British v. American Vocabulary (Update)

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JZahn

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Sep 7, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/7/95
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Jeez, guys (and gals), I didn't mean to start another thread along the
lines of "Edifice..." when I asked for examples of British v. American
vocabulary. All I was looking for was additions to my list of words which
mean different things to Americans and Brits.

The variety of responses I received ranged from "good idea, but it would
be too much work" to "don't bother, or you'll ruin the story's atmosphere"
to "how dare you presume to question the Queen's English, you heathen
American."

Ack!!

Anyhow, here is the expanded list I've compiled from your responses:

American British
-------------- -----------------
apartment flat
elevator lift
? airing cupboard

cookie biscuit
biscuit scone
chips crisps
fries chips (only as in Fish & )
tomato tomato
potato potato
raisin sultana
jello jelly
jelly jam
(technically, we have "jam" in America, too, but it usually contains bits
of
fruit preserves, where "jelly" is made from fruit juice and pectin.
Jell-o is a brand name
for a gelatin dessert, but it's taken on a generic meaning.)

suspenders braces
garters suspenders
undershirt vest
panties knickers
(Technically, in America, only females usually wear "panties"
while males wear "undershorts" or "underpants" or "boxer shorts". Is
there British cognate?)
pantyhose tights
diaper nappy (napkin)
napkin serviette (French?)

gasoline petrol
hood bonnet
trunk boot
truck lorry
sidewalk pavement
pavement road ?
subway underground
? subway (pedestrian underpass)

radio wireless (tranny? maybe your grandparents..;)

Bubble and Squeak: A meal made of leftover cabbage (or any form of
greens)
and mashed potato. These are mixed, then fried together.
Bangers & Mash = Sausages and Mashed potatoes.
Spotted Dick = A pudding consisting of sponge with sultanas (Am.:raisins)
in it,
usually served with custard. Normally portions are cut off from a large
cylindrical
roll of sponge, hence the name.

/*************************************************************************
*******
And, finally, this from Adrian Preston (te_...@kingston.ac.uk):

>An 'airing cupboard' is a large cupboard, usually in or near the bathroom
>in which resides the house's hot water tank. The cupboard usually has one
or
>more shelves on which to place wet clothes in order that they are dried
or
>'aired' by the heat from the hot water tank. Hence the name.

Well, at least THAT is cleared up!

Dr G.T. Parks

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Sep 8, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/8/95
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jz...@aol.com (JZahn) writes:

> Anyhow, here is the expanded list I've compiled from your responses:
>
> American British
> -------------- -----------------
>

> raisin sultana

Raisin is a common word in British English too. In the UK a raisin is
a dried red grape, while a sultana is a dried white grape.

> panties knickers
> (Technically, in America, only females usually wear "panties"
> while males wear "undershorts" or "underpants" or "boxer shorts". Is
> there British cognate?)

Underpants (often shortened to pants) is the most widely used term in
the UK. Boxer shorts is also used. I've never heard undershorts over
here.

> diaper nappy (napkin)
> napkin serviette (French?)

No, napkin means the same here as it does in the USA. Serviette, which
is indeed of French in origin, is a (more pretentious) alternative.

> pavement road ?

Yes, or tarmac.

> radio wireless (tranny? maybe your grandparents..;)

I think radio is in fact the most common term in the UK. Wireless
certainly and tranny to a lesser extent have a rather archaic feel.

Geoff Parks

Paul C Evans

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Sep 9, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/9/95
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In article <GTP10.95S...@bootes.cus.cam.ac.uk>,

Dr G.T. Parks <gt...@bootes.cus.cam.ac.uk> wrote:
>jz...@aol.com (JZahn) writes:
>
>> Anyhow, here is the expanded list I've compiled from your responses:
>>
>> American British
>> -------------- -----------------

Here's another I came across recently on another newsgroup:

eraser rubber
rubber (i.e. condom) ??????

