Gaming Books that Also Make Good Reading?

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htn963

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Jan 24, 2007, 9:51:58 PM1/24/07
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I'm not talking about novels based on games, but the actual
rulebooks, background guides and the like for use in group roleplaying
games that are churned out by the ton by White Wolf Publishing and
others.

The reason I asked is because I recently browsed through a GURPS
softcover treatment of Jack Vance's Planet of Adventure and found
myself engrossed. I've always dismissed these four books of Vance as
minor and haven't read them but this GURPS adaptation perked my
interest and by golly I'll also go read these books of Vance
afterwards. The illustrations were cheezy, but the writers managed to
capture the archness and spirited, creative fun that is Vance.

Any other ones? For just light reading -- I don't have time to
invest in group roleplaying games nowadays.

--
Ht

kelly...@comcast.net

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Jan 24, 2007, 10:03:31 PM1/24/07
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If you don't mind some fantasy with your cyberpunk I would recomend
some of the older Shadowrun sourcebooks. Some specifics include
"Aztlan," "Dunklezahn: Portfolio of a Dragon," "Cybertechnology," and
"Tir Taigire." (sp) All are long out of print and obsoleted by both
the passage of the settings timeline and changes to the rules but the
fiction value is excelent. I still reread "Aztlan" even though I have
not run a SR game in years.

Message has been deleted

Peter Meilinger

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Jan 25, 2007, 12:18:22 AM1/25/07
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On Jan 24, 6:51 pm, "htn963" <htn...@verizon.net> wrote:

> Any other ones? For just light reading -- I don't have time
> to invest in group roleplaying games nowadays.

You can't go too far wrong tracking down some more GURPS
books. They tend to be well-written and interesting, and there
are quite a few translations of SF settings that might pique your
interest. Looking at the master list at

http://www.sjgames.com/gurps/books/

I'd definitely recommend:

Black Ops - Action/Cinematic take on an X-Files/Men In
Black type of setting. Ass-kicking secret agents take on
the supernatural, basically. It's a pretty good read.

Discworld - must reading if you like the setting. Great
stuff.

Technomancer - the first atomic weapon brought magic
back to the world, and things got mighty weird. Good
reading and a very well thought out setting.

Warehouse 23 - Remember the big-ass warehouse
that the Ark of the Covenant got shoved into? This
book is full of stuff like that, from short descriptions
to short stories.

There are plenty of other good GURPS books, but
I didn't want to get out of hand.

Other games that come to mind:

Castle Falkenstein - a modern game designer gets
pulled into an alternate Victorian Age, complete
with magic and steamtech and real life versions
of various fictional characters. A good read and
full of great artwork. There's a GURPS version,
too, but I'd go for the original.

Feng Shui - magic, martial arts, supertech
and big, big fucking guns, as various strange
factions try to gain control of enough places of
power to - dare I say it? - RULE THE WORLD!
The game is an attempt to mesh pretty much
every type of Hong Kong action flick into one
setting, and it does a pretty good job. There
have been at least two editions of this one,
and I'm only familiar with the first, which I'd
highly recommend.

One word of warning - I happen to enjoy
the rules of RPGs as much as the non-rules
stuff, but I've tried to recommend games where
the non-rules stuff is excellent all by itself.

Pete

Ken from Chicago

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Jan 25, 2007, 1:16:38 AM1/25/07
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"htn963" <htn...@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:1169693518....@v33g2000cwv.googlegroups.com...

A lot of sf fans like the world-building in sf novels, well, rpgs cut out
the middle and gives strictly the world-building without any pesky plot.

Plus BABYLON 5 and FIREFLY rpgs reveal more backstory on their respective
universes--especially the latter (e.g., STL multi-generation ships aka
"arks").

-- Ken from Chicago


Dorothy J Heydt

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Jan 25, 2007, 1:19:30 AM1/25/07
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In article <1169693518....@v33g2000cwv.googlegroups.com>,

htn963 <htn...@verizon.net> wrote:
> I'm not talking about novels based on games, but the actual
>rulebooks, background guides and the like for use in group roleplaying
>games that are churned out by the ton by White Wolf Publishing and
>others.

