TAFF Auction Here

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Gary Farber

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Oct 7, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/7/97
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No, not the Chuch Harris stuff. Not quite yet: as soon as my life is a
bit more stable. Honest.

But herewith, a special rass-eff-only trial run, Simple Version.

One item only.

For auction: one copy of Vanna Bonta's FLIGHT. Hardcover, near-mint
condition. When you win, you send your money directly to the TAFF
Administrator of your choice, and the book will be sent to you.

Shall we say that the auction will close at 12:01 a.m on October 16th?

Bids will be made in US dollars, but you can pay the equivalent currency
to the TAFF Admin of your choice.

Post bids here; if you're worried about propagation, you may also e-mail
them to me, and I'll post a summary of where we stand every other day.

Minimum bid to start: $10. Go.

Thanks go to the fan who wishes to stay anonymous who located the copy,
unread, in a used book store.
--
--
Copyright 1997 by Gary Farber; Experienced Web Researcher; Nonfiction
Writer, Fiction and Nonfiction Editor; gfa...@panix.com; B'klyn, NYC

Cally Soukup

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Oct 10, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/10/97
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Gary Farber (gfa...@panix.com) wrote:

: Post bids here; if you're worried about propagation, you may also e-mail


: them to me, and I'll post a summary of where we stand every other day.

: Minimum bid to start: $10. Go.

Ok, this is the *third* time I've tried to post this. The intra-house lan
seems to have hiccoughed. Anyway, I'll bid $10, seeing as it's for TAFF.
Ghu only knows why, though. Morbid curiousity, perhaps.

--
"I may disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your
right to say it" -- Beatrice Hall

Cally Soukup ma...@mcs.com

Gary Farber

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Oct 11, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/11/97
to

In <61mncb$1...@pedestal.two14.lan> Cally Soukup <ma...@mcs.com> wrote:
: Gary Farber (gfa...@panix.com) wrote:

: : Post bids here; if you're worried about propagation, you may also e-mail
: : them to me, and I'll post a summary of where we stand every other day.

: : Minimum bid to start: $10. Go.

: Ok, this is the *third* time I've tried to post this. The intra-house lan
: seems to have hiccoughed. Anyway, I'll bid $10, seeing as it's for TAFF.
: Ghu only knows why, though. Morbid curiousity, perhaps.

Ah, and I was just going to post that I had an offer by e-mail for $10.
No, really. :-)

$15, anyone?

Marilee J. Layman

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Oct 11, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/11/97
to

In <61octp$r...@panix2.panix.com>, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber)
wrote:

>In <61mncb$1...@pedestal.two14.lan> Cally Soukup <ma...@mcs.com> wrote:
>: Gary Farber (gfa...@panix.com) wrote:
>
>: : Post bids here; if you're worried about propagation, you may also e-mail
>: : them to me, and I'll post a summary of where we stand every other day.
>
>: : Minimum bid to start: $10. Go.
>
>: Ok, this is the *third* time I've tried to post this. The intra-house lan
>: seems to have hiccoughed. Anyway, I'll bid $10, seeing as it's for TAFF.
>: Ghu only knows why, though. Morbid curiousity, perhaps.
>
>Ah, and I was just going to post that I had an offer by e-mail for $10.
>No, really. :-)
>
>$15, anyone?

Gary, maybe you should go about this a different way. Most of us
can't bear to hurt books, no matter what, and we're not going to
*read* this book, so why take up shelf space? I suppose that now the
auction has started, it can't be changed, but if you come across
another, maybe we can bid for pages - each to do what they want with
their individual page(s).

--
Marilee J. Layman Co-Leader, The Other*Worlds*Cafe
RELM Mu...@aol.com A Science Fiction Discussion Group
**New** Web site: http://home.virtual-pc.com/outland/owc/index.html
AOL keyword: FR > Science Fiction > The Other*Worlds*Cafe (listbox)

Barnaby

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Oct 12, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/12/97
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Gary Farber wrote in article <61e02v$m...@panix2.panix.com>...

>For auction: one copy of Vanna Bonta's FLIGHT. Hardcover, near-mint
>condition. When you win, you send your money directly to the TAFF
>Administrator of your choice, and the book will be sent to you.
>
>Shall we say that the auction will close at 12:01 a.m on October 16th?

>Minimum bid to start: $10. Go.

How much do I have to pay to make Art Widner read it?

Barnaby Rapoport

Cally Soukup

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Oct 12, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/12/97
to

Gary Farber (gfa...@panix.com) wrote:
: In <61mncb$1...@pedestal.two14.lan> Cally Soukup <ma...@mcs.com> wrote:

: : Ok, this is the *third* time I've tried to post this. The intra-house lan


: : seems to have hiccoughed. Anyway, I'll bid $10, seeing as it's for TAFF.
: : Ghu only knows why, though. Morbid curiousity, perhaps.

: Ah, and I was just going to post that I had an offer by e-mail for $10.
: No, really. :-)

: $15, anyone?

Well, $11, anyway. Though I shouldn't, as the furnace cleaner who came over
yesterday afternoon condemned our furnace. Ever tried to get estimates on a
new furnace on a Saturday afternoon? Thank Ghu for the unusually warm
weather we're having.

Virginia Ferguson

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Oct 12, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/12/97
to

In <61qock$s...@pedestal.two14.lan> ma...@mcs.com (Cally Soukup) writes:

>Gary Farber (gfa...@panix.com) wrote:
>: In <61mncb$1...@pedestal.two14.lan> Cally Soukup <ma...@mcs.com> wrote:

>: : Ok, this is the *third* time I've tried to post this. The intra-house lan
>: : seems to have hiccoughed. Anyway, I'll bid $10, seeing as it's for TAFF.
>: : Ghu only knows why, though. Morbid curiousity, perhaps.

>: Ah, and I was just going to post that I had an offer by e-mail for $10.
>: No, really. :-)

>: $15, anyone?

>Well, $11, anyway. Though I shouldn't, as the furnace cleaner who came over
>yesterday afternoon condemned our furnace. Ever tried to get estimates on a
>new furnace on a Saturday afternoon? Thank Ghu for the unusually warm
>weather we're having.

You know, this reads suspiciously like "I'm reluctant to buy this book now
due to lack of a working furnace"...

Mike Ford

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Oct 13, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/13/97
to

On 7 Oct 1997 14:46:55 -0400, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber)
wrote:


>Shall we say that the auction will close at 12:01 a.m on October 16th?

Umm -- <Pedant> in which time zone? </Pedant>
----
Mike Ford m...@mcgoff.karoo.co.uk
Leeds, UK

Gary Farber

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Oct 13, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/13/97
to

In <3440fc1b....@news.karoo.co.uk> Mike Ford <m...@mcgoff.karoo.co.uk> wrote:
: On 7 Oct 1997 14:46:55 -0400, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber)
: wrote:


: >Shall we say that the auction will close at 12:01 a.m on October 16th?

: Umm -- <Pedant> in which time zone? </Pedant>

Hell, if it keeps making money, I'll extend it, but bidding isn't exactly
fast and furious yet. Hey, Langford, how can you live without a copy for
Thog?

