[Update] 1999 IF Art Show Clarified Rules, Judges Selected

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Doeadeer3

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Mar 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM3/16/99
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1999 IF Art Show (Juried)
(or How to Build a Better Mouse Trap)

>You have entered a hushed art gallery with high white walls and
subdued lighting, except for the bright spotlights aimed at various
pedestals around the room. At first the displays look like ordinary
sculpture, but then you notice the intriguing "Flash Gordon" ray gun in
the center. You glimpse lights flashing, hear rustling and discover even
more unusual forms: a Cubist futuristic booth and what appears to be an
outdoor setting complete with storm clouds rolling over wind tossed trees.

It is only when you spot the burly man in the flannel shirt chopping wood
that you fully realize this is sculpture unlike any you have imagined before.

These 3-dimensional displays are IF sculptures, modeled with text.

----------------------------------------------------------

Purpose: To explore the 3-dimensionality * of Interactive-Fiction.

(Without the framework of plot/puzzles.)

----------------------------------------------------------

Panel of Judges: Mike Beryln, Marnie Parker, Mike Roberts,

Dan Shiovitz, Lucian Smith ...waiting for other judges to reply.

----------------------------------------------------------

This is a juried IF "art" show. Juried shows are judged BEFORE the
entries are shown to the public. Only the top four places are
awarded. All other entries are not ranked, but are put on display.

Best of Show Best of Still Lifes (Objects)
Best of Landscapes (Scenery/Rooms)
Best of Portraits (NPCs)

Tentatively called the "Malyons". **

Rules:

1. No graphics, sound files or ASCII art.

2. All entries must be original works. However, they may taken from an
unreleased works in progress.

3. They must be anonymous for the judges' vote. Immediately afterwards,
they may be recompiled to replace your pseudonym with real name or
handle, unless you want to remain anonymous for the show.

4. "Playable" in less than 45 minutes. Shorter is usually better.

5. Your exploration can be of:

an object (or objects, max 3)
scenery ("rooms", max 3)
NPC (max 1)

Only one of the three. See next post (page) for guidelines for each.

You will need to specify which category you are entering, either by
zipping a text file with your piece or specifying in the introduction
or help.

6. Essentially plotless and puzzleless.

Introduction - Allowed for those who need more structure. But only to
"set the stage" and/or provide the player with some motivation to explore.

Scoring - A "task achieved" scoring method may also be included, to
give players an idea of when they have explored as much as possible.

Absolutely no "brain twister" puzzles. No end goal other than exploration.

If players need to figure out how to: manipulate an object, move from
place to place, what to ask a NPC, you should guide them to an
action/topic by prompting them with subtle (not too subtle) hints in
descriptions and/or responses.

Stumping the player is not the goal. Encouraging exploration is.

7. How you achieve a convincing portrayal of your choice, how you
accomplish the illusion that what you are modeling with text descriptions
and IF programming is 3-dimensional, is actually/fantastically "real", is
up to you.

Every available technique is allowed: daemons, timers, built-in library
actions, author created actions and dialogue (the latter, NPC only).

8. All entries will be displayed on my web page for a two week "Art Show".

9. The deadline is midnight April 30th EDT (Eastern Daylight Savings Time).

Since I am also a judge and would recognize some email addresses, I
cannot receive your entries.

Volker Blasius is working on a way to keep the entries anonymous and
also only available for private viewing until after the judges vote.

----------------------------------------------------------

Comments:

I am sure there are loopholes, but loopholes are fun too.

I, personally, hope experienced IF writers enter because I think this is
a different, freeing approach to writing IF.

But newbies and those who feel they will never write a full-blown game
because of the necessity of having to create a plot and/or puzzles, are
especially encouraged to enter. To help us all explore the IF medium.

I am still looking for a first place prize (want to donate something?)

----------------------------------------------------------

* Interactivity, simulation or virtual reality capability, tangibility,
both descriptive and responsive depth, realistically communicated
kinetic/auditory/visual/etc. (re)actions/sensations/cues. The IF
medium.

** May not be totally appropriate because of the association in IF
programming with the word, "animate" (life = NPC).

----------------------------------------------------------

Thank you to all the judges for agreeing to participate.

To Volker Blasius for continuing to seek a method to keep entries
private.

And a special thanks to Adam J. Thornton for his tireless editing
and listening "ear". Also to LucFrench for his valuable input in
helping to realize this idea.

Doe :-) BTW - I do not see this as a "mini-comp" in the strict
sense of the word.


