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Why Doctor Who should have never been cancelled in 1989

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The Doctor

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Feb 17, 2024, 9:45:35 AMFeb 17
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From ChatGPT

Introduction:

In 1989, after 26 years of thrilling audiences with its time-traveling
adventures and captivating storytelling, Doctor Who faced an untimely
cancellation. The decision to end the series left fans devastated and marked
the end of an era in television history. This article explores the reasons why
Doctor Who should have never been cancelled in 1989, delving into its cultural
significance, its enduring legacy, and the missed opportunities
that arose from its premature demise.

Cultural Phenomenon:

Doctor Who transcended the confines of television to become a cultural
phenomenon beloved by fans around the world. Since its inception in 1963, the
series captured the imagination of viewers with its imaginative narratives,
iconic characters, and groundbreaking special effects. Doctor Who became more
than just a TV show; it was a shared experience that brought people together
across generations and continents.

The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 deprived fans of a beloved institution
and left a void in popular culture. The absence of new episodes meant the end
of an era for millions of viewers who had grown up with the Doctor's
adventures. Furthermore, the cancellation prevented the series from reaching
new audiences and engaging with a new generation of fans.

Enduring Legacy:

Despite its cancellation, Doctor Who's legacy endured long after its final
episode aired. The series continued to inspire countless spin-offs, novels,
audio dramas, and comic books, keeping the spirit of the show alive for years
to come. The dedicated fanbase, known affectionately as Whovians, remained
devoted to the series, organizing conventions, fan clubs, and online
communities to celebrate their love for the Doctor and their companions.

The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 only served to strengthen the dedication
of its fanbase and cement its status as a cultural icon. The show's influence
extended beyond television to influence other works of science fiction and
fantasy, inspiring countless creators and artists to explore the boundless
possibilities of time and space.

Missed Opportunities:

The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 represented a missed opportunity for the
series to evolve and grow in new directions. With advances in technology and
storytelling techniques, Doctor Who had the potential to reach new heights of
creativity and innovation. The cancellation prevented the series from exploring
new story arcs, introducing new characters,
and pushing the boundaries of the sci-fi genre.

Furthermore, the cancellation deprived fans of closure for ongoing storylines
and character arcs. The Seventh Doctor, portrayed by Sylvester McCoy, was left
without a proper send-off, and many questions remained unanswered. The
cancellation left fans with a sense of unfinished business and a longing for
resolution that would not be realised for many years.

Revival and Renewal:

Despite its cancellation in 1989, Doctor Who would eventually be revived in
2005, much to the delight of fans worldwide. The revival of the series breathed
new life into the franchise, introducing a new generation of fans to the
wonders of time and space. The success of the revival series proved that there
was still a hunger for Doctor Who's unique brand of storytelling
and that the Doctor's adventures were far from over.

In hindsight, the cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 was a missed opportunity
to keep the series alive and thriving for future generations. While the revival
series has brought renewed interest and enthusiasm for the Doctor's adventures,
one can't help but wonder what could have been
if the series had been allowed to continue uninterrupted.

Conclusion:

The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 remains a source of disappointment for
fans who mourn the loss of one of television's most beloved series. The
decision to end the show prematurely deprived audiences of new adventures,
compelling characters, and imaginative storytelling. However, while the
cancellation may have been a setback,
it was not the end of the Doctor's journey.

Doctor Who's enduring legacy lives on in the hearts and minds of fans
who continue to celebrate the series' rich history and enduring appeal.
The cancellation in 1989 may have been a missed opportunity,
but it ultimately paved the way for the series' triumphant return
and ensured that the Doctor's adventures would continue to inspire
and captivate audiences for generations to come.
--
Member - Liberal International This is doc...@nk.ca Ici doc...@nk.ca
Yahweh, King & country!Never Satan President Republic!Beware AntiChrist rising!
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Arthur Lipscomb

unread,
Feb 17, 2024, 1:25:05 PMFeb 17
to
This. The show came back strong so in the end the cancellation didn't
hurt. Sure, it deprived hard core fans such as myself with the ability
to enjoy the show. But it's back now and going strong.