Gary "I'll have to check which timezone Italy is in" Farber

David Langford

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Oct 13, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/13/97
to

On 13 Oct 1997 00:53:05 -0400, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) wrote:

[re auction of =Flight= copy]

>Hell, if it keeps making money, I'll extend it, but bidding isn't exactly
>fast and furious yet. Hey, Langford, how can you live without a copy for
>Thog?

Langford could feel Farber's scrutiny all over him. His ridge of sales
resistance densified, but unexpectedly a bid of $15 perched over his
glasses....

Dave
--
David Langford
ans...@cix.co.uk | http://www.ansible.demon.co.uk/

John Richards

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Oct 13, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/13/97
to

David Langford wrote:
>
> On 13 Oct 1997 00:53:05 -0400, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) wrote:
>
> [re auction of =Flight= copy]
>
> >Hell, if it keeps making money, I'll extend it, but bidding isn't exactly
> >fast and furious yet. Hey, Langford, how can you live without a copy for
> >Thog?
>
> Langford could feel Farber's scrutiny all over him. His ridge of sales
> resistance densified, but unexpectedly a bid of $15 perched over his
> glasses....

How much is that in real money? Oh Hell I bid UKL 10 anyhow.

--
JFW Richards South Hants Science Fiction Group
Portsmouth, Hants 2nd and 4th Tuesdays
England. UK. The Magpie, Fratton Road, Portsmouth

Johan Anglemark

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Oct 13, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/13/97
to

Scríobh san airteagal <34421E...@panorama.panorama.com> John Richards
<jo...@panorama.panorama.com>:

>David Langford wrote:
>>
>> On 13 Oct 1997 00:53:05 -0400, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) wrote:
>>
>> [re auction of =Flight= copy]
>>
>> >Hell, if it keeps making money, I'll extend it, but bidding isn't exactly
>> >fast and furious yet. Hey, Langford, how can you live without a copy for
>> >Thog?
>>
>> Langford could feel Farber's scrutiny all over him. His ridge of sales
>> resistance densified, but unexpectedly a bid of $15 perched over his
>> glasses....
>
>How much is that in real money? Oh Hell I bid UKL 10 anyhow.

Which should be approx $16.50. I guess you lead.

-Johan

--
Johan Anglemark (Sweden) johan.anglemark<at>bahnhof.se
http://www.bahnhof.se/~anglemar/
Europeisk Förening för SF: http://www.bahnhof.se/~anglemar/EFSF

Cally Soukup

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Oct 13, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/13/97
to

Virginia Ferguson (gi...@panix.com) wrote:

: In <61qock$s...@pedestal.two14.lan> ma...@mcs.com (Cally Soukup) writes:
: >Gary Farber (gfa...@panix.com) wrote:

: >: $15, anyone?

: >Well, $11, anyway. Though I shouldn't, as the furnace cleaner who came
: >over yesterday afternoon condemned our furnace. Ever tried to get
: >estimates on a new furnace on a Saturday afternoon? Thank Ghu for the
: >unusually warm weather we're having.

: You know, this reads suspiciously like "I'm reluctant to buy this book now
: due to lack of a working furnace"...

Does it? Of course you know I'd never say such a thing. Nope. Never.
Well, hardly ever....

How many BTUs in a hardcover book, anyway?

Ed Gaillard

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Oct 14, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/14/97
to

In article <3442ecb2...@news.erols.com>,
Marilee J. Layman <mjla...@erols.com> wrote:

[speaking about the auction of a copy of A Certain Book]


>I suppose that now the
>auction has started, it can't be changed, but if you come across
>another, maybe we can bid for pages - each to do what they want with
>their individual page(s).

As an example of what one might do with individual pages of such a
book, check out Toad Head (http://www.spies.com/ToadHead/). (Note:
The site is graphics-intensive; while readable with Lynx, it's decaf
without the images.)

-ed g.
"People of the global village read only Latvian newspapers" -Toad Head

Justitia

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Oct 16, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/16/97
to

Gary Farber wrote:

> I now have an e-mail bid for FLIGHT for $25.

> Do I hear $30? It's for TAFF, you know. (You also pay postage.)

I bid $30, on condition that you _never_ ship it to me.

- Steve

Arthur Hlavaty

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Oct 16, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/16/97
to

Morgan Gallagher (Mor...@sidhen.demon.co.uk) wrote:

: "When the all the possibles have been eliminated, there only exists the
: impossible." (Which is no doubt a terribly paraphrase of the original.)


"When you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however, improbable,
is the best Conan Doyle could come up with at the time." -- Bob Shaw

--
Arthur D. Hlavaty hla...@panix.com
Church of the SuperGenius In Wile E. We Trust
\\\ E-zine available on request. ///

Gary Farber

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Oct 16, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/16/97
to

I now have an e-mail bid for FLIGHT for $25.

"'Well, I have some good news for you,' she beamed.
Washed in the cool spray of her smile, Mendle guessed, just by the
expression on her face. 'You cracked the communication code?'"
-- page 359

"'This,' Aira said, indicating another instrument on the panel. 'A
Particularization Device. It construes the negative atomic image of an
object, or designated space and all masses contained within, wavelengths,
whatever. The negative design is called Blueprint Concept. Everything we
see, with our eyes is the positive. And it has a negative. This
calculates the speed of bombardment, arrival, the projection necessary for
an image to resemble a positive. Something like a photograph. If you
look at a picture of a woman, let's say, you see the positive, and the
negative also exists. Well, on this, you can even *design* the negative.
Or reproduce negatives. When activated, particles attach to the blueprint
concept and make a positive.'
"'As you were describing everything, this world suddenly didn't seem so
solid at all,' Mendle marveled, awed."
-- page 362-3

Chapter 2 begins:

"Electricity crackled and lights flashed. Bright colors pulsated. Red,
red. Yellow, yellow. White. Green, green. White. blue. Violet,
violet. Red. Yellow. Red, red, red. White."
-- page 21.

"She wanted him. It was a frenzy. The more she felt him unresponsive
under her hands, the more determined she was to control him. It wasn't
that she wanted to give him pleasure; she wanted to burrow under his skin.
She needed the magnets of his blood to jump to her negatives and
positives. She hated him for being so much on his own.
"'I've really missed you,' she said, buttering him with what she called
love."
-- page 87

Followed by:

Chapter 13.
"Mendle's biologcal drive for sex disengaged from his soul. On its own,
unintegrated with his persoal sentiments, the impulse was an electrical
force. The antagonism between Sandra and him increased polarity between
terminals. The alcohol in his system impaired analysis of his body's
response. The sensation of sexual desire spread in Mendle -- an
involuntary desire to conquer, to dominate Sandra, as a body. The fact
that he didn't like her as a person licensed and fanned it.
"'You look fine,' Mendle said, returning her embrace yet not liking
himself for enjoying the mechanics of being a conduit for flow."
-- page 88.