Plenty of opportunity for misunderstanding there...

--
Paul Evans in Chicago "The ants are with her hands to sleep:
ths...@iitmax.iit.edu The king scattereth more
the cry of the afflicted." -- Dog-Matic

Magnus Olsson

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Sep 10, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/10/95
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In article <42ss50$t...@iitmax.acc.iit.edu>,

Paul C Evans <ths...@iitmax.acc.iit.edu> wrote:
>Here's another I came across recently on another newsgroup:
>
>eraser rubber
>rubber (i.e. condom) ??????
>
>Plenty of opportunity for misunderstanding there...

Well, I think the usage "rubber" == "condom" is commin in Britain too
nowadays.

Anyway, a friend of mine put her foot in her mouth with this word.
She went to the US as a high school exchange student, and of she'd
been taught in school that a "rubber" in English is an eraser, and not
about any other sense of the word. On her first day in her American
school, she turned around and asked the guy sitting behind her if he'd
got a rubber... I suppose this reinforced the general reputation of
Swedish women abroad :-)

Magnus Olsson (m...@df.lth.se) / yacc computer club, Lund, Sweden
Work: Innovativ Vision AB, Linkoping (magnus...@ivab.se)
Old adresses (may still work): mag...@thep.lu.se, the...@selund.bitnet
PGP key available via finger (to df.lth.se) or on request.

Trevor Barrie

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Sep 10, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/10/95
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In article <42n0na$j...@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, jz...@aol.com (JZahn) says:

>American British
>-------------- -----------------
>cookie biscuit
>biscuit scone

Just to take this one step further, what do the British call the
things that I call "scones"? "Cookies", perhaps?

**************************************************************************
Trevor Barrie tba...@peinet.pe.ca "It's a great big universe,
87 Kennedy Drive and we're all really puny;
West Royalty, PEI we're just tiny little specks
C1E 1X7 CANADA (902) 628-6845 about the size of Mickey Rooney."
**************************************************************************

Ben Chalmers

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Sep 10, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/10/95
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In article <42ss50$t...@iitmax.acc.iit.edu>,

ths...@iitmax.acc.iit.edu (Paul C Evans) wrote:

> In article <GTP10.95S...@bootes.cus.cam.ac.uk>,
> Dr G.T. Parks <gt...@bootes.cus.cam.ac.uk> wrote:
> >jz...@aol.com (JZahn) writes:
> >
> >> Anyhow, here is the expanded list I've compiled from your responses:
> >>
> >> American

British
> >> --------------
-----------------
>

> Here's another I came across recently on another newsgroup:
>
> eraser rubber
> rubber (i.e. condom) ??????
>
> Plenty of opportunity for misunderstanding there...
>

Hence the confusion of an american teacher working at my Fathers school when
he told her that
"OK, each child gets one rubber per term, and won't get another one until the
following one"

In britain we tend to call condoms condoms. They are, however known
variously as French Letters (though this is somewhat dated) Rubber Jonnies,
or just Jonnies.

--
Name :Ben Chalmers. Bringing about Armageddon can be dangerous.
Email:b...@bench.demon.co.uk Do not attempt it in your home. -Good Omens
WWW :http://uptown.turnpike.net/B/benchal/Ben.html

Neil K. Guy

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Sep 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/11/95
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gt...@bootes.cus.cam.ac.uk (Dr G.T. Parks) writes:

>I think radio is in fact the most common term in the UK. Wireless
>certainly and tranny to a lesser extent have a rather archaic feel.

Hm. Tranny... I spent my early childhood in the UK and have no
recollection of the word "tranny". Wireless I only remember coming
across in books - it was always "radio" for me. I remember the term
confusing me no end, as all the radios I'd seen were quite full of
wires - not least of which being the wire that plugged into the mains.
("power" for Americans.)