> Missed Opportunities:
>
> The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 represented a missed opportunity for the
> series to evolve and grow in new directions. With advances in technology and
> storytelling techniques, Doctor Who had the potential to reach new heights of
> creativity and innovation. The cancellation prevented the series from exploring
> new story arcs, introducing new characters,
> and pushing the boundaries of the sci-fi genre.
>
> Furthermore, the cancellation deprived fans of closure for ongoing storylines
> and character arcs. The Seventh Doctor, portrayed by Sylvester McCoy, was left
> without a proper send-off, and many questions remained unanswered. The
> cancellation left fans with a sense of unfinished business and a longing for
> resolution that would not be realised for many years.
>
> Revival and Renewal:
>

Yes, until the revival which allowed the show to wrap up many
storylines. Unfortunately some of those wrap ups have been off screen,
but they are being wrapped up. And the ones that aren't I probably
don't remember anyway! LOL ;-)



The Last Doctor

unread,
Feb 17, 2024, 3:29:53 PMFeb 17
to
[SNIP machine generated text]

Dave, if you can’t articulate your own feelings then I’m sorry. But I’m no
more interested in computers generating I’ll-considered opinions for you
than I am in computers generating substandard artwork for you.

Speak for yourself. Don’t treat a computer like it’s your “thinking brain”
support animal. It’s not fair on you.

Your Name

unread,
Feb 17, 2024, 4:26:49 PMFeb 17
to
It's not fair on the computer! :-p

The Doctor

unread,
Feb 17, 2024, 5:48:25 PMFeb 17
to
In article <uqqtlu$hhbr$2...@dont-email.me>,
There should have never been a cancellation to start with!

>> Missed Opportunities:
>>
>> The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 represented a missed
>opportunity for the
>> series to evolve and grow in new directions. With advances in technology and
>> storytelling techniques, Doctor Who had the potential to reach new heights of
>> creativity and innovation. The cancellation prevented the series from
>exploring
>> new story arcs, introducing new characters,
>> and pushing the boundaries of the sci-fi genre.
>>
>> Furthermore, the cancellation deprived fans of closure for ongoing storylines
>> and character arcs. The Seventh Doctor, portrayed by Sylvester McCoy, was left
>> without a proper send-off, and many questions remained unanswered. The
>> cancellation left fans with a sense of unfinished business and a longing for
>> resolution that would not be realised for many years.
>>
>> Revival and Renewal:
>>
>
>Yes, until the revival which allowed the show to wrap up many
>storylines. Unfortunately some of those wrap ups have been off screen,
>but they are being wrapped up. And the ones that aren't I probably
>don't remember anyway! LOL ;-)
>
>
>

Why is that?

The Doctor

unread,
Feb 17, 2024, 5:49:08 PMFeb 17
to
In article <uqr4vu$j69n$1...@dont-email.me>,
I would if I disagree with it!

Looks like MM is going as nuts as chibnall.

The Doctor

unread,
Feb 17, 2024, 5:50:59 PMFeb 17
to
In article <uqr8al$jr2l$1...@dont-email.me>,
Good for a laugh!

Of Course you now have to flame Captain Blueshirt Blueshirt for this.

He cannot generate a proper counter argument!

The Last Doctor

unread,
Feb 18, 2024, 10:58:15 AMFeb 18
to
No Yads got ChatGPT to think for him:
>”
>
> In 1989, after 26 years of thrilling audiences with its time-traveling
> adventures and captivating storytelling,

Hyperbole. Wherever ChatGPT picked up its Doctor Who knowledge it was
clearly from extreme fanbois: I loved the show and it was usually
entertaining, but rarely thrilling and only occasionally captivating, even
at the best of times. Which were over by 1980 …

>Doctor Who faced an untimely
> cancellation.

Assuming a conclusion. At this point the computer has not established a
case that the cancellation was “untimely”. (It was, but in the sense that
it was LATE.)

> The decision to end the series left fans devastated and marked
> the end of an era in television history.

There weren’t many fans left to BE devastated. That was rather the point.
It did mark the end of an era. Mainly with an huge sigh of relief that the
poor, overworked, ailing, ageing pet had been mercifully put to sleep.