This all takes place at the World Science Fiction Convention in Anaheim,
by the way, where Mendle Orion has just received the Campbell Award for
Best New Writer. Much of the novel is set there, and features
descriptions of the con, parties, and fans.

"While they decided on a table that satellited the dance floor, Sandra
studied Mendle with sideways probes."
-- page 120.

And there's so much more!

Do I hear $30? It's for TAFF, you know. (You also pay postage.)

Morgan Gallagher

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

In article <626c2j$3...@panix2.panix.com>, Gary Farber
<gfa...@panix.com> writes
>In <te6PGBAV...@sidhen.demon.co.uk>
>Morgan Gallagher <Mor...@sidhen.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>: In article <6266mn$r...@panix2.panix.com>, Gary Farber
>: <gfa...@panix.com> writes
>: >It construes the negative atomic image of an
>: ^^^^^^^^^
>: >object, or designated space and all masses contained within, wavelengths,
>: >whatever.
>
>: Tell me this is a typo. Please, I'm beginning you, tell me this is a
That should have been 'Begging'
>: typo?
>
>Not a typo.
>
>You can get a syndicate together to make a bid, you know. :-)
>--


Yes, but my bid wouldn't need to include postage.

Shouldn't we be giving you some sort of award for managing to read this
stuff?


--
Morgan

"Nunc demum intellego," dixit Winnie ille Pu. "Stultus et
delusus fui," dixit "et ursus sine ullo cerebro sum."

David E Romm

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

In article <6266mn$r...@panix2.panix.com>, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) wrote:

> "'I've really missed you,' she said, buttering him with what she called
> love."

I'll give you $0.50 if you don't post any more of this.
--
Shockwave radio: Science Fiction/Science Fact/Weirdness Unbound
http://www.visi.com/~romm
Especially during Seinfeld.

Morgan Gallagher

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

In article <6266mn$r...@panix2.panix.com>, Gary Farber
<gfa...@panix.com> writes
> "'You look fine,' Mendle said, returning her embrace yet not liking
>himself for enjoying the mechanics of being a conduit for flow."
>-- page 88.
>
>This all takes place at the World Science Fiction Convention in Anaheim,
>by the way, where Mendle Orion has just received the Campbell Award for
>Best New Writer. Much of the novel is set there, and features
>descriptions of the con, parties, and fans.
>
>"While they decided on a table that satellited the dance floor, Sandra
>studied Mendle with sideways probes."
>-- page 120.


Ok. I've decided. This is some massive hoax, right? A bunch of you
have gotton together and fabricated not only these 'excerpts', but
you've done all those AOL posts, and the counter arguments, just to
snucker us poor colonials into thinking this book actually exists?

Right?

"When the all the possibles have been eliminated, there only exists the
impossible." (Which is no doubt a terribly paraphrase of the original.)

Morgan Gallagher

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

In article <626o48$h...@panix2.panix.com>, Gary Farber
<gfa...@panix.com> writes
>In <PYcnnAAN...@sidhen.demon.co.uk>
>Morgan Gallagher <Mor...@sidhen.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>[. . .]
>
>: Yes, but my bid wouldn't need to include postage.
>
>Money saved right there; you could donate the book back to TAFF, or to a
>con for public readings, or to the Thog Archive.


I have a better idea. I think you should burn the book and auction The
Ashes. They can move between continents with TAFF winners.

We can keep them in a kiln jar just like a Brian Burgess Pork Pie.

Something are just too dangerous to read.

Justitia

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

David E Romm wrote:

> In article <6266mn$r...@panix2.panix.com>, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) wrote:

> > "'I've really missed you,' she said, buttering him with what she called
> > love."

> I'll give you $0.50 if you don't post any more of this.

I'll give everyone at the last dba a buck if no one posts any more of
this.

Arthur Hlavaty

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

: In article <6266mn$r...@panix2.panix.com>, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) wrote:

: > "'I've really missed you,' she said, buttering him with what she called
: > love."

Wasn't there something like that in _Last Tango in Paris_?

Marcus L. Rowland

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

In article <626c2j$3...@panix2.panix.com>, Gary Farber
<gfa...@panix.com> writes

>You can get a syndicate together to make a bid, you know. :-)

When you've finished selling this one I have an unwanted (at least by
me) book that's the equivalent for @ fandom; The UK edition of How To
Make A Fortune on the Information Superhighway by Canter and Siegel.
Should I start to post excerpts???
--
Marcus L. Rowland
http://www.ffutures.demon.co.uk/
"We are all victims of this slime. They... ...fill our mailboxes with gibberish
that would get them indicted if people had time to press charges"
[Hunter S. Thompson predicts junk e-mail, 1985 (from Generation of Swine)]

Gary Farber

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

In <3446D4...@erols.com> Justitia <just...@erols.com> wrote:
: Gary Farber wrote:
:
: > I now have an e-mail bid for FLIGHT for $25.

: > Do I hear $30? It's for TAFF, you know. (You also pay postage.)

: I bid $30, on condition that you _never_ ship it to me.

I have $35 from Steve Brown, who says a new SF EYE is currently at the
printer's. Do I hear $40? Raphael? Dave? Berni? Others?

If there are no bids on Saturday, I will Post More Excerpts. :-)

Justitia

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

Gary Farber wrote:
> In <3446D4...@erols.com> Justitia <just...@erols.com> wrote:
> : Gary Farber wrote:

> : > Do I hear $30? It's for TAFF, you know. (You also pay postage.)

> : I bid $30, on condition that you _never_ ship it to me.

> I have $35 from Steve Brown...


> If there are no bids on Saturday, I will Post More Excerpts. :-)

$37.50, provided you never ship it to me _and_ there are no more
excerpts.

Morgan Gallagher

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

In article <6266mn$r...@panix2.panix.com>, Gary Farber
<gfa...@panix.com> writes

>It construes the negative atomic image of an
^^^^^^^^^
>object, or designated space and all masses contained within, wavelengths,
>whatever.


Tell me this is a typo. Please, I'm beginning you, tell me this is a

typo?

Gary Farber

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

In <PYcnnAAN...@sidhen.demon.co.uk>
Morgan Gallagher <Mor...@sidhen.demon.co.uk> wrote:
[. . .]

: Yes, but my bid wouldn't need to include postage.

Money saved right there; you could donate the book back to TAFF, or to a
con for public readings, or to the Thog Archive.

: Shouldn't we be giving you some sort of award for managing to read this
: stuff?

It's not so hard to open to random pages to find passages to quote. And I
do this for a living, such as it is.

But so far I've spared you any text from the parts that are supposed to be
the "novel" that "Mendle Orion" is "writing," or any of the text from
whatever the Other Dimension is supposed to be; those are *really*
amazing, but it seems less fair to quote at least the former, since the
author could declare that said writing is supposed to be that of "Mendle
Orion"'s. Of course, he is supposed to be a Campbell-Award-Winner. . . .

Ray Radlein

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

Gary Farber wrote:
>
> Chapter 2 begins:
>
> "Electricity crackled and lights flashed. Bright colors pulsated.
> Red, red. Yellow, yellow. White. Green, green.