There are several GURPS books that are well worth reading,
particularly the Uplift one, to which Brin contributed a lot of
interesting detail before the Brain Eater got him. And I
understand GURPS is going to bring out a Girl Genius rulebook one
of these days, when Kaja finishes writing it. Now that will be
fun.

Dorothy J. Heydt
Albany, California
djh...@kithrup.com

Michael Grosberg

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Jan 25, 2007, 2:13:40 AM1/25/07
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On Jan 25, 4:51 am, "htn963" <htn...@verizon.net> wrote:
> I'm not talking about novels based on games, but the actual
> rulebooks, background guides and the like for use in group roleplaying
> games that are churned out by the ton by White Wolf Publishing and
> others.
>

I never played role playing games, but I did enjoy reading the Paranoia
rulebook, which was not unlike reading a Douglas Adams book, with all
the plot and character bits removed. I got it from a friend who did
play and occasionally was a GM. He and his friends tried to organize a
group to play it, but it seemed to be so much fun to play no one
volunteered to be the GM.

I understand there is now a new version, Paranoia XP, which I haven't
read.

Gene Ward Smith

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Jan 25, 2007, 2:37:51 AM1/25/07
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On Jan 24, 10:19 pm, djhe...@kithrup.com (Dorothy J Heydt) wrote:
> In article <1169693518.677252.42...@v33g2000cwv.googlegroups.com>,

> There are several GURPS books that are well worth reading,
> particularly the Uplift one, to which Brin contributed a lot of
> interesting detail before the Brain Eater got him. And I
> understand GURPS is going to bring out a Girl Genius rulebook one
> of these days, when Kaja finishes writing it. Now that will be
> fun.

The infamous Steve Jackson Games raid saw the FBI confiscating the
manuscript for GURPS Cyberpunk. Anything there worth reading?

Leif Magnar Kj|nn|y

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Jan 25, 2007, 4:14:11 AM1/25/07
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In article <1169710671.9...@s48g2000cws.googlegroups.com>,

Gene Ward Smith <genewa...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>The infamous Steve Jackson Games raid saw the FBI confiscating the
>manuscript for GURPS Cyberpunk. Anything there worth reading?

It is very much a product of its time (late 80s, early 90s) and may hold
some genuine interest as such.


--
Leif Kjønnøy, cunctator maximus. http://www.pvv.org/~leifmk

David Johnston

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Jan 25, 2007, 5:07:41 AM1/25/07
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On 24 Jan 2007 23:37:51 -0800, "Gene Ward Smith"
<genewa...@gmail.com> wrote:

For entertainment? I don't really think so. GURPS Cyberpunk was
heavy on crunch, light on fluff.

David Goldfarb

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Jan 25, 2007, 7:18:14 AM1/25/07
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In article <1169702302....@v33g2000cwv.googlegroups.com>,

Peter Meilinger <p_mei...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>You can't go too far wrong tracking down some more GURPS
>books. They tend to be well-written and interesting, and there
>are quite a few translations of SF settings that might pique your
>interest.

GURPS Time Travel is by John M. Ford, and GURPS Celtic Myth is
by Jo and Ken Walton. I have both, even though I haven't done
any roleplaying in about fifteen years.

--
David Goldfarb | "When the cat calls at midnight, your shorts
gold...@ocf.berkeley.edu | will ignite."
gold...@csua.berkeley.edu | -- J. Michael Straczynski

Michael Hellwig

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Jan 25, 2007, 9:55:05 AM1/25/07
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Also very playable, at least from the parts that I got to know at my
security-clearance.

Because of course the Computer knows best what I should know and what I
shouldn't. I am a happy citizen. Really. Honestly. Please. Don't shoot
me, Mr Troubleshooter!

Nancy Lebovitz

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Jan 25, 2007, 10:18:28 AM1/25/07
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> I'm not talking about novels based on games, but the actual
>rulebooks, background guides and the like for use in group roleplaying
>games that are churned out by the ton by White Wolf Publishing and
>others.
>
You might try Nobilis. Afaik, it's a how-to-be-a-tormented-demigod
game. The writing is graceful and the ideas are cool, though I hit
overload with it rather quickly.