The whole question of English vs American terminology is something I
find very interesting, as someone who has lived in both countries and
now resides in Canada. My game in perpetual progress deals with this,
to an extent. Here in Canada most vocabulary is basically American,
but spelling is often UK English for certain words. (though not for
others - we're an inconsistent lot, I suppose. Colonized culturally
first by Brits and now by Americans...)

In any event, I sort of feel it doesn't matter much, as long as
potentially confusing things are explained (not too obstrusively) in
context. And as long as the game accepts a sizeable school of
synonyms. My game, for instance, accepts "garbage can" (Canada and
US), "trash can" (US), and "dustbin" (UK). Likewise words like
colour/color, centre/center, etc.

The difficulty comes into culturally-specific questions. As someone
pointed out, not everyone in the US knows what an airing cupboard or a
dumbwaiter are. Likewise the diamond maze in Zork I is completely
mystifying to non-Americans. (or non-Japanese ;) How do you deal with
things like this? I have at least one puzzle that I'm concerned might
be tricky for non North Americans as it relies on certain things
concerning the phone system. Asking the player where he or she is from
seems unnecessarily clumsy. Maybe a little hook that reads the
latitude and longitude of the player's location, for computers that
store such information? :)

- Neil K.

--
49N 16' 123W 7' / Vancouver, BC, Canada / n_k...@sfu.ca

Neil K. Guy

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Sep 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/11/95
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m...@marvin.df.lth.se (Magnus Olsson) writes:

>Anyway, a friend of mine put her foot in her mouth with this word.
>She went to the US as a high school exchange student, and of she'd
>been taught in school that a "rubber" in English is an eraser, and not
>about any other sense of the word. On her first day in her American
>school, she turned around and asked the guy sitting behind her if he'd
>got a rubber... I suppose this reinforced the general reputation of
>Swedish women abroad :-)

An English friend had a similar embarrassing experience. She had to
get up early and decided to ask a neighbour to bang on her door and
get her out of bed. So she asked her neighbour to "knock her up" in
the morning. He was, naturally, a bit taken aback at this foreign
woman asking him quite matter-of-factly to impregnate her out of the
blue... Endless opportunities for cross-cultural hilarity... Others
might include the small waistbags that North Americans call
"fannypacks", much to the amusement of the British. Or Canadian "homo"
milk that Americans have a good chuckle over.

Boiling Lava

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Sep 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/11/95
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JZahn (jz...@aol.com) wrote:
:
: American British
: -------------- -----------------
: panties knickers

: (Technically, in America, only females usually wear "panties"
: while males wear "undershorts" or "underpants" or "boxer shorts". Is
: there British cognate?)

I think most men and women use the term "underwear," which you
didn't mention. :)

Julian Arnold

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Sep 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/11/95
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(russ...@wanda.pond.com) wrote:

> Does "fanny" mean the same thing in British informal usage as it does in
> American -- one's rear end?

Well, one's (female) front end. Oh, what hilarity we have with that one.
--
Jools Arnold jo...@arnod.demon.co.uk


russ...@wanda.pond.com

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Sep 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/11/95
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In article <430ale$k...@morgoth.sfu.ca>, Neil K. Guy <ne...@news.sfu.ca> wrote:
}gt...@bootes.cus.cam.ac.uk (Dr G.T. Parks) writes:
}
} The difficulty comes into culturally-specific questions. As someone
}pointed out, not everyone in the US knows what an airing cupboard or a
}dumbwaiter are.

"Dumbwaiter" is a perfectly good US English word describing a small
elevator (or lift :-) ) used for transporting items between floors of
a building. I suspect the problem here is that few Americans have
ever come across one. Are they more common in the UK? The only one
I've ever seen was in the Computer Science Center building at the
University of Maryland College Park -- I assume it was used for
printouts at one time, though it was not in use when I was there.
--
Matthew T. Russotto russ...@pond.com russ...@his.com
"Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice, and moderation in pursuit
of justice is no virtue."

russ...@wanda.pond.com

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Sep 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/11/95
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In article <430b1r$k...@morgoth.sfu.ca>, Neil K. Guy <ne...@news.sfu.ca> wrote:

}blue... Endless opportunities for cross-cultural hilarity... Others
}might include the small waistbags that North Americans call
}"fannypacks", much to the amusement of the British.