> This article explores the reasons why
> Doctor Who should have never been cancelled in 1989, delving into its cultural
> significance, its enduring legacy,

Lots of things that come to an end had cultural significance and an
enduring legacy. That doesn’t mean that they remained current and relevant.

> and the missed opportunities
> that arose from its premature demise.

Premature assumed again - essay needs to present evidence and it doesn’t.

> Cultural Phenomenon:
>
> Doctor Who transcended the confines of television to become a cultural
> phenomenon beloved by fans around the world. Since its inception in 1963, the
> series captured the imagination of viewers with its imaginative narratives,
> iconic characters, and groundbreaking special effects. Doctor Who became more
> than just a TV show; it was a shared experience that brought people together
> across generations and continents.

Yes it was a lovely thing. But the pitiful remains of that thing were
largely regarded with sadness or disdain in 1989.

>
> The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 deprived fans of a beloved institution
> and left a void in popular culture.

Hardly. Fan made continuations in various media began almost immediately
and carry on to this day. Cancelling the show didn’t cancel fandom,
imagination or continuation by other means - from the New Adventures novels
to the BBV Stranger, PROBE and Downtime videos, the third Doctor audios
Paradise of Death and Ghosts of N- Space, the regrettable EastEnders
charity crossover - this “void” must be the least voidy void ever imagined.

> The absence of new episodes meant the end
> of an era for millions of viewers who had grown up with the Doctor's
> adventures. Furthermore, the cancellation prevented the series from reaching
> new audiences and engaging with a new generation of fans.

Self evident, but the show as it was was leaking fans. Not gaining new
ones.

>
> Enduring Legacy:
>
> Despite its cancellation, Doctor Who's legacy endured long after its final
> episode aired. The series continued to inspire countless spin-offs, novels,
> audio dramas, and comic books, keeping the spirit of the show alive for years
> to come. The dedicated fanbase, known affectionately as Whovians, remained
> devoted to the series, organizing conventions, fan clubs, and online
> communities to celebrate their love for the Doctor and their companions.
>
> The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 only served to strengthen the dedication
> of its fanbase and cement its status as a cultural icon. The show's influence
> extended beyond television to influence other works of science fiction and
> fantasy, inspiring countless creators and artists to explore the boundless
> possibilities of time and space.

These paragraphs indicate how strong the Whoniverse became after
cancellation of the show - so certainly don’t show that the cancellation
was a bad thing! Who was livelier and fresher in the 90s than it had been
in the 80s.


>
> Missed Opportunities:
>
> The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 represented a missed opportunity for the
> series to evolve and grow in new directions.

The text is now contradicting itself, as it has just shown (as I had
earlier) that the series continued to
“evolve and grow in new directions” BECAUSE of the cancellation. Sounds
like opportunities seized, not missed.

> With advances in technology and
> storytelling techniques, Doctor Who had the potential to reach new heights of
> creativity and innovation.

It only had to improve to “poor” (as it did in season 26) to reach new
heights of creativity and innovation compared with previous seasons. It
wasn’t enough.


>The cancellation prevented the series from exploring
> new story arcs, introducing new characters,
> and pushing the boundaries of the sci-fi genre.

No, it did all those things. Just not on TV for a while.

>
> Furthermore, the cancellation deprived fans of closure for ongoing storylines
> and character arcs. The Seventh Doctor, portrayed by Sylvester McCoy, was left
> without a proper send-off, and many questions remained unanswered. The
> cancellation left fans with a sense of unfinished business and a longing for
> resolution that would not be realised for many years.

The rest of the text just repeats the same points over and over, after
digressing into the revival which, given that it was 15 years after the
cancellation, is hardly relevant to the cancellation itself.

> … it ultimately paved the way for the series' triumphant return
> and ensured that the Doctor's adventures would continue to inspire
> and captivate audiences for generations to come.

So no harm, no foul. In the long run. And that breathing space was
necessary - it’s exceedingly unlikely that the modern show would have
arisen out of more McCoy and whatever horrors John Nathan-Turner might have
inflicted on us next.

--
“The timelines and … canon … are rupturing” - the Doctor

The Doctor

unread,
Feb 18, 2024, 3:24:48 PMFeb 18
to
In article <uqt9el$19int$1...@dont-email.me>,
The Last Doctor <mi...@xenocyte.com> wrote:
>No Yads got ChatGPT to think for him:

IYIO!

