq the Sword
> to complete the Battle Circle for the last couple decades.)

You are seriously warped, dude.

Gene Ward Smith

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 5:14:15 PM2/24/08
to
tphile <tph...@cableone.net> wrote in news:ca55e58d-d1e8-48c3-
873b-dac...@s12g2000prg.googlegroups.com:

> In Footfall I enjoyed the SF writers think tank

That was the one thing I really hated.

Karl Johanson

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 5:47:04 PM2/24/08
to
"Sea Wasp" <seawasp...@sgeObviousinc.com> wrote

> Karl Johanson wrote:
>> "Cosmin Corbea" <cosminc@spa_mtrap.canada.com.invalid> wrote
>>
>>
>>>As to worst SF book I read, it's hands down a vile concoction
>>>perpetrated by Niven, Pournelle and Flynn, named "Fallen Angels". I
>>>can't understand how the three of them - whose other work I quite
>>>like otherwise - managed to come up with such a terrible mess.
>>
>>
>> A friend read "Fallen Angels" in his young teen young teen years. He
>> was so stunned that anyone would put that much effort into vilifying
>> a specific group of people
>
> Truly an innocent. Even as a young teen I was quite aware that people
> would put INFINITE effort into vilifying groups of people they didn't
> like. "Fallen Angels" doesn't represent much effort on that level at
> all.

Another Green Party member introduced me to him, hoping I'd convince him
that nuclear energy was a viable idea. I did, but he doesn't want any
Orion launches: )

>> ('greens' in this case), that he looked into 'green' causes. Some
>> year later he ran for city council with the local Green Party & was
>> elected.
>
> While I've read Fallen Angels several times and enjoyed it immensely
> each time.

I enjoyed some of it. The notion that any group, including 'greens' can
be dangerous if misinformed, or ill motivated, is valid. The 'there are
no tame greens' bit was tiresome.

At the recent LA Worldcon, Jerry Pournelle repeated a common claim that
in the 1970's the 'scientific consensus' was that the world was headed
for an ice age. When he was asked if 'scientific consensus' meant that
the peer-reviewed science journal articles in the 70's all agreed, he
said, 'all of the panels at science conferences, he attended, were
talking about how to deal with a coming ice age.' This didn't define a
scientific consensus at all, of course, and talking about what to do
about a hypothetical scenario, is quite different than providing
scientific evidence that that scenario will happen at a given time.

Karl Johanson


GSV Three Minds in a Can

unread,
Feb 24, 2008, 5:45:57 PM2/24/08
to
Bitstring <slrnfs3mm...@gatekeeper.vic.com>, from the wonderful
person David DeLaney <d...@gatekeeper.vic.com> said

>Sea Wasp <seawasp...@sgeObviousinc.com> wrote:
>>Jon Schild wrote:
>>> I always thought, after attempting to slog through it, that Piers
>>> Anthony's _Orn_ was the worst ever written. But it wasn't this bad.
>>
>> Piers has many faults, but he can write quite decent prose, and Orn
>>is FAR from even the worst HE'S written, let alone the worst stuff
>>EVER written.
>
>Agreed. I'd give that to his Bio Of A Really Icky Space Tyrant series. (And
>this is from someone who owns and has reread all of Xanth, as well as
>Macroscope, Omnivore/Orn/Ox, Mercycle, and has been looking for Neq the Sword
>to complete the Battle Circle for the last couple decades.)

I though battle circle was available as a one volume omnibus (assuming
we are talking MMPB) and even Neq should be available via ABEBOOKS,
unless you think that's cheating .. if it ain't, I'm sitting on a
goldmine ..

--
GSV Three Minds in a Can
11,020 Km walked. 2,118 Km PROWs surveyed. 38.3% complete.

David DeLaney

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Feb 24, 2008, 6:43:11 PM2/24/08