Lemon Yellow. Orange Orange. Hearts. Moons. Stars. Clovers. "Always
after me Lucky Charms!"

I must stop now! I am vortexing!


- Ray R.


--
*********************************************************************
"Well, before my sword can pass all the way through your neck, it has
to pass *half way* through your neck. But before it can do *that*, it
has to first pass *one-fourth* of the way through your neck. And
before it can do *that*...." - Zeno, Warrior Princess

Ray Radlein - r...@learnlink.emory.edu
homepage coming soon! wooo, wooo.
*********************************************************************


Ulrika

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Oct 17, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/17/97
to

In article <626o48$h...@panix2.panix.com>, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber)
writes:

>But so far I've spared you any text from the parts that are supposed to
> be the "novel" that "Mendle Orion" is "writing," or any of the text from
>whatever the Other Dimension is supposed to be; those are *really*
>amazing, but it seems less fair to quote at least the former, since the
>author could declare that said writing is supposed to be that of
>"Mendle Orion"'s. Of course, he is supposed to be a
>Campbell-Award-Winner. . . .

Well, yeah, but so's Jerry. So there, Mister Smartypants.

But seriously, lay some of the really amazing stuff on us. I am already
numb with stark amaze, I hardly have any functioning neurons left to boggle
with.


Ulrika O'Brien, Philosopher Without Portfolio

***ulr...@aol.com***

Arwel Parry

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Oct 18, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/18/97
to

In article <olA70BAD...@ffutures.demon.co.uk>, "Marcus L. Rowland"
<mrow...@ffutures.demon.co.uk> writes
>In article <626c2j$3...@panix2.panix.com>, Gary Farber
><gfa...@panix.com> writes

>>You can get a syndicate together to make a bid, you know. :-)
>
>When you've finished selling this one I have an unwanted (at least by
>me) book that's the equivalent for @ fandom; The UK edition of How To
>Make A Fortune on the Information Superhighway by Canter and Siegel.
>Should I start to post excerpts???

Argh! Please restrain yourself!

Arwel
--
Arwel Parry
http://www.cartref.demon.co.uk/

Vicki Rosenzweig

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Oct 18, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/18/97
to


Gary--

Have him send the money to TAFF, then stop quoting
and *auction the book off a second time,* since the condition
of his bid is that you not give him the book. Very generous
of you, Steve; TAFF is certainly a worthy cause, but this is
a nice-sized donation nonetheless.
--
Vicki Rosenzweig
v...@interport.net | http://www.users.interport.net/~vr/
Typos are Coyote padding through the language, grinning.
--Susanna Sturgis

Justitia

unread,
Oct 18, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/18/97
to

Vicki Rosenzweig wrote:
> Justitia wrote:
> > Gary Farber wrote:

> > > I have $35 from Steve Brown...
> > > If there are no bids on Saturday, I will Post More Excerpts. :-)

> > $37.50, provided you never ship it to me _and_ there are no more
> > excerpts.

> Have him send the money to TAFF, then stop quoting


> and *auction the book off a second time,* since the condition
> of his bid is that you not give him the book.

Done (but I get my $37.50 back if he ever excerpts again).

eyeb...@interpath.com

unread,
Oct 19, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/19/97
to

In article <344932...@interport.net>, Vicki Rosenzweig
<v...@interport.net> wrote:

> Justitia wrote:
> >
> > Gary Farber wrote:

> > > In <3446D4...@erols.com> Justitia <just...@erols.com> wrote:
> > > : Gary Farber wrote:
> >
> > > : > Do I hear $30? It's for TAFF, you know. (You also pay postage.)
> >
> > > : I bid $30, on condition that you _never_ ship it to me.
> >

> > > I have $35 from Steve Brown...
> > > If there are no bids on Saturday, I will Post More Excerpts. :-)
> >
> > $37.50, provided you never ship it to me _and_ there are no more
> > excerpts.
>
>

> Gary--


>
> Have him send the money to TAFF, then stop quoting
> and *auction the book off a second time,* since the condition

> of his bid is that you not give him the book. Very generous
> of you, Steve; TAFF is certainly a worthy cause, but this is
> a nice-sized donation nonetheless.

It's a very worthy cause, which nicely dovetails with my perverted lust to
own works of fiction written with such towering lack of skill.

I'm willing to bump up to $42.50, however I wonder about the mechanism of
bidding against someone who resolutely does not want to own the item being
bid for. Can someone parse this out for me, or should we just keep
bidding away until TAFF is funded for all time?

Steve Brown

Ray Radlein

unread,
Oct 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/20/97
to

Marcus L. Rowland wrote:
>
> When you've finished selling this one I have an unwanted (at least
> by me) book that's the equivalent for @ fandom; The UK edition of
> How To Make A Fortune on the Information Superhighway by Canter and
> Siegel. Should I start to post excerpts???

Since you have asked us, rather than simply bombarding all of us with
unwanted excerpts, you clearly were not paying attention when you read
it.

Avedon Carol

unread,
Oct 20, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/20/97
to

On Fri, 17 Oct 1997 03:13:03 -0400, Ray Radlein
<r...@learnlink.emory.edu> wrote:

>Gary Farber wrote:
>>
>> Chapter 2 begins:
>>
>> "Electricity crackled and lights flashed. Bright colors pulsated.
>> Red, red. Yellow, yellow. White. Green, green.
>
>Lemon Yellow. Orange Orange. Hearts. Moons. Stars. Clovers. "Always
>after me Lucky Charms!"
>
>I must stop now! I am vortexing!

Damn, I was sure the next bit was, "All the clouds are cumuloft,
walking in space..."

Avedon
ave...@cix.co.uk

Note: The reply field lies.

T Nielsen Hayden

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Oct 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/21/97
to

Chris Suslowicz <armag...@dial.fnord.pipex.com> wrote:
> In article <344A6C...@erols.com>,
> Justitia <just...@erols.com> wrote:

> >Very well. I bid $45.00 on condition that the book be sent to
> >Steve Brown.

> New Bidder: 50 USD +shipping[1], provided it's sent to Thog The Mighty.

> [1] What is its Hazmat classification?

Hazmat is cousin of Thog.

:tnh

T Nielsen Hayden

unread,
Oct 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/21/97
to

Gary Farber <gfa...@panix.com> excerpted:

> She needed the magnets of his blood to jump to her negatives and

> positives. She hated him for being so much on his own. (p. 87)

> Mendle's biological drive for sex disengaged from his soul. On its own,


> unintegrated with his persoal sentiments, the impulse was an electrical
> force. The antagonism between Sandra and him increased polarity between
> terminals. The alcohol in his system impaired analysis of his body's
> response. The sensation of sexual desire spread in Mendle -- an
> involuntary desire to conquer, to dominate Sandra, as a body. The fact
> that he didn't like her as a person licensed and fanned it.