The author also has a massive piece of ongoing fiction at hitherby
(sorry about no url--my net connection is limited to telnet at the moment)
which has the graceful writing and cool ideas plus a very odd sense
of humor. I still hit overload, but a lot of people love it.

--
Nancy Lebovitz http://www.nancybuttons.com

http://nancylebov.livejournal.com
My two favorite colors are "Oooooh" and "SHINY!".

il...@rcn.com

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Jan 25, 2007, 10:48:23 AM1/25/07
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Some published adventures for "Call of Cthulhu" game make for an
enjoyable reading -- if you enjoy Lovecraft, that is.

If you want to read *rules* as opposed to adventures, and happen to be
a Chtorr fan, I recommend GURPS Chtorr. It acts as a "data dump" for
Chtorran ecology. Many details David Gerrold worked out but did not
seem fit to include in the novels are in this game.

Peter Meilinger

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Jan 25, 2007, 12:58:25 PM1/25/07
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On Jan 25, 7:48 am, i...@rcn.com wrote:
> Some published adventures for "Call of Cthulhu" game make for an
> enjoyable reading -- if you enjoy Lovecraft, that is.

Thank you for reminding me to plug the Delta Green sourcebooks
from Pagan Publishing Delta Green's an organization that works
within the US government to investigate and eliminate paranormal
threats from the Cthulhu Mythos. It's been officially disbanded,
largely due to the actions of another organization, that wants to
work with/exploit the paranormal, especially the alien Greys whose
origin isn't exactly what you'd think. Great books, well worth reading
if you're into the Cthulhu mythos or just modern day supernatural
stuff in general.

> If you want to read *rules* as opposed to adventures, and happen to be
> a Chtorr fan, I recommend GURPS Chtorr. It acts as a "data dump" for
> Chtorran ecology. Many details David Gerrold worked out but did not
> seem fit to include in the novels are in this game.

I'd definitely second this recommendation for anyone into the Cthorr
books. GURPS Conan is another translated setting that fans should
definitely track down, as is the Callahan's Crosstime Saloon book.
I've heard good things about the Prisoner and Vorkosigan books, but
haven't read them myself.

Pete

Mike C

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Jan 25, 2007, 1:13:49 PM1/25/07
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When I was younger I used to love the "Out of the Pit" book by Steve
Jackson - basically just a list of the various monsters one would find
in the fighting fantasy books, a little history on them, and what they
tended to to. That is, attempt to devour, kill, disembowel or otherwise
inconvenience adventurers. Some of it was quite creepy to me at the
time, I must have been quite young reading it.

David DeLaney

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Jan 25, 2007, 1:43:08 PM1/25/07
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Several GURPS books are good. Discworld, The Prisoner, Illuminati University,
Goblins. Steev Jackson Games' Toon is at least repeatedly amusing. And I
found their entire In Nomine series to be absorbing.

Other interesting possibilities (some of these will take extreme effort to
find, alas):
Continuum, and Further Information, from Aetherco/Dreamcatcher
Paranoia (the new XP version from Mongoose Pub., and the older West End Games
rulebooks and modules)
Amber, and Shadow Knight, from Phage Press
Immortal: The Invisible War from Precedence Publishing (the one numbered 1000
with the picture of the lady evoking a shiny dinosaur-shaped object against
a background of night with stars, not the one numbered 10001 that's orange
with what looks almost like a pinup on the cover), and its followup rulebooks
The Shapeshifter's Manual and Serenades The First Book Of Powers
Nobilis, from Hogshead Publishing

_If_ you can find them, the _first_ set of stuff Wizards of the Coast put
out - before Magic was ever on the table - is The Primal Order, and three
expansion books for it, Pawns, Knights, and Chessboards.

I tend to like the gods-and-powers books from TSR, which covers several
different systems over the decades; Forgotten Realms Faiths & Pantheons,
886430000, is proably the most complete/consistent one, due to the amount of
time Ed Greenwood put in on the setting.
Similarly, the "describing the universes the place is set in" books appeal
to me, such as (White Wolf examples) The Thousand Hells for Kindred of the
East, Umbra the Velvet Shadow for Werewolf, or The Book of Worlds and The
Infinite Tapestry for Mage.