Doe doea...@aol.com (formerly known as FemaleDeer)
****************************************************************************
"In all matters of opinion, our adversaries are insane." Mark Twain

Doeadeer3

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Mar 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM3/16/99
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These are not hard and fast rules, but guidelines. To be fair to
the other entrants, try to sculpt within then to a reasonable degree.

They are to help you narrow your focus, so you can concentrate on
exploring and finding your choice's limits, and so you can concentrate
on exploring and finding your ability to make it intriguing and
responsive within those limits.

Remember: The tighter your focus, the better.

Entries will be judged on modeling AND focus.

----------------------------------------------------------

Guidelines (What To Aim For):

Object(s) (Still Life) ***

1. Create any type of object.

Bowl of fruit, set of interconnecting building blocks, morphing weapon
(each morph one of the three max objects), broken wizard's wand
needing repair, internal combustion engine, force field, quark changing
from particle to wave and a theoretical net to catch it with, time machine,
old-fashioned unicycle.

Takable, enterable (supporter/container), climbable and/or has sub parts.

2. Place in a one room setting.

With dimension, texture and color: inside, mid air, in/under water,
above/below ground, wood, stone, light, no/variable light, blue, vibrant red.

But make the room description "sketchy", three to four lines, not
elaborate, to keep the spotlight focused on the object, not the scenery.

3. Avoid NPCs.

NPCs do not include talkable-to objects: microphone, a remote
responsive to simple verbal commands. As long as they are not
intelligent ("animate").

NPC's are also not special effects created with daemons/timers.
Voices, smells, etc. Try to limit the visual appearance of such
illusionary NPCs to when the player is in an enterable object. Create
the sensation it is traveling through "passing scenery". Centuries/people
slipping by a time machine, countryside/cows rolling by a car.
Reinforce the 3-dimensionality of the object, not the scenery.

4. Limit additional locations for "driveable" objects.

If the only way to achieve movement for a driveable object is to add a
room, try to add only one more (again "sketchy", not elaborate).

5. Help the player explore.

By manipulating the object: eating, opening, attacking, burning, driving it.
Having it react: makes ill, repels, dampens, crashes, etc.

Any way you can think of.

*** Refers to subject matter, "without life". May be mobile.

----------------------------------------------------------

Scenery - Room(s) (Landscape)

1. Create any type of location.

Out of doors or inside, flying free in the clouds, in a dream, underwater,
on distant planet, aboard a weightless spaceship, in an amusement park,
underground in an evil empire, traveling between the pages of a book,
squeezed on a narrow bandwidth, sitting in the stands of a crowded
stadium.

2. Limit takeable/enterable objects.

Such as one enterable object if that is important to the locale. Try to
blend it into the background, so the focus remains on the scenery.

Provide no inventory objects. Or just a couple, but only just to increase
interaction with the environment.

3. Avoid NPC's.

Does not include daemon/timer special effects. (See objects, #3,
daemons.)

Scenery illusionary NPCs could be too far away to interact with or just
passing through the location. If the latter, reverse the object technique,
create the sensation they are traveling by and the player is stationary.

4. Make connections non-rooms.

Directions, short tunnels, ladders, chutes, trap doors, airlocks could be
one of the three maximum rooms or the player could only appear to pass
through them (i.e., not separate locations, just a descriptions).

5. Help The Player Explore.

By flying, swimming, feeling the grass under their feet, skating, hearing
the monkeys chatter, digging in the ground, smelling the sweat of the
crowd, going over a waterfall, seeking a wider band width, climbing.

Whatever sensory experiences/reactions you can imagine.

----------------------------------------------------------

NPC (Portraits)

1. Create any type of NPC.

Robot, monkey, man fishing, woman making a quilt, quilt making a
woman, lightening bolt deciding whether to strike the player, colony of
ants regretting their movie appearance, alien, stomping dream monster,
idea who feels its time has come, intelligent computer the size of a
small moon.

2. Place in a one room setting. (See objects, #2)

Only make the description more elaborate if the NPC is engaged in an
activity (man sitting on a dock, fishing). But still use just three to four
lines so the spotlight remains on the NPC, not the scenery.

3. Limit takeable/enterable objects.

Such as one enterable object for the NPC to sit on/in, if that is
important to their portrayal. Keep unobtrusive and player non-enterable.

Provide no inventory objects. Or just a couple, but only to increase
interaction with the NPC.

4. Keep the NPC's objects (worn/carried) to a minimum.

5. Help the player explore.

By talking to the NPC, kissing, breaking, consuming them, impeding
their movement (within the one room) and/or interrupting their activity.

Whatever you can possibly dream up.