> "You look fine," Mendle said, returning her embrace yet not liking

> himself for enjoying the mechanics of being a conduit for flow. (p. 88)

You realize this means if you're rutting like crazed weasels anywhere near a
floppy disk, you're likely to corrupt its data or wipe it entirely. "Safe
sex" means stashing all your magnetic storage media in a lead-lined chest
before you can even begin a little preliminary canoodling.

> While they decided on a table that satellited the dance floor, Sandra

> studied Mendle with sideways probes. (p. 120)

I think you're within a page there of the passage about the women who're
exuding altitude. TeresaBecca says: Check It Out.

::tnh::fwa

T Nielsen Hayden

unread,
Oct 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/21/97
to

Ed Gaillard <gail...@panix.com> wrote:

> The site is graphics-intensive; while readable with Lynx, it's decaf
> without the images.)

Decaf? Decaf. Weird but entirely comprehensible. I think I'll steal that
real soon.

::tnh::fwa

T Nielsen Hayden

unread,
Oct 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/21/97
to

T Nielsen Hayden <t...@panix.com> wrote:
> Morgan Gallagher <Mor...@sidhen.demon.co.uk> wrote:

> > In article <6266mn$r...@panix2.panix.com>, Gary Farber
> > <gfa...@panix.com> writes

> > >"While they decided on a table that satellited the dance floor, Sandra


> > >studied Mendle with sideways probes."

> > >-- page 120.

> > Ok. I've decided. This is some massive hoax, right? A bunch of you
> > have gotton together and fabricated not only these 'excerpts', but
> > you've done all those AOL posts, and the counter arguments, just to
> > snucker us poor colonials into thinking this book actually exists?

> Morgan, this book has been publicly mocked at the weekly Malibu lunchtime
> gathering of industry people who also read comics. It has been whooped at
> by Tor Editorial, and ceremonially shelved there next to our copy of =Black
> Body= (an unprecedented act of recognition). Its copyright page has been
> viewed with dumb amazement by Tor's unflappable Production Department.

> And frankly, while rasff and the Malibu crowd might be woofing you, Tor SF
> editorial would be unlikely to do so =en masse=, and Production would never
> go along with the gag at all.

> It's real.


DEPT. OF CORRECTIONS: I should of course have made it clear that by "Tor" I
meant "some people at Tor", by "Tor Editorial" I meant "some people in Tor
Editorial", and by "Tor Production" I meant "some people in Tor Production".
Tor as a company has no opinion about =Flight=.

::tnh::fwa

eyeb...@interpath.com

unread,
Oct 21, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/21/97
to

In article <62h3m2$o...@news1.panix.com>, T Nielsen Hayden <t...@panix.com> wrote:

> Morgan, this book has been publicly mocked at the weekly Malibu lunchtime
> gathering of industry people who also read comics. It has been whooped at
> by Tor Editorial, and ceremonially shelved there next to our copy of =Black
> Body= (an unprecedented act of recognition)

*Black Body*? By H.C. Turk? Villard 1989? The witch novel with that
immortal opening: "When I slid in my baby slime between my supine mother's
legs, I did not comprehend the expression of her accompanying friends
..."? I thought I was the only person who knew about this one, thought
admittedly I lead a fannishly sheltered life.

Steve Brown

T Nielsen Hayden

unread,
Oct 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/22/97
to

In article <eyebrown-211...@asheville-065.interpath.net>,
eyeb...@interpath.com wrote:

That very same, that stupefyingly bad book. How did you come across it?

::tnh::fwa

Morgan Gallagher

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Oct 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/22/97
to

In article <tnh-221097...@tnh.dialup.access.net>, T Nielsen
Hayden <t...@panix.com> writes
>As you know, Alison, an orbit -- that is, the path taken by a satellite --
>consists of a circular dotted line floating in space. We also know that
>"satellite" is sometimes used to indicate a smaller object at some
>distance from the main object, viz. a "satellite suburb". I therefore take
>this to mean that they chose a table at the (most likely circular)
>periphery of the dance floor.


This is, of course, how what I took it to mean.

But only after I'd had a giggle at the idea of how fast those table were
moving round int he circle, and did the glasses slide off? Or how hard
it was tog et into a chair whilst it was - presumably - satiliting the
table that was satiliting the dance floor.

I'm still trying to work out how a maching can construe energies
however.

T Nielsen Hayden

unread,
Oct 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/22/97
to

In article <344f1e66....@news.demon.co.uk>,
ali...@fuggles.demon.co.uk wrote:

> In article <6266mn$r...@panix2.panix.com>, Gary Farber
> <gfa...@panix.com> writes
>
> >"While they decided on a table that satellited the dance floor, Sandra
> >studied Mendle with sideways probes."
> >-- page 120.
>

> Presumably she borrowed the sideways probes that Langford keeps in the
> Ansible Mothership on Eldermoo?
>
> And 'satellited'? I'm having trouble here. My only conception of what
> this word could possibly mean is 'orbited'. Which explains why it took
> them so long to decide on a table -- they had to catch it first.

As you know, Alison, an orbit -- that is, the path taken by a satellite --
consists of a circular dotted line floating in space. We also know that
"satellite" is sometimes used to indicate a smaller object at some
distance from the main object, viz. a "satellite suburb". I therefore take
this to mean that they chose a table at the (most likely circular)
periphery of the dance floor.

::tnh::fwa

eyeb...@interpath.com

unread,
Oct 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/22/97
to

In article <ug1puw...@ncipher.com>, Alan Braggins <ar...@ncipher.com> wrote:

> gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) writes:
> > : > > >"While they decided on a table that satellited the dance floor,
Sandra
> > : > > >studied Mendle with sideways probes."

> > : > > Ok. I've decided. This is some massive hoax, right?
> > : Even if they post here, they could be you under a fake name.
> > No, there are plenty of people who can confirm.
> Yeah sure, like you wouldn't be in on the hoax too? :-)
>
> > : You'll just have to send the book to Langford.
> > Keep those bids coming.
> I'll chip in Ł5 towards a Langford bid.

Hmmm. It appears the auction is shaking out into me vs. a consortium on
behalf of Thog. I'm up for it. Where are we at Gary?

Steve Brown

David G. Bell

unread,
Oct 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/22/97
to

In article <344e3d79...@news.demon.co.uk>
ans...@cix.co.uk "David Langford" writes:

> On Wed, 22 Oct 1997 11:19:00 -0400, eyeb...@interpath.com (being that fine
> fellow Steve Brown) wrote:
>
> [snip: bidding details in the on-line auction for Fiendish Farber's
> Fabulous =Flight= First Folio ...]


>
> >Hmmm. It appears the auction is shaking out into me vs. a consortium on
> >behalf of Thog. I'm up for it. Where are we at Gary?
>

> I think I'll put in a fiver towards Steve's bid. The vast Ethics Department
> of Thog PLC (Thog: "Ethics place Thog sack in Greece once?") is still
> pondering the relevance of the =Eye of Argon= Doctrine, whereby stuff too
> awful to be published professionally is as a rule spared the impact of
> Thog's morningstar.
>
> Besides, after reading numerous extracts in r.a.sf.f, do you lot really
> wish to undergo them all over again in =Ansible=?