If you have to pick and choose, I'd say go for Nobilis, the original
Immortal, and The Primal Order, among the above.

Dave
--
\/David DeLaney posting from d...@vic.com "It's not the pot that grows the flower
It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
Love is all it takes to make a family" - R&P. VISUALIZE HAPPYNET VRbeable<BLINK>
http://www.vic.com/~dbd/ - net.legends FAQ & Magic / I WUV you in all CAPS! --K.

Dan Blum

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Jan 25, 2007, 2:24:41 PM1/25/07
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Peter Meilinger <p_mei...@hotmail.com> wrote:

The Vorkosigan book hasn't been published yet.

--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum to...@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."

Damien Sullivan

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Jan 25, 2007, 9:00:42 PM1/25/07
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d...@gatekeeper.vic.com (David DeLaney) wrote:

>Several GURPS books are good. Discworld, The Prisoner, Illuminati University,
>Goblins. Steev Jackson Games' Toon is at least repeatedly amusing. And I
>found their entire In Nomine series to be absorbing.

Transhuman Space.

-xx- Damien X-)

Jaimie Vandenbergh

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Jan 25, 2007, 9:29:08 PM1/25/07
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On 24 Jan 2007 21:18:22 -0800, "Peter Meilinger"
<p_mei...@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Warehouse 23 - Remember the big-ass warehouse
>that the Ark of the Covenant got shoved into? This
>book is full of stuff like that, from short descriptions
>to short stories.

http://www.warehouse23.com/basement/

I'd completely forgotten about that. Pleasantly silly.

Cheers - Jaimie
--
"I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has
endowed us with sense, reason and intellect has intended us
to forgo their use." - Galileo Galilei

David Tate

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Jan 25, 2007, 10:16:22 PM1/25/07
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On Jan 24, 9:51 pm, "htn963" <htn...@verizon.net> wrote:
> I'm not talking about novels based on games, but the actual
> rulebooks, background guides and the like [...]

>
> Any other ones? For just light reading -- I don't have time to
> invest in group roleplaying games nowadays.

I've always enjoyed the works of Chad Underkoffler, an independent game
designer best known for his "Campaign in a Box" column in _Pyramid_
magazine, and for a couple of recent hits using the "Prose Descriptive
Qualities" (PDQ) rule system. In particular, _Dead Inside: The
Roleplaying Game of Loss and Redemption_ is quite good, and won a
number of awards. _Truth and Justice_ is a *very* popular superheroes
system, but wasn't as interesting to me as a text-to-be-read. _The
Zorceror of Zo_, his latest publication, is a PDQ take on fairy tales
and their tropes, but I haven't read it yet.

Full disclosure: Chad is an acquaintance of mine, and I often do
advance reader reviews of his projects.

David Tate

Robotech_Master

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Jan 25, 2007, 11:19:14 PM1/25/07
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On 24 Jan 2007 18:51:58 -0800, htn963 <htn...@verizon.net> wrote:

> I'm not talking about novels based on games, but the actual
> rulebooks, background guides and the like for use in group roleplaying
> games that are churned out by the ton by White Wolf Publishing and
> others.

If you can find it: De Profundis (Hogshead Games). Published a few
years back as part of their New Wave series, now out of print.
Actually an English translation of a Polish RPG, this is a 32-page
book. The premise of the game is that you play by mail, writing
letters as if you're living in the world of Lovecraft, and do real
research and so forth to put real-world details into it. Blending
reality and fantasy, that kind of thing. The neat thing is that the
book is written as a Lovecraftian pastiche, so it works on three
levels: game rules, play example, and short story.

Another fun to read book is Nobilis (2nd. ed.) by Rebecca Sean
Borgstrom. The version I have is the first printing by Hogshead
Games; it's a coffeetable book (complete with a ribbon bookmark) about
a dreamlike setting of gods and demigods that defies any kind of a
short explanation. Riddled with fiction pieces about the setting,
it's beautiful to look at, and absorbing to read. (I think it's with
another publisher now and subsequent printings have cheapened on the
production values.)