----------------------------------------------------------

Judges will also be focusing, on how you present your choice, not the
background. So you will do yourself a favor if you do not waste time on
extra items. An excellent entry might not have any at all.

----------------------------------------------------------

I hope you will enjoy feeling the "clay of IF" between your fingers.

After the show, these sculptures will be placed on permanent display
at gmd.de.

Doe :-) Have Fun!

(Tried to format lines break correctly, not sure I succeeded.)

Andrew Plotkin

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Mar 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM3/16/99
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Doeadeer3 (doea...@aol.com) wrote:
> This is a juried IF "art" show. Juried shows are judged BEFORE the
> entries are shown to the public. Only the top four places are
> awarded. All other entries are not ranked, but are put on display.

> Best of Show Best of Still Lifes (Objects)
> Best of Landscapes (Scenery/Rooms)
> Best of Portraits (NPCs)

> Tentatively called the "Malyons". **

Heh! Good.

> Absolutely no "brain twister" puzzles. No end goal other than exploration.

> [...]


> Stumping the player is not the goal. Encouraging exploration is.

This seems practically self-contradictory to me... but you all know my
prejudices. :-)

This looks very cool.

> Doe :-) BTW - I do not see this as a "mini-comp" in the strict
> sense of the word.

What *is* the strict sense of the word?

I think the minicomps are primarily good at being artistic exercises. Come
in, sit down, try something under a small set of constraints. Much
shorter-term than even the "Short Text Adventure" IFComp.

And this seems to be what your show encourages as well, although as you
say, the "constraint" is a broader approach than simply "no inventory" or
"include a chicken."

I haven't made up my mind about the "juried" part. Nor will I until after
the whole thing is over.

--Z

--

"And Aholibamah bare Jeush, and Jaalam, and Korah: these were the
borogoves..."

Doeadeer3

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Mar 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM3/16/99
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>Subject: Re: [Update] 1999 IF Art Show Clarified Rules, Judges Selected
>From: erky...@netcom.com (Andrew Plotkin)
>Date: 3/16/99 10:12 AM Pacific Standard Time

>What *is* the strict sense of the word?

mini & comp Hard to say what is the strict sense of the word because of
that. What is mini? What is comp?

I do plan to try it again next year regardless of how this year's show turns
out. Most "minicomps" are not repeated (hmmm, can't think of one anyway).
Because I'd like it to be a yearly thing. Maybe in that sense.

>I think the minicomps are primarily good at being artistic exercises. Come
>in, sit down, try something under a small set of constraints. Much
>shorter-term than even the "Short Text Adventure" IFComp.

Yep. No argument with that at all. I am still seeing chickens in a different
context than I did before.

>And this seems to be what your show encourages as well, although as you
>say, the "constraint" is a broader approach than simply "no inventory" or
>"include a chicken."
>
>I haven't made up my mind about the "juried" part. Nor will I until after
>the whole thing is over.
>
>--Z

Actually I haven't made up my mind about the juried part either. We will see
how it goes, if people like it... how many entries there are... We shall
see... part of doing something the first time is to see what works and what
doesn't... so afterwards I shall be very interested in any follow up discussion
and/or feedback.

Glad you like it.

Doe :-)

Andrew Plotkin

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Mar 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM3/16/99
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Doeadeer3 (doea...@aol.com) wrote:
> >Subject: Re: [Update] 1999 IF Art Show Clarified Rules, Judges Selected
> >From: erky...@netcom.com (Andrew Plotkin)
> >Date: 3/16/99 10:12 AM Pacific Standard Time

> >What *is* the strict sense of the word?

> mini & comp Hard to say what is the strict sense of the word because of
> that. What is mini? What is comp?

> I do plan to try it again next year regardless of how this year's show turns
> out. Most "minicomps" are not repeated (hmmm, can't think of one anyway).
> Because I'd like it to be a yearly thing. Maybe in that sense.

Not more often? This seems like something you could repeat three or four
times a year without much strain.

Kathleen Fischer

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Mar 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM3/16/99
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Doeadeer3 wrote:
> 2. All entries must be original works. However, they may taken from an
> unreleased works in progress.

As a twist on a question I asked some time ago - would a game who has
had one of its object/scenery/npc parts entered into the art show
find itself disqualified from the annual IF Comp99?

Would a player (at some future date, when my "big" game gets released)
be disappointed to find the now recycled object/scenery/npc there?

Kathleen (well, I *might* finish my game someday... it could happen...
maybe)

--
*******************************************************************
* Kathleen M. Fischer *
* kfischer@x_greenhouse.llnl.gov (Remove 'x_' before replying) *
** "Don't stop to stomp ants while the elephants are stampeding" **

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