That IS a strange one. Does "fanny" mean the same thing in British


informal usage as it does in American -- one's rear end?

--

Ben Chalmers

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Sep 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/11/95
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In article <431ji7$f...@wanda.pond.com>,
russ...@wanda.pond.com (you) wrote:

> In article <430b1r$k...@morgoth.sfu.ca>, Neil K. Guy <ne...@news.sfu.ca> wrote:
>
> }blue... Endless opportunities for cross-cultural hilarity... Others
> }might include the small waistbags that North Americans call
> }"fannypacks", much to the amusement of the British.
>
> That IS a strange one. Does "fanny" mean the same thing in British
> informal usage as it does in American -- one's rear end?
>
>
>

err... no... not quite....

In Britain, the fanny is the female sexual organ (who said us brits were up
tight anal retentives unable to come to terms with our sexuality... 8)

By the way, they're Bumbags in the UK (Does Bum mean Backside in American, or
just tramp?)

Mah / Nicholas (MGM)

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Sep 12, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/12/95
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In article <431ji7$f...@wanda.pond.com>, <russ...@wanda.pond.com> wrote:
>That IS a strange one. Does "fanny" mean the same thing in British
>informal usage as it does in American -- one's rear end?

No .. it's closer to 51% of the world's front end ... (Probably came
from that great work that is Not Pornography, Fanny Hill)

--OH
--
America may be unique in being a country which has leapt from barbarism
to decadence without touching civilisation.
-- John O'Hara

Allison Weaver

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Sep 12, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/12/95
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On Mon, 11 Sep 1995, Ben Chalmers wrote:

> By the way, they're Bumbags in the UK (Does Bum mean Backside in American, or
> just tramp?)

Well, I understand the term both ways, but then I have read a number of
British authors. Anyone else?

PS. Ben, I haven't found anyone who knows why frats and sororities are
named with Greek characters. Again, anyone else that can help?

Allison

Roger B Jones Jr

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Sep 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/13/95
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Allison Weaver <awe...@nova.umuc.edu> writes:

>On Mon, 11 Sep 1995, Ben Chalmers wrote:
>> By the way, they're Bumbags in the UK (Does Bum mean Backside in American, or
>> just tramp?)
>Well, I understand the term both ways, but then I have read a number of
>British authors. Anyone else?

Bum and Fanny are roughly equivalent terms in American, both referring to
the gluteus maximus and environs. Bum is, perhaps, a bit more "childish"
(meaning more likely to be used by a child), but both are relatively tame
words, generally usable in all but the most polite company.

>PS. Ben, I haven't found anyone who knows why frats and sororities are
>named with Greek characters. Again, anyone else that can help?

Fraternities are (mostly) named with Greek characters because the first one,
Phi Beta Kappa, was. Phi Beta Kappa was a literary/academic society, as
were those that followed; social aspects rapidly overpowered academic
aspects in most fraternities. For most fraternities, the Greek letters
are the first letters of the "secret motto", which is one of the shared
secrets that brings about a feeling of brotherhood. Note that the motto
is not necessarily in Greek; I've heard of them in English, Greek, and Latin.

Nowadays, the Greek letters are "traditional" for fraternities, so they
perpetuate themselves. They are remnants of the academic past of
fraternities, from the days when fraternities were more than places to
socialize and live off-campus.
--
Brad Jones (rjo...@us.oracle.com), Oracle Toolkit Development Tools
In the unlikely event that Oracle has opinions, these aren't them.
"Why don't we just give Bill Gates ALL the money now and get it over with?"
"Pride." -- Doonesbury, 17 Aug 1995

John Holder

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Sep 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/13/95
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Thus spake Ben Chalmers (B...@bench.demon.co.uk):
] err... no... not quite....