>>”
>>
>> In 1989, after 26 years of thrilling audiences with its time-traveling
>> adventures and captivating storytelling,
>
>Hyperbole. Wherever ChatGPT picked up its Doctor Who knowledge it was
>clearly from extreme fanbois: I loved the show and it was usually
>entertaining, but rarely thrilling and only occasionally captivating, even
>at the best of times. Which were over by 1980 …
>

I guess CHATGPT does not view MM as intellignet!

>>Doctor Who faced an untimely
>> cancellation.
>
>Assuming a conclusion. At this point the computer has not established a
>case that the cancellation was “untimely”. (It was, but in the sense that
>it was LATE.)
>

Wrongo, bongo!

>> The decision to end the series left fans devastated and marked
>> the end of an era in television history.
>
>There weren’t many fans left to BE devastated. That was rather the point.
>It did mark the end of an era. Mainly with an huge sigh of relief that the
>poor, overworked, ailing, ageing pet had been mercifully put to sleep.
>

Excuse us, but what abou those writing letters to the BBC to bring DW back!

>> This article explores the reasons why
>> Doctor Who should have never been cancelled in 1989, delving into its cultural
>> significance, its enduring legacy,
>
>Lots of things that come to an end had cultural significance and an
>enduring legacy. That doesn’t mean that they remained current and relevant.
>

So where do you hide?

>> and the missed opportunities
>> that arose from its premature demise.
>
>Premature assumed again - essay needs to present evidence and it doesn’t.
>

Wrongo yet again!

>> Cultural Phenomenon:
>>
>> Doctor Who transcended the confines of television to become a cultural
>> phenomenon beloved by fans around the world. Since its inception in 1963, the
>> series captured the imagination of viewers with its imaginative narratives,
>> iconic characters, and groundbreaking special effects. Doctor Who became more
>> than just a TV show; it was a shared experience that brought people together
>> across generations and continents.
>
>Yes it was a lovely thing. But the pitiful remains of that thing were
>largely regarded with sadness or disdain in 1989.

Only by those who have no appreciation.

>
>>
>> The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 deprived fans of a beloved institution
>> and left a void in popular culture.
>
>Hardly. Fan made continuations in various media began almost immediately
>and carry on to this day. Cancelling the show didn’t cancel fandom,
>imagination or continuation by other means - from the New Adventures novels
>to the BBV Stranger, PROBE and Downtime videos, the third Doctor audios
>Paradise of Death and Ghosts of N- Space, the regrettable EastEnders
>charity crossover - this “void” must be the least voidy void ever imagined.

You forget 1996 as well.

>
>> The absence of new episodes meant the end
>> of an era for millions of viewers who had grown up with the Doctor's
>> adventures. Furthermore, the cancellation prevented the series from reaching
>> new audiences and engaging with a new generation of fans.
>
>Self evident, but the show as it was was leaking fans. Not gaining new
>ones.
>

In North America , it was gaining not leakng!

>>
>> Enduring Legacy:
>>
>> Despite its cancellation, Doctor Who's legacy endured long after its final
>> episode aired. The series continued to inspire countless spin-offs, novels,
>> audio dramas, and comic books, keeping the spirit of the show alive for years
>> to come. The dedicated fanbase, known affectionately as Whovians, remained
>> devoted to the series, organizing conventions, fan clubs, and online
>> communities to celebrate their love for the Doctor and their companions.
>>
>> The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 only served to strengthen the
>dedication
>> of its fanbase and cement its status as a cultural icon. The show's influence
>> extended beyond television to influence other works of science fiction and
>> fantasy, inspiring countless creators and artists to explore the boundless
>> possibilities of time and space.
>
>These paragraphs indicate how strong the Whoniverse became after
>cancellation of the show - so certainly don’t show that the cancellation
>was a bad thing! Who was livelier and fresher in the 90s than it had been
>in the 80s.


After That had left, the inept Mjor could have been a fun target for satire!