Universalis (Ramshead Games) is a small indie-published RPG that's a
bit dry to read (like a computer programming manual), until you
internalize what it is you're reading. It's a whole new paradigm of
gaming compared to anything I've seen before, combining freedom to
storytell with Nomic schemes for building onto the rules. It may just
be me, but it really expanded my mind.

--
Chris Meadows aka | WWW: http://www.terrania.us | Somebody
Robotech_Master | ICQ: 5477383 AIM: RoboMastr | help, I'm
robotec...@gmail.com | Skype, LJ-Gizmo: Robotech_Master | trapped in
robo...@eyrie.org | Yahoo: robotech_master_2000 | a sig file!

Sea Wasp

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Jan 26, 2007, 12:14:14 AM1/26/07
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I enjoyed the GURPS Lensman book.

ICE's Middle-Earth books were often fascinating.

The Arduin books were always fun to read.


--
Sea Wasp
/^\
;;;
Live Journal: http://www.livejournal.com/users/seawasp/

David DeLaney

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Jan 26, 2007, 3:16:33 AM1/26/07
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Sea Wasp <seawasp...@sgeobviousinc.com> wrote:
> The Arduin books were always fun to read.

Yes, they were/are. And I can't figure out -why-...

Dave "not yet back in my cycle to where I want to reread them again" DeLaney

David Goldfarb

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Jan 26, 2007, 4:17:12 AM1/26/07
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In article <epaho4$nm9$1...@reader2.panix.com>,
Nancy Lebovitz <nan...@panix.com> wrote:
>The author [of _Nobilis_] also has a massive piece of ongoing fiction
>at hitherby
>(sorry about no url--my net connection is limited to telnet at the moment)
>which has the graceful writing and cool ideas plus a very odd sense
>of humor. I still hit overload, but a lot of people love it.

http://imago.hitherby.com/

Count me among the rabid fans. (I've even donated money.)

--
David Goldfarb |"'The truth will set you free.'
gold...@ocf.berkeley.edu | If you love the truth, you'll inevitably
gold...@csua.berkeley.edu | come back!" -- Hitherby Dragons

David Given

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Jan 26, 2007, 6:51:55 AM1/26/07
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Michael Hellwig wrote:
[...]

> Because of course the Computer knows best what I should know and what I
> shouldn't. I am a happy citizen. Really. Honestly. Please. Don't shoot
> me, Mr Troubleshooter!

My favourite Paranoia moment was when I managed to successfully persuade the
GM that the guards couldn't shoot me for being in a violet zone with only red
clearance, because I was bleeding profusely and the bit of floor I was
standing on at the time was, in fact, red...

--
┌── dg@cowlark.com ─── http://www.cowlark.com ───────────────────

│ "There does not now, nor will there ever, exist a programming language in
│ which it is the least bit hard to write bad programs." --- Flon's Axiom

David Given

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Jan 26, 2007, 6:54:09 AM1/26/07
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htn963 wrote:
[...]

> Any other ones? For just light reading -- I don't have time to
> invest in group roleplaying games nowadays.

I found myself utterly absorbed by a small-press RPG sourcebook I found at a
friend's house called _I Kill Puppies For Satan_...

Sea Wasp

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Jan 26, 2007, 7:30:47 AM1/26/07
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David DeLaney wrote:
> Sea Wasp <seawasp...@sgeobviousinc.com> wrote:
>
>> The Arduin books were always fun to read.
>
>
> Yes, they were/are. And I can't figure out -why-...
>
> Dave "not yet back in my cycle to where I want to reread them again" DeLaney

The guy who wrote them was allowed to write it pretty much HIS way,
and from HIS world's point of view. And his world was -- especially
for its era -- unique. Arduin stood for a long time as the ONLY
officially-published world that was high-powered and blended so many
things into a single universe. The energy and enthusiasm Dave Hargrave
had for his universe was brought through in his writing, so strongly
that you were willing to wade through the 8-point printing to read it.