] In Britain, the fanny is the female sexual organ (who said us brits were up
] tight anal retentives unable to come to terms with our sexuality... 8)

Oh my! ;^)

] By the way, they're Bumbags in the UK (Does Bum mean Backside in American, or
] just tramp?)

In American English, fanny mean bum.

bum can mean hobo or homeless person.

a "tramp" is a promiscuous woman or man.

] --

] Name :Ben Chalmers. Bringing about Armageddon can be dangerous.
] Email:b...@bench.demon.co.uk Do not attempt it in your home. -Good Omens
] WWW :http://uptown.turnpike.net/B/benchal/Ben.html

--
__ __
__/\_\ John Holder - jho...@nmsu.edu /_/\__
/\_\/_/ Computer Science - New Mexico State University \_\/_/\
\/_/\_\ I Brew the Beer I drink! /_/\_\/
\/_/ WWW: http://speedracer.nmsu.edu/~jholder \_\/

John W Kennedy

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Sep 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/13/95
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In <42te75$2...@bud.peinet.pe.ca>, tba...@peinet.pe.ca (Trevor Barrie) writes:
>In article <42n0na$j...@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, jz...@aol.com (JZahn) says:
>
>>American British
>>-------------- -----------------
>>cookie biscuit
>>biscuit scone
>
>Just to take this one step further, what do the British call the
>things that I call "scones"? "Cookies", perhaps?

Americans don't generally use the word "scone". When they do,
they use it in the British sense. But most Americans, looking at
a scone, would call it a "biscuit", because it's very close to
an American biscuit. Similarly, someone from the UK would call
an American biscuit a "scone".


John W Kennedy

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Sep 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/13/95
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In <431jcq$f...@wanda.pond.com>, russ...@wanda.pond.com writes:
>"Dumbwaiter" is a perfectly good US English word describing a small
>elevator (or lift :-) ) used for transporting items between floors of
>a building.

This is true today, but the original meaning was a table equipped with
what is known today (in the US at least) as a "lazy Susan".


JZahn

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Sep 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/13/95
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(Am: Howdy) (Br: 'ello, 'ello) (Aus: G'day):

I found a couple more items for our ever-growing list of English
vocabulary differences among Britain, America, and (now) Australia. Are
there any other English-speaking cultures which we should be including
(e.g. India, South Africa, New Zealand)?

1.) Latex Prophylactics Department

We've been through the eraser/rubber/condom discussion already. I
recently was told by a Welsh acquaintance that "Durex" in Australia is a
brand of adhesive tape ("Scotch tape" in America), but in England, a
"Durex" is a condom. Comments?

2.) Interestingly-named British Food Items Department

Toad In The Hole: Batter pudding with sausage cooked inside. Baked in
individual serving dishes/ramekins/custard cups.

3.) Miscellaneous Vocabulary Department

In England, "a bomb" is a great success, while in America, it's a dismal
failure.

A British "chat program" is known as a "talk show" in America.

"Pissed" in England means "drunk/intoxicated," while in America it either
means "angry" or the past tense of a slang term for urination.

4.) Naughty Bits Department

I've been following the discussion of "fanny" with great amusement. I
never realized why "Fanny Hill" was such a scandalous title! At great
risk of invoking the wrath of the Political Correctness Police and
Self-Appointed Guardians of Decency, I'm inviting slang vocabulary
submissions for the following concepts:

Genitalia, Male
Genitalia, Female
Other Body Parts (Breasts, Buttocks, etc.)
Sexual Activity (Masturbation, Intercourse, other variations)

If you have a submission for these items, but are shy about identifying
yourself, do NOT respond to this newsgroup, but send private E-mail to me,
or use an anonymous remailer.