>
>
>>
>> Missed Opportunities:
>>
>> The cancellation of Doctor Who in 1989 represented a missed
>opportunity for the
>> series to evolve and grow in new directions.
>
>The text is now contradicting itself, as it has just shown (as I had
>earlier) that the series continued to
>“evolve and grow in new directions” BECAUSE of the cancellation. Sounds
>like opportunities seized, not missed.
>

Same difference.


>> With advances in technology and
>> storytelling techniques, Doctor Who had the potential to reach new heights of
>> creativity and innovation.
>
>It only had to improve to “poor” (as it did in season 26) to reach new
>heights of creativity and innovation compared with previous seasons. It
>wasn’t enough.
>

Yet Grade Powell did say scifi had not palce in the BBC. Major Clue!

>
>>The cancellation prevented the series from exploring
>> new story arcs, introducing new characters,
>> and pushing the boundaries of the sci-fi genre.
>
>No, it did all those things. Just not on TV for a while.
>

And in the 1990s?

>>
>> Furthermore, the cancellation deprived fans of closure for ongoing storylines
>> and character arcs. The Seventh Doctor, portrayed by Sylvester McCoy,
>was left
>> without a proper send-off, and many questions remained unanswered. The
>> cancellation left fans with a sense of unfinished business and a longing for
>> resolution that would not be realised for many years.
>
>The rest of the text just repeats the same points over and over, after
>digressing into the revival which, given that it was 15 years after the
>cancellation, is hardly relevant to the cancellation itself.
>
>> … it ultimately paved the way for the series' triumphant return
>> and ensured that the Doctor's adventures would continue to inspire
>> and captivate audiences for generations to come.
>
>So no harm, no foul. In the long run. And that breathing space was
>necessary - it’s exceedingly unlikely that the modern show would have
>arisen out of more McCoy and whatever horrors John Nathan-Turner might have
>inflicted on us next.
>

I rather that than the alternative.

>--
>“The timelines and … canon … are rupturing” - the Doctor


Ubiquitous

unread,
Feb 20, 2024, 11:45:50 AMFeb 20
to
In article <uqqgqc$vo4$1...@gallifrey.nk.ca>, doc...@doctor.nl2k.ab.ca wrote:

>Introduction:
>
>In 1989, after 26 years of thrilling audiences with its time-traveling
>adventures and captivating storytelling, Doctor Who faced an untimely
>cancellation. The decision to end the series left fans devastated and marked
>the end of an era in television history. This article explores the reasons
>why Doctor Who should have never been cancelled in 1989, delving into its
>cultural significance, its enduring legacy, and the missed opportunities
>that arose from its premature demise.

The cancellation of “Doctor Who” in 1989 was due to a combination of factors:

1) Declining Popularity: The show was trapped in a vicious circle of declining
popularity amongst viewers and neglect from the powers-that-be at the
BBC.

2) Budget Constraints: Despite sustained periods of great success, interviews
with cast and crew in more recent years have revealed that the fate of
the series was often uncertain, with deadlines and budget restrictions
causing constant issues.

3) Poor Reception: According to an internal BBC document that has since
surfaced, McCoy’s Doctor, his assistant Mel and Doctor Who’s stories
were also all scoring abysmally with test audiences.

4) Disdain from BBC Executives: Three senior BBC executives generally share
the blame for Doctor Who’s cancellation - Peter Cregeen, the BBC’s Head
of Series in 1989, who ultimately made the decision to drop the show;
Jonathan Powell, then Controller of BBC One; and Michael Grade, who had
preceded Powell in BBC One’s top job. Both Powell’s and Grade’s disdain
for Doctor Who was well documented.

It’s important to note that despite these challenges, the show made a
triumphant return in 2005 and has since transformed into a global sensation.


--
Let's go Brandon!

The Doctor

unread,
Feb 20, 2024, 5:04:54 PMFeb 20
to
In article <ur2kvq$2j0hm$9...@dont-email.me>,
Blame Powell and Co is correct!!

>
>--
>Let's go Brandon!
>


--
Member - Liberal International This is doc...@nk.ca Ici doc...@nk.ca
Yahweh, King & country!Never Satan President Republic!Beware AntiChrist rising!
Look at Psalms 14 and 53 on Atheism ; unsubscribe from Google Groups to be seen
What worth the power of law that won't stop lawlessness? -unknown
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