I also forgot to mention the Space Opera books, most especially the
Star Atlases -- the Azuriach Imperium, Terran Sector, Mercantile
League, and Korellian Empire especially.

David DeLaney

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Jan 26, 2007, 9:07:21 AM1/26/07
to
David Given <d...@cowlark.com> wrote:
>htn963 wrote:
>[...]
>> Any other ones? For just light reading -- I don't have time to
>> invest in group roleplaying games nowadays.
>
>I found myself utterly absorbed by a small-press RPG sourcebook I found at a
>friend's house called _I Kill Puppies For Satan_...

And another pair which will be impossible-to-find (since the white-wolf.com
store doesn't admit either exists any longer, which isn't too surprising)
are HOL and its sequel, Buttery Wholesomeness. Not safe for work if you do
find them...

Dave "and there's always Kobolds Ate My Baby and its sequels" DeLaney

Howard Brazee

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Jan 26, 2007, 5:47:39 PM1/26/07
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Nabokov's 'The Defense

htn963

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Jan 26, 2007, 6:10:34 PM1/26/07
to
Thanks for all the suggestions so far, guys, and I do mean it -- I
have a strong interest in this genre and will look to acquire as many
of these titles as I can for my collection. (Tip for other collectors:
the Half-Price Book stores (of which I'm not affiliated with but a
frequent buyer) usually has a good selection and they often put them
out on clearance for $1-3.) And didn't Justin Alexander participated
in writing some gaming books? -- if you're reading this, I hereby offer
you a truce and olive branch despite our past tiffs for your thoughts
on this subject.

Now I'm a bit surprised that no one has mentioned any Planescape
or Vampire:Masquerade titles. The first looks to have a very ambitious
and freaky setting while the latter has so many selections ya think one
or two would make good reading.

--
Ht

Michael Hellwig

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Jan 26, 2007, 6:43:16 PM1/26/07
to
On Fri, 26 Jan 2007 11:51:55 GMT, David Given wrote:
> Michael Hellwig wrote:
> [...]
>> Because of course the Computer knows best what I should know and what I
>> shouldn't. I am a happy citizen. Really. Honestly. Please. Don't shoot
>> me, Mr Troubleshooter!
>
> My favourite Paranoia moment was when I managed to successfully persuade the
> GM that the guards couldn't shoot me for being in a violet zone with only red
> clearance, because I was bleeding profusely and the bit of floor I was
> standing on at the time was, in fact, red...
>

Nice thinking, that. I fondly remember all the times our GM had to use
the "vehicle accidents and falling from great heights"-table. And that
one time he used the "tactical nuclear weapons"-table. Great times that.

Shana Rosenfeld

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Jan 26, 2007, 9:50:58 PM1/26/07
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htn963 wrote:

The Planescape setting was interesting reading, but scattered all
over the place.

I would recommend the second edition "Volo's Guides" by Ed Greenwood,
which were essentially travel guides to the Forgotten Realms. I used
them for bedtime reading.

I have found the third edition of D&D (and later) to be less fun to
read. [The stat blocks take up too much space and are boring.]

I agree with the Paranoia recommendations -- the modules were a lot
of fun to read, even if I would never have dreamed of playing in them.

Also the Arduin recommendation.

I liked the worldbooks that ICE put out, even if the game itself was
not my cup of tea.

Lots of GURPS worldbooks are fun -- one I find especially amusing is
GURPS IOU.

--
Shana L. Rosenfeld sh...@westnet.com
http://slrose.livejournal.com

Peter Meilinger

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Jan 27, 2007, 1:00:31 AM1/27/07
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On Jan 25, 8:19 pm, Robotech_Master <robot...@eyrie.org> wrote:


> If you can find it: De Profundis (Hogshead Games).

Speaking of Hogshead, I absolutely loved their Baron
Munchausen game. It's basically just a drinking game
where you sit around bullshitting each other with tall
tales, but it was a lot of fun to read. It was written by
the good Baron himself, you understand, and included
details of many of his adventures, as well as wonderful
asides such as "And in the next section, I will take
another opportunity to be gratuitously rude about the
French." And the dueling rules were an absolute
masterpiece, until the publisher made him suggest
the use of rock, paper scissors instead of real swords.