5. Australian Vocabulary Department

I need submissions from some authentic Aussies, here. The only Australian
word I know is "billabong" or "billie" which I believe means "teakettle."

That's all for now, folks.

Jeff Zahn (jz...@aol.com)

John W Kennedy

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Sep 14, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/14/95
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In <Pine.SOL.3.91.950912195708.28287A-100000@nova>, Allison Weaver <awe...@nova.umuc.edu> writes:
>PS. Ben, I haven't found anyone who knows why frats and sororities are
>named with Greek characters. Again, anyone else that can help?

I believe that, historically, they were to conceal secret names that were
either actual Greek or English spelled as Greek. Sufficiently old material
will occasionally turn up a reference in the form "Phi of Alpha Alpha". When
the original fraternities were created (the sororities are, of course, much
younger), Greek was an ordinary accomplishment, after all.


the ideal copy

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Sep 15, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/15/95
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In article <437g3v$o...@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, jz...@aol.com (JZahn) wrote:
> 2.) Interestingly-named British Food Items Department
>
> Toad In The Hole: Batter pudding with sausage cooked inside. Baked in
> individual serving dishes/ramekins/custard cups.

Don't forget Spotted Dick.

> 3.) Miscellaneous Vocabulary Department
>
> In England, "a bomb" is a great success, while in America, it's a dismal
> failure.

Naah. "His new car goes like a bomb" means it goes fast; but "Ford's
Probe launch was a bomb" means it was a dismal failure. Clear now? :-)


mathew
--
the ideal copy is the same, the ideal copy has your name
when you can't it makes you can, when you aren't it makes you am

http://www.domino.org/~meta/

A Clune

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Sep 15, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/15/95
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jz...@aol.com (JZahn) writes:


>"Pissed" in England means "drunk/intoxicated," while in America it either
>means "angry" or the past tense of a slang term for urination.


Nearly - "I was well pissed off" means very annoyed, "I was well pissed"
means drunk...

Also "well hammered", "smashed", "steaming" all mean drunk..

John W Kennedy

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Sep 15, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/15/95
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In <437g3v$o...@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, jz...@aol.com (JZahn) writes:
>"Pissed" in England means "drunk/intoxicated," while in America it either
>means "angry" or the past tense of a slang term for urination.
>
It's a somewhat vulgar word, but neither slang nor American. You'll find it
used twice in 2nd Samuel in the King James Bible (US) / Authorized Version
(UK), where a Hebrew idiom for "male human being" is literally translated
twice as "one that pisseth against the wall". (Most modern translations
quietly substitute "male".)


Mark Clements

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Sep 19, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/19/95
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In article <437g3v$o...@newsbf02.news.aol.com> jz...@aol.com "JZahn" writes:

> 1.) Latex Prophylactics Department
>
> We've been through the eraser/rubber/condom discussion already. I
> recently was told by a Welsh acquaintance that "Durex" in Australia is a
> brand of adhesive tape ("Scotch tape" in America), but in England, a
> "Durex" is a condom. Comments?

Durex is a brand name.
Scotch Tape is known as Sellotape in England (also a brand name).

> 2.) Interestingly-named British Food Items Department
>
> Toad In The Hole: Batter pudding with sausage cooked inside. Baked in
> individual serving dishes/ramekins/custard cups.

Needn't be in individual portions. Batter pudding is also known
as Yorkshire Pudding.

> 3.) Miscellaneous Vocabulary Department
>
> In England, "a bomb" is a great success, while in America, it's a dismal
> failure.

I can't think of an example of this, except that a show bombed, which
is the same as the American 'pseudo-meaning'. If someone can think
of an example where it used as a success, then we recognise both.

> A British "chat program" is known as a "talk show" in America.

Normally 'chat show' not program.

> "Pissed" in England means "drunk/intoxicated," while in America it either
> means "angry" or the past tense of a slang term for urination.