Perhaps there are some Ansible readers who are not yet on the net? And,
Dave, would you be so uncultured as to deny a lady, for so we must still
assume Vanna Bonta to be, the opportunity to promote her
work^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hmake a fool of herself.


--
David G. Bell -- Farmer, SF Fan, Filker, Furry, and Punslinger..


eyeb...@interpath.com

unread,
Oct 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/22/97
to

In article <tnh-221097...@tnh.dialup.access.net>, t...@panix.com (T
Nielsen Hayden) wrote:

The publisher sent it to me, unsolicited. That very day I'd just received
a letter from Joan Gordon (well-known feminist academic critic, for you
lurkers) expressing a desire to write a book review for me, and could I
send her a book? Black Body had a fairly attractive package, and the flap
copy *did* promise a "tour de force" which was "beautifully written" and
featured "one of the most memorable heroines of contemporary fiction". So
off it went.

Joan wrote me that review ("I must admit that I never finished this novel.
Perhaps great things occur in the last few hundred pages, but the few
hundred pages I read were too agonizing for me to continue the
search."--SFE #6). However I believe the task was a pretty painful
experience for her. At any rate, it has been a number of years since I
heard from her. Oh well ...

Steve Brown

Maureen Kincaid Speller

unread,
Oct 22, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/22/97
to

On Wed, 22 Oct 1997 11:19:00 -0400, eyeb...@interpath.com wrote:

>In article <ug1puw...@ncipher.com>, Alan Braggins <ar...@ncipher.com> wrote:
>
>> gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) writes:
>> > : > > >"While they decided on a table that satellited the dance floor,
>Sandra
>> > : > > >studied Mendle with sideways probes."
>> > : > > Ok. I've decided. This is some massive hoax, right?
>> > : Even if they post here, they could be you under a fake name.
>> > No, there are plenty of people who can confirm.
>> Yeah sure, like you wouldn't be in on the hoax too? :-)
>>
>> > : You'll just have to send the book to Langford.
>> > Keep those bids coming.
>> I'll chip in Ł5 towards a Langford bid.
>

>Hmmm. It appears the auction is shaking out into me vs. a consortium on
>behalf of Thog. I'm up for it. Where are we at Gary?
>

>Steve Brown

A fiver for Thog here as well

Maureen

Maureen Kincaid Speller
m...@acnestis.demon.co.uk

Ulrika O'Brien for TAFF

Maureen Kincaid Speller

unread,
Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

On Wed, 22 Oct 1997 17:53:48 GMT, ans...@cix.co.uk (David Langford)
wrote:

>On Wed, 22 Oct 1997 11:19:00 -0400, eyeb...@interpath.com (being that fine
>fellow Steve Brown) wrote:
>
>[snip: bidding details in the on-line auction for Fiendish Farber's
>Fabulous =Flight= First Folio ...]
>

>>Hmmm. It appears the auction is shaking out into me vs. a consortium on
>>behalf of Thog. I'm up for it. Where are we at Gary?
>

>I think I'll put in a fiver towards Steve's bid. The vast Ethics Department
>of Thog PLC (Thog: "Ethics place Thog sack in Greece once?") is still
>pondering the relevance of the =Eye of Argon= Doctrine, whereby stuff too
>awful to be published professionally is as a rule spared the impact of
>Thog's morningstar.
>

This, or part of it, may be appearing for the second time - the
computer tried to second-guess me just now, and got it wrong.

I was going to say that a) if the Bydra is keen to present herself as
a 'profesional' writer who are we to gainsay her the chance to receive
the full experience of being a professional sf writer, and b) come
clean ... you just don't want it in the house, do you? The cellars of
BSFA Central are at your disposal...

eyeb...@interpath.com

unread,
Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

In article <344e3d79...@news.demon.co.uk>, ans...@cix.co.uk (David
Langford) wrote:

> On Wed, 22 Oct 1997 11:19:00 -0400, eyeb...@interpath.com (being that fine
> fellow Steve Brown) wrote:
>
> [snip: bidding details in the on-line auction for Fiendish Farber's
> Fabulous =Flight= First Folio ...]
>
> >Hmmm. It appears the auction is shaking out into me vs. a consortium on
> >behalf of Thog. I'm up for it. Where are we at Gary?
>
> I think I'll put in a fiver towards Steve's bid. The vast Ethics Department
> of Thog PLC (Thog: "Ethics place Thog sack in Greece once?") is still
> pondering the relevance of the =Eye of Argon= Doctrine, whereby stuff too
> awful to be published professionally is as a rule spared the impact of
> Thog's morningstar.

If Maureen et al. are putting up fivers on behalf of Thog, and Thog
Himself (via his agent) is putting up fivers on behalf of me, then this
auction is perilously close to crossing that crucial boundary between
complexity and chaos. How would Sotheby's handle a situation like this?
Gary, some clarification, please.

> Besides, after reading numerous extracts in r.a.sf.f, do you lot really
> wish to undergo them all over again in =Ansible=?

I am one who tends to favor the =Eye of Argon= Doctrine. Examples of
awful prose by bad writers are inifnite. A bad sentence by a good writer,
though, is a gem. That line in the recent Ansible about JGB quietly
deleting his Thob Approved passage from his French edition is a priceless
benchmark in sf history.

However, far be it from me to deprive any offline Ansible readers of any
pleasures at all, however guilty. Here's my proposal: I dearly wish to
*own* this book, and would like to be able to contribute to a cause as
worthy as TAFF (while I am currently able). Hey, some people collect
stamps, others collect Barbie dolls. I collect Really Bad Books.

I would be willing to mail the copy of Thog (after a suitable period of
gloating over it in the privacy of my bedroom) for indefinite loan (and as
much quoting as Ansible readers can stand), so long as it is understood
that, in the fullness of time, I get it back.

Steve Brown

eyeb...@interpath.com

unread,
Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

In article <tnh-221097...@tnh.dialup.access.net>, t...@panix.com (T
Nielsen Hayden) wrote:

> If Joan Gordon read a few hundred pages, she got through more of =Black
> Body= than anyone else I've ever heard of. Oops! Except for Don D'Ammassa,
> who not only read it but gave it a positive review.

The Reviewer's Code demands that a book be read through to the bitter
end. I think Joan dutifully tried, but failed. She was apologetic about
this. I couldn't get myself booted through more than the first chapter,
but I'd like to see a plot synopsis. I once printed an open plea to
anyone who could read the entirety of L. Ron Hubbard's ten volume thing,
to simply boil it down into a description of evennts. No one took me up
on it.

Regarding the Code, my personal worst experience was Heinlein's "Number of
the Beast." When it came out I chose to review it for a column I was
getting paid for (making the Code even more ethically important). I knew,
by page twenty, that I really did *not* want to read this book, but
honesty compelled me onward. I read every word and it was not a fun thing
to do.