Pete

Michael Ikeda

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Jan 27, 2007, 8:10:12 AM1/27/07
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"htn963" <htn...@verizon.net> wrote in
news:1169853034.2...@a34g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:

> Thanks for all the suggestions so far, guys, and I do mean
> it -- I
> have a strong interest in this genre and will look to acquire as
> many of these titles as I can for my collection.

One title that I haven't seen mentioned is "Atlantis, The Lost
World" by Bard Games. Note that this is basically a combination of
two earlier Bard Games supplements: The Lexicon (basically a world
overview, with articles on each country as well as some maps) and The
Bestiary (assorted beasties natural and otherwise). Some material
was added to the Lexicon section. It's connected to a RPG that Bard
Games published, but the only place the game directly enters is an
appendix that has stats for the creatures in the Bestiary.

(Morrigan Press recently issued a revised version but I haven't read
it.)

--
Michael Ikeda mmi...@erols.com
"Telling a statistician not to use sampling is like telling an
astronomer they can't say there is a moon and stars"
Lynne Billard, past president American Statistical Association

Sea Wasp

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Jan 27, 2007, 8:54:23 AM1/27/07
to

The WW books I read early on all had the "we're so special and
original with our angsty new approach" aura turned up to 11, which
turned me off. Later on that dropped off. Aberrant was fairly fun to
read, but didn't grab me as much as the others I've already mentioned.

v$af$...@i-m-t.demon.co.uk

unread,
Jan 27, 2007, 1:54:38 PM1/27/07
to
- hi; in rasfwr article, <slrnerk21...@gatekeeper.vic.com>,
d...@gatekeeper.vic.com (David DeLaney) declared:

> David Given <d...@cowlark.com> wrote:
>> htn963 wrote:
>>[...]
>>>Any other ones? For just light reading -- I don't have time to
>>>invest in group roleplaying games nowadays.
>>
>>I found myself utterly absorbed by a small-press RPG sourcebook I
>>found at a friend's house called _I Kill Puppies For Satan_...
>
>And another pair which will be impossible-to-find (since the white-
>wolf.com store doesn't admit either exists any longer, which isn't

>too surprising) are HOL and its sequel, Buttery Wholesomeness. Not
>safe for work if you do find them...
>
- hmmmm? does this mean i should put the price of my stock
up 10% perhaps? - or maybe 25% ? [1] *g*

- macho women with guns has a fair claim to've provided
entertainment *long* after anyone'd've anticipated its
fading; but to my mind the strangest long-term survivor
has been furry pirates rpg.

- no offence intended to denetzens of alt.fan.furry (etc.),
and i do quite understand that the game's capable of being
run (and played) in three [2] clearly distinguishable ways,
"but"...

- love, ppint.
[the address from which this was posted bounces e-mail;
please change the "f" to a "g" and drop the "v" if you
wish to cc. or e-mail me.]
--
[1] - "I like rhetorical questions;
I usually get them right."
- joann l.dominik, 6/95

Andrew Wheeler

unread,
Jan 27, 2007, 8:49:33 PM1/27/07
to

And that reminds me of my favorite gaming table of all time, Middle
Earth Role Playing's Ram Butt Bash Knock Down Slug Attack Table (which
one must say all in one breath, as quickly as possible).

--
Andrew Wheeler: Professional Editor, Amateur Wise-Acre
--
If you enjoyed this post, try my blog at
http://antickmusings.blogspot.com
If you hated this post, you probably have bad taste anyway.