Also is used as passed tense for urination, when used as a verb.
As an adjective it means drunk, while 'pissed off' means angry.

Also note that a lot of these expressions change even within a country
(hell - even within a city) and slang itself would be impossible to
incorporate into games, except in a very superficial way, as it is
constantly changing.

It would have to be a 'wizard' game to get slang words 'pukka'. Any
attempt which wasn't totally 'fab' would end up a real 'bummer'.

(hey, that almost rhymes!) ;)

--
___ ,';_,-,__
Writing is just backwards reading. /~_ ,',' |O|,:,\,
Reading is just clever seeing. / /,',' /--|_|-;:;|
Seeing is believing. ( )',_) ) ):;)
To write, you must believe... >\,(__ / /:;;|
:...Mark...//~ /:;:;:\

Greg Ewing

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Sep 21, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/21/95
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In article <811550...@mabsy.demon.co.uk>, Mark Clements <Ma...@mabsy.demon.co.uk> writes:

|> Also is used as passed tense for urination,

^^^^^^

:-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-) :-)

Philip Sainty

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Sep 23, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/23/95
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In article <811550...@mabsy.demon.co.uk>,
Mark Clements <Ma...@mabsy.demon.co.uk> wrote:

>In article <437g3v$o...@newsbf02.news.aol.com> jz...@aol.com "JZahn" writes:
>> A British "chat program" is known as a "talk show" in America.
>
>Normally 'chat show' not program.

Or even programme :)


Philip


Mark Clements

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Sep 24, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/24/95
to
I just stumbled on an example that I think is relevant to this thread.

I was speaking to a friend of mine who's just gone from London to
Manchester (for university), and has found that the word
'Bollocks' (as well as meaning the testicular protruberances) has
the opposite meaning from London. Here it means rubbish (awful/crap/pants)
and there it means good (From an abbreviation of 'the dog's bollocks').

So the same word can have wildly different meanings even within the
same country. And this is more important to implement in a work
of IF, as you at least want your country to understand, if not
others!

--
(Keeping semtex in your microwave is a bloody stupid thing to do!)

Mark Green

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Sep 28, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/28/95
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In article <811961...@mabsy.demon.co.uk>
Ma...@mabsy.demon.co.uk "Mark Clements" writes:

> I just stumbled on an example that I think is relevant to this thread.
>
> I was speaking to a friend of mine who's just gone from London to
> Manchester (for university), and has found that the word
> 'Bollocks' (as well as meaning the testicular protruberances) has
> the opposite meaning from London. Here it means rubbish (awful/crap/pants)
> and there it means good (From an abbreviation of 'the dog's bollocks').
>
> So the same word can have wildly different meanings even within the
> same country. And this is more important to implement in a work
> of IF, as you at least want your country to understand, if not
> others!
>

Odd - I had formed the opinion that "bollocks" in general meant
rubbish, but that "the bollocks", or similar (any reference to a specific
bollock, I suppose ;) ;) ) meant good, from that abbreviation.
Even more so, I'm told it has no meaning at all in the USA - is this true?

Mg
--

Matt Ackeret

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Oct 2, 1995, 3:00:00 AM10/2/95
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In article <812291...@antelope.demon.co.uk>,

Mark Green <Ma...@antelope.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> Odd - I had formed the opinion that "bollocks" in general meant
>rubbish, but that "the bollocks", or similar (any reference to a specific
>bollock, I suppose ;) ;) ) meant good, from that abbreviation.
> Even more so, I'm told it has no meaning at all in the USA - is this true?

Hmm, I guess I had gotten the impression that it meant the butt, and then
sort of covered crap/junk/crud/rubbish.. guess not.

Anyhow, the only reason I've heard the word that I can remember is from the
Sex Pistols' album name (Never Mind the Bollocks)... Though one of the guys
on "Real World" (on MTV) uses it once in a while.
--
unk...@apple.com Apple II Forever
These opinions are mine, not Apple's.

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