Steve Brown

Maureen Kincaid Speller

unread,
Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

On Wed, 22 Oct 1997 17:53:48 GMT, ans...@cix.co.uk (David Langford)
wrote:

>On Wed, 22 Oct 1997 11:19:00 -0400, eyeb...@interpath.com (being that fine
>fellow Steve Brown) wrote:
>
>[snip: bidding details in the on-line auction for Fiendish Farber's
>Fabulous =Flight= First Folio ...]
>
>>Hmmm. It appears the auction is shaking out into me vs. a consortium on
>>behalf of Thog. I'm up for it. Where are we at Gary?
>
>I think I'll put in a fiver towards Steve's bid. The vast Ethics Department
>of Thog PLC (Thog: "Ethics place Thog sack in Greece once?") is still
>pondering the relevance of the =Eye of Argon= Doctrine, whereby stuff too
>awful to be published professionally is as a rule spared the impact of
>Thog's morningstar.
>

Maureen Kincaid Speller

Aahz

unread,
Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

In article <eyebrown-231...@asheville-122.interpath.net>,

<eyeb...@interpath.com> wrote:
>
>Regarding the Code, my personal worst experience was Heinlein's "Number
>of the Beast." When it came out I chose to review it for a column I
>was getting paid for (making the Code even more ethically important).
>I knew, by page twenty, that I really did *not* want to read this book,
>but honesty compelled me onward. I read every word and it was not a
>fun thing to do.

Out of curiosity, what did you think of _Job_? (I'm doing an ongoing
anecdotal survey; so far roughly 20% like neither _Job_ nor _NotB_,
roughly 30% like _Job_ only, roughly 30% like _NotB_ only, and roughly
20% like both. I'm particularly amused by the bulk of people who only
like one.)
--
--- Aahz (@netcom.com)

Hugs and backrubs -- I break Rule 6 <*> http://www.bayarea.net/~aahz
Androgynous poly kinky vanilla queer het

"If you want a picture of the future of Usenet, imagine a foot stuck in
a human mouth -- forever." -- Avram Grumer

Dave Locke

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Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

Johan Anglemark phosphorized:

> eyeb...@interpath.com:


>
> >I would be willing to mail the copy of Thog (after a suitable period of
> >gloating over it in the privacy of my bedroom)
>

> Thus delivering it to =Ansible= full of indescribable stains? You, sir,
> are a blot on fannish decency.

Nah, just brown eyetracks.

---
Dave | dave...@bigfoot.com | http://www.angelfire.com/oh/slowdjin

Johan Anglemark

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Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

Scríobh san airteagal
<eyebrown-231...@asheville-122.interpath.net>
eyeb...@interpath.com:

>ans...@cix.co.uk (David Langford) wrote:
>
>> Besides, after reading numerous extracts in r.a.sf.f, do you lot really
>> wish to undergo them all over again in =Ansible=?
>
>I am one who tends to favor the =Eye of Argon= Doctrine. Examples of
>awful prose by bad writers are inifnite. A bad sentence by a good writer,
>though, is a gem. That line in the recent Ansible about JGB quietly
>deleting his Thob Approved passage from his French edition is a priceless
>benchmark in sf history.
>
>However, far be it from me to deprive any offline Ansible readers of any
>pleasures at all, however guilty. Here's my proposal: I dearly wish to
>*own* this book, and would like to be able to contribute to a cause as
>worthy as TAFF (while I am currently able). Hey, some people collect
>stamps, others collect Barbie dolls. I collect Really Bad Books.
>

>I would be willing to mail the copy of Thog (after a suitable period of
>gloating over it in the privacy of my bedroom)

Thus delivering it to =Ansible= full of indescribable stains? You, sir,
are a blot on fannish decency.

-J

--
Johan Anglemark (Sweden) johan.anglemark<at>bahnhof.se
http://www.bahnhof.se/~anglemar/
Europeisk Förening för SF: http://www.bahnhof.se/~anglemar/EFSF

eyeb...@interpath.com

unread,
Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

In article <aahzEII...@netcom.com>, aa...@netcom.com (Aahz) wrote:

> In article <eyebrown-231...@asheville-122.interpath.net>,
> <eyeb...@interpath.com> wrote:
> >
> >Regarding the Code, my personal worst experience was Heinlein's "Number
> >of the Beast." When it came out I chose to review it for a column I
> >was getting paid for (making the Code even more ethically important).
> >I knew, by page twenty, that I really did *not* want to read this book,
> >but honesty compelled me onward. I read every word and it was not a
> >fun thing to do.
>
> Out of curiosity, what did you think of _Job_? (I'm doing an ongoing
> anecdotal survey; so far roughly 20% like neither _Job_ nor _NotB_,
> roughly 30% like _Job_ only, roughly 30% like _NotB_ only, and roughly
> 20% like both. I'm particularly amused by the bulk of people who only
> like one.)

I thought it better than NotB, in that it had a recognizable storyline not
*too* dependent on idiot whim. However I still thought it pretty awful.

My full opinion (so glad you asked) is that "Stranger" is the first novel
in H's Senile Phase. It had fitful bits of good stuff, but lots of crap.
Not only that, the crap in that book served as a template for all that was
to come. Each succeeding book seemed to be a progressively more awful
rewrite of the bad parts of "Stranger".

However, there are, I'm aware, many who would disagree, and vehemently.
I've seem what Heinlein threads have done elsewhere and promise not to get
sucked in. This is my nutshell personal opinion and I won't come back to
this topic (unless, of course, appropriately funny responses show up).

steve Brown

Justitia

unread,
Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

Aahz wrote:

> Out of curiosity, what did you think of _Job_? (I'm doing an ongoing
> anecdotal survey; so far roughly 20% like neither _Job_ nor _NotB_,
> roughly 30% like _Job_ only, roughly 30% like _NotB_ only, and roughly
> 20% like both. I'm particularly amused by the bulk of people who only
> like one.)

Weren't they the same book? It, or both of them, sucked.

- Steve

Barnaby

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Oct 23, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/23/97
to

eyeb...@interpath.com wrote in article ...

>I once printed an open plea to
>anyone who could read the entirety of L. Ron Hubbard's ten volume thing,

>to simply boil it down into a description of events. No one took me up
>on it.

I remember that. The problem for me, and probably for everyone else, wasn't
so much reading all ten volumes as buying them.

Barnaby Rapoport

Doug Berry

unread,
Oct 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/24/97
to

On Thu, 23 Oct 1997 15:46:10 GMT, aa...@netcom.com (Aahz) wrote:


>Out of curiosity, what did you think of _Job_? (I'm doing an ongoing
>anecdotal survey; so far roughly 20% like neither _Job_ nor _NotB_,
>roughly 30% like _Job_ only, roughly 30% like _NotB_ only, and roughly
>20% like both. I'm particularly amused by the bulk of people who only
>like one.)

Liked Job, hated Number. Although neither of them were much to write home about. IMNSHO, "Friday" was the last great Heinlein.
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Gary Farber

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Oct 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/24/97
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In <3450dc90...@news.wenet.net> Doug Berry
<dbe...@nospam.hooked.net> wrote:

: On Thu, 23 Oct 1997 15:46:10 GMT, aa...@netcom.com (Aahz) wrote:

: >Out of curiosity, what did you think of _Job_? (I'm doing an ongoing
: >anecdotal survey; so far roughly 20% like neither _Job_ nor _NotB_,
: >roughly 30% like _Job_ only, roughly 30% like _NotB_ only, and roughly
: >20% like both. I'm particularly amused by the bulk of people who only
: >like one.)