Sea Wasp

unread,
Jan 28, 2007, 10:19:30 AM1/28/07
to
Michael Ikeda wrote:
> "htn963" <htn...@verizon.net> wrote in
> news:1169853034.2...@a34g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:
>
>
>> Thanks for all the suggestions so far, guys, and I do mean
>> it -- I
>>have a strong interest in this genre and will look to acquire as
>>many of these titles as I can for my collection.
>
>
> One title that I haven't seen mentioned is "Atlantis, The Lost
> World" by Bard Games. Note that this is basically a combination of
> two earlier Bard Games supplements: The Lexicon (basically a world
> overview, with articles on each country as well as some maps) and The
> Bestiary (assorted beasties natural and otherwise). Some material
> was added to the Lexicon section. It's connected to a RPG that Bard
> Games published, but the only place the game directly enters is an
> appendix that has stats for the creatures in the Bestiary.
>
> (Morrigan Press recently issued a revised version but I haven't read
> it.)
>

It doesn't include The Arcanum, which was the most USEFUL part of the
Atlantis system????

Michael Ikeda

unread,
Jan 28, 2007, 7:29:52 PM1/28/07
to
Sea Wasp <seawasp...@sgeobviousinc.com> wrote in
news:45BCBF02...@sgeobviousinc.com:

Correct. The Bard Games "Atlantis" supplement doesn't include the
Arcanum. I think the idea is that it IS supposed to be a
supplement adaptable to different RPGs rather than a rulesbook.

Sea Wasp

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Jan 28, 2007, 8:34:57 PM1/28/07
to
Michael Ikeda wrote:
> Sea Wasp <seawasp...@sgeobviousinc.com> wrote in

>>


>> It doesn't include The Arcanum, which was the most USEFUL
>> part of the
>>Atlantis system????
>
>
> Correct. The Bard Games "Atlantis" supplement doesn't include the
> Arcanum. I think the idea is that it IS supposed to be a
> supplement adaptable to different RPGs rather than a rulesbook.
>


Pity. That's the only part I wanted.

It was, basically, 3e D&D about 15-20 years before 3e was written.

Johan Larson

unread,
Jan 28, 2007, 9:03:23 PM1/28/07
to
htn963 wrote:

> I'm not talking about novels based on games, but the actual
> rulebooks, background guides and the like for use in group roleplaying
> games that are churned out by the ton by White Wolf Publishing and
> others.
>
> The reason I asked is because I recently browsed through a GURPS
> softcover treatment of Jack Vance's Planet of Adventure and found
> myself engrossed. I've always dismissed these four books of Vance as
> minor and haven't read them but this GURPS adaptation perked my
> interest and by golly I'll also go read these books of Vance
> afterwards. The illustrations were cheezy, but the writers managed to
> capture the archness and spirited, creative fun that is Vance.
>

> Any other ones? For just light reading -- I don't have time to
> invest in group roleplaying games nowadays.

Give "Reign of Steel" by Steve Jackson Games a try. The setting owes a debt
to the Terminator series, in that a computer that looks a lot like Skynet
orchestrates a catastrophic war to take over the world. The interesting
twist is that when the dust settles, the world has not one ruling super-
computer, but a dozen or so, each with its own ideas about how things
should be run.

Johan Larson

Johan Larson

unread,
Jan 28, 2007, 9:10:36 PM1/28/07
to
Peter Meilinger wrote:

>
>
> On Jan 24, 6:51 pm, "htn963" <htn...@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>> Any other ones? For just light reading -- I don't have time
>> to invest in group roleplaying games nowadays.
>

> You can't go too far wrong tracking down some more GURPS
> books. They tend to be well-written and interesting, and there
> are quite a few translations of SF settings that might pique your
> interest. Looking at the master list at
>
> http://www.sjgames.com/gurps/books/
>
> I'd definitely recommend:
>
> Black Ops - Action/Cinematic take on an X-Files/Men In
> Black type of setting. Ass-kicking secret agents take on
> the supernatural, basically. It's a pretty good read.

Yes, it's a pretty good read. I'd be a bit leery of trying to play such
a campaign, since GURPS has trouble dealing with cinematically powerful
multi-talented characters, which is what the Black Ops are. This is
shown most clearly in the character templates: the Ops need a page-ful
of skills each, and that's just for the basic stuff.

Some kind of skills hierarchy, with cinematic characters being allowed
to take points in macro-skills, with all the subordinate skills being
subsumed, would solve the problem neatly. I think the most recent
revision of GURPS includes something like that, but I drifted away when
it was being developed.

Johan Larson

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