: Liked Job, hated Number. Although neither of them were much to write
: home about. IMNSHO, "Friday" was the last great Heinlein.

I thought both JOB and NUMBER sucked, as did TO SAIL. I'd say that FRIDAY
was the last decent Heinlein, an odd, but welcome anomaly among the late
novels, although I also think he seemed to have lost his point partway
through and wandered into a highly flabby ending. MOON IS A HARSH
MISTRESS was the last "great" Heinlein, IMHO, and the last really decent
one (yeah, I know you don't like it, either, Avedon).

I WILL FEAR NO EVIL and FARNHAN'S FREEHOLD were both pretty sucky, too.

OTOH, I think the idea that the movie makers are trying to sell, the old
saw that STARSHIP TROOPERS was/is "fascist" is Dumb and Wrong.

Probably a mistake to comment on Heinlein. Sorry.
--
--
Copyright 1997 by Gary Farber; Experienced Web Researcher; Nonfiction
Writer, Fiction and Nonfiction Editor; gfa...@panix.com; B'klyn, NYC

RSmith2678

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Oct 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/24/97
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For what it's worth, I know of at least one library (located not too far
from where I
now sit) that has a complete set.

The cost seems so much less when it's tax money that's being spent. <grin>

--Randy Smith
RSmit...@aol.com

--The Guy From Nebraska

Jim Rittenhouse

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Oct 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/24/97
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In article <62qug1$h...@panix2.panix.com>, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) wrote:

>I thought both JOB and NUMBER sucked, as did TO SAIL. I'd say that FRIDAY
>was the last decent Heinlein, an odd, but welcome anomaly among the late
>novels, although I also think he seemed to have lost his point partway
>through and wandered into a highly flabby ending. MOON IS A HARSH
>MISTRESS was the last "great" Heinlein, IMHO, and the last really decent
>one (yeah, I know you don't like it, either, Avedon).
>
>I WILL FEAR NO EVIL and FARNHAN'S FREEHOLD were both pretty sucky, too.
>
>OTOH, I think the idea that the movie makers are trying to sell, the old
>saw that STARSHIP TROOPERS was/is "fascist" is Dumb and Wrong.

I agree generally with Gary, except that FARNHAM'S FREEHOLD to me is 'lesser
RAH' than truly sucky. What did you think of TIME ENOUGH FOR LOVE then, Gary?
My opinion is 'deeply uneven'.


Jim Rittenhouse (urs...@primenet.com)
http://www.primenet.com/~ursine
http://www.primenet.com/~ursine/pod.html - POINT OF DIVERGENCE, the Alternate History APA.


Ray Radlein

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Oct 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM10/25/97
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Gary Farber wrote:
>
> Probably a mistake to comment on Heinlein. Sorry.

Hey, Gary! Tell us all your Heinlein anecdote!


<snicker>


- Ray R.

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to pass *half way* through your neck. But before it can do *that*, it
has to first pass *one-fourth* of the way through your neck. And
before it can do *that*...." - Zeno, Warrior Princess

Ray Radlein - r...@learnlink.emory.edu
homepage coming soon! wooo, wooo.
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Gary Farber

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Oct 26, 1997, 2:00:00 AM10/26/97
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In <62rspt$a...@nntp02.primenet.com> Jim Rittenhouse
<urs...@primenet.com> wrote:
[. . .]
: I agree generally with Gary, except that FARNHAM'S FREEHOLD to me is 'lesser
: RAH' than truly sucky.

I should admit that I haven't reread it in at least twenty years; but my
memories of it are not fond; if I had a copy handy, I might give it a
glance sometime to see how it looks to me now, but my copy is in storage,
and I feel no rush to unearth it.

: What did you think of TIME ENOUGH FOR LOVE then, Gary?

: My opinion is 'deeply uneven'.

That's slightly kinder than I'm inclined, but I'd live with that
description. I'll admit it had some decent/good bits, but as a book it
was, um, quite lumpy. I prefer the tighter, earlier, Heinlein. I'll also
toss in that of the "unexpurgated" versions of his old novels published in
recent versions, in each case I thought the edited versions far superior:
much tighter; all the "unexpurgated" versions added, with a handful of
exceptions, was excess verbiage. (This does not mean I agree with all the
changes requested by Alice Dagliesh, however: in no way.)

More comment: I was extremely disappointed with GRUMBLES FROM THE GRAVE.
the letters were highly incomplete, and seemed extremely, um, selectively
chosen. I found far more about Heinlein's garden then I cared to know,
and far less about the writing, and other people, or even other
interesting thoughts and observations of his, than I would have preferred
-- although as someone interested in the man, I did think the book worth
reading. A selection of his letters by someone less interested in being
his hagiographer would be a wonderful thing, though, unlikely as we ever
are to see it.

Lawrence Watt-Evans

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Oct 26, 1997, 2:00:00 AM10/26/97
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On 26 Oct 1997 01:04:34 -0500, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber) wrote:

>That's slightly kinder than I'm inclined, but I'd live with that
>description. I'll admit it had some decent/good bits, but as a book it
>was, um, quite lumpy. I prefer the tighter, earlier, Heinlein. I'll also
>toss in that of the "unexpurgated" versions of his old novels published in
>recent versions, in each case I thought the edited versions far superior:
>much tighter; all the "unexpurgated" versions added, with a handful of
>exceptions, was excess verbiage. (This does not mean I agree with all the
>changes requested by Alice Dagliesh, however: in no way.)

Oh, I dunno -- I liked the refurbished THE PUPPET MASTERS. More
colorful. And the changes in RED PLANET were so trivial as to not
matter one way or the other esthetically.

On the others, though, yeah.

>More comment: I was extremely disappointed with GRUMBLES FROM THE GRAVE.

Yeah. Me, too.


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Marilee J. Layman

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Oct 26, 1997, 2:00:00 AM10/26/97
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In <62umhi$e...@panix2.panix.com>, gfa...@panix.com (Gary Farber)
wrote:

>More comment: I was extremely disappointed with GRUMBLES FROM THE GRAVE.


>the letters were highly incomplete, and seemed extremely, um, selectively
>chosen. I found far more about Heinlein's garden then I cared to know,
>and far less about the writing, and other people, or even other
>interesting thoughts and observations of his, than I would have preferred
>-- although as someone interested in the man, I did think the book worth
>reading.

I think it also might have been a better book if the letters had been
arranged chronologically rather than topically. You really didn't get
much sense of the *history* this way.

--
Marilee J. Layman Co-Leader, The Other*Worlds*Cafe
RELM Mu...@aol.com A Science Fiction Discussion Group
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Jim Rittenhouse

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Oct 26, 1997, 2:00:00 AM